History Main / SameCharacterButDifferent

20th Jun '17 6:58:36 PM MJTrooper
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* Phoenix Wright from the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series was a promising lawyer and a really caring person on the first trilogy. And then came ''[[VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney Apollo Justice]]'', 7 years later, where Phoenix was now homeless man who played poker at the basement of a bar, and has a 15-year-old adopted daughter. Turns out that [[spoiler: due to a large petty grudge, he was set up and tricked into presenting forged evidence that cost him his career. Tracey, his adopted daughter, is the biological daughter of the man that Wright was representing and whom lost his life. Turns out the guy that offed him was the same who set up Phoenix, all out of a messed-up sense of pride. Although when you get to play as him, you learn that he's still the same guy on the inside]].

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* Phoenix Wright from the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series was a promising lawyer and a really caring person on the first trilogy. And then came ''[[VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney Apollo Justice]]'', 7 years later, where Phoenix was now homeless man who played poker at the basement of a bar, and has a 15-year-old adopted daughter. Turns out that [[spoiler: due to a large petty grudge, he was set up and tricked into presenting forged evidence that cost him his career. Tracey, Trucy, his adopted daughter, is the biological daughter of the man that Wright was representing and whom lost his life. Turns out the guy that offed him was the same who set up Phoenix, all out of a messed-up sense of pride. Although when you get to play as him, you learn that he's still the same guy on the inside]].
15th Jun '17 11:06:51 PM Usernumber2920
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** Even though he was the FinalBoss of ''VideoGame/MarvelSuperHeroes'', ComicBook/{{Thanos}} is also playable in said game. However, he retained his [[GameBreaker game breaking]] normal attacks even as a playable character. He had 6 Hyper Combos, representing his usage of each of the 6 [[ComicBook/TheInfinityGauntlet Infinity Gems]]. He was toned down considerably in ''[=MvC2=]'', where his normals weren't given such high priority and now, he only had access to 4 Hyper Combos, missing the ones were he uses the Time and Mind Gems. [[TheBusCameBack Making his return to the series]] in ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcomInfinite'', Thanos' moveset was given quite an overhaul. He has several new normals, special moves, and most importantly, Hyper Combos[[note]]Considering that the usage of the now called Infinity [[Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse Stones]] are a part of the gameplay mechanics of ''[=MvCI=]'', Thanos no longer has access to them for Hyper Combos[[/note]].
21st May '17 5:38:54 AM Sabrewing
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* Noob Saibot of the ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' franchise went through a curious change after his first appearance in ''II''. In that game, he was a pure black palette swap of Scorpion, replete with his spear special move. Come the third game, despite the game having ninjas in the form of Sub-Zero and the cyborg trio of Sektor, Cyrax and Smoke, Noob was made into a pure black palette swap of ''Kano'', and with no special moves. When Scorpion and Reptile were re-introduced in the ''Ultimate'' update of ''3'', Noob was altered into his traditional pure black ninja form, and the later ''Trilogy'' version made him the shadow attack-based character we know today.
8th May '17 11:18:55 AM SpocktorWho
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* In ''Series/TheFlash2014'', Season 2 introduced an evil speedster named Zoom as the BigBad of the season, who was a [[TheSociopath sociopathic]] SerialKiller. However [[spoiler:after his defeat at the end of the season, he gets [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off by Time Wraiths into the Speed Force. In there he degrades to a zombie-like state with no semblance of humanity remaining, and is forced to be a slave of the Speed Force for all eternity where he hunts down time aberrations.]]

