History Main / RomanaClef

17th Jun '16 1:45:53 AM PaulA
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* ''Literature/ThePictureOfDorianGray'' by OscarWilde is often called a ''roman à clef''. However, in this case the "key" is not that it's based on specific people, but that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar it's about homosexuality]].

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* ''Literature/ThePictureOfDorianGray'' by OscarWilde Creator/OscarWilde is often called a ''roman à clef''. However, in this case the "key" is not that it's based on specific people, but that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar it's about homosexuality]].
13th Jun '16 7:20:47 PM PaulA
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* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's "The Mystery of Marie Rogêt" was in fact an account of the real-life murder of Mary Rogers, written and published while the crime was still in the newspapers and unsolved. In it Poe's detective Dupin learns of the crime solely from newspaper reports and presents his theory of how it was committed - which in fact is exactly what Poe himself did in writing the story.

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* Creator/EdgarAllanPoe's "The Mystery of Marie Rogêt" "Literature/TheMysteryOfMarieRoget" was in fact an account of the real-life murder of Mary Rogers, written and published while the crime was still in the newspapers and unsolved. In it Poe's detective Dupin Literature/CAugusteDupin learns of the crime solely from newspaper reports and presents his theory of how it was committed - -- which in fact is exactly what Poe himself did in writing the story.
11th Apr '16 10:52:47 AM aye_amber
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* Many HaroldRobbins novels qualify, most notably ''The Carpetbaggers'' (inspired, in part, by HowardHughes) and ''Where Love Has Gone'' (based on the Lana Turner/Joey Stompanato scandal).

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* Many HaroldRobbins Creator/HaroldRobbins novels qualify, most notably ''The Carpetbaggers'' (inspired, in part, by HowardHughes) Creator/HowardHughes) and ''Where Love Has Gone'' (based on the Lana Turner/Joey Turner / Joey Stompanato scandal).



* ''Junky'', or depending on the version ''Junkie'', by WilliamSBurroughs is essentially an account of his life as a drug addict and dealer, but with the names changed, though he didn't much bother with his own, changing it to William Lee, which he also used as an author pseudonym for this book.

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* ''Junky'', or depending on the version ''Junkie'', by WilliamSBurroughs Creator/WilliamSBurroughs is essentially an account of his life as a drug addict and dealer, but with the names changed, though he didn't much bother with his own, changing it to William Lee, which he also used as an author pseudonym for this book.
22nd Mar '16 7:22:47 AM AgProv
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** The popular character of Bluebottle [[note]]originated by nearly forgotten founder-Goon [[ThePeteBest Creator/MichaelBentine]] and not by Creator/PeterSellers[[/note]] began with a really eccentric and physically odd-looking Scoutmaster who Michael Bentine encountered in London. Discovering the scoutmaster had a ''truly'' unique voice, Bentine grabbed his friend Creator/PeterSellers by the arm and said "You have ''got'' to meet this man!" After the encounter, Bentine said to Sellers "Look. I can't do that voice. ''You can.'' There's your Bluebottle!" The rest became radio history. Even when invited to a Goon Show recording, the life-model for the character still did not twig who Bluebottle was based on, and complimented Sellers on creating such a funny character who could not ''possibly'' exist in real life.

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** The popular character of Bluebottle [[note]]originated by nearly forgotten founder-Goon [[ThePeteBest Creator/MichaelBentine]] and not by Creator/PeterSellers[[/note]] began with a really eccentric and physically odd-looking Scoutmaster who Michael Bentine Creator/MichaelBentine encountered in London. Discovering the scoutmaster had a ''truly'' unique voice, Bentine grabbed his friend Creator/PeterSellers by the arm and said "You have ''got'' to meet this man!" After the encounter, Bentine said to Sellers "Look. I can't do that voice. ''You can.'' There's your Bluebottle!" The rest became radio history. Even when invited to a Goon Show recording, the life-model for the character still did not twig who Bluebottle was based on, and complimented Sellers on creating such a funny character who could not ''possibly'' exist in real life.
17th Mar '16 11:32:02 AM MsChibi
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A fictional account of RealLife events, loaded with {{Captain Ersatz}}es of real people. These are often autobiographical or RippedFromTheHeadlines. These differ from InspiredBy and VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory in that the story is not [[{{Dramatization}} dramatized]], merely [[LawyerFriendlyCameo retold with different proper nouns]]. Historically, many of these have been great success merely from people in high society buying them to figure out if they are one of the characters.

