History Main / RecycledTheSeries

1st Sep '17 8:22:30 PM scootermark
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* Probably the most successful example is ''Series/{{MASH}}''. Almost the entire ensemble was recast. Also, over the course of its run, it increasingly diverged from the irreverent tone of the [[Film/{{MASH}} movie]]. And yet, it is virtually unsurpassed in ratings. It's a prime example of AdaptationDisplacement as a result, as few remember the movie and even fewer remember the [[Literature/{{MASH}} books]].
* Coming in second, ''Series/StargateSG1'' replaced the entire cast (save for a few minor characters), but was able to leverage the implied potential of the movie's set-up with minimal retconning. It spawned two spin-offs of its own, collectively accounting for more than 300 episodes worth of content. They later reversed the process by making two DTV movies in turn [[TheMovie based off the series]].
* One of the earliest successful examples was the 1964 series ''Literature/PeytonPlace'' which was based on a 1956 novel and 1957 movie. It ran for five seasons (at one point airing three new episodes a week!) and launched the careers of Mia Farrow and Ryan O'Neal.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' is another example of the series improving on the movie, largely due to the talent and commitment of the two leads.
* ''Film/{{RoboCop 1987}}'' became a huge franchise. Aside from the two sequels and the remake, it spawned [[Series/RoboCopTheSeries a 1994 television]] adaptation which marketed the show to a younger audience, retaining the "Media Break" segments, but toning down the violence (to such a degree that [=RoboCop/Murphy=] ''never killed a single person''). There was a mini-series adaptation made in 2000 called (''Series/RoboCopPrimeDirectives''), which brought back the violence and satire of the Media Break commercials, but heaped on plenty of illogical plot twists ([=RoboCop=] hides out as a homeless man! An African-American police captain becomes the next-gen [=RoboCop=]! A neurological virus is contained in a teddy bear! [=RoboCop=] is now Alex Murphy again!) and silly acting.
** They even made an AnimatedAdaptation (see below).
* ''[[Series/{{Highlander}} Highlander: The Series]]'', which took the tack of focusing on a relative of the film franchise's hero. It did {{Retcon}} the film's ending (though for many years, a number of fans insisted that the entire series took place during an unspecified break in the action of the first film), but then, so did the other three ''Highlander'' films.
** Yes, they made an AnimatedAdaptation of this as well!
* ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' followed on from the 1953 film, taking the large time lapse as justification for introducing an entirely new set of characters.
* ''Series/FridayThe13thTheSeries'' was not based in any obvious way on the film franchise for which it was named, aside from a vague suggestion that the shop-full-of-cursed-antiques around which the show revolved was the source of Jason's iconic hockey mask.
* Similarly, ''Series/PoltergeistTheLegacy'' had little to do with the original ''Film/{{Poltergeist}}''.
* ''Series/FreddysNightmares'' was a horror GenreAnthology based on the ''Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' film series. A small number of episodes involved Freddy himself, though the character acted as narrator for the other stories.

to:

* Probably ''Series/AgentCarter'' follows the titular character after the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger''.
* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is something of one to the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, though it's not spun out of any film in particular but rather they spy agency that helps connect all of them. Unlike
most successful example is ''Series/{{MASH}}''. Almost examples here, the entire ensemble movie series continues to go on ''and'' the TV show stays in the movie continuity rather than being an alternate or retconned version, so it and the movies can and ''do'' directly affect each other: the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' serve as the first season's big plot twist, and the show's subplots are laying groundwork for [[spoiler:ComicBook/TheInhumans]] years ahead of their own movie.
* ABC tried to compete with ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' by making a TV show based on ''Film/BlueThunder''. It didn't work.
* ''Series/{{Alice 1976}}''
was recast. Also, over very loosely adapted from Creator/MartinScorsese's film ''Film/AliceDoesntLiveHereAnymore''.
* ''Series/AlienNation'' was another series that arguably improved on
the course source. Where the movie was pretty much a sci-fi/buddy-cop action flick, the series allowed much more depth to the characters, and was more of its run, it increasingly diverged a social commentary than a shoot-em-up. The series made some slight continuity changes from the irreverent tone movie, making the aliens' anatomy more human (to allow less elaborate prosthetic makeup, though it was still considerable) and ignoring the mutagenic drug that was important to the film's climax. It also changed the spelling of the [[Film/{{MASH}} movie]]. And yet, human lead's last name, from Sikes to Sykes. Otherwise, it is virtually unsurpassed in ratings. It's a prime example of AdaptationDisplacement as a result, as few remember kept consistent with the movie and even fewer remember the [[Literature/{{MASH}} books]].
* Coming in second, ''Series/StargateSG1'' replaced the entire cast (save for a few minor characters), but was able to leverage the implied potential of the movie's set-up with minimal retconning. It spawned two spin-offs of its own, collectively accounting for more than 300 episodes worth of content. They later reversed the process by making two DTV movies in turn [[TheMovie based off the series]].
* One of the earliest successful examples was the 1964 series ''Literature/PeytonPlace'' which was based on a 1956 novel and 1957 movie. It ran for five seasons (at one point airing three new episodes a week!) and launched the careers of Mia Farrow and Ryan O'Neal.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' is another example of the series improving on the movie, largely due to the talent and commitment of the two leads.
* ''Film/{{RoboCop 1987}}'' became a huge franchise. Aside
incorporated footage from the two sequels and movie as a flashback in its pilot episode.
* Amazingly, someone thought ''Film/AnimalHouse'' would make a good TV series;
the remake, it spawned [[Series/RoboCopTheSeries a 1994 television]] adaptation which marketed the show to a younger audience, retaining the "Media Break" segments, but toning down the violence (to such a degree extremely short run of ''Delta House'' predictably proved that [=RoboCop/Murphy=] ''never killed a single person''). There was a mini-series adaptation made in 2000 called (''Series/RoboCopPrimeDirectives''), which brought back the violence and satire of the Media Break commercials, but heaped on plenty of illogical plot twists ([=RoboCop=] hides out as a homeless man! An African-American police captain becomes the next-gen [=RoboCop=]! A neurological virus is contained in a teddy bear! [=RoboCop=] is now Alex Murphy again!) and silly acting.
** They even made an AnimatedAdaptation (see below).
to be wrong.
* ''[[Series/{{Highlander}} Highlander: The Series]]'', which took the tack of focusing on a relative of the film franchise's hero. It did {{Retcon}} the film's ending (though for many years, a number of fans insisted that the entire Syndicated series took place during an unspecified break in ''Are We There Yet?'' follows the action continuing adventures of the first film), but then, so did the other three ''Highlander'' films.
** Yes, they made an AnimatedAdaptation of this as well!
* ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' followed on from the 1953 film, taking the large time lapse as justification for introducing an entirely new set of characters.
* ''Series/FridayThe13thTheSeries'' was not based
characters introduced in any obvious way on the film franchise for which it was named, aside from a vague suggestion that the shop-full-of-cursed-antiques around which the show revolved was the source of Jason's iconic hockey mask.
* Similarly, ''Series/PoltergeistTheLegacy'' had little to do with the original ''Film/{{Poltergeist}}''.
* ''Series/FreddysNightmares'' was a horror GenreAnthology based on the ''Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' film series. A small number of episodes involved Freddy himself, though the character acted as narrator for the other stories.
Ice Cube's family-friendly vehicle ''Film/AreWeThereYet'' and its sequel, ''Are We Done Yet?''



