History Main / SecondSeasonDownfall

4th May '18 10:05:28 AM RacattackForce
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* ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'' was hit hard by this. The second season experienced a huge decline in animation quality due to moving studios, {{Flanderization}}, and produced some of the most hated episodes of the series (She Loves Me and Heloise Schmeloise). There was also the lack of promotion by Disney XD taking its toll (Supposedly because the show's implication that Miseryville was {{Hell}} was too family-unfriendly). This is even stranger considering that there were announcements for a third season.

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* ''WesternAnimation/JimmyTwoShoes'' was hit hard by this. The second season experienced a huge decline in animation quality due to moving studios, {{Flanderization}}, and produced some of the most hated episodes of the series (She Loves Me and Heloise Schmeloise). There was also the lack of promotion by Disney XD its American broadcaster, Creator/DisneyXD, taking its toll (Supposedly because the show's implication that Miseryville was {{Hell}} was too family-unfriendly).toll. This is even stranger considering that there were announcements for a third season.
5th Mar '18 11:00:13 AM KizunaTallis
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Compare JumpingTheShark. Contrast LongRunners.

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Compare JumpingTheShark.JumpingTheShark and GrowingTheBeard. Contrast LongRunners.
17th Jan '18 7:28:57 AM KizunaTallis
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Well... not always. Sometimes [[ItWillNeverCatchOn nobody expected the show to make it]], and so [[SeriesFauxnale the writers and producers pulled out all the stops in the first year]], [[PostScriptSeason leaving nothing to work with for the next season]]. Sometimes a show with a novel concept inspires [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] that either pull off the gimmick more skillfully, or are so [[DuelingShows ubiquitious]] that [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny viewers become bored]] with both the original and the knockoffs. Sometimes ExecutiveMeddling is to blame, especially if the second season coincides with a change in network leadership. Sometimes there's no clear cause at all; the show simply ran out of steam, and SeasonalRot kicked in early. And perhaps most common of all, maybe the network just didn't want to commit to two more seasons of the show. Yes, two more seasons. Very, very few American broadcast network shows are canceled after their third season because a show usually needs about 4 seasons' worth of episodes in order to be viable for [[UsefulNotes/Syndication off-network syndication]], which for producers is often where the real money is. So, if a network looks like it might be thinking about canceling a show after its third season, the studio that produces that show will usually offer the network some sort of incentive to keep it on the air for long enough to reach syndication; as a result, when network programming executives decide whether or not to renew second-season shows, they often do so based on whether they can see having that show on their schedules for another 2 seasons.

to:

Well... not always. Sometimes [[ItWillNeverCatchOn nobody expected the show to make it]], and so [[SeriesFauxnale the writers and producers pulled out all the stops in the first year]], [[PostScriptSeason leaving nothing to work with for the next season]]. Sometimes a show with a novel concept inspires [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] that either pull off the gimmick more skillfully, or are so [[DuelingShows ubiquitious]] that [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny viewers become bored]] with both the original and the knockoffs. Sometimes ExecutiveMeddling is to blame, especially if the second season coincides with a change in network leadership. Sometimes there's no clear cause at all; the show simply ran out of steam, and SeasonalRot kicked in early. And perhaps most common of all, maybe the network just didn't want to commit to two more seasons of the show. Yes, two more seasons. Very, very few American broadcast network shows are canceled after their third season because a show usually needs about 4 seasons' worth of episodes in order to be viable for [[UsefulNotes/Syndication [[UsefulNotes/{{Syndication}} off-network syndication]], which for producers is often where the real money is. So, if a network looks like it might be thinking about canceling a show after its third season, the studio that produces that show will usually offer the network some sort of incentive to keep it on the air for long enough to reach syndication; as a result, when network programming executives decide whether or not to renew second-season shows, they often do so based on whether they can see having that show on their schedules for another 2 seasons.
13th Jan '18 12:57:21 AM Prinzenick
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* The second season of ''WesternAnimation/TheTwistedTalesOfFelixTheCat'' took a budget cut in the animation, attempted to take the series into a more script driven and less weird direction with more emphasis on the [[WesternAnimation/JoeOrioloFelixTheCat Joe Oriolo era of the Felix the Cat series]], and the change was not for the better—the ratings for it tanked even harder than the first seasons underperformance. It only lasted eight episodes before [[CutShort the show was cancelled altogether]]. Even the production team [[CreatorBacklash considered the second season a complete disaster.]]
12th Jan '18 10:11:43 AM KizunaTallis
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Well... not always. Sometimes [[ItWillNeverCatchOn nobody expected the show to make it]], and so [[SeriesFauxnale the writers and producers pulled out all the stops in the first year]], [[PostScriptSeason leaving nothing to work with for the next season]]. Sometimes a show with a novel concept inspires [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] that either pull off the gimmick more skillfully, or are so [[DuelingShows ubiquitious]] that [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny viewers become bored]] with both the original and the knockoffs. Sometimes ExecutiveMeddling is to blame, especially if the second season coincides with a change in network leadership. Sometimes there's no clear cause at all; the show simply ran out of steam, and SeasonalRot kicked in early. And perhaps most common of all, maybe the network just didn't want to commit to two more seasons of the show. Yes, two more seasons. Very, very few American broadcast network shows are canceled after their third season because a show usually needs about 4 seasons' worth of episodes in order to be viable for [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Syndication off-network syndication]], which for producers is often where the real money is. So, if a network looks like it might be thinking about canceling a show after its third season, the studio that produces that show will usually offer the network some sort of incentive to keep it on the air for long enough to reach syndication; as a result, when network programming executives decide whether or not to renew second-season shows, they often do so based on whether they can see having that show on their schedules for another 2 seasons.