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* In ''Series/TheFlash2014'', Season 2 introduced an evil speedster named Zoom as the BigBad of the season, who was a [[TheSociopath sociopathic]] SerialKiller. However [[spoiler:after his defeat at the end of the season, he gets [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off by Time Wraiths into the Speed Force. ]] In there he degrades to a zombie-like state with no semblance of humanity remaining, and is forced to be a slave of the Speed Force for all eternity where he hunts down time aberrations.]]
5th Apr '17 9:55:36 AM JoeMerl
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** Chapman. In the main books, he became a Controller [[PapaWolf to protect his daughter]], and generally seems to be a good guy. In the prequel book ''The Andalite Chronicles,'' a teenager named Hedrick Chapman winds up [[TheQuisling selling out the Earth to the Yeerks]] and then apparently dies; someone identical is later seen on Earth, but seems to have no memory of going into space. There's enough of a disconnect between the characterizations that [[http://cinnamonbunzuh.blogspot.com/2011/11/andalite-chronicles.html some suggest]] that Hedrick did die in space and the other Chapman appearances are his brother or something.

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** {{Inverted}}, time-wise, with Vice-Principal Chapman. In the main books, he became a Controller [[PapaWolf to protect his daughter]], and generally seems to be a good guy. In the prequel book ''The Andalite Chronicles,'' a teenager named Hedrick Chapman winds up [[TheQuisling selling out the Earth to the Yeerks]] and then apparently dies; someone identical is later seen on Earth, but seems to have no memory of going into space. There's enough of a disconnect between the characterizations that [[http://cinnamonbunzuh.blogspot.com/2011/11/andalite-chronicles.html some suggest]] that Hedrick did die in space and the other Chapman appearances are his brother or something.
22nd Mar '17 4:43:33 PM Snowy66
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* In ''Series/TheFlash2014'', Season 2 introduced an evil speedster named Zoom as the BigBad of the season, who was a [[TheSociopath sociopathic]] SerialKiller. However [[spoiler:after his defeat at the end of the season, he gets [[DraggedOffToHell dragged off by Time Wraiths into the Speed Force. In there he degrades to a zombie-like state with no semblance of humanity remaining, and is forced to be a slave of the Speed Force for all eternity where he hunts down time aberrations.]]
18th Mar '17 2:06:31 PM nombretomado
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* Paul Robinson was one of the main characters in the golden age of Australian soap opera ''{{Neighbours}}'' back in the 80s. Then, he was greedy and ambitious, though he usually managed to do the right thing in the end. Cut to 20 years later, and a new batch of writers think that the show needs a villain. Well, who better than the soap's original bad boy Paul? Unfortunately, the new writers misremembered how bad Paul had been - his first act upon returning was to burn down the Lasitters hotel complex, murdering a minor character who got in his way. His evil behaviour continued for a while until the writers relented and wrote in a storyline where he had a brain tumour which had affected his personality. It didn't stick however and he was soon back to blackmailing, stealing, sabotaging building sites and generally wrecking lives, although he wasn't quite as bad as when he first came back.

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* Paul Robinson was one of the main characters in the golden age of Australian soap opera ''{{Neighbours}}'' ''Series/{{Neighbours}}'' back in the 80s. Then, he was greedy and ambitious, though he usually managed to do the right thing in the end. Cut to 20 years later, and a new batch of writers think that the show needs a villain. Well, who better than the soap's original bad boy Paul? Unfortunately, the new writers misremembered how bad Paul had been - his first act upon returning was to burn down the Lasitters hotel complex, murdering a minor character who got in his way. His evil behaviour continued for a while until the writers relented and wrote in a storyline where he had a brain tumour which had affected his personality. It didn't stick however and he was soon back to blackmailing, stealing, sabotaging building sites and generally wrecking lives, although he wasn't quite as bad as when he first came back.



* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' Morgana goes from idealist WellIntentionedExtremist driven to villainy to make things fair and because she takes everything emotionally to less emotional person, who rarely thinks to improve the things in Camelot once she has taken it over, out of stress.