* ''Film/TheBadNewsBears'' had an unsuccessful sitcom adaptation in 1980.
* ''Film/TheBeastmaster'' was released in 1982. [[Series/{{Beastmaster}} Beastmaster: The Series]] first aired in 1999, and featured Marc Singer (who starred in the movie) as a recurring guest star in the third season.



* ''[[Series/YoungIndianaJones The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles]]''
* ''Series/HoneyIShrunkTheKids'' supposedly takes place after the first movie, though it has [[TheOtherDarrin different appearances for the characters, especially Amy and Quark]], and [[AlternateContinuity ignoring most of the continuities of the movies]] save for the shrink ray, which was downplayed after the second season until the SeriesFinale in the third.
* ''Series/VoyageToTheBottomOfTheSea''
* ''Series/{{Fame}}'', a TV show based on a movie. Followed later by a musical play. And a remake of the film. And a reality show.
* ''Series/InTheHeatOfTheNight'', the TV series, picks up twenty years after [[Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight the movie]] with a married Virgil Tibbs moving to Sparta and signing on as Chief of [nonexistent] Detectives. It's the 'New South', and everyone's anxious to seem racially progressive... except, initially at least, Gillespie. Also, of course, several dozen bad guys. Ran six seasons; despite the AdaptationDecay inherent in translating racial politics from film to TV, it was kept interesting by brilliant casting choices Carroll O'Connor and Howard Rollins.
* ''Franchise/PlanetOfTheApes''
** The 1968 movie has a live-action series that lasted only a single season in 1974, which more or less followed the same premise as the original film.
** There was also an AnimatedAdaptation dubbed ''Return to the Planet of the Apes'', in which the ape civilization depicted in the series was more advanced than its live-action counterparts. (Ironically, this is the only adaptation that comes close to the simian world as shown in Pierre Boulle's original novel!)
* ''Film/TheMagnificentSeven'' became a [[Series/TheMagnificentSeven TV series]] in 1998, ''thirty-eight'' years after the movie.
* Although ''Franchise/StarTrek'' was a series before it became TheMovie, the many SpinOff series often took advantage of all the extra stuff from the films by recycling special effects, uniforms, and sets.
* ''The Paper Chase'', which ran for one year on network TV, then was later picked up on pay cable (one of the first such series) for an additional two years. The series was less brooding in tone than [[Film/ThePaperChase the movie]], and allowed much greater character development, while also exploring some complex legal topics.
* ''Series/AlienNation'' was another series that arguably improved on the source. Where the movie was pretty much a sci-fi/buddy-cop action flick, the series allowed much more depth to the characters, and was more of a social commentary than a shoot-em-up. The series made some slight continuity changes from the movie, making the aliens' anatomy more human (to allow less elaborate prosthetic makeup, though it was still considerable) and ignoring the mutagenic drug that was important to the film's climax. It also changed the spelling of the human lead's last name, from Sikes to Sykes. Otherwise, it kept consistent with the movie and even incorporated footage from the movie as a flashback in its pilot episode.
* Amazingly, someone thought ''Film/AnimalHouse'' would make a good TV series; the extremely short run of ''Delta House'' predictably proved that to be wrong.
* Classic movies that spawned justifiably forgotten TV series include ''Film/{{Shane}}'', ''Film/TheThinMan'' and ''Film/TheThirdMan''.
* A ''Series/{{Topper}}'' series aired from 1953 to 1955, using the first film's premise.
* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'' spun off the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' movies, and specifically movies [[Film/TheTerminator 1]] and [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay 2]], [[CanonDisContinuity ignoring or even deliberately undoing points]] of [[Film/Terminator3RiseOfTheMachines 3]].
* A strange borderline case is ''That's Hollywood'', which is a sort-of spinoff of the ''[[ClipShow That's Entertainment]]'' movies. The executive producer came from the film and the film and show had similar subject matter and titles, but ''That's Hollywood'' came from 20th Century Fox instead of MGM. Not to mention that this is a rare case where a ''documentary'' spun off a TV series this way.

to:

