History Main / RuleOfFunny

20th Sep '17 7:59:04 AM LavonPapillon1
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* ImpossiblePickleJar
17th Sep '17 9:57:18 PM Vir
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** In "[=SpongeGuard=] on Duty", [=SpongeBob=] attempts to save Patrick from drowning by drinking all of the water in Goo Lagoon. Despite [=SpongeBob=] using a straw, he somehow sucks Patrick up as well.
9th Sep '17 4:21:39 PM nombretomado
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-->-AndrewHussie

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-->-AndrewHussie-->-Creator/AndrewHussie
8th Sep '17 1:27:30 AM ClintEastwood
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* Penny's intelligence and Sheldon's social skills in ''Series/{{TheBigBangTheory}}'' both tend to vary wildly based on this trope.

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* Penny's intelligence and Sheldon's social skills in ''Series/{{TheBigBangTheory}}'' ''Series/TheBigBangTheory'' both tend to vary wildly based on this trope.



** They briefly {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed Holly's [[TheDitz senility]] for a joke multiple times, with the extreme being "White Hole" (in which (s)he was counting by banging her head on the screen). However, (s)he is shown to be much more lucid (if not necessarily brilliant) in other episodes, notably in "Queeg" with a well-planned hoax ''based'' on the idiot-perception and in "Back to Reality" when (s)he saves the entire crew. Also, "White Hole" itself establishes that the ship's power generation requires her input, making you wonder why something hasn't exploded yet.

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** They briefly {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed Holly's [[TheDitz senility]] for a joke multiple times, with the extreme being "White Hole" "[[Recap/{{Red Dwarf Season IV White Hole}} White Hole]]" (in which (s)he was counting by banging her head on the screen). However, (s)he is shown to be much more lucid (if not necessarily brilliant) in other episodes, notably in "Queeg" "[[Recap/{{Red Dwarf Season II Queeg}} Queeg]]" with a well-planned hoax ''based'' on the idiot-perception and in "Back "[[Recap/{{Red Dwarf Back To Earth}} Back to Reality" Earth]]" when (s)he saves the entire crew. Also, "White Hole" itself establishes that the ship's power generation requires her input, making you wonder why something hasn't exploded yet.



* Many of the "challenges" in ''TopGear''. Why turn a truck into an amphibious vehicle? Why launch a car on a rocket only to see it hit the ground and then explode? Why make James May try to drive fast? (Or why let him get lost--actually lost--on a ''race track''? Because it's funny, durn it!)

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* Many of the "challenges" in ''TopGear''.''Series/TopGear''. Why turn a truck into an amphibious vehicle? Why launch a car on a rocket only to see it hit the ground and then explode? Why make James May try to drive fast? (Or why let him get lost--actually lost--on a ''race track''? Because it's funny, durn it!)



** ''"What should I know about the vast territory that lies beyond the confines of my little subculture of textbooks, Ramen noodles, coin-operated laundry and TV shows that seem to think they can skate by with random jokes about giant chickens that have absolutely nothing to do with the overall narrative? The boys at South Park are absolutely correct: Those cutaways and flashbacks have nothing to do with the story! They're just there to be... funny. And that is a shallow indulgence that South Park is [[StealthInsult quite above]], and for that I salute them."''\\

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** ''"What -->What should I know about the vast territory that lies beyond the confines of my little subculture of textbooks, Ramen noodles, coin-operated laundry and TV shows that seem to think they can skate by with random jokes about giant chickens that have absolutely nothing to do with the overall narrative? The boys at South Park are absolutely correct: Those cutaways and flashbacks have nothing to do with the story! They're just there to be... funny. And that is a shallow indulgence that South Park is [[StealthInsult quite above]], and for that I salute them."''\\\\



* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "The Serpent's Pass" Toph is rescued from drowning by Suki and (thinking she is Sokka) gives her a [[HoYay big kiss]]. Even though Toph is blind, there was nothing to stop her from noticing the makeup during the kiss, but the resulting scene is funny.

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* In the ''WesternAnimation/AvatarTheLastAirbender'' episode "The "[[{{Recap/AvatarTheLastAirbenderTheSerpentsPass}} The Serpent's Pass" Pass]]" Toph is rescued from drowning by Suki and (thinking she is Sokka) gives her a [[HoYay big kiss]]. Even though Toph is blind, there was nothing to stop her from noticing the makeup during the kiss, but the resulting scene is funny.



* An instance similar to the [=SpongeBob=] example occurs in the ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' episode "The Deep South", when Zoidberg's house burns to the ground... underwater. Zoidberg wails "How could this have happened?" and Hermes notes, "That's a very good question." Implicitly claiming responsibility, Bender picks his still-lit cigar out of the ruins and puffs on it -- eliciting a cry of, "That just raises further questions!"

