History Main / RightManIntheWrongPlace

3rd May '16 2:27:38 PM eroock
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A type of ActionSurvivor. On the [[SuperWeight TV Tropes power scale]], these usually rate as Muggle Weight or Iron Weight. Compare FallingIntoTheCockpit and ItBeganWithATwistOfFate, and compare/contrast UnlikelyHero and HeroicBystander.

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Also see DieHardOnAnX. A type of ActionSurvivor. On the [[SuperWeight TV Tropes power scale]], these usually rate as Muggle Weight or Iron Weight. Compare FallingIntoTheCockpit and ItBeganWithATwistOfFate, and compare/contrast UnlikelyHero and HeroicBystander.
3rd May '16 2:26:40 PM eroock
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* [[Creator/HarrisonFord President James Marshall]], from the movie ''Film/AirForceOne'' (like Jack Ryan, below, he's long-retired military, in this case Vietnam experience courtesy of the Army), is forced to step up when his Secret Service security detail is overpowered while aboard the titular aircraft.
* [[Creator/SigourneyWeaver Ellen Ripley]] from the ''Franchise/{{Alien}}'' franchise, particularly in ''Film/{{Aliens}}'' (the closest to the classic action format). A cargo officer on an interstellar tug with no previous martial experience, she nonetheless manages to destroy alien menaces that claim the lives of fellow crewmen, superhuman cyborgs, and heavily armed {{space marine}}s alike. Seems like the only ones she can't defeat are the [[ExecutiveMeddling producers]].



* [[Creator/KurtRussell Dr. Phil Grant]], from the movie ''Film/ExecutiveDecision'', finds himself thrust into fighting a terrorist hijacking of an aircraft, instead of just lecturing on terrorism.



* The protagonist in ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' isn't exactly a civilian bystander, but the only reason he was in a position to foil the demonic invasion is because he was [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassigned to a security detail on one of the moons of Mars after assaulting a superior officer]].
20th Jan '16 4:59:49 PM Thunderchin
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* The essential premise behind [[Creator/BruceWillis John McClane]] of ''Film/DieHard''. Except for [[Film/DieHardWithAVengeance the third movie]], he always stumbled into a position to not only kick ass but save the day, but if not he would be okay with someone else doing it. He says so repeatedly. ''Film/DieHard2'' had the tag line, "John [=McClane=] is back in the wrong place at the wrong time!" While he is a policeman (though always off-duty when the actual excitement happens), he is not a trained counter-terror expert or anything. A line in one of the trailers for the second movie, unused because TrailersAlwaysLie, has [=McClane=] himself lampshading his situation. As he is running through the tunnels [[spoiler:under Dulles Airport]], he pauses for a seconds and mutters, "How can the same thing happen to the same guy, twice" and then runs off again.

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* The essential premise behind [[Creator/BruceWillis John McClane]] of ''Film/DieHard''. Except for [[Film/DieHardWithAVengeance the third movie]], he always stumbled into a position to not only kick ass but save the day, but if not he would be okay with someone else doing it. He says so repeatedly. ''Film/DieHard2'' had the tag line, "John [=McClane=] is back in the wrong place at the wrong time!" While he is a policeman (though always off-duty when the actual excitement happens), he is not a trained counter-terror expert or anything. A line in one of the trailers for the second movie, unused because TrailersAlwaysLie, has [=McClane=] himself lampshading his situation. As he is running through the tunnels [[spoiler:under Dulles Airport]], he pauses for a seconds and mutters, "How can the same thing shit happen to the same guy, twice" and then runs off again.again.
--> '''[[Film/LiveFreeOrDieHard Thomas Gabriel]]:''' On your tombstone, it should read: the wrong man in the wrong place at the wrong time.
14th Jan '16 10:55:33 PM TARINunit9
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* OlderThanTheyThink ; Creator/GKChesterton's Literature/FatherBrown says the [[TropeNamer trope name]] in the story "The Sins of Prince Saradine".