* ''[[Series/YoungIndianaJones The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles]]''
* ''Series/HoneyIShrunkTheKids'' supposedly takes place after the first movie, though it has [[TheOtherDarrin different appearances for the characters, especially Amy and Quark]], and [[AlternateContinuity ignoring most of the continuities of the movies]] save for the shrink ray, which
In 1975 ''Film/BlazingSaddles'' was downplayed after the second season until the SeriesFinale in the third.
* ''Series/VoyageToTheBottomOfTheSea''
* ''Series/{{Fame}}'',
made into a TV show based on a movie. Followed later pilot, ''Black Bart,'' written by a musical play. And a remake of the film. And a reality show.
* ''Series/InTheHeatOfTheNight'', the TV series, picks up twenty years after [[Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight the movie]] with a married Virgil Tibbs moving to Sparta and signing on as Chief of [nonexistent] Detectives. It's the 'New South', and everyone's anxious to seem racially progressive... except, initially at least, Gillespie. Also, of course, several dozen bad guys. Ran six seasons; despite the AdaptationDecay inherent in translating racial politics from film to TV, it was kept interesting by brilliant casting choices Carroll O'Connor and Howard Rollins.
* ''Franchise/PlanetOfTheApes''
** The 1968 movie has a live-action series that lasted only a single season in 1974, which more or less followed the same premise as the original film.
** There was also an AnimatedAdaptation dubbed ''Return to the Planet of the Apes'', in which the ape civilization depicted in the series was more advanced than its live-action counterparts. (Ironically, this is the only adaptation that comes close to the simian world as shown in Pierre Boulle's original novel!)
* ''Film/TheMagnificentSeven'' became a [[Series/TheMagnificentSeven TV series]] in 1998, ''thirty-eight'' years after the movie.
* Although ''Franchise/StarTrek'' was a series before it became TheMovie, the many SpinOff series often took advantage of all the extra stuff from the films by recycling special effects, uniforms, and sets.
* ''The Paper Chase'', which ran for one year on network TV, then was later picked up on pay cable (one of the first such series) for an additional two years. The series was less brooding in tone than [[Film/ThePaperChase the movie]], and allowed much greater character development, while also exploring some complex legal topics.
* ''Series/AlienNation'' was another series that arguably improved on the source. Where the movie was pretty much a sci-fi/buddy-cop action flick, the series allowed much more depth to the characters, and was more of a social commentary than a shoot-em-up. The series made some slight continuity changes from the movie, making the aliens' anatomy more human (to allow less elaborate prosthetic makeup, though it was still considerable) and ignoring the mutagenic drug that was important to
the film's climax. screenwriter Andrew Bergman. It also changed the spelling of the human lead's last name, from Sikes to Sykes. Otherwise, was never picked up as a series, but it kept consistent with was aired on April 4, 1975, and appears on the movie DVD -- it had Louis Gossett, Jr. as Bart (with a moustache for some reason), and even incorporated footage from Steve Landesberg replaced Gene Wilder as his drunkard sidekick, a former Confederate officer named "Reb" Jordan. Other characters are [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute replaced]], and the movie as a flashback in its pilot episode.
* Amazingly, someone thought ''Film/AnimalHouse'' would make a good TV series;
script completely lacks the extremely short run of ''Delta House'' predictably proved that to be wrong.
* Classic movies that spawned justifiably forgotten TV series include ''Film/{{Shane}}'', ''Film/TheThinMan''
spoofing and ''Film/TheThirdMan''.
* A ''Series/{{Topper}}'' series aired from 1953 to 1955, using
humour style of the first film's premise.
* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles''
film it spun off the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' movies, and specifically movies [[Film/TheTerminator 1]] and [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay 2]], [[CanonDisContinuity ignoring or even deliberately undoing points]] of [[Film/Terminator3RiseOfTheMachines 3]].
* A strange borderline case is ''That's Hollywood'', which is a sort-of spinoff of the ''[[ClipShow That's Entertainment]]'' movies. The executive producer came from the film and the film and show had similar subject matter and titles, but ''That's Hollywood'' came from 20th Century Fox instead of MGM. Not to mention that this is a rare case where a ''documentary'' spun off a TV series this way.
from.



* ''Series/WeirdScience'' - A 90s teen comedy series based on [[Film/WeirdScience the 80s movie]]. It even used the Music/OingoBoingo song "Weird Science" from the original film as its theme song.
* ''Private Benjamin'' ran for three seasons, but was cut short in part due to Elieen Brennan's injuries in a car accident.
* ''Film/{{Parenthood}}'' was made into two different TV series (1990, and 2010) with different characters, but a similar concept.
* ''Literature/LogansRun'', the novel, was adapted as ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074812/ Logan's Run]]'', [[Film/LogansRun the movie]], which was later remade as ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075527/ Logan's Run]]'', [[Series/LogansRun the series]]. The series followed the same basic SternChase plot as ''Series/TheFugitive'', ''Series/KungFu'' and ''Series/TheIncredibleHulk'': The heroes take it on the lam (from the City of Domes), pursued by an obsessive hunter (Francis 7). Each week, they encounter a new town with its own set of troubles, sort things out, then leave before their pursuers can catch up.
* In 1975 ''Film/BlazingSaddles'' was made into a TV pilot, ''Black Bart,'' written by the film's screenwriter Andrew Bergman. It was never picked up as a series, but it was aired on April 4, 1975, and appears on the movie DVD -- it had Louis Gossett, Jr. as Bart (with a moustache for some reason), and Steve Landesberg replaced Gene Wilder as his drunkard sidekick, a former Confederate officer named "Reb" Jordan. Other characters are [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute replaced]], and the script completely lacks the spoofing and humour style of the film it spun off from.
* ''Crash'', the series. Besides the setting, general theme, name, and producer, it had little to do with the film. It received a mixed reception from critics and ran for two seasons before going on hiatus following the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] of its star, Dennis Hopper.
* ''The Courtship of Eddie's Father''

to:

* ''Series/WeirdScience'' - A 90s teen comedy ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' is an unusual example, in that the [[Film/BuffyTheVampireSlayer 1992 movie]] wasn't all that popular. The script writer, Creator/JossWhedon, [[ExecutiveMeddling didn't think the final product matched his original vision]], so he jumped at the chance to remake it as a TV series based on [[Film/WeirdScience the 80s movie]]. It even used the Music/OingoBoingo song "Weird Science" from in 1996. The TV-series is a sequel to the original film movie script, ignoring the changes made that resulted in the final product. He later made a comic of the version of the movie's events considered canon in the series.
* ''Film/{{Casablanca}}'' had [[http://www.vincasa.com/indextvseries.html two forgotten television adaptions]], both {{prequels}}. One, from the 1950s, aired
as its theme song.
* ''Private Benjamin'' ran for three seasons, but was cut short in
part due to Elieen Brennan's injuries in of a car accident.
* ''Film/{{Parenthood}}''
WheelProgram. [[Series/{{Casablanca}} The other]], from the 1980s, was made into two different TV a standalone series (1990, and 2010) with different characters, but a similar concept.
* ''Literature/LogansRun'', the novel, was adapted as ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074812/ Logan's Run]]'', [[Film/LogansRun the movie]],
which was later remade as ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075527/ Logan's Run]]'', [[Series/LogansRun the series]]. The series followed the same basic SternChase plot as ''Series/TheFugitive'', ''Series/KungFu'' and ''Series/TheIncredibleHulk'': The heroes take it on the lam (from the City of Domes), pursued by an obsessive hunter (Francis 7). Each week, they encounter a new town with its own set of troubles, sort things out, then leave before their pursuers can catch up.
* In 1975 ''Film/BlazingSaddles'' was made into a TV pilot, ''Black Bart,'' written by the film's screenwriter Andrew Bergman. It was never picked up as a series, but it was aired on April 4, 1975, and appears on the movie DVD -- it had Louis Gossett, Jr. as Bart (with a moustache for some reason), and Steve Landesberg replaced Gene Wilder as his drunkard sidekick, a former Confederate officer named "Reb" Jordan. Other characters are [[SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute replaced]], and the script completely lacks the spoofing and humour style of the film it spun off from.
* ''Crash'', the series. Besides the setting, general theme, name, and producer, it had little to do with the film. It received a mixed reception from critics and ran for two seasons before going on hiatus following the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] of its star, Dennis Hopper.
* ''The Courtship of Eddie's Father''
only lasted five episodes.



* ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh'', another Amy Heckerling high school film (see above), was turned into a forgettable short-lived series that was stripped of all the R-rated content that made the film a classic.
* ''Film/{{Casablanca}}'' had [[http://www.vincasa.com/indextvseries.html two forgotten television adaptions]], both {{prequels}}. One, from the 1950s, aired as part of a WheelProgram. [[Series/{{Casablanca}} The other]], from the 1980s, was a standalone series which only lasted five episodes.

to:

* ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh'', another Amy Heckerling high school film (see above), ''The Courtship of Eddie's Father''
* ''Crash'', the series. Besides the setting, general theme, name, and producer, it had little to do with the film. It received a mixed reception from critics and ran for two seasons before going on hiatus following the [[AuthorExistenceFailure death]] of its star, Dennis Hopper.
* ''Series/TheCrowStairwayToHeaven'', a LighterAndSofter series based on the first movie.
* ''Film/DearWhitePeople''
was turned made into a forgettable short-lived Netflix series in 2017, which is more or less a direct sequel to the events of the movie.

* The 1982 comedy ''Film/{{Diner}}'' was made into a pilot the following year
that was stripped of all the R-rated content that made the film a classic.
* ''Film/{{Casablanca}}'' had [[http://www.vincasa.com/indextvseries.html two forgotten television adaptions]], both {{prequels}}. One, from the 1950s,
aired as part of on CBS but wasn't made into a WheelProgram. [[Series/{{Casablanca}} The other]], from series. Creator/BarryLevinson directed both, but Paul Reiser was the 1980s, was a standalone series which only lasted five episodes.cast member in both.



* ''Film/LockStockAndTwoSmokingBarrels'' had a surprisingly good but short-lived spin-off series of hour-long episodes.
* ''Franchise/TheWitchesOfEastwick'', released in 1987 (and based on a novel), became a TV series called ''Series/{{Eastwick}}''. Interestingly, one of the actresses from the original movie is in the series as someone entirely different. This was the third attempt to adapt it to television, lasting half a season while the previous never moved beyond pilot.
* ''Mama'', based on ''Film/IRememberMama'', was an early (1949-1957) television example. It was actually the first show to be cancelled and then revived in response to a deluge of viewer mail.
* There was a short-lived spinoff of ''Film/MyBigFatGreekWedding'' called ''MyBigFatGreekLife'', starring many of the same actors and following the lives of the main characters after the wedding.
* ''Series/TheCrowStairwayToHeaven'', a LighterAndSofter series based on the first movie.

to:

* ''Film/LockStockAndTwoSmokingBarrels'' had a surprisingly good but short-lived spin-off series Kind of hour-long episodes.
* ''Franchise/TheWitchesOfEastwick'', released in 1987 (and based on a novel), became a TV series called ''Series/{{Eastwick}}''. Interestingly, one of the actresses from the original movie is in the series as someone entirely different. This was the third attempt to adapt it to television, lasting half a season while the previous never moved beyond pilot.
* ''Mama'', based on ''Film/IRememberMama'', was
an early (1949-1957) television odd example. It A character, played by Martin Clunes appeared in a film ''Saving Grace'' and later two prequel miniseries. In making ''Series/DocMartin'', the character was actually given a ReTool with DoctorJerk added to the first show to be cancelled character (who was originally just a FishOutOfWater), and then revived in response to a deluge of viewer mail.
* There
his last name was a short-lived spinoff of ''Film/MyBigFatGreekWedding'' called ''MyBigFatGreekLife'', starring many changed to Ellingham (an [[SignificantAnagram anagram]] of the same actors and following the lives last name of the main characters after the wedding.
* ''Series/TheCrowStairwayToHeaven'', a LighterAndSofter series based on the first movie.
show's writer Dominic Minghella).



* In 1966, ''Film/{{Shane}}'' got turned into a TV series. Because David Carradine is the natural substitute for Creator/AlanLadd.
* One whole ''decade'' after the movie's premiere, ABC Family decided to recycle ''Film/TenThingsIHateAboutYou'' as a sitcom, with a completely new cast (except for the main characters' father). The series was decently well-received by critics, but was canceled after the first season.
* ''Film/TheBeastmaster'' was released in 1982. [[Series/{{Beastmaster}} Beastmaster: The Series]] first aired in 1999, and featured Marc Singer (who starred in the movie) as a recurring guest star in the third season.
* Creator/{{NBC}}'s ''Series/{{Outsourced}}'' is an adaptation of [[Film/{{Outsourced}} a film of the same name]] which [[AdaptationDisplacement you've never heard of]].
* ''Film/{{Westworld}}'' had a critically acclaimed but short-lived TV series called ''Beyond Westworld'' which explored more deeply the issues raised in the first film (and [[CanonDisContinuity ignored the sequel]]).
* ''Series/TheManyLovesOfDobieGillis'', based on short stories by Max Shulman which had also been adapted into the 1953 musical comedy film ''The Affairs of Dobie Gillis''.
* ''Film/TheManWhoFellToEarth'' was remade as a MadeForTVMovie in 1987 (both the original novel and screenplay were credited) -- it was intended as a pilot for a series and, among other alterations, completely changed the ending to set one up.
* The 1982 comedy ''Film/{{Diner}}'' was made into a pilot the following year that aired on CBS but wasn't made into a series. Creator/BarryLevinson directed both, but Paul Reiser was the only cast member in both.
* ''Theatre/TheKingAndI'' has the short-lived 1970s sitcom ''Anna and the King'', not to be confused with [[Film/AnnaAndTheKing the 1999 movie of the same name]]. Featuring an American Anna (played by [[FakeAmerican British]] Samantha Eggar) and none of the Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein music, this didn't have much to do with ''The King And I'', other than the basic premise, Creator/YulBrynner reprising his role as King Mongkut, and the occasional recycling of dresses and jewelry from the movie.