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* ''Series/{{Merlin}}'' ''Series/{{Merlin|2008}}'' Morgana goes from idealist WellIntentionedExtremist driven to villainy to make things fair and because she takes everything emotionally to less emotional person, who rarely thinks to improve the things in Camelot once she has taken it over, out of stress.
11th Mar '17 12:12:48 PM DVB
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* Phoenix Wright from the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series was a promising lawyer and a really caring person on the first trilogy. And then came ''[[VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney Apollo Justice]]'', 7 years later, where Phoenix was now homeless man who played poker at the basement of a bar, having adopted a daughter months after the end of the previous events. [[spoiler:Although when you get to play as him, you learn that he's still the same guy on the inside]].

to:

* Phoenix Wright from the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' series was a promising lawyer and a really caring person on the first trilogy. And then came ''[[VisualNovel/ApolloJusticeAceAttorney Apollo Justice]]'', 7 years later, where Phoenix was now homeless man who played poker at the basement of a bar, having and has a 15-year-old adopted daughter. Turns out that [[spoiler: due to a large petty grudge, he was set up and tricked into presenting forged evidence that cost him his career. Tracey, his adopted daughter, is the biological daughter months after the end of the previous events. [[spoiler:Although man that Wright was representing and whom lost his life. Turns out the guy that offed him was the same who set up Phoenix, all out of a messed-up sense of pride. Although when you get to play as him, you learn that he's still the same guy on the inside]].
4th Mar '17 8:57:28 AM X2X
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** It was lampshaded when Tommy's old teammate Adam came by and mused on "it's really hard to imagine him as a teacher."

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** It was lampshaded when Tommy's old teammate Adam came by [[Series/PowerRangersOperationOverdrive a few seasons later]] and mused on how "it's really hard to imagine him as a teacher."



* Charlie, previously presumed dead in ''Videogame/StreetFighterAlpha'' series, returns in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV''. He is now covered in unsettling, wrong-colored skin grafts held together by giant staples, has a PowerCrystal stuck into the middle of his forehead, and his physical transformation seems to have induced a personality transformation as well with Charlie issuing cold threats of lethal violence if you are unfortunate enough to be his opponent. His moveset is also different, replete with FlashStep teleports and the ability to call upon a dark green energy of sorts. The story mode explains that [[spoiler:he was revived by Illuminati agents and is given a task to kill Bison and stop the Shadaloo group, and he's told that while he's given enhanced powers, his revival won't last long, so he's pretty dead-set on his mission. The ''Alpha 2'' ending of him getting betrayed by his own Air Force members (who are implied to be Shadaloo's mole troops) and got thrown out of his aircraft also makes him bitter and untrusting.]]
* Invoked in ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphoniaDawnOfTheNewWorld''. Lloyd returns but acts completely out of character [[spoiler: because that Lloyd is an impostor.]]

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* Charlie, previously presumed dead in ''Videogame/StreetFighterAlpha'' ''VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha'' series, returns in ''VideoGame/StreetFighterV''. He is now covered in unsettling, wrong-colored skin grafts held together by giant staples, has a PowerCrystal stuck into the middle of his forehead, and his physical transformation seems to have induced a personality transformation as well with Charlie issuing cold threats of lethal violence if you are unfortunate enough to be his opponent. His moveset is also different, replete with FlashStep teleports and the ability to call upon a dark green energy of sorts. The story mode explains that [[spoiler:he was revived by Illuminati agents and is given a task to kill Bison and stop the Shadaloo group, and he's told that while he's given enhanced powers, his revival won't last long, so he's pretty dead-set on his mission. The ''Alpha 2'' ending of him getting betrayed by his own Air Force members (who are implied to be Shadaloo's mole troops) and got thrown out of his aircraft also makes him bitter and untrusting.]]
* Invoked in ''VideoGame/TalesOfSymphoniaDawnOfTheNewWorld''. Lloyd returns but acts completely out of character [[spoiler: because [[spoiler:because that Lloyd is an impostor.]]impostor]].