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* An instance similar to the [=SpongeBob=] example occurs in the ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' episode "The "[[Recap/FuturamaS2E12TheDeepSouth The Deep South", South]]", when Zoidberg's house burns to the ground... underwater. Zoidberg wails "How could this have happened?" and Hermes notes, "That's a very good question." Implicitly claiming responsibility, Bender picks his still-lit cigar out of the ruins and puffs on it -- eliciting a cry of, "That just raises further questions!"



** ''Futurama'' is fond of both this rule and lampshading it. In an early episode, aliens are threatening to invade Earth and the planet sends Zapp Branigan to destroy the mothership. After an epic battle with a massive, well-guarded space installation, Earth succeeds in destroying the thing. Zapp celebrates the victory, before a substantially larger ship pops into view. This, it turns out, is the mothership. When Zapp asks what they just destroyed, Kiff looks at a computer screen, groans and says, "The Hubble telescope." Series producer David X. Cohen said in the episode's commentary track that he knew the joke made absolutely no sense, but loved it so much he had to keep it in.

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** ''Futurama'' is fond of both this rule and lampshading it. In an early episode, "[[Recap/FuturamaS1E12WhenAliensAttack When Aliens Attack]]", aliens are threatening to invade Earth and the planet sends Zapp Branigan to destroy the mothership. After an epic battle with a massive, well-guarded space installation, Earth succeeds in destroying the thing. Zapp celebrates the victory, before a substantially larger ship pops into view. This, it turns out, is the mothership. When Zapp asks what they just destroyed, Kiff looks at a computer screen, groans and says, "The Hubble telescope." Series producer David X. Cohen said in the episode's commentary track that he knew the joke made absolutely no sense, but loved it so much he had to keep it in.



** The "Cape Feare" invokes this trope to a significant extent. It was the last hurrah for a number of the show's original writers who were leaving. They threw every wacky or random gag into the episode with the mentality of "What are they going to do? Fire us?" This resulted in one of the most highly regarded episodes of the show ever. Among other things, the episode features an elephant stepping on Bob's face and Bob putting on a full Gilbert and Sullivan opera (complete with costumes and a playbill) after being asked to do so on the spot.
** The Simpsons is a LongRunner which slips a running gag past the MoralGuardians. BumblingDad and JerkAss Homer repeatedly strangles his son, Bart. This is always PlayedForLaughs and excused on the Rule of Funny. This may also serve as a show GettingCrapPastTheRadar thanks to a show-level version of the GrandfatherClause; child abuse as comedy is not going to fly on most shows.
*** Which makes it even funnier when they ''do'' treat it as child abuse. One episode had Homer take fathering lessons. He tells the class a story where Bart, the little dickens, calls him fat. He then casually say 'so then I was strangling him when...' causing the whole group to drop their jaws and question what kind of man he is. Completely played for laughs how they react, and even has Homer reveal that's how he was raised, not that Abe strangled him when he did bad, but that ''Homer'' strangled his ''father'' every time he tried to punish him. One of the funiest scenes ever.
** In several episodes, Ned's biblical references are complete nonsense, and simply sound like weird things from the Old Testament. In the episode "Home Sweet Home- Diddily- Dum- Doodily," for instance, he expresses shock that Bart and Lisa are unfamiliar with the story of the "the Bridal Feast of Beth Chedruharazzeb."

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** The "Cape Feare" "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS5E2CapeFeare Cape Feare]]" invokes this trope to a significant extent. It was the last hurrah for a number of the show's original writers who were leaving. They threw every wacky or random gag into the episode with the mentality of "What are they going to do? Fire us?" This resulted in one of the most highly regarded episodes of the show ever. Among other things, the episode features an elephant stepping on Bob's face and Bob putting on a full Gilbert and Sullivan opera (complete with costumes and a playbill) after being asked to do so on the spot.
** The Simpsons ''The Simpsons'' is a LongRunner which slips a running gag past the MoralGuardians. BumblingDad and JerkAss {{Jerkass}} Homer repeatedly strangles his son, Bart. This is always PlayedForLaughs and excused on the Rule of Funny. This may also serve as a show GettingCrapPastTheRadar thanks to a show-level version of the GrandfatherClause; child abuse as comedy is not going to fly on most shows.
*** Which makes it even funnier when they ''do'' treat it as child abuse. One episode had Homer take fathering lessons. He tells the class a story where Bart, the little dickens, calls him fat. He then casually say 'so then I was strangling him when...' causing the whole group to drop their jaws and question what kind of man he is. Completely played for laughs how they react, and even has Homer reveal that's how he was raised, not that Abe strangled him when he did bad, but that ''Homer'' strangled his ''father'' every time he tried to punish him. One of the funiest funniest scenes ever.
** In several episodes, Ned's biblical references are complete nonsense, and simply sound like weird things from the Old Testament. In the episode "Home "[[Recap/TheSimpsonsS7E3HomeSweetHomediddlyDumDoodily Home Sweet Home- Diddily- Dum- Doodily," Homediddly-Dum-Doodily]]", for instance, he expresses shock that Bart and Lisa are unfamiliar with the story of the "the Bridal Feast of Beth Chedruharazzeb."
27th Aug '17 1:00:40 PM nombretomado
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* ''AtelierSeries'' are lighthearted in general, but the ''[[VideoGame/ManaKhemiaAlchemistsOfAlRevis Mana]] [[VideoGame/ManaKhemia2FallOfAlchemy Khemia]]'' and DS games (''Liese'', ''[[VideoGame/AtelierAnnieAlchemistsOfSeraIsland Annie]]'', and ''Lina'') are practically made of this trope.

