History Main / RepeatingSoTheAudienceCanHear

5th Jan '17 9:26:46 PM SuperFeatherYoshi
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In ''WesternAnimation/CourageTheCowardlyDog'', Di Lung reiterates everything the Evil Empress (who only speaks in Chinese) say in English, even when they are alone.
24th Dec '16 11:48:13 AM Discar
Is there an issue? Send a Message


:: Writers for his TV appearances were not always so charitable toward the audience.
** In the 1962 war movie, ''Hell Is For Heroes'' he plays an Army clerk, who is told to keep up a running chatter on a non-existent field telephone for the benefit of the Germans listening to a concealed microphone (that the Americans have found).

to:

:: Writers for his TV appearances were not always so charitable toward the audience.
**
* In the 1962 war movie, ''Hell Is For Heroes'' he Bob Newhart plays an Army clerk, who is told to keep up a running chatter on a non-existent field telephone for the benefit of the Germans listening to a concealed microphone (that the Americans have found).


Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Castle}}'': Played straight and lampshaded. In "Deep in Death", Castle is wearing a wire for an operation, with the others listening in outside. When the show comes back from commercial, Castle recaps a conversation that happened offscreen.
-->'''Ryan:''' ...does he realize he's summarizing a conversation we just heard in its entirety?\\
'''Esposito:''' I dunno.
22nd Nov '16 9:30:17 PM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This is actually recommended as a way of enhancing language development by providing an example of how to say that particular statement 'properly'. It's especially recommended as an alternative to correcting the child's speech, because it encourages the child to talk more instead of discouraging them. Besides that, it's well documented that it is not really possible to teach a small child how to speak 'properly' by correcting mistakes. To put it more technically, language acquisition is only possible via positive stimuli. You learn a language by listening to speech in that language and establishing patterns by repetition, not by learning arbitrary and/or artificial rules. Therefore, instruction has no impact at all, including negative instruction, i.e. correcting 'errors'. In short, repeating the sentence after a child says it is the ONLY way to speed up the child's learning of a language's inner workings, as counter-intuitive as that might sound.

to:

** This is actually recommended as a way of enhancing language development by providing an example of how to say that particular statement 'properly'."properly". It's especially recommended as an alternative to correcting the child's speech, because it encourages the child to talk more instead of discouraging them. Besides that, it's well documented that it Language is not really possible too complex to teach a small child how to speak 'properly' by correcting mistakes. To put it more technically, language acquisition is mistakes, and the only possible via positive stimuli. You way to really learn a language by listening is to speech in that language and establishing learn patterns by repetition, not by learning arbitrary and/or artificial rules. Therefore, instruction has no impact at all, including negative instruction, i.e. correcting 'errors'. In short, repeating the sentence after established through repetition. Repeating what a child says it not only helps them learn to speak properly, but is the ONLY only way to truly speed up the child's learning of a language's inner workings, as counter-intuitive as that might sound.their language acquisition.
22nd Nov '16 9:15:16 PM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


--> Are you saying "snuff," Walt? What's snuff? You take a pinch of tobacco ''(starts giggling)'' and you shove it up your nose! And it makes you sneeze, huh. I imagine it would, Walt, yeah. Goldenrod seems to do it pretty well over here. It has some other uses, though. You can chew it? Or put it in a pipe. Or you can shred it up and put it on a piece of paper, and roll it up - don't tell me, Walt, don't tell me- you stick in your ear, right Walt? Oh, between your lips! Then what do you do to it? ''(Giggling)'' You set fire to it! Then what do you do, Walt? You inhale the smoke! Walt, we've been a little worried about you...[[ItWillNeverCatchOn you're gonna have a tough time getting people to stick burning leaves in their mouth]]...."

to:

--> Are you saying "snuff," Walt? What's snuff? You take a pinch of tobacco ''(starts giggling)'' and you shove it up your nose! And it makes you sneeze, huh. I imagine it would, Walt, yeah. Goldenrod seems to do it pretty well over here. It has some other uses, though. You can chew it? Or put it in a pipe. Or you can shred it up and put it on a piece of paper, and roll it up - don't tell me, Walt, don't tell me- me - you stick in your ear, right Walt? Oh, between your lips! Then what do you do to it? ''(Giggling)'' You set fire to it! Then what do you do, Walt? You inhale the smoke! Walt, we've been a little worried about you...[[ItWillNeverCatchOn you're gonna have a tough time getting people to stick burning leaves in their mouth]]...."
9th Nov '16 11:13:17 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Anything Creator/HannaBarbera uses this. ''TheFlintstones'', ''TheJetsons'', ''TopCat'', you name it. On ''WesternAnimation/DastardlyAndMuttleyInTheirFlyingMachines'', Dick Dastardly usually translates the General's phone calls in this manner. Actually averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheHairBearBunch'' episode "The Bear Who Came To Dinner." Botch calls Peevly from a pay phone at a drive-in theater to snitch on the bears, and the conversation switches scenes between the two callers.