to:

* In 1966, ''Film/{{Shane}}'' got turned into ''Series/{{Fame}}'', a TV series. Because David Carradine is the natural substitute for Creator/AlanLadd.
* One whole ''decade'' after the movie's premiere, ABC Family decided to recycle ''Film/TenThingsIHateAboutYou'' as a sitcom, with a completely new cast (except for the main characters' father). The series was decently well-received by critics, but was canceled after the first season.
* ''Film/TheBeastmaster'' was released in 1982. [[Series/{{Beastmaster}} Beastmaster: The Series]] first aired in 1999, and featured Marc Singer (who starred in the movie) as a recurring guest star in the third season.
* Creator/{{NBC}}'s ''Series/{{Outsourced}}'' is an adaptation of [[Film/{{Outsourced}} a film of the same name]] which [[AdaptationDisplacement you've never heard of]].
* ''Film/{{Westworld}}'' had a critically acclaimed but short-lived TV series called ''Beyond Westworld'' which explored more deeply the issues raised in the first film (and [[CanonDisContinuity ignored the sequel]]).
* ''Series/TheManyLovesOfDobieGillis'',
show based on short stories a movie. Followed later by Max Shulman which had also been adapted into the 1953 a musical comedy film ''The Affairs of Dobie Gillis''.
* ''Film/TheManWhoFellToEarth'' was remade as
play. And a MadeForTVMovie in 1987 (both the original novel and screenplay were credited) -- it was intended as a pilot for a series and, among other alterations, completely changed the ending to set one up.
* The 1982 comedy ''Film/{{Diner}}'' was made into a pilot the following year that aired on CBS but wasn't made into a series. Creator/BarryLevinson directed both, but Paul Reiser was the only cast member in both.
* ''Theatre/TheKingAndI'' has the short-lived 1970s sitcom ''Anna and the King'', not to be confused with [[Film/AnnaAndTheKing the 1999 movie
remake of the same name]]. Featuring an American Anna (played by [[FakeAmerican British]] Samantha Eggar) and none of the Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein music, this didn't have much to do with ''The King film. And I'', other than the basic premise, Creator/YulBrynner reprising his role as King Mongkut, and the occasional recycling of dresses and jewelry from the movie.a reality show.



* There's several planned film-to-screen adaptations that never got past the {{Pilot}}:
** There was a live-action ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' sitcom commissioned by Disney (who owned the film's distributor, Miramax) in 1995. In attempt to attract family viewers, the show's tone was [[GenreShift markedly different from the film's]] and starred Jim Breuer as Randall. Attempts by Creator/KevinSmith and original stars Brian O'Halloran and Jeff Anderson to be involved with the project were shot down (Smith's script idea was rejected and O'Halloran and Anderson auditioned for the part of Dante, as Jim Breuer was already given the Randall part) and the show never survived past the pilot anyway. The later, Smith-approved [[WesternAnimation/ClerksTheAnimatedSeries animated series]] did better, in that it actually made it to air.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/True_Grit:_A_Further_Adventure True Grit: A Further Adventure]].
** There was an attempt to make ''Mr. and Mrs. Smith'' into a TV series. It wasn't ordered to series.
** There was a pilot for an Film/LAConfidential series, with Creator/KieferSutherland in the Creator/KevinSpacey role. (Sutherland's IMDB page lists it as 2003, but considering he was already doing ''Series/TwentyFour'' by then it was presumably made well before that.)
** There was an unsold pilot for a ''Literature/CatchTwentyTwo'' series starring Richard Dreyfuss as Yossarian.
* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' is an unusual example, in that the [[Film/BuffyTheVampireSlayer 1992 movie]] wasn't all that popular. The script writer, Creator/JossWhedon, [[ExecutiveMeddling didn't think the final product matched his original vision]], so he jumped at the chance to remake it as a TV series in 1996. The TV-series is a sequel to the original movie script, ignoring the changes made that resulted in the final product. He later made a comic of the version of the movie's events considered canon in the series.



* The 1997 movie ''Kiss Me, Guido'', about a gay man renting out his spare room to a straight Italian man (hence the "guido") actually started life as a rejected sitcom pilot in 1991, becoming a stageplay along the way. It finally became the very short-lived sitcom ''Some of My Best Friends'' with Jason Bateman and Danny Nucci in 2001.

to:

* The 1997 Discussed in one episode of ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', where Crow ponders if the movie ''Kiss Me, Guido'', about they just saw, ''Film/TheFinalSacrifice'', would work better as a gay man renting weekly series. He acts it out his spare room with Mike, who takes the role of the executive hearing the pitch and starts meddling with the idea.
* ''Series/ForeverKnight'' was based off a made-for-tv film called ''Nick Knight''. The script was rewritten for the pilot,with a few changes. The setting changed to Toronto, Nick moved from a theater
to a straight Italian man (hence converted warehouse loft,the vampires were made older and more backstory added,and the "guido") actually started life as a rejected sitcom pilot in 1991, becoming a stageplay along the way. It finally male coroner became a female,likely for more sexual tension. Most of the very short-lived sitcom ''Some cast was replaced,but Don Kapelos kept the role of My Best Friends'' with Jason Bateman and Danny Nucci in 2001.Don Schanke. Also,Nick's '59 Cadillac became a '63 one.
* ''Series/FreddysNightmares'' was a horror GenreAnthology based on the ''Franchise/ANightmareOnElmStreet'' film series. A small number of episodes involved Freddy himself, though the character acted as narrator for the other stories.