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* OlderThanTheyThink ; OlderThanTheyThink; Creator/GKChesterton's Literature/FatherBrown says provides an UrExample by dropping the [[TropeNamer trope name]] in the story "The Sins of Prince Saradine".



* Gordon Freeman from the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' franchise is the TropeNamer, from the G-Man's quote about him above. Ordinary scientist of theoretical physics, forced to become a OneManArmy against a horde of alien gribblies. And not only does he kill the aliens, he also kills most of the military force sent to contain the situation. Interestingly enough, in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', the situation is a subversion, as the G-Man himself has purposefully left Gordon at a specific place and time, rather than Gordon falling into it by accident or chance. He's still really ''not'' supposed to be there and not at all prepared for the situation thus the G-Man's quote. Then again, if you think of it as Gordon just continuing where he left off, the trope is still being played as straight as before.

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* Gordon Freeman from the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' franchise is the TropeNamer, from the G-Man's quote about him above. Ordinary scientist of theoretical physics, forced to become a OneManArmy against a horde of alien gribblies. And not only does he kill the aliens, he also kills most of the military force sent to contain the situation. Interestingly enough, although the trope is named in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', the situation is a subversion, subversion from that point onwards, as the G-Man himself has purposefully left Gordon at a specific place and time, rather than Gordon falling into it by accident or chance. He's Then again he's still really ''not'' supposed to be there and not at all prepared for the situation thus the G-Man's quote. Then again, situation, so if you think of it as Gordon just continuing where he left off, off the trope is still being played as straight as before.
29th Dec '15 9:33:19 AM rjd1922
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* Gordon Freeman from the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' franchise is the TropeNamer, from the G-Man's quote about him above. Ordinary scientist of theoretical physics, forced to become a OneManArmy against a horde of alien gribblies. And not only does he kill the aliens, he also kills most of the military force sent to contain the situation. Interestingly enough, in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', the situation is a subversion, as the G-Man himself has purposefully left Gordon at a specific place and time, rather than Gordon falling into it by accident or chance. He's still really ''not'' supposed to be there and not at all prepared for the situation thus The G-Man's quote. Then again, if you think of it as Gordon just continuing where he left off, the trope is still being played as straight as before.

to:

* Gordon Freeman from the ''VideoGame/HalfLife'' franchise is the TropeNamer, from the G-Man's quote about him above. Ordinary scientist of theoretical physics, forced to become a OneManArmy against a horde of alien gribblies. And not only does he kill the aliens, he also kills most of the military force sent to contain the situation. Interestingly enough, in ''VideoGame/HalfLife2'', the situation is a subversion, as the G-Man himself has purposefully left Gordon at a specific place and time, rather than Gordon falling into it by accident or chance. He's still really ''not'' supposed to be there and not at all prepared for the situation thus The the G-Man's quote. Then again, if you think of it as Gordon just continuing where he left off, the trope is still being played as straight as before.
5th Oct '15 8:09:25 AM rjd1922
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* The protagonist in ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' isn't exactly a civilian bystander, but the only reason he was in a position to foil the demonic invasion is because he was reassigned to a middle-of-nowhere security detail after assaulting a superior officer.

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* The protagonist in ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' isn't exactly a civilian bystander, but the only reason he was in a position to foil the demonic invasion is because he was [[ReassignedToAntarctica reassigned to a middle-of-nowhere security detail on one of the moons of Mars after assaulting a superior officer.officer]].
4th Aug '15 5:31:28 AM NorthernDruid
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* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Sora wasn't supposed to get the Keyblade of World's Hearts. That was supposed to go to Riku, but he had turned to Darkness already, denying him a keyblade from the Relm of Light.