to:

* Anything Creator/HannaBarbera uses this. ''TheFlintstones'', ''TheJetsons'', ''WesternAnimation/TheFlintstones'', ''WesternAnimation/TheJetsons'', ''TopCat'', you name it. On ''WesternAnimation/DastardlyAndMuttleyInTheirFlyingMachines'', Dick Dastardly usually translates the General's phone calls in this manner. Actually averted in ''WesternAnimation/TheHairBearBunch'' episode "The Bear Who Came To Dinner." Botch calls Peevly from a pay phone at a drive-in theater to snitch on the bears, and the conversation switches scenes between the two callers.
25th Jun '16 11:57:16 AM MrItty
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* A particularly ludicrous example occurred in the the ''Series/DoctorWho'' first season story "The Keys of Marinus." A police guard, Ayden, receives a telephone call on speakerphone. When he answers, the first thing he says is "Don't say any more, there are people here. I'll take it on the personal." He then lifts up the receiver and tells the party on the other end "Alright, go ahead." He then proceeds to repeat, aloud, everything the other person says. The scene even ends with him telling the other party "Well listen closely and I'll tell you what you may have to do", implying he is about to reveal the plot that he was concerned the "people here" would have heard the other party saying in the first place.
9th Jun '16 2:32:39 AM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* There is often one character who can understand [[Literature/{{Discworld}} The Librarian]] and who will repeat things so the reader (and other characters) understand, but sometimes he needs to resort to charades. Likewise with the Death of Rats (usually the Raven).

to:

* There In the ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' novels, there is often one character who can understand [[Literature/{{Discworld}} The Librarian]] the Librarian (who speaks no human language) and who will repeat things so the reader (and other characters) understand, but sometimes he needs to resort to charades. Likewise with the Death of Rats (usually (whose interpreter is usually the Raven).


Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheSerialMurders'', a notorious feature of the ShowWithinTheShow ''The Northern Barstows'' is that whenever something happens that the writers couldn't afford, couldn't fit, or just couldn't be bothered to show on screen, they deliver the necessary exposition by writing a scene in which Ben Barstow receives a phone call telling him all about it -- or rather, stands with a phone to his ear "repeating" the information for the benefit of the audience. "Morrie's Boom-Boom Room Hot Spot has burned down t' the ground? In a mysterious fire t' police say might well be arson? Eeh, I'm right astonished!"


Added DiffLines:

* Done in a revealingly inconsistent way in the ''Series/EnemyAtTheDoor'' episode "V for Victory". In one scene, Kluge takes a telephone report from an underling with a minimum of repetition, then immediately discusses the report with a colleague, letting the audience in on the details that way. In a later scene in the same episode, Kluge receives another telephone report with no colleagues handy, and this time the trope is played straight.
8th Jun '16 7:46:35 AM sheika
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''Manga/DetectiveConan'' used and abused of this trope. It gets pretty silly.
27th May '16 1:00:34 AM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Common in call centers, especially for stuff like numbers or a tricky spelling. The "high-risk" example" given above also applies in that many call center operators will repeat or at least paraphrase the caller's description of the issue that prompted the call. This can be useful to ensure the operator correctly understands the matter and will not waste time (especially in a call center with strict metrics for call handle times and such) attempting to solve the wrong problem.

to:

* Common in call centers, especially for stuff like numbers or a tricky spelling. The "high-risk" example" example given above also applies in that many call center operators will repeat or at least paraphrase the caller's description of the issue that prompted the call. This can be useful to ensure the operator correctly understands the matter and will not waste time (especially in a call center with strict metrics for call handle times and such) attempting to solve the wrong problem.
27th May '16 12:52:46 AM Kid
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Done in ''TheGigglerTreatment'' with baby Kayla, who can only say "Aba", but her family loves her so much they always know what she means. Much of the time whoever's talking to her will repeat what she says so the reader understands.

to:

* Done in ''TheGigglerTreatment'' ''The Giggler Treatment'' with baby Kayla, who can only say "Aba", but her family loves her so much they always know what she means. Much of the time whoever's talking to her will repeat what she says so the reader understands.
This list shows the last 10 events of 170. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RepeatingSoTheAudienceCanHear