History Main / SeasonalRot

30th Apr '16 8:53:09 PM MyFinalEdits
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** The series was rebooted ''again'' in 1999, lasting until 2004, and fans tend to think that most of the films from this period are at best, forgettable, and at worst, horrible. The ''only'' well-liked film made in those years is the unfortunately titled ''Film/GodzillaMothraKingGhidorahGiantMonstersAllOutAttack''. Common criticisms of the others are that they lacked originality and relied on emulating the older movies too much (only one entirely new monster was introduced), refused to build up any sort of coherent continuity, with each film pretty much taking place in its own self-contained version of the Godzilla universe, and made Godzilla far too powerful, to the point of there being no doubt at all that he would win every battle.
* ''Franchise/FinalDestination'' is one of the rare long-running horror franchises that's generally seen as having never went through a DorkAge, with fan opinion varying wildly on which films are the best. The lone exception is [[Film/FinalDestination4 the fourth film]], which is pretty much unanimously held to be by far the worst in the series, on account of its DullSurprise acting, blandly-written characters, a general lack of suspense, SpecialEffectFailure leading to fairly crappy kills and an unimpressive opening disaster, and abuse of [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDMovie its 3D gimmick]]. The [[Film/FinalDestination5 next film]], fortunately, is generally seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]] that sent the series out on a high note.

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** The series was rebooted ''again'' in 1999, lasting until 2004, and fans tend to think that most of the films from this period are at best, forgettable, and at worst, horrible. The ''only'' well-liked film made in those years is the unfortunately titled ''Film/GodzillaMothraKingGhidorahGiantMonstersAllOutAttack''. Common criticisms of the others are that they lacked originality and relied on emulating the older movies too much (only one entirely new monster was introduced), refused to build up any sort of coherent continuity, with each film pretty much taking place in its own self-contained version of the Godzilla universe, and made Godzilla far too powerful, to the point of there being no doubt at all that he would win every battle.
* ''Franchise/FinalDestination'' is one of the rare long-running horror franchises that's generally seen as having never went through a DorkAge, with fan opinion varying wildly on which films are the best. The lone exception is [[Film/FinalDestination4 the fourth film]], which is pretty much unanimously held to be by far the worst in the series, on account of its DullSurprise acting, blandly-written characters, a general lack of suspense, SpecialEffectFailure leading to fairly crappy kills and an unimpressive opening disaster, and abuse of [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDMovie its 3D gimmick]]. The [[Film/FinalDestination5 next film]], fortunately, is generally seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]] that sent the series out on a high note.
30th Apr '16 5:50:21 AM MacronNotes
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* ''Franchise/FinalDestination'' is one of the rare long-running horror franchises that's generally seen as having never went through a DorkAge, with fan opinion varying wildly on which films are the best. The lone exception is [[Film/FinalDestination4 the fourth film]], which is pretty much unanimously held to be by far the worst in the series, on account of its DullSurprise acting, blandly-written characters, a general lack of suspense, SpecialEffectFailure leading to fairly crappy kills and an unimpressive opening disaster, and abuse of [[ThreeDMovie its 3D gimmick]]. The [[Film/FinalDestination5 next film]], fortunately, is generally seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]] that sent the series out on a high note.

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* ''Franchise/FinalDestination'' is one of the rare long-running horror franchises that's generally seen as having never went through a DorkAge, with fan opinion varying wildly on which films are the best. The lone exception is [[Film/FinalDestination4 the fourth film]], which is pretty much unanimously held to be by far the worst in the series, on account of its DullSurprise acting, blandly-written characters, a general lack of suspense, SpecialEffectFailure leading to fairly crappy kills and an unimpressive opening disaster, and abuse of [[ThreeDMovie [[UsefulNotes/ThreeDMovie its 3D gimmick]]. The [[Film/FinalDestination5 next film]], fortunately, is generally seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]] that sent the series out on a high note.
26th Apr '16 10:42:40 AM TheRedRedKroovy
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* ''Franchise/FinalDestination'' is one of the rare long-running horror franchises that's generally seen as having never went through a DorkAge, with fan opinion varying wildly on which films are the best. The lone exception is [[Film/FinalDestination4 the fourth film]], which is pretty much unanimously held to be by far the worst in the series, on account of its DullSurprise acting, blandly-written characters, a general lack of suspense, SpecialEffectFailure leading to fairly crappy kills and an unimpressive opening disaster, and abuse of [[ThreeDMovie its 3D gimmick]]. The [[Film/FinalDestination5 next film]], fortunately, is generally seen as [[WinBackTheCrowd a return to form]] that sent the series out on a high note.