* [[Franchise/ResidentEvil Jill Valentine]] manages to do this in a non-storyline way in ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3''. In ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' she was still wearing her STARS uniform and was able to do things like a flaming dash and summon zombies, birds, and a Tyrant for her Hyper Combo. Come ''[=MvC3=]'', where she came in as DownloadableContent, she was modeled after her appearance in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'', where she was under Wesker's control. As a result she fought like an acrobatic assassin, using things like sommersault kicks and attacking with her Skorpion submachine gun. The two ''Marvel vs. Capcom'' iterations of Jill are completely different from each other with zero overlap, essentially making them two distinct characters in the same series of games.

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* [[Franchise/ResidentEvil Jill Valentine]] manages to do this in a non-storyline way in ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3''. In ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom2'' she was still wearing her STARS S.T.A.R.S. uniform and was able to do things like a flaming dash and summon zombies, birds, and a Tyrant for her Hyper Combo. Come ''[=MvC3=]'', where she came in as DownloadableContent, she was modeled after her appearance in ''VideoGame/ResidentEvil5'', where she was under Wesker's control. As a result she fought like an acrobatic assassin, using things like sommersault kicks and attacking with her Skorpion submachine gun. The two ''Marvel vs. Capcom'' iterations of Jill are completely different from each other with zero overlap, essentially making them two distinct characters in the same series of games.
19th Feb '17 4:46:12 PM CumbersomeTercel
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* Amy Madison, in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. In the episode "Witch", she's a quiet young thing whose evil mother has taken over Amy's body. In episodes before she was [[PutOnABus Put In a Cage]] she was a witch who was no (or negligibly) more evil than Willow (at the time), but when Amy is reintroduced a couple of seasons later, she's turned pretty much as bad as Mom. Cue the surprisingly consistent WildMassGuessing about Mom repossessing Amy after the events of Graduation Day.

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* Amy Madison, in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer''. In the episode "Witch", "[[{{Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS1E3TheWitch}} The Witch]]", she's a quiet young thing whose evil mother has taken over Amy's body. In episodes before she was [[PutOnABus Put In a Cage]] she was a witch who was no (or negligibly) more evil than Willow (at the time), but when Amy is reintroduced a couple of seasons later, she's turned pretty much as bad as Mom. Cue the surprisingly consistent WildMassGuessing about Mom repossessing Amy after the events of Graduation Day.



