History Main / ShootTheMessenger

6th Aug '16 8:07:23 AM thatmadork
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* Very often played straight by Chaos in ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', but actually {{Averted|Trope}} by the Dark Eldar: Scourges (individuals who have been modified to have wings) are highly valued by the various kabals for being couriers as well as flying troops, so the kabals tend to come down hard on anyone who makes a habit of messing with them.
29th Jul '16 10:31:44 AM ryanasaurus0077
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* In ''Film/ThreeHundred'', King Leonidas and the Spartans execute a Persian messenger and his armed escort for insulting their kingdom while bringing Xerxes' demand for "earth and water" as a token of submission to the empire, telling him that he'll find plenty of both down in the well, where they then proceed to throw them down. Which is kicked off (literally) by [[MemeticMutation Leonidas yelling "This! Is! SPARTA!"]]
** The real Leonidas ''actually did this''.

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* In ''Film/ThreeHundred'', King Leonidas and the Spartans execute a Persian messenger and his armed escort for insulting their kingdom while bringing Xerxes' demand for "earth and water" as a token of submission to the empire, telling him that he'll find plenty of both down in the well, where they then proceed to throw them down. Which is kicked off (literally) by [[MemeticMutation Leonidas yelling "This! Is! SPARTA!"]]
**
SPARTA!"]] The best part? The real Leonidas ''actually did this''. this''.



(''the protagonists stare at each other in disbelief that Malfoy also got in trouble'')

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(''the ''[the protagonists stare at each other in disbelief that Malfoy also got in trouble'')trouble]''
29th Jul '16 9:16:46 AM TheDragonDemands
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**The real Leonidas ''actually did this''.
25th Jul '16 3:29:33 PM margdean56
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* In Manzoni's ''Literature/TheBetrothed'', the Podestà and Count Attilio have an argument about chivalry, Attilio thinks it's legal and moral to beat a messenger who carries bad news, especially if the message is the challenge to a [[SwordFight duel]].

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* In Manzoni's ''Literature/TheBetrothed'', the Podestà Podest&atilde&; and Count Attilio have an argument about chivalry, Attilio thinks it's legal and moral to beat a messenger who carries bad news, especially if the message is the challenge to a [[SwordFight duel]].



* Chevette Washington, a bicycle messenger in Creator/WilliamGibson's ''Literature/BridgeTrilogy'', mentions this trope frequently. She's never shot, but she clarifies that the basic idea- blaming a messenger for her message- is true.

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* Chevette Washington, a bicycle messenger in Creator/WilliamGibson's ''Literature/BridgeTrilogy'', mentions this trope frequently. She's never shot, but she clarifies that the basic idea- blaming idea--blaming a messenger for her message- is message--is true.



* In one of Creator/StephenKing's more down-to-earth short stories, a rival gang leader sends a messenger to insult another's gang leader by taunting his sister (who's obese) so they can draw him out. The messenger is obviously scared to the point of tears while saying 'yo mama' jokes right in the man's face, but luckily is not killed but the gang leader still got himself killed rushing recklessly into the open to kill the sender (which prompts his sister to go on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge. Subverting the trope further, said obese sister later gets revenge on the message sender himself by killing him slowly with a [[EyeScream metal wire through the eye.]]
* In Creator/PatrickOBrian's ''Literature/AubreyMaturin'' series, this is inverted in that messengers bearing good news will be "much caressed" by the PowersThatBe back in England. (Given how the series works, that makes this TruthInTelevision.) Stephen Maturin then uses his powers of persuasion to see to it that Aubrey, though screwed of his victory by a spotlight-stealing admiral, still gets chosen as the messenger and thus gets a plum command.

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* In one of Creator/StephenKing's more down-to-earth short stories, a rival gang leader sends a messenger to insult another's gang leader by taunting his sister (who's obese) so they can draw him out. The messenger is obviously scared to the point of tears while saying 'yo mama' jokes right in the man's face, but luckily is not killed but the killed. The gang leader still got himself killed rushing recklessly into the open to kill the sender (which prompts his sister to go on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge. Subverting the trope further, said obese sister later gets revenge on the message sender himself by killing him slowly with a [[EyeScream metal wire through the eye.]]
* In Creator/PatrickOBrian's [=Patrick O'Brian's=] ''Literature/AubreyMaturin'' series, this is inverted in that messengers bearing good news will be "much caressed" by the PowersThatBe back in England. (Given how the series works, that makes this TruthInTelevision.) Stephen Maturin then uses his powers of persuasion to see to it that Aubrey, though screwed out of his victory by a spotlight-stealing admiral, still gets chosen as the messenger and thus gets a plum command.



* ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera: In the original book, the standard method of solving any problem by the Opera administrators'', {{Pointy Haired Boss}}es Richard and Moncharmin is to fire those employees involved in it (including those that informed of the problem). Only those with [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections enough influence can escape]].

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* ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera: ''Literature/ThePhantomOfTheOpera'': In the original book, the standard method of solving any problem by the Opera administrators'', administrators, {{Pointy Haired Boss}}es Richard and Moncharmin Moncharmin, is to fire those employees involved in it (including those that informed of the problem). Only those with [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections enough influence can escape]].