* Creator/TomClancy himself admitted that he had [[WhyWereBummedCommunismFell run out of good candidates for villain nations by the mid-1990s]], which resulted in a pair of suicidally outmatched opponents for the United States in ''[[Literature/JackRyan Debt of Honor]]'' (Japan fights Round Two...) and ''Executive Orders.''

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* Creator/TomClancy himself admitted that he had [[WhyWereBummedCommunismFell run out of good candidates for villain nations by the mid-1990s]], which resulted in a pair of suicidally outmatched opponents for the United States in ''[[Literature/JackRyan Debt of Honor]]'' (Japan fights tries to go for Round Two...) Two against the USA) and ''Executive Orders.''Orders'' (Iran tries to take over the Middle East).
17th Apr '16 3:34:15 AM Arivne
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*** Five years later, ''Mirrodin'' block saw the largest number of cards banned in Standard since ''Urza's Saga'' block. It's follow-up block, ''Champions of Kamigawa'' was underpowered like ''Mercadian Masques.'' It's worth noting that a version of ''Mirrodin's'' headliner Standard deck is now considered top-tier in the "Modern," format, where every card from 2003 onward is legal, and the Modern version is actually ''less powerful'' than the Standard version because 6 cards from the original are banned in Modern.

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*** Five years later, ''Mirrodin'' block saw the largest number of cards banned in Standard since ''Urza's Saga'' block. It's Its follow-up block, ''Champions of Kamigawa'' was underpowered like ''Mercadian Masques.'' It's worth noting that a version of ''Mirrodin's'' headliner Standard deck is now considered top-tier in the "Modern," format, where every card from 2003 onward is legal, and the Modern version is actually ''less powerful'' than the Standard version because 6 cards from the original are banned in Modern.
17th Apr '16 3:24:15 AM Arivne
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* The quality of the ''Franchise/UniversalHorror'' films took a general dive during mid-1940s. Most fans would agree that the franchise's golden age lasted from ''Film/{{Dracula 1931}}'' to ''Film/TheWolfMan1941'', a decade that contained a few duds but was mostly undisputed classics. 1942's ''Film/TheGhostofFrankenstein'' marked the franchise's transition from A-movies to [[BMovie B-movies]], and the films that followed generally had uninspired plots, [[TheOtherDarrin unpopular replacements]] of actors who had defined iconic roles in the previous decade, and a failure to take any real advantage of the novel idea of monsters showing up in each other's movies (for example, Frankenstein's monster and the Wolf man both appear in 1945's ''Film/HouseOfDracula'' but neither of them actually share any scenes with Dracula, or each other for that matter). 1948's ''Film/AbbottAndCostelloMeetFrankenstein'' was more well received that what came before it, and 1954's ''Film/CreatureFromTheBlackLagoon'' was a massive success, temporarily stopping the rot before its own sequels turned out to be disappointments.

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* The quality of the ''Franchise/UniversalHorror'' films took a general dive during mid-1940s. Most fans would agree that the franchise's golden age lasted from ''Film/{{Dracula 1931}}'' to ''Film/TheWolfMan1941'', a decade that contained a few duds but was mostly undisputed classics. 1942's ''Film/TheGhostofFrankenstein'' ''Film/TheGhostOfFrankenstein'' marked the franchise's transition from A-movies to [[BMovie B-movies]], and the films that followed generally had uninspired plots, [[TheOtherDarrin unpopular replacements]] of actors who had defined iconic roles in the previous decade, and a failure to take any real advantage of the novel idea of monsters showing up in each other's movies (for example, Frankenstein's monster and the Wolf man both appear in 1945's ''Film/HouseOfDracula'' but neither of them actually share any scenes with Dracula, or each other for that matter). 1948's ''Film/AbbottAndCostelloMeetFrankenstein'' was more well received that what came before it, and 1954's ''Film/CreatureFromTheBlackLagoon'' was a massive success, temporarily stopping the rot before its own sequels turned out to be disappointments.
17th Apr '16 3:16:17 AM Arivne
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* Slott's run itself, once praised as a return to form with the well-received ''Big Time'', ''No One Dies'', and especially ''ComicBook/SpiderIsland'' storylines, is widely considered to have gone through this as well. Some say that the aforementioned ''Superior'' was the starting point, especially since in order for the story to work Slott flat-out ignored that Spider-Man's supporting cast have traditionally been among the best normal humans at playing SpotTheImpostor, but that book built up a [[CultClassic cult following]] of its own. By contrast, almost nobody likes the relaunched ''Amazing'' title with Peter back in the mantle. It got off on a bad foot to begin with by having all of Peter's previous love interests dump him so he could be paired with ComicBook/{{Silk}}, and OriginalCharacter of Slott's widely derided as a MarySue, then continued with the ''ComicBook/SpiderVerse'' BatFamilyCrossover, which consisted largely of various AlternateUniverse Spider-People being brutally killed, some of whom died in ways that got fans speculating that Slott was ''trying'' [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity to piss them off]]. Slott did his own case no favors be revealing himself to be a {{Jerkass}} [[PrimaDonnaDirector prima donna writer]] on social media, to the point that even those fans who like his writing won't defend him as a person.