** Intended as one-shot villains and brought back due to popular demand, the Daleks in the first Dalek serial, "The Daleks", are much more technologically inferior than the Dalek Earth invasion force from the next Dalek serial, "The Dalek Invasion of Earth", which the Doctor says took place a million years ''earlier''. In addition to this, they have entirely different personalities, physical appearances, motivations, weaknesses, battle tactics, military hierarchy and culture; are a lot more of a physical threat rather than their borderline TheGrotesque characterisation before; and begin to show much more of the shrieking authoritarianism that they would later become famous for (when in "The Daleks" they just spoke in a funny way). The Invasion Daleks are much better and more threatening, though, and it was these versions of them that became the standard used in future Dalek stories.
** Varga plants show up in "Mission to the Unknown" and "The Daleks' Master Plan" (the first story being a direct prequel to the latter), in which they are TheVirus - they walk around on their roots, stab people with three-inch thorns and anyone hit with their toxin slowly transforms into one, [[CrushKillDestroy losing their mind in the process]]. They eventually show up almost fifty years later in the ''Doctor Who'' adventure game "[[Recap/DoctorWhoTAGE01CityOfTheDaleks City of the Daleks]]", as much smaller {{Man Eating Plant}}s with pointedly immobile roots that rhythmically shoot out tentacles to grab food.
** The Macra first show up as hyperintelligent, spacefaring [[GiantEnemyCrab crab monsters]] with hypnotic powers in "The Macra Terror", and return 40 years later in "Gridlock" as much bigger crab monsters that are no longer sapient and have no psychic powers. The Doctor claims that they've devolved into dumb animals over billions of years. On the other hand, one reference book holds that the Macra from "Gridlock" escaped from the New New York Zoo when the power failed, suggesting they were non-sapient to begin with. The non-sapient Macra show up in an Eleventh Doctor ChooseYourOwnAdventure book as well.
** The Great Intelligence has BlueAndOrangeMorality in "The Abominable Snowman", no human emotions, and explicitly states in "The Web of Fear" that it has no need for or understanding of revenge. When it reappeared after 44 years in "The Name of the Doctor", it gains a new backstory as a imaginary childhood friend come to life and is obsessed with getting revenge on the Doctor. The Yeti are also absent, replaced with ''literal'' snowmen in "The Snowman".
** The Master warrants a mention, even with the fact that the regeneration mechanic (and the fact that he stole a lot of bodies) allows him to drastically reinvent his personality offscreen. First he was a DiabolicalMastermind and the Doctor's FriendlyEnemy with a knack for disguises and hypnosis, then an [[FacialHorror unspeakable rotting thing]] after his body failed, then a FauxAffablyEvil [[EvilIsHammy over-the-top villain]] after stealing a body, who eventually takes on several catlike traits thanks to a virus he encounters in one story. There's a certain amount of flexibility here due to DependingOnTheWriter issues and the decision to have it all be the same actual incarnation of the Master, but it's all reasonably logical and explicable by ''Doctor Who'' standards. Then in the TV Movie he returns as a rather phallic-looking ghost snake who possesses an ambulance driver and turns him into a CaptainErsatz of Film/TheTerminator with cat eyes and acid saliva. After which he returns as a PsychopathicManchild PresidentEvil intended to be a much closer EvilCounterpart for his accompanying Doctor, with the FreudianExcuse that he constantly heard war drums beating in his head [[{{Retcon}} his whole life]] due to the Time Lords implanting it in his brain. He gets his hypnotic powers back, but they work in a completely different way. The Master's next incarnation is RevisitingTheRoots by this point, being a twisted and charming FriendlyEnemy with an outrageous personality and a knack for disguise... even though she's also a woman.
** TheBrigadier also suffers from this in "Mawdryn Undead", appearing in a story that was originally intended for science teacher Ian (who'd been absent from the show for decades). The solution? Remove all references to Ian, and make the Brigadier a maths teacher.
** The Third Doctor story "The Mutants" features a race of buglike aliens called Mutts, which are an unintelligent interstitial form of the HumanAlien Solonians, all of whom eventually AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence when the Doctor speeds up their metamorphosis. In "The Brain of Morbius", the Doctor comes across the murdered body of a Mutt, and explains to Sarah that Mutts are a spacefaring, insectoid race widespread throughout the same galaxy in which Karn and Gallifrey are located. The word 'Mutt' was a pretty serious racial slur in the original story, and the Doctor shouldn't even consider Mutts a species at all! The original intention had been to recycle the Mutt costume for a generic insectoid alien, but Holmes decided it should actually be a Mutt to add some continuity, bungling the reference. (The novelisation of the story, by Terrance Dicks, who had edited the original serial "The Mutants", changes the Mutt to an alien named Kriz.)
** In "Terror of the Zygons" the Zygon technology only allowed them to double humans if the [[ReplicantSnatching humans were captured and kept in specialised tanks for the duration of the transformation]], and the doubling was only a relatively small part of their plot (which mostly focused on their cyborg technology and the use of the [[StockNessMonster Skarasen]]). In "Day of the Doctor", they don't appear to have this restriction and simply have doubling as their Hat, directly confronting the UNIT members they're shapeshifted into -- they also have the ability to double memories and feelings, which they couldn't do originally. Their next appearance "The Zygon Invasion" / "The Zygon Inversion" explains that their abilities have evolved over time, and in this story they can now impersonate a potential victim's loved ones by reading their thoughts and copying what they find there, and continue to hold the form of a human even after the original has died. This story also reveals that they still use captivity pods in case the person they're impersonating needs to be pumped for information later.
** In "The Brain of Morbius", we're told TheIgor Condo was rescued from a Dravidian ship, leading most to assume Condo's quirky traits (his large size, ugliness and low intelligence) were because he was a Dravidian. "The Infinite Quest" features Dravidians... but now they're InsectoidAliens who live in hives.
** Famously used with Glitz, who was written into a second episode at the last moment to replace a new character and gained a level in JerkAss in the process. Although given that his first episode saw him planning to shoot the Doctor in the back simply because he ''might'' get in his way, it was practically a HeelFaceTurn.