* ''Film/{{Timecop}}'' spawned ''Series/{{Timecop}}'' a series which aired for nine episodes.
* Although it wasn't directly based on a movie, Aaron Sorkin drew inspiration for his series ''Series/TheWestWing'' from his film ''Film/TheAmericanPresident''. ''Series/TheWestWing'' went on to run for seven critically acclaimed years and win ''nineteen'' Emmys.
* Film/{{Tremors}} [[TitleTheAdaptation The Series]] based off the cult classic films. Only had two original cast members and introduced a government lab where [[MonsterOfTheWeek all kinds of creatures]] could appear from. The series was cancelled half way through its first season despite being one of the Sci-Fi Channels highest rated series.
* ''Series/ForeverKnight'' was based off a made-for-tv film called ''Nick Knight''. The script was rewritten for the pilot,with a few changes. The setting changed to Toronto, Nick moved from a theater to a converted warehouse loft,the vampires were made older and more backstory added,and the male coroner became a female,likely for more sexual tension. Most of the cast was replaced,but Don Kapelos kept the role of Don Schanke. Also,Nick's '59 Cadillac became a '63 one.
* Kind of an odd example. A character, played by Martin Clunes appeared in a film ''Saving Grace'' and later two prequel miniseries. In making ''Series/DocMartin'', the character was given a ReTool with DoctorJerk added to the character (who was originally just a FishOutOfWater), and his last name was changed to Ellingham (an [[SignificantAnagram anagram]] of the last name of the show's writer Dominic Minghella).

to:

* ''Film/{{Timecop}}'' spawned ''Series/{{Timecop}}'' a series ''Series/FridayThe13thTheSeries'' was not based in any obvious way on the film franchise for which aired for nine episodes.
* Although
it wasn't directly based on a movie, Aaron Sorkin drew inspiration for his series ''Series/TheWestWing'' from his film ''Film/TheAmericanPresident''. ''Series/TheWestWing'' went on to run for seven critically acclaimed years and win ''nineteen'' Emmys.
* Film/{{Tremors}} [[TitleTheAdaptation The Series]] based off the cult classic films. Only had two original cast members and introduced a government lab where [[MonsterOfTheWeek all kinds of creatures]] could appear from. The series
was cancelled half way through its first season despite being one of the Sci-Fi Channels highest rated series.
* ''Series/ForeverKnight'' was based off a made-for-tv film called ''Nick Knight''. The script was rewritten for the pilot,with a few changes. The setting changed to Toronto, Nick moved
named, aside from a theater to a converted warehouse loft,the vampires were made older and more backstory added,and vague suggestion that the male coroner became a female,likely for more sexual tension. Most of shop-full-of-cursed-antiques around which the cast show revolved was replaced,but Don Kapelos kept the role source of Don Schanke. Also,Nick's '59 Cadillac became a '63 one.
* Kind of an odd example. A character, played by Martin Clunes appeared in a film ''Saving Grace'' and later two prequel miniseries. In making ''Series/DocMartin'', the character was given a ReTool with DoctorJerk added to the character (who was originally just a FishOutOfWater), and his last name was changed to Ellingham (an [[SignificantAnagram anagram]] of the last name of the show's writer Dominic Minghella).
Jason's iconic hockey mask.



* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is something of one to the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, though it's not spun out of any film in particular but rather they spy agency that helps connect all of them. Unlike most examples here, the movie series continues to go on ''and'' the TV show stays in the movie continuity rather than being an alternate or retconned version, so it and the movies can and ''do'' directly affect each other: the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' serve as the first season's big plot twist, and the show's subplots are laying groundwork for [[spoiler:ComicBook/TheInhumans]] years ahead of their own movie.
* ''Series/AgentCarter'' follows the titular character after the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger''.
* ''Film/{{Starman}}'' had a short-lived and completely forgotten, but actually not terrible, series starring [[Film/{{Airplane}} Robert Hays]]. Conversion to a series required retconning the one-use magic gum-ball-sized metal spheres so that there was one re-usable sphere, passed on to the alien's son, and the alien brought another with him when he returned to help his progeny.
* ABC tried to compete with ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' by making a TV show based on ''Film/BlueThunder''. It didn't work.
* Syndicated series ''Are We There Yet?'' follows the continuing adventures of characters introduced in Ice Cube's family-friendly vehicle ''Film/AreWeThereYet'' and its sequel, ''Are We Done Yet?''

to:

* ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'' is something of one to ''[[Series/{{Highlander}} Highlander: The Series]]'', which took the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, though it's not spun out tack of any focusing on a relative of the film in particular but rather they spy agency franchise's hero. It did {{Retcon}} the film's ending (though for many years, a number of fans insisted that helps connect all of them. Unlike most examples here, the movie entire series continues to go on ''and'' the TV show stays took place during an unspecified break in the movie continuity rather than being an alternate or retconned version, so it and the movies can and ''do'' directly affect each other: the events action of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' serve as the first season's big plot twist, and film), but then, so did the show's subplots are laying groundwork for [[spoiler:ComicBook/TheInhumans]] years ahead other three ''Highlander'' films.
** Yes, they made an AnimatedAdaptation
of their own movie.
this as well!
* ''Series/AgentCarter'' follows the titular character ''Series/HoneyIShrunkTheKids'' supposedly takes place after the events of ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger''.
* ''Film/{{Starman}}'' had a short-lived
first movie, though it has [[TheOtherDarrin different appearances for the characters, especially Amy and completely forgotten, but actually not terrible, series starring [[Film/{{Airplane}} Robert Hays]]. Conversion to a series required retconning Quark]], and [[AlternateContinuity ignoring most of the one-use magic gum-ball-sized metal spheres so that there continuities of the movies]] save for the shrink ray, which was one re-usable sphere, passed on to downplayed after the alien's son, and second season until the alien brought another with him when he returned to help his progeny.
* ABC tried to compete with ''Series/{{Airwolf}}'' by making a TV show based on ''Film/BlueThunder''. It didn't work.
* Syndicated series ''Are We There Yet?'' follows
SeriesFinale in the continuing adventures of characters introduced in Ice Cube's family-friendly vehicle ''Film/AreWeThereYet'' and its sequel, ''Are We Done Yet?''third.



