History Main / ReplacementMooks

1st May '16 5:48:58 AM erforce
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-->--''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers''


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-->--''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers''

-->-- ''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers''



* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'': ''Every'' Terminator starts as this. The first one introduced, the T-800, was a replacement for the T-600. In the next film, the T-1000 replaced the T-800. Then, the T-X replaced the T-1000. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], because they're machines and SkyNet is just upgrading.

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* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'': ''Every'' Terminator starts as this. The [[Film/TheTerminator first one introduced, introduced]], the T-800, was a replacement for the T-600. In the [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay next film, film]], the T-1000 replaced the T-800. Then, the T-X [[Film/Terminator3RiseOfTheMachines T-X]] replaced the T-1000. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], because they're machines and SkyNet [=SkyNet=] is just upgrading.
28th Mar '16 7:56:13 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''Film/TheMatrix Reloaded''. After the failure of the Smith-model Agents in ''Film/TheMatrix'', the Machines come out with improved Agents (which Neo calls "upgrades" when he first meets them).

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* ''Film/TheMatrix Reloaded''.''Film/TheMatrixReloaded''. After the failure of the Smith-model Agents in ''Film/TheMatrix'', the Machines come out with improved Agents (which Neo calls "upgrades" when he first meets them).



* ''Every'' [[TheTerminator Terminator]] starts as this. The first one introduced, the T-800, was a replacement for the T-600. In the next film, the T-1000 replaced the T-800. Then, the T-X replaced the T-1000. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], because they're machines and SkyNet is just upgrading.

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* ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'': ''Every'' [[TheTerminator Terminator]] Terminator starts as this. The first one introduced, the T-800, was a replacement for the T-600. In the next film, the T-1000 replaced the T-800. Then, the T-X replaced the T-1000. [[JustifiedTrope Justified]], because they're machines and SkyNet is just upgrading.



* A realistic version of this shows up in ''ASongOfIceAndFire''. When civil war wracks the Kingdom of Westeros during a SuccessionCrisis, the Kingsguard (bodyguards for the royal family) suffer several losses. When Jaime Lannister finally makes it back to the capital to take command, he's horrified and infuriated to find that he has two dependable knights left in the Kingsguard, while most of the other new members are political appointments, second raters, or amoral mercenaries.

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* A realistic version of this shows up in ''ASongOfIceAndFire''.''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire''. When civil war wracks the Kingdom of Westeros during a SuccessionCrisis, the Kingsguard (bodyguards for the royal family) suffer several losses. When Jaime Lannister finally makes it back to the capital to take command, he's horrified and infuriated to find that he has two dependable knights left in the Kingsguard, while most of the other new members are political appointments, second raters, or amoral mercenaries.


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24th Feb '16 9:05:55 AM KingZeal
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This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is for the EliteMooks or {{Giant Mook}}s from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. Another variation is that a new BigBad comes with their own, more powerful forces. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].

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This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is that a new BigBad comes with their own, more powerful forces. Another variation is for the EliteMooks or {{Giant Mook}}s from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. Another variation is that a new BigBad comes with their own, more powerful forces. Mooks. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].
24th Feb '16 9:04:22 AM KingZeal
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->'''Goldar:''' "Might I suggest we send down a group of Putties to attack the Rangers? They're in the open and will be easy prey."
->'''Lord Zedd:''' ''(laughs evilly)'' "Your Putties are as useless to me as you are. I have my own army of Putties, the likes of which you have never seen!"
-->--''Series/MightyMorphinPowerRangers''




This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is for the EliteMooks or {{Giant Mook}}s from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].

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\nThis typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is for the EliteMooks or {{Giant Mook}}s from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. Another variation is that a new BigBad comes with their own, more powerful forces. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].
24th Feb '16 8:57:40 AM KingZeal
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This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is for the EliteMooks or GiantMooks from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].

to:

This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is for the EliteMooks or GiantMooks {{Giant Mook}}s from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].
24th Feb '16 8:57:21 AM KingZeal
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This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].

The inversion to this is MookCarryover, whereas a new BigBad uses the same {{Mook}}s or EliteMooks as the previous one.

to:

This typically happens in series which retain a recurring villain who, after failing in their plans the last time, has seen fit to replace their forces with newer enemies for the hero, whether in part or in whole. A variation of this trope is for the EliteMooks or GiantMooks from the previous iteration to now to be the ''standard'' Mooks. This is usually because the villain is attempting to learn from his or her mistakes during the previous altercation--after all, if something doesn't work once, why try it again? New enemies could catch the heroes off-guard, or make it much more difficult to adjust. Or, the villain might just want to send a message about what happens when [[YouHaveFailedMe his minions aren't up to task]].

The inversion to this is MookCarryover, whereas a new BigBad uses the same {{Mook}}s {{Mooks}} or EliteMooks as the previous one.
24th Feb '16 8:56:27 AM KingZeal
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The inversion to this is MookCarryover, whereas a new BigBad uses the same {{Mook}}s or EliteMooks as the previous one.
24th Feb '16 8:54:16 AM KingZeal
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The BigBad was defeated, their forces routed, and TheHero has saved the day. Sure [[ExitVillainStageLeft they escaped]], but everyone's going to be ready when [[WeWillMeetAgain they return as promised]]. Besides, you've handled the worst they could throw at you. [[TemptingFate What could they possibly do to surprise you now?]]

But the villain comes back with an unwelcome surprise: our DangerouslyGenreSavvy villain may have been defeated last time, but [[MagnificentBastard they ain't stupid]]. It seems that all of the weak, pathetic mooks the hero(es) barged right through last time have been replaced. Possibly, by something ''much'' [[SortingAlgorithmOfEvil worse]].

Our BigBad has brought in the ReplacementMooks.

to:

The BigBad was defeated, their forces routed, and TheHero has saved the day. Sure [[ExitVillainStageLeft they escaped]], but everyone's going to be ready when [[WeWillMeetAgain they return as promised]]. Besides, you've handled the worst they could throw at you. [[TemptingFate What could they possibly do to surprise you now?]]

But the villain comes back with an unwelcome surprise: our
Our DangerouslyGenreSavvy villain BigBad may have been defeated last time, but [[MagnificentBastard they ain't stupid]]. It seems that all of the weak, pathetic mooks the hero(es) barged right through last time have been replaced. Possibly, by something ''much'' [[SortingAlgorithmOfEvil worse]].

Our BigBad has brought in the ReplacementMooks.
2nd Jan '16 1:58:48 PM nombretomado
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* Done as one of Robotnik's schemes in ''SonicTheComic'', where he basically exploits Sonic taking the games' difficulty curve for granted by transposing some of his more advanced badniks from a SonicCD level into the GreenHillZone.

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* Done as one of Robotnik's schemes in ''SonicTheComic'', ''ComicBook/SonicTheComic'', where he basically exploits Sonic taking the games' difficulty curve for granted by transposing some of his more advanced badniks from a SonicCD level into the GreenHillZone.
16th Nov '15 10:46:39 PM dmcreif
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* In ''Series/BreakingBad'', Gus kills Victor because Victor was spotted at the scene of Gale's murder by witnesses. Victor is replaced by another henchman, Tyrus Kitt.
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