to:

** Intended as one-shot villains and brought back due to popular demand, the Daleks in the first Dalek serial, "The Daleks", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS1E2TheDaleks The Daleks]]", are much more technologically inferior than the Dalek Earth invasion force from the next Dalek serial, "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E2TheDalekInvasionOfEarth The Dalek Invasion of Earth", Earth]]", which the Doctor says took place a million years ''earlier''. In addition to this, they have entirely different personalities, physical appearances, motivations, weaknesses, battle tactics, military hierarchy and culture; are a lot more of a physical threat rather than their borderline TheGrotesque characterisation before; and begin to show much more of the shrieking authoritarianism that they would later become famous for (when in "The Daleks" they just spoke in a funny way). The Invasion Daleks are much better and more threatening, though, and it was these versions of them that became the standard used in future Dalek stories.
** Varga plants show up in "Mission "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E2MissionToTheUnknown Mission to the Unknown" Unknown]]" and "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS3E4TheDaleksMasterPlan The Daleks' Master Plan" Plan]]" (the first story being a direct prequel to the latter), in which they are TheVirus - they walk around on their roots, stab people with three-inch thorns and anyone hit with their toxin slowly transforms into one, [[CrushKillDestroy losing their mind in the process]]. They eventually show up almost fifty years later in the ''Doctor Who'' adventure game "[[Recap/DoctorWhoTAGE01CityOfTheDaleks City of the Daleks]]", as much smaller {{Man Eating Plant}}s with pointedly immobile roots that rhythmically shoot out tentacles to grab food.
** The Macra first show up as hyperintelligent, spacefaring [[GiantEnemyCrab crab monsters]] with hypnotic powers in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS4E7TheMacraTerror The Macra Terror", Terror]]", and return 40 years later in "Gridlock" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E3Gridlock Gridlock]]" as much bigger crab monsters that are no longer sapient and have no psychic powers. The Doctor claims that they've devolved into dumb animals over billions of years. On the other hand, one reference book holds that the Macra from "Gridlock" escaped from the New New York Zoo when the power failed, suggesting they were non-sapient to begin with. The non-sapient Macra show up in an Eleventh Doctor ChooseYourOwnAdventure book as well.
** The Great Intelligence has BlueAndOrangeMorality in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E2TheAbominableSnowmen The Abominable Snowman", Snowmen]]", no human emotions, and explicitly states in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS5E5TheWebOfFear The Web of Fear" Fear]]" that it has no need for or understanding of revenge. When it reappeared after 44 years in "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E13TheNameOfTheDoctor The Name of the Doctor", Doctor]]", it gains a new backstory as a imaginary childhood friend come to life and is obsessed with getting revenge on the Doctor. The Yeti are also absent, replaced with ''literal'' snowmen in "The Snowman".
"[[Recap/DoctorWho2012CSTheSnowmen The Snowmen]]".
** The Master warrants a mention, even with the fact that the regeneration mechanic (and the fact that he stole a lot of bodies) allows him to drastically reinvent his personality offscreen. First he was a DiabolicalMastermind and the Doctor's FriendlyEnemy with a knack for disguises and hypnosis, then an [[FacialHorror unspeakable rotting thing]] after his body failed, then a FauxAffablyEvil [[EvilIsHammy over-the-top villain]] after stealing a body, who eventually takes on several catlike traits thanks to a virus he encounters in one story. There's a certain amount of flexibility here due to DependingOnTheWriter issues and the decision to have it all be the same actual incarnation of the Master, but it's all reasonably logical and explicable by ''Doctor Who'' standards. Then in the [[Recap/DoctorWhoTVMTheTVMovie The TV Movie Movie]], he returns as a rather phallic-looking ghost snake who possesses an ambulance driver and turns him into a CaptainErsatz of Film/TheTerminator with cat eyes and acid saliva. After which he returns as a PsychopathicManchild PresidentEvil intended to be a much closer EvilCounterpart for his accompanying Doctor, with the FreudianExcuse that he constantly heard war drums beating in his head [[{{Retcon}} his whole life]] due to the Time Lords implanting it in his brain. He gets his hypnotic powers back, but they work in a completely different way. The Master's next incarnation is RevisitingTheRoots by this point, being a twisted and charming FriendlyEnemy with an outrageous personality and a knack for disguise... even though she's also a woman.