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* In ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'', Sora wasn't supposed to get the Sora's Keyblade of World's Hearts. That didn't originally belong to him. It was supposed to go to Riku, be Riku's, but he had turned to Darkness already, denying him a keyblade from the Relm of Light.Darkness, forsaking his Keyblad. So it ended up with Sora instead.
25th Jul '15 6:28:02 PM Morbidorable
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* While most ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' protagonists are trained combatants--knights, soldiers, mercenaries--nearly every main character from II onward fits this trope to varying degrees, since they nearly always get pulled into something far, far bigger than they'd ever have imagined. Examples:
** ''VideoGame/{{FinalFantasyII}}'': Firion and his friends start off as orphans running away from the Empire. After getting curbstomped early-on, they join the resistance and proceed to kick every ass in sight.
** ''VideoGame/{{FinalFantasyV}}'': Bartz is a wanderer. Lenna's a princess. Faris is a pirate captain. Galuf's an old man with amnesia. Together, they fight crime! And, oh yeah, [[spoiler:they become the living embodiments of passion, devotion, courage, and hope, allowing them to recreate the entire world from scratch after it's been destroyed by the Big Bad.]]
** ''VideoGame/{{FinalFantasyXI}}'': At the beginning of the game, you're a lowly first-level adventurer lucky to get any work at atll. By the end of the last expansion[[note]]which, admittedly, hasn't been finished yet[[/note]], you've prevented the destruction of your world up to nine times, saved at least two parallel worlds, and killed around thirty gods altogether[[note]]although it depends on how you decide which bosses constitute gods and whether you've done every optional hunt and boss fight[[/note]. Along the way, you'll have to gain a lot of levels on many different jobs, but don't let that get you down--every single level is really in badass.
25th Jul '15 6:18:26 PM Morbidorable
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Added DiffLines:

* While most ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' protagonists are trained combatants--knights, soldiers, mercenaries--nearly every main character from II onward fits this trope to varying degrees, since they nearly always get pulled into something far, far bigger than they'd ever have imagined. Examples:
** ''VideoGame/{{FinalFantasyII}}'': Firion and his friends start off as orphans running away from the Empire. After getting curbstomped early-on, they join the resistance and proceed to kick every ass in sight.
** ''VideoGame/{{FinalFantasyV}}'': Bartz is a wanderer. Lenna's a princess. Faris is a pirate captain. Galuf's an old man with amnesia. Together, they fight crime! And, oh yeah, [[spoiler:they become the living embodiments of passion, devotion, courage, and hope, allowing them to recreate the entire world from scratch after it's been destroyed by the Big Bad.]]
** ''VideoGame/{{FinalFantasyXI}}'': At the beginning of the game, you're a lowly first-level adventurer lucky to get any work at atll. By the end of the last expansion[[note]]which, admittedly, hasn't been finished yet[[/note]], you've prevented the destruction of your world up to nine times, saved at least two parallel worlds, and killed around thirty gods altogether[[note]]although it depends on how you decide which bosses constitute gods and whether you've done every optional hunt and boss fight[[/note]. Along the way, you'll have to gain a lot of levels on many different jobs, but don't let that get you down--every single level is really in badass.
3rd Jun '15 4:49:30 AM Prfnoff
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* The protagonist in {{Doom}} isn't exactly a civilian bystander, but the only reason he was in a position to foil the demonic invasion is because he was reassigned to a middle-of-nowhere security detail after assaulting a superior officer.

to:

* The protagonist in {{Doom}} ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' isn't exactly a civilian bystander, but the only reason he was in a position to foil the demonic invasion is because he was reassigned to a middle-of-nowhere security detail after assaulting a superior officer.



* [[FarCry3 Jason Brody]] was just some guy on vacation when he was captured by Vaas's pirates.

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* [[FarCry3 ''VideoGame/FarCry3'': Jason Brody]] Brody was just some guy on vacation when he was captured by Vaas's pirates.



* In ''TurningPointFallOfLiberty'', a game set in an AlternateHistory where WinstonChurchill died in a car accident before UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Carson is a steelworker helping build a skyscraper in New York when the Germans invade. He fights his way out and joins LaResistance.

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* In ''TurningPointFallOfLiberty'', ''VideoGame/TurningPointFallOfLiberty'', a game set in an AlternateHistory where WinstonChurchill died in a car accident before UsefulNotes/WorldWarII, Carson is a steelworker helping build a skyscraper in New York when the Germans invade. He fights his way out and joins LaResistance.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RightManIntheWrongPlace