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* ''AtelierSeries'' ''VideoGame/{{Atelier}}'' games are lighthearted in general, but the ''[[VideoGame/ManaKhemiaAlchemistsOfAlRevis Mana]] [[VideoGame/ManaKhemia2FallOfAlchemy Khemia]]'' and DS games (''Liese'', ''[[VideoGame/AtelierAnnieAlchemistsOfSeraIsland Annie]]'', and ''Lina'') are practically made of this trope.
25th Aug '17 5:55:55 AM Vir
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** In "Blagsnarst, A Love Story", Roger tries to make a weapon by combining some sticks, a rock and some gum. When the camera zooms out, he now has a functioning assault rifle.

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** In "Blagsnarst, A Love Story", Roger tries to make a weapon by combining some sticks, a rock and some gum. [[BehindTheBlack When the camera zooms out, out]], he now has a functioning assault rifle.
30th Jul '17 7:33:10 PM Vir
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** In "Skiddley Whiffers", when Doofenshmirtz explains to Perry why he's trying to [[OverprotectiveDad protect Vanessa]] on her camping trip, we're treated to a flashback from his HilariouslyAbusiveChildhood where he gets [[BeeAfraid attacked by bees]]], which leads to him falling off a cliff, through a patch of thorn bushes, and through a field of fire hydrants. He then shows Perry that he has a hydrant stuck inside his leg (he can't have it removed because it's too close to an artery), which appears out of nowhere and disappears just as quickly.

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** In "Skiddley Whiffers", when Doofenshmirtz explains to Perry why he's trying to [[OverprotectiveDad protect Vanessa]] on her camping trip, we're treated to a flashback from his HilariouslyAbusiveChildhood where he gets [[BeeAfraid attacked by bees]]], bees]], which leads to him falling off a cliff, through a patch of thorn bushes, and through a field of fire hydrants. He then shows Perry that he has a hydrant stuck inside his leg (he can't have it removed because it's too close to an artery), which appears out of nowhere and disappears just as quickly.
30th Jul '17 6:48:59 PM Vir
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** In "Skiddley Whiffers", when Doofenshmirtz explains to Perry why he's trying to [[OverprotectiveDad protect Vanessa]] on her camping trip, we're treated to a flashback from his HilariouslyAbusiveChildhood where he gets [[BeeAfraid attacked by bees]]], which leads to him falling off a cliff, through a patch of thorn bushes, and through a field of fire hydrants. He then shows Perry that he has a hydrant stuck inside his leg (he can't have it removed because it's too close to an artery), which appears out of nowhere and disappears just as quickly.
6th Jun '17 6:55:59 PM Vir
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** In "Blagsnarst, A Love Story", Roger tries to make a weapon by combining two sticks, a rock and some gum. When the camera zooms out, he now has a functioning assault rifle.

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** In "Blagsnarst, A Love Story", Roger tries to make a weapon by combining two some sticks, a rock and some gum. When the camera zooms out, he now has a functioning assault rifle.
31st May '17 1:19:57 AM Vir
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** Arguably one of the most polarizing points in the show's evolution for fans was when the characterizations became dependant on the trope. Depending on the gag, the entire cast can switch between likeable yet wacky characters akin to the original episodes or FauxAffablyEvil psychopaths taking part in high order ComedicSociopathy. This is even more jarring when originally [[OnlySaneMan level headed and more humanized]] characters such as Lois and Brian [[ComedicSociopathy join in on]] [[BewareTheNiceOnes the sadism]] [[{{Flanderization}} of a gag]].

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** Arguably one of the most polarizing points in the show's evolution for fans was when the characterizations became dependant on the trope. Depending on the gag, the entire cast can switch between likeable likable yet wacky characters akin to the original episodes or FauxAffablyEvil psychopaths taking part in high order ComedicSociopathy. This is even more jarring when originally [[OnlySaneMan level headed and more humanized]] characters such as Lois and Brian [[ComedicSociopathy join in on]] [[BewareTheNiceOnes the sadism]] [[{{Flanderization}} of a gag]].


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** The two times Squidward gets sent flying off his bike and off a cliff in "Jellyfishing" and "My Pretty Seahorse", he suddenly explodes for no reason other than this trope.
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