** TheBrigadier also suffers from this in "Mawdryn Undead", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS20E3MawdrynUndead Mawdryn Undead]]", appearing in a story that was originally intended for science teacher Ian (who'd been absent from the show for decades). The solution? Remove all references to Ian, and make the Brigadier a maths teacher.
** The Third Doctor story "The Mutants" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS9E4TheMutants The Mutants]]" features a race of buglike aliens called Mutts, which are an unintelligent interstitial form of the HumanAlien Solonians, all of whom eventually AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence when the Doctor speeds up their metamorphosis. In "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E5TheBrainOfMorbius The Brain of Morbius", Morbius]]", the Doctor comes across the murdered body of a Mutt, and explains to Sarah that Mutts are a spacefaring, insectoid race widespread throughout the same galaxy in which Karn and Gallifrey are located. The word 'Mutt' was a pretty serious racial slur in the original story, and the Doctor shouldn't even consider Mutts a species at all! The original intention had been to recycle the Mutt costume for a generic insectoid alien, but Holmes Creator/RobertHolmes decided it should actually be a Mutt to add some continuity, bungling the reference. (The novelisation of the story, by Terrance Dicks, Creator/TerranceDicks, who had edited the original serial "The Mutants", changes the Mutt to an alien named Kriz.)
** In "Terror "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS13E1TerrorOfTheZygons Terror of the Zygons" Zygons]]", the Zygon technology only allowed them to double humans if the [[ReplicantSnatching humans were captured and kept in specialised tanks for the duration of the transformation]], and the doubling was only a relatively small part of their plot (which mostly focused on their cyborg technology and the use of the [[StockNessMonster Skarasen]]). In "Day "[[Recap/DoctorWho50thASTheDayOfTheDoctor The Day of the Doctor", Doctor]]", they don't appear to have this restriction and simply have doubling as their Hat, directly confronting the UNIT members they're shapeshifted into -- they also have the ability to double memories and feelings, which they couldn't do originally. Their next appearance "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E7TheZygonInvasion The Zygon Invasion" Invasion]]" / "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS35E8TheZygonInversion The Zygon Inversion" Inversion]]" explains that their abilities have evolved over time, and in this story they can now impersonate a potential victim's loved ones by reading their thoughts and copying what they find there, and continue to hold the form of a human even after the original has died. This story also reveals that they still use captivity pods in case the person they're impersonating needs to be pumped for information later.
** In "The Brain of Morbius", we're told TheIgor Condo was rescued from a Dravidian ship, leading most to assume Condo's quirky traits (his large size, ugliness and low intelligence) were because he was a Dravidian. "The "[[Recap/DoctorWho2007TDWASTheInfiniteQuest The Infinite Quest" Quest]]" features Dravidians... but now they're InsectoidAliens who live in hives.
** Famously used with Glitz, who was written into a second episode "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]" at the last moment to replace a new character and gained a level in JerkAss in the process. Although given that his first episode saw him planning to shoot the Doctor in the back simply because he ''might'' get in his way, it was practically a HeelFaceTurn.
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