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* Slott's run itself, once praised as a return to form with the well-received ''Big Time'', ''No One Dies'', and especially ''ComicBook/SpiderIsland'' storylines, is widely considered to have gone through this as well. Some say that the aforementioned ''Superior'' was the starting point, especially since in order for the story to work Slott flat-out ignored that Spider-Man's supporting cast have traditionally been among the best normal humans at playing SpotTheImpostor, but that book built up a [[CultClassic cult following]] of its own. By contrast, almost nobody likes the relaunched ''Amazing'' title with Peter back in the mantle. It got off on a bad foot to begin with by having all of Peter's previous love interests dump him so he could be paired with ComicBook/{{Silk}}, and an OriginalCharacter of Slott's widely derided as a MarySue, then continued with the ''ComicBook/SpiderVerse'' BatFamilyCrossover, which consisted largely of various AlternateUniverse Spider-People being brutally killed, some of whom died in ways that got fans speculating that Slott was ''trying'' [[NoSuchThingAsBadPublicity to piss them off]]. Slott did his own case no favors be revealing himself to be a {{Jerkass}} [[PrimaDonnaDirector prima donna writer]] on social media, to the point that even those fans who like his writing won't defend him as a person.
17th Apr '16 3:10:43 AM Arivne
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* The second arc of ''Manga/DeathNote''. After a TimeSkip Light got two new opponents called Mello and Near, setting up a three-way cat-and-mouse duel. Unfortunately the story falls prey to DarknessInducedAudienceApathy. Light comes across as a one-note villain and it's hard to cheer for Near, due to his spoiled ungrateful nature and his whole character being a [[ReplacementScrappy blatant copy]] [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute of L with no unique traits]]. Mello is interesting but is OutOfFocus half the time, making the Light vs. Near conflict awfully similar to Light vs. L. The Shinigami appear less and less and there are insane levels of WallsOfText. The biggest contributing factor was the fact that the author wanted the series to be exactly 108 chapters long, but didn't quite have enough material to fill that amount, so the story ended up severely dragged out and padded. The anime adaptation, for comparison, was only 37 episodes, with Near and Mello's arc only lasting the last 5 or so before Mikami Arc.

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* The second arc of ''Manga/DeathNote''. After a TimeSkip Light got two new opponents called Mello and Near, setting up a three-way cat-and-mouse duel. Unfortunately the story falls prey to DarknessInducedAudienceApathy. Light comes across as a one-note villain and it's hard to cheer for Near, due to his spoiled ungrateful nature and his whole character being a [[ReplacementScrappy blatant copy]] [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute of L with no unique traits]]. Mello is interesting but is OutOfFocus half the time, making the Light vs. Near conflict awfully similar to Light vs. L. The Shinigami appear less and less and there are insane levels of WallsOfText. The biggest contributing factor was the fact that the author wanted the series to be exactly 108 [[OneHundredEight 108]] chapters long, but didn't quite have enough material to fill that amount, so the story ended up severely dragged out and padded. The anime adaptation, for comparison, was only 37 episodes, with Near and Mello's arc only lasting the last 5 or so before Mikami Arc.
16th Apr '16 10:00:43 PM Blazer
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* Many fans agree that the ''ComicBook/{{Batman}}'' storyline ''Superheavy'', is this for Scott Snyder's entire run on ComicBook/TheNew52. The storyline saw James Gordon play a PoweredArmor-riding Batman when the real Batman vanished after the events of ''ComicBook/BatmanEndgame''. A lot of it had to do with the fact that Gordon was a real JerkAss most of the time and many readers were just waiting for Bruce to finally decide to hop back in the saddle.
16th Apr '16 12:51:46 PM SpinAttaxx
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* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'': All of the arcs after the Orange Islands have taken flak for running on longer than necessary, though Johto and Sinnoh take more flak than Hoenn due to ArcFatigue; Hoenn was shorter in order to make room for Battle Frontier (which, due to good pacing, was actually well-received).