* ''Film/TheBadNewsBears'' had an unsuccessful sitcom adaptation in 1980.
* Discussed in one episode of ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', where Crow ponders if the movie they just saw, ''Film/TheFinalSacrifice'', would work better as a weekly series. He acts it out with Mike, who takes the role of the executive hearing the pitch and starts meddling with the idea.

to:

* ''Film/TheBadNewsBears'' had an unsuccessful ''Series/InTheHeatOfTheNight'', the TV series, picks up twenty years after [[Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight the movie]] with a married Virgil Tibbs moving to Sparta and signing on as Chief of [nonexistent] Detectives. It's the 'New South', and everyone's anxious to seem racially progressive... except, initially at least, Gillespie. Also, of course, several dozen bad guys. Ran six seasons; despite the AdaptationDecay inherent in translating racial politics from film to TV, it was kept interesting by brilliant casting choices Carroll O'Connor and Howard Rollins.
* ''Theatre/TheKingAndI'' has the short-lived 1970s
sitcom adaptation ''Anna and the King'', not to be confused with [[Film/AnnaAndTheKing the 1999 movie of the same name]]. Featuring an American Anna (played by [[FakeAmerican British]] Samantha Eggar) and none of the Creator/RodgersAndHammerstein music, this didn't have much to do with ''The King And I'', other than the basic premise, Creator/YulBrynner reprising his role as King Mongkut, and the occasional recycling of dresses and jewelry from the movie.
* The 1997 movie ''Kiss Me, Guido'', about a gay man renting out his spare room to a straight Italian man (hence the "guido") actually started life as a rejected sitcom pilot
in 1980.
* Discussed
1991, becoming a stageplay along the way. It finally became the very short-lived sitcom ''Some of My Best Friends'' with Jason Bateman and Danny Nucci in 2001.
* ''Film/LockStockAndTwoSmokingBarrels'' had a surprisingly good but short-lived spin-off series of hour-long episodes.
* ''Literature/LogansRun'', the novel, was adapted as ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0074812/ Logan's Run]]'', [[Film/LogansRun the movie]], which was later remade as ''[[http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075527/ Logan's Run]]'', [[Series/LogansRun the series]]. The series followed the same basic SternChase plot as ''Series/TheFugitive'', ''Series/KungFu'' and ''Series/TheIncredibleHulk'': The heroes take it on the lam (from the City of Domes), pursued by an obsessive hunter (Francis 7). Each week, they encounter a new town with its own set of troubles, sort things out, then leave before their pursuers can catch up.
* ''Mama'', based on ''Film/IRememberMama'', was an early (1949-1957) television example. It was actually the first show to be cancelled and then revived in response to a deluge of viewer mail.
* ''Film/TheManWhoFellToEarth'' was remade as a MadeForTVMovie in 1987 (both the original novel and screenplay were credited) -- it was intended as a pilot for a series and, among other alterations, completely changed the ending to set
one episode up.
* ''Series/TheManyLovesOfDobieGillis'', based on short stories by Max Shulman which had also been adapted into the 1953 musical comedy film ''The Affairs
of ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'', where Crow ponders if Dobie Gillis''.
* Probably the most successful example is ''Series/{{MASH}}''. Almost the entire ensemble was recast. Also, over the course of its run, it increasingly diverged from the irreverent tone of the [[Film/{{MASH}} movie]]. And yet, it is virtually unsurpassed in ratings. It's a prime example of AdaptationDisplacement as a result, as few remember
the movie they just saw, ''Film/TheFinalSacrifice'', would work better as a weekly series. He acts it out with Mike, who takes and even fewer remember the role of the executive hearing the pitch and starts meddling with the idea.[[Literature/{{MASH}} books]].



* ''Series/{{Alice 1976}}'' was very loosely adapted from Creator/MartinScorsese's film ''Film/AliceDoesntLiveHereAnymore''.
* ''Film/DearWhitePeople'' was made into a Netflix series in 2017, which is more or less a direct sequel to the events of the movie.

to:

* ''Series/{{Alice 1976}}'' There was very loosely adapted from Creator/MartinScorsese's a short-lived spinoff of ''Film/MyBigFatGreekWedding'' called ''MyBigFatGreekLife'', starring many of the same actors and following the lives of the main characters after the wedding.
* ''Theatre/TheOddCouple'' is another example of the series improving on the movie, largely due to the talent and commitment of the two leads.
* Creator/{{NBC}}'s ''Series/{{Outsourced}}'' is an adaptation of [[Film/{{Outsourced}} a
film ''Film/AliceDoesntLiveHereAnymore''.
of the same name]] which [[AdaptationDisplacement you've never heard of]].
* ''Film/DearWhitePeople'' ''The Paper Chase'', which ran for one year on network TV, then was later picked up on pay cable (one of the first such series) for an additional two years. The series was less brooding in tone than [[Film/ThePaperChase the movie]], and allowed much greater character development, while also exploring some complex legal topics.
* ''Film/{{Parenthood}}''
was made into a Netflix two different TV series in 2017, (1990, and 2010) with different characters, but a similar concept.
* One of the earliest successful examples was the 1964 series ''Literature/PeytonPlace''
which is was based on a 1956 novel and 1957 movie. It ran for five seasons (at one point airing three new episodes a week!) and launched the careers of Mia Farrow and Ryan O'Neal.
* ''Franchise/PlanetOfTheApes''
** The 1968 movie has a live-action series that lasted only a single season in 1974, which
more or less a direct sequel followed the same premise as the original film.
** There was also an AnimatedAdaptation dubbed ''Return
to the events Planet of the movie.Apes'', in which the ape civilization depicted in the series was more advanced than its live-action counterparts. (Ironically, this is the only adaptation that comes close to the simian world as shown in Pierre Boulle's original novel!)
* ''Series/PoltergeistTheLegacy'' had little to do with the original ''Film/{{Poltergeist}}''.
* ''Private Benjamin'' ran for three seasons, but was cut short in part due to Elieen Brennan's injuries in a car accident.
* ''Film/{{RoboCop 1987}}'' became a huge franchise. Aside from the two sequels and the remake, it spawned [[Series/RoboCopTheSeries a 1994 television]] adaptation which marketed the show to a younger audience, retaining the "Media Break" segments, but toning down the violence (to such a degree that [=RoboCop/Murphy=] ''never killed a single person''). There was a mini-series adaptation made in 2000 called (''Series/RoboCopPrimeDirectives''), which brought back the violence and satire of the Media Break commercials, but heaped on plenty of illogical plot twists ([=RoboCop=] hides out as a homeless man! An African-American police captain becomes the next-gen [=RoboCop=]! A neurological virus is contained in a teddy bear! [=RoboCop=] is now Alex Murphy again!) and silly acting.
** They even made an AnimatedAdaptation (see below).
* In 1966, ''Film/{{Shane}}'' got turned into a TV series. Because David Carradine is the natural substitute for Creator/AlanLadd.
* Probably the second most successful adaptation after ''Series/{{MASH}}'', ''Series/StargateSG1'' replaced the entire cast (save for a few minor characters), but was able to leverage the implied potential of the movie's set-up with minimal retconning. It spawned two spin-offs of its own, collectively accounting for more than 300 episodes worth of content. They later reversed the process by making two DTV movies in turn [[TheMovie based off the series]].
* ''Film/{{Starman}}'' had a short-lived and completely forgotten, but actually not terrible, series starring [[Film/{{Airplane}} Robert Hays]]. Conversion to a series required retconning the one-use magic gum-ball-sized metal spheres so that there was one re-usable sphere, passed on to the alien's son, and the alien brought another with him when he returned to help his progeny.
* Although ''Franchise/StarTrek'' was a series before it became TheMovie, the many SpinOff series often took advantage of all the extra stuff from the films by recycling special effects, uniforms, and sets.
* One whole ''decade'' after the movie's premiere, ABC Family decided to recycle ''Film/TenThingsIHateAboutYou'' as a sitcom, with a completely new cast (except for the main characters' father). The series was decently well-received by critics, but was canceled after the first season.
* ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'' spun off the ''Franchise/{{Terminator}}'' movies, and specifically movies [[Film/TheTerminator 1]] and [[Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay 2]], [[CanonDisContinuity ignoring or even deliberately undoing points]] of [[Film/Terminator3RiseOfTheMachines 3]].
* A strange borderline case is ''That's Hollywood'', which is a sort-of spinoff of the ''[[ClipShow That's Entertainment]]'' movies. The executive producer came from the film and the film and show had similar subject matter and titles, but ''That's Hollywood'' came from 20th Century Fox instead of MGM. Not to mention that this is a rare case where a ''documentary'' spun off a TV series this way.
* ''Film/TheMagnificentSeven'' became a [[Series/TheMagnificentSeven TV series]] in 1998, ''thirty-eight'' years after the movie.
* Classic movies ''Film/TheThinMan'' and ''Film/TheThirdMan'' got forgotten series adaptations.
* ''Film/{{Timecop}}'' spawned ''Series/{{Timecop}}'' a series which aired for nine episodes.
* ''Film/FastTimesAtRidgemontHigh'', another Amy Heckerling high school film (see above), was turned into a forgettable short-lived series that was stripped of all the R-rated content that made the film a classic.
* A ''Series/{{Topper}}'' series aired from 1953 to 1955, using the first film's premise.
* ''Film/{{Tremors}}'' [[TitleTheAdaptation The Series]] based off the cult classic films. Only had two original cast members and introduced a government lab where [[MonsterOfTheWeek all kinds of creatures]] could appear from. The series was cancelled half way through its first season despite being one of the Sci-Fi Channels highest rated series.
* ''Series/VoyageToTheBottomOfTheSea''
* ''Series/WarOfTheWorlds'' followed on from the 1953 film, taking the large time lapse as justification for introducing an entirely new set of characters.
* ''Series/WeirdScience'' - A 90s teen comedy series based on [[Film/WeirdScience the 80s movie]]. It even used the Music/OingoBoingo song "Weird Science" from the original film as its theme song.
* Although it wasn't directly based on a movie, Aaron Sorkin drew inspiration for his series ''Series/TheWestWing'' from his film ''Film/TheAmericanPresident''. ''Series/TheWestWing'' went on to run for seven critically acclaimed years and win ''nineteen'' Emmys.
* ''Film/{{Westworld}}'' had a critically acclaimed but short-lived TV series called ''Beyond Westworld'' which explored more deeply the issues raised in the first film (and [[CanonDisContinuity ignored the sequel]]).
* ''Franchise/TheWitchesOfEastwick'', released in 1987 (and based on a novel), became a TV series called ''Series/{{Eastwick}}''. Interestingly, one of the actresses from the original movie is in the series as someone entirely different. This was the third attempt to adapt it to television, lasting half a season while the previous never moved beyond pilot.
* ''[[Series/YoungIndianaJones The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles]]'', a prequel starring a much younger version of the hero.
* There's several planned film-to-screen adaptations that never got past the {{Pilot}}:
** There was a live-action ''Film/{{Clerks}}'' sitcom commissioned by Disney (who owned the film's distributor, Miramax) in 1995. In attempt to attract family viewers, the show's tone was [[GenreShift markedly different from the film's]] and starred Jim Breuer as Randall. Attempts by Creator/KevinSmith and original stars Brian O'Halloran and Jeff Anderson to be involved with the project were shot down (Smith's script idea was rejected and O'Halloran and Anderson auditioned for the part of Dante, as Jim Breuer was already given the Randall part) and the show never survived past the pilot anyway. The later, Smith-approved [[WesternAnimation/ClerksTheAnimatedSeries animated series]] did better, in that it actually made it to air.
** [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/True_Grit:_A_Further_Adventure True Grit: A Further Adventure]].
** There was an attempt to make ''Mr. and Mrs. Smith'' into a TV series. It wasn't ordered to series.
** There was a pilot for an Film/LAConfidential series, with Creator/KieferSutherland in the Creator/KevinSpacey role. (Sutherland's IMDB page lists it as 2003, but considering he was already doing ''Series/TwentyFour'' by then it was presumably made well before that.)
** There was an unsold pilot for a ''Literature/CatchTwentyTwo'' series starring Richard Dreyfuss as Yossarian.
1st Sep '17 8:09:40 PM scootermark
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* ''Film/{{Starman