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A fictional account of RealLife events, loaded with {{Captain Ersatz}}es of real people. These are often autobiographical or RippedFromTheHeadlines. These differ from InspiredBy and VeryLooselyBasedOnATrueStory in that the story is not [[{{Dramatization}} dramatized]], merely [[LawyerFriendlyCameo retold with different proper nouns]]. (Which isn't to say that ''no'' ArtisticLicense whatsoever is taken.) Historically, many of these have been great success merely from people in high society buying them to figure out if they are one of the characters.
7th Feb '16 4:47:49 PM Wercury
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* ''Film/DogDayAfternoon'' was based off of a real 1972 Brooklyn bank robbery and keeps many details true to RealLife.

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* ''Film/DogDayAfternoon'' was based off of a real 1972 Brooklyn bank robbery and keeps many details true to RealLife.RealLife, with the notable exception of the ending, where [[spoiler:Al Pacino's character reluctantly sells his partner out in exchange of a plea bargain. Reportedly, this put his real life counterpart on bad sheets with his fellow inmates at the correctional facility he was in when they played the movie there, giving him the reputation of a rat.]]
15th Nov '15 11:53:38 PM gallium
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Added DiffLines:

* The oldest anime film to survive, 1943's ''Anime/MomotarosSeaEagles'', is a WartimeCartoon showing the attack on Pearl Harbor as carried out by an Imperial Japanese Navy manned by cute, cuddly animals. They're attacking "Demon Island"--but Demon Island is drawn to look just like Oahu and Pearl Harbor, the battleships are tied up in two rows just like Pearl Harbor, the ships fly American flags except the flags have one big star, and "Aloha Oe" plays on the soundtrack as the Japanese planes swoop in.
9th Nov '15 7:40:50 AM gallium
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Added DiffLines:

* InUniverse in ''Film/{{Deathtrap}}''. Sidney is a playwright. He and his lover, aspiring playwright Cliff, conspire to murder Sidney's wife Myra via a FrightDeathtrap. Everything goes swimmingly, as the FrightDeathtrap induces a fatal heart attack for Myra and Sidney inherits her vast fortune. However, afterwards Sidney is horrified to find out that Cliff is writing a play called ''[[TitleDrop Deathtrap]]'', which is nothing more than the story of how Cliff and Sidney killed Myra, with only the names changed.
27th Sep '15 11:00:48 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Hamiltons in EastOfEden are based on JohnSteinbeck's own relatives, without even changing their names. Events drawn from Steinbeck's own boyhood are interspersed among main plot points concerning between the Trasks and Hamiltons.
* Mordecai Richler's ''SolomonGurskyWasHere'' is a weird mix of reportage and total madness. The stuff about a family of Canadian Jewish bootleggers who got rich during Prohibition and then became philanthropists? Based very, very closely on the real-life Bronfman family. The stuff with the Franklin expedition's secretly Jewish doctor and sole survivor, the faked death in a plane crash, the mystic ravens? Not so much.

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* The Hamiltons in EastOfEden are based on JohnSteinbeck's Creator/JohnSteinbeck's own relatives, without even changing their names. Events drawn from Steinbeck's own boyhood are interspersed among main plot points concerning between the Trasks and Hamiltons.
* Mordecai Richler's ''SolomonGurskyWasHere'' ''Literature/SolomonGurskyWasHere'' is a weird mix of reportage and total madness. The stuff about a family of Canadian Jewish bootleggers who got rich during Prohibition and then became philanthropists? Based very, very closely on the real-life Bronfman family. The stuff with the Franklin expedition's secretly Jewish doctor and sole survivor, the faked death in a plane crash, the mystic ravens? Not so much.
11th Jul '15 9:39:57 PM gallium
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* ''Theatre/LongDaysJourneyIntoNight'' is based more or less on episodes from Eugene O'Neill's own youth. O'Neill deliberately refused to allow the play to be published or produced until after his death, probably out of worry that he would be too closely identified with the play's protagonist, Edmund Tyrone. (O'Neill had a brother named Edmund who died in infancy, like Edmund Tyrone's brother Eugene.)

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* ''Theatre/LongDaysJourneyIntoNight'' is based more or less on episodes from Eugene O'Neill's Creator/EugeneONeill's own youth. O'Neill deliberately refused to allow the play to be published or produced until after his death, probably out of worry that he would be too closely identified with the play's protagonist, Edmund Tyrone. (O'Neill had a brother named Edmund who died in infancy, like Edmund Tyrone's brother Eugene.)
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