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* ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'': ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'':
**
All of the arcs after the Orange Islands have taken flak for running on longer than necessary, though Johto and Sinnoh take more flak than Hoenn due to ArcFatigue; Hoenn was shorter in order to make room for Battle Frontier (which, due to good pacing, was actually well-received).



** The Unova arc ended up rotting as well. It started with decent pacing and subdivisions for story arcs, which actually continued on to the TournamentArc. Unfortunately, things began slipping once the 2011 Tohoku-Fukushima disaster hit, and a two-parter was pulled [[TooSoon to avoid encountering criticism]], though it was still well-received for the remainder of the next year. Then ''Black 2 & White 2'' created an [[ExecutiveMeddling executive-mandated revamp of the arc, and it officially all fell apart.]] There were good spots, like when WhatCouldHaveBeen Johto's Celebi Arc (but with Meloetta instead) was made, but the big League Tournament itself was almost universally reviled for making the the poor decision of having TheScrappy, an excruciatingly dopey boy named Cameron, knock out not just fan-favorite Bianca but Ash himself as well, making this his fifth tournament loss and thus ruining all momentum built up yet again. The Plasma arc afterward distilled a lot of the moral debates and ideals of the games and has ''massive'' amounts of TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot, and the arc after that, featuring Ash and co. island-hopping in the Decalore Archipelago, [[FillerArc is nothing but filler]], with a ton of plots unashamedly [[RecycledScript recycled]] from the series' extensive history and filled with shameless advertising for the upcoming games.

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** The Unova arc ended up rotting as well. It started with decent pacing and subdivisions for story arcs, which actually continued on to the TournamentArc. Unfortunately, things began slipping once the 2011 Tohoku-Fukushima disaster hit, and a two-parter was pulled [[TooSoon to avoid encountering criticism]], though it was still well-received for the remainder of the next year. Then ''Black 2 & White 2'' created an [[ExecutiveMeddling executive-mandated revamp of the arc, and it officially all fell apart.]] There were good spots, like when WhatCouldHaveBeen Johto's Celebi Arc (but with Meloetta instead) was made, but the big League Tournament itself was almost universally reviled for making the the poor decision of having TheScrappy, an excruciatingly dopey boy named Cameron, knock out not just fan-favorite Bianca but Ash himself as well, making this his fifth tournament loss and thus ruining all momentum built up yet again. The Plasma arc afterward distilled a lot of the moral debates and ideals of the games and has ''massive'' amounts of TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodPlot, and the arc after that, featuring Ash and co. island-hopping in the Decalore Archipelago, [[FillerArc is nothing but filler]], with a ton of plots unashamedly [[RecycledScript recycled]] from the series' extensive history and filled with shameless advertising for the upcoming games.then-upcoming ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY''.



** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', the Buu Arc is often seen by quite a few fans as the point where the show [[JumpingTheShark jumped the shark]] and rapidly declined in quality. Most of the issues pointed are the story being more over-the-top than ever with examples such as the Super Saiyan 3 form, Piccolo being DemotedToExtra, Buu being almost the same as the previous villain Cell to the point of lacking a motivation, Vegeta making a SenselessSacrifice despite an attempt to develop him, Goku being the SpotlightStealingSquad when the series appeared to be focusing on Gohan, Goten and Trunks, and the anticlimatic and sudden ending. But the beautiful irony of the whole debate is the fact that the Buu Arc produced some of the highest rated episodes in the history of the Dragon Ball franchise in both [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2002-09-28/dragonball-z-tops-ratings America]] '''and''' [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/Identities_Revealed Japan]], so it's debatable as to whether there were that many fans who thought there was a decline in the quality of the series in the Buu Arc as it was able to pull in such high TV ratings. To top it all of, [[BaseBreaker Majin Buu]], who is seen as [[AmericansHateTingle the worst villain in the show to fans in America]], is actually the [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/Dragon_Ball_Kanzenban_Official_Guide:_Dragon_Ball_Forever highest rated villain in the top 20 poll of the most popular characters in the series in Japan,]] above '''both''' Freiza and Cell, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff both of whom considered the better villains in the franchise to fans in America]].