* According to ''Literature/GestaDanorum'', King Gorm of Denmark vowed he would kill anyone who would bring him the message that his favourite son Knut was dead. When Knut is killed, nobody dares to tell Gorm, so the queen drops hints until Gorm realizes the truth by himself.

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* According to ''Literature/GestaDanorum'', King Gorm of Denmark vowed he would kill anyone who would bring brought him the message that his favourite son Knut was dead. When Knut is killed, nobody dares to tell Gorm, so the queen drops hints until Gorm realizes the truth by himself.
25th Jul '16 2:58:31 PM margdean56
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* Subverted in a regularly recycled ''ComicStrip/BeetleBailey'' gag: The officers receives a written order from the general, and it has one obvious spelling error that changes the meaning completely. Someone will point out what the general probably meant to say, but then someone else will always ask: [[WhoWillBellTheCat "But who dares to tell the general that he did a mistake?"]] While the general probably wouldn't shoot anyone for pointing out one little spelling error (''probably...''), the answer is always the same: Nobody dares to tell the general that he did a mistake. They prefer to follow out the order, exactly the way it's written, and look like idiots, rather than telling the general to make a correction.

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* Subverted in a regularly recycled ''ComicStrip/BeetleBailey'' gag: The officers receives receive a written order from the general, and it has one obvious spelling error that changes the meaning completely. Someone will point out what the general probably meant to say, but then someone else will always ask: [[WhoWillBellTheCat "But who dares to tell the general that he did made a mistake?"]] While the general probably wouldn't shoot anyone for pointing out one little spelling error (''probably...''), the answer is always the same: Nobody dares to tell the general that he did made a mistake. They prefer to follow out the order, exactly the way it's written, and look like idiots, rather than telling the general to make a correction.
25th Jul '16 2:11:51 AM PaulA
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* This is taken to the next level in the backstory of the first book of the ''Literature/{{Chalion}}'' series; a crazy enemy general tells the messengers that one of them will have to kill the other. [[TheHero Cazaril]] refuses to take part, denying the villain his fun, but the other messenger, Dondo, tries to go through with it. The general stops it, and releases them both, knowing that Dondo's frantic attempts to hide the truth of his cowardice will do more to Cazaril than he could.

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* This is taken to the next level in the backstory of the first book of the ''Literature/{{Chalion}}'' series; ''Literature/TheCurseOfChalion''; a crazy enemy general tells the messengers that one of them will have to kill the other. [[TheHero Cazaril]] refuses to take part, denying the villain his fun, but the other messenger, Dondo, tries to go through with it. The general stops it, and releases them both, knowing that Dondo's frantic attempts to hide the truth of his cowardice will do more to Cazaril than he could.
2nd Jul '16 10:32:30 AM nombretomado
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* In the {{Bionicle}} toyline, Roodaka, a major villain of one arc, receives some bad news, and grabs the messenger by the throat.

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* In the {{Bionicle}} Toys/{{Bionicle}} toyline, Roodaka, a major villain of one arc, receives some bad news, and grabs the messenger by the throat.
1st Jul '16 12:55:26 AM PaulA
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* Mentioned, but explicitly Subverted, in ''[[{{Literature/TheElenium}} The Tamuli]]''. Berit and Khalad discuss the idea while they are [[spoiler:in disguise, drawing attention from Sparhawk]]. Khalad offends a messenger, and mentions the idea of shaking him down to A) prove a point about manners, and B) see if he has the next message they are supposed to receive. When Berit objects, mentioning that their enemies might [[spoiler:kill Queen Ehlana]], Khalad posits that they could easily kill each messenger without reprecussion, and are probably confusing the enemy by not doing so.

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* Mentioned, but explicitly Subverted, in ''[[{{Literature/TheElenium}} The Tamuli]]''.''Literature/TheTamuli''. Berit and Khalad discuss the idea while they are [[spoiler:in disguise, drawing attention from Sparhawk]]. Khalad offends a messenger, and mentions the idea of shaking him down to A) prove a point about manners, and B) see if he has the next message they are supposed to receive. When Berit objects, mentioning that their enemies might [[spoiler:kill Queen Ehlana]], Khalad posits that they could easily kill each messenger without reprecussion, and are probably confusing the enemy by not doing so.
25th Jun '16 12:16:39 PM JackG
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Compare: ShootTheTelevision

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Compare: ShootTheTelevision
ShootTheTelevision and SpareAMessenger.
23rd Jun '16 6:49:28 PM nombretomado
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* ''Film/{{Clue}}'' the movie is all about this. [[TimCurry Wadsworth]] points out directly that "everyone who's died gave vital information about one of [the guests]." Ironically, the last informant who is killed is a delivering a singing telegram shot at the front door.

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* ''Film/{{Clue}}'' the movie is all about this. [[TimCurry [[Creator/TimCurry Wadsworth]] points out directly that "everyone who's died gave vital information about one of [the guests]." Ironically, the last informant who is killed is a delivering a singing telegram shot at the front door.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.ShootTheMessenger