to:

Well... not always. Sometimes [[ItWillNeverCatchOn nobody expected the show to make it]], and so [[SeriesFauxnale the writers and producers pulled out all the stops in the first year]], [[PostScriptSeason leaving nothing to work with for the next season]]. Sometimes a show with a novel concept inspires [[FollowTheLeader imitators]] that either pull off the gimmick more skillfully, or are so [[DuelingShows ubiquitious]] that [[SeinfeldIsUnfunny viewers become bored]] with both the original and the knockoffs. Sometimes ExecutiveMeddling is to blame, especially if the second season coincides with a change in network leadership. Sometimes there's no clear cause at all; the show simply ran out of steam, and SeasonalRot kicked in early. And perhaps most common of all, maybe the network just didn't want to commit to two more seasons of the show. Yes, two more seasons. Very, very few American broadcast network shows are canceled after their third season because a show usually needs about 4 seasons' worth of episodes in order to be viable for [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Main/Syndication [[UsefulNotes/Syndication off-network syndication]], which for producers is often where the real money is. So, if a network looks like it might be thinking about canceling a show after its third season, the studio that produces that show will usually offer the network some sort of incentive to keep it on the air for long enough to reach syndication; as a result, when network programming executives decide whether or not to renew second-season shows, they often do so based on whether they can see having that show on their schedules for another 2 seasons.
4th May '17 11:22:11 AM BabyM
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* ''[[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gabriel%27s_Fire Gabriel's Fire]]'' (1990) was a serious drama starring Creator/JamesEarlJones as a former police officer, wrongly convicted of murder, who becomes a private detective after his release from prison. In its first season, it won three Emmys (Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Jones), Outstanding Supporting Actress (Madge Sinclair), and Outstanding Guest Actor (David Opatoshu)) and an NAACP Image Award. Going into its second season, the show was [[ReTool re-tooled]] into a LighterAndSofter {{Dramedy}} called ''Pros and Cons.'' The new version was cancelled after 12 episodes.
** It could have been worse: the original WorkingTitle for season 2 was ''Bird and Katt.''
12th Mar '17 8:17:20 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* Music/FrankSinatra appeared on two different variety series, both titled ''The Frank Sinatra Show'', in TheFifties: the first a straight musical variety series, the second an unusual variety/drama format. The latter, which aired in the FridayNightDeathSlot on ABC, only lasted one season (1957-58)...but the first, airing on CBS at the dawn of commercial television, lasted two: the first (1950-51) on Saturday against ''Your Show of Shows'', and the second (1951-52) on Tuesday against Milton Berle. Not only was Sinatra host in the second season, he was also ''its only regular''. (He was also the only regular of the ABC series.)

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* Music/FrankSinatra appeared on two different variety series, both titled ''The ''[[Music/FrankSinatra The Frank Sinatra Show'', in TheFifties: the first Show]]'' was a straight musical variety series, the second an unusual variety/drama format. The latter, which aired in the FridayNightDeathSlot show broadcast on ABC, only lasted one season (1957-58)...but the first, airing on CBS at the dawn of commercial television, lasted two: Creator/{{CBS}} for two seasons from 1950 to 1952. While the first (1950-51) season did well on Saturday Saturdays at 9 against ''Your Show of Shows'', and Shows'' on Creator/{{NBC}}, the second (1951-52) one faltered on Tuesday Tuesdays at 8 against Milton Berle. Not only was Sinatra host in ''Texaco Star Theater'' (Milton Berle's show) on NBC and the second season, he surprise hit ''Life is Worth Living'' on Creator/DuMont, which debuted in mid-season. The show's popularity was also ''its only regular''. (He hurt by the scandals surrounding Sinatra's affair with Ava Gardner and his musical career being at a low point commercially and artistically (his late Creator/{{Columbia|Records}}-era output being notorious for gimmicky novelty tunes). [[note]](The name was also the only regular of the ABC series.)reused for an unusual variety/drama format which aired on Creator/{{ABC}} for one season in 1957-58; that one failed due to Sinatra attempting to tape ''eleven shows in fifteen days'' (he hated rehearsing), which showed in his performances and earned him a critical mauling.)[[/note]]
3rd Feb '17 7:46:41 PM Scifimaster92
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* Most diehard fans of ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' tend to hold the opinion that the changes from the first to second season (which included the deaths of several major and supporting characters - including the villains of the first season, the world flipping over TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture and most of the first-season plot threads dropped in favor of standalone episodes) caused the show's death.
29th Dec '16 11:20:31 AM nombretomado
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* ''Series/TwinPeaks''. DavidLynch explicitly stated that he never wanted to bring the Laura Palmer story to a close, preferring to use it as a frame for the sub-plots and span it over several seasons, but Creator/{{ABC}} [[ExecutiveMeddling didn't think the audience would stick around]]. As a result, her killer was revealed halfway through Season 2 and the show became nothing ''but'' sub-plots. Lynch justifiably backed mostly out of its production to continue with his film career, directing only a few episodes with others directed by filmmakers of various skill levels.

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* ''Series/TwinPeaks''. DavidLynch Creator/DavidLynch explicitly stated that he never wanted to bring the Laura Palmer story to a close, preferring to use it as a frame for the sub-plots and span it over several seasons, but Creator/{{ABC}} [[ExecutiveMeddling didn't think the audience would stick around]]. As a result, her killer was revealed halfway through Season 2 and the show became nothing ''but'' sub-plots. Lynch justifiably backed mostly out of its production to continue with his film career, directing only a few episodes with others directed by filmmakers of various skill levels.
31st Oct '16 11:10:55 PM Scifimaster92
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* Although the first season of ''Series/Space1999''faced some criticism for the [[ArtisticLicensePhysics physical improbability of its setup]], it was still well-received for the most part and often compared to ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. The second season, on the other hand, was an entirely different story, seen by many as one of the most egregious examples of this trope in sci-fi. For its second half, the series was {{retool}}ed into a LighterAndSofter action series with ''much'' less cerebral [[IdiotPlot plots]] and several characters removed [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome without explanation]]. These changes went over very poorly with the established fandom and even some of the cast members (especially Martin Landau) and the series was swiftly cancelled soon after.

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* Although the first season of ''Series/Space1999''faced ''Series/Space1999'' faced some criticism for the [[ArtisticLicensePhysics physical improbability of its setup]], it was still well-received for the most part and often compared to ''Film/TwoThousandOneASpaceOdyssey''. The second season, on the other hand, was an entirely different story, seen by many as one of the most egregious examples of this trope in sci-fi. For its second half, the series was {{retool}}ed into a LighterAndSofter action series with ''much'' less cerebral [[IdiotPlot plots]] and several characters removed [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome without explanation]]. These changes went over very poorly with the established fandom and even some of the cast members (especially Martin Landau) and the series was swiftly cancelled soon after.
This list shows the last 10 events of 146. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SecondSeasonDownfall