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** In ''Anime/DragonBallZ'', the Buu Arc Saga is often seen by quite a few fans as the point where the show [[JumpingTheShark jumped the shark]] and rapidly declined in quality. Most of the issues pointed are the story being more over-the-top than ever with examples such as the Super Saiyan 3 form, Piccolo being DemotedToExtra, Buu being almost the same as the previous villain Cell to the point of lacking a motivation, Vegeta making a SenselessSacrifice despite an attempt to develop him, Goku being the SpotlightStealingSquad when the series appeared to be focusing on Gohan, Goten and Trunks, and the anticlimatic and sudden ending. But the beautiful irony of the whole debate is the fact that the Buu Arc Saga produced some of the highest rated episodes in the history of the Dragon Ball franchise in both [[http://www.animenewsnetwork.com/news/2002-09-28/dragonball-z-tops-ratings America]] '''and''' [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/Identities_Revealed Japan]], so it's debatable as to whether there were that many fans who thought there was a decline in the quality of the series in the Buu Arc Saga as it was able to pull in such high TV ratings. To top it all of, [[BaseBreaker Majin Buu]], who is seen as [[AmericansHateTingle the worst villain in the show to fans in America]], is actually the [[http://dragonball.wikia.com/wiki/Dragon_Ball_Kanzenban_Official_Guide:_Dragon_Ball_Forever highest rated villain in the top 20 poll of the most popular characters in the series in Japan,]] above '''both''' Freiza Frieza and Cell, [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff both of whom are considered the better villains in the franchise to fans in America]].



* ''[[Comic/TheDandy The Dandy]]'' of the latter half of the 1960s and 1970s, while considered a golden age for the comic by some, is often seen as a weak point in the comic's history by many due to [[TwoDecadesBehind how badly the comic fell behind the times]], with outdated strips like Black Bob and Winker Watson running in an era where other comics had more relatable, down to earth strips like Dennis the Menace. To add to this, most people drawing the strips were veteran artists who had started with comics in the 1940s or before. If an artist died, then more often than not their strips were reprinted, rather than replaced or given a new artist. Little effort was made to remedy this until Albert Barnes, who had been the ''Dandy'' editor since its inception in the 1930s, was finally replaced... ''in 1982''.

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* ''[[Comic/TheDandy The Dandy]]'' of the latter half of the 1960s and 1970s, while considered a golden age for the comic by some, is often seen as a weak point in the comic's history by many due to [[TwoDecadesBehind how badly the comic fell behind the times]], with outdated strips like Black Bob and Winker Watson running in an era where other comics had more relatable, down to earth strips like Dennis the Menace. To add to this, most people drawing the strips were veteran artists who had started with comics in the 1940s or before. If an artist died, [[AuthorExistenceFailure died]], then more often than not their strips were reprinted, rather than replaced or given a new artist. Little effort was made to remedy this until Albert Barnes, who had been the ''Dandy'' editor since its inception in the 1930s, was finally replaced... ''in 1982''.


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* While ''Comicbook/TheTransformers'' started off reasonably well under Bob Budiansky's pen, around 1987-1988 the plots began to get rather silly and nonsensical, such as Skullgrin becoming a movie star, Optimus Prime [[HonorBeforeReason allowing himself to die because some computer game NPCs died]] (though [[DeathIsCheap he did get better later]]), and the Autobots engaging in inter-planetary wrestling. This got better when [[MyRealDaddy the more well-regarded]] Simon Furman took over for the remainder of the book's life and drove the plot into a more [[DarkerAndEdgier serious and epic]] direction.
1st Apr '16 12:48:25 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* ''Creator/TheLittleRascals'' was hit by this in 1938, when the series moved to MGM. Fans of the shorts have criticized the MGM years for growing progressively unfunnier, removing the charm that the Hal Roach shorts had, and becoming moralistic, preachy and patriotic.

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* ''Creator/TheLittleRascals'' ''[[Film/OurGang The Little Rascals]]'' was hit by this in 1938, when the series moved to MGM. Fans of the shorts have criticized the MGM years for growing progressively unfunnier, removing the charm that the Hal Roach shorts had, and becoming moralistic, preachy and patriotic.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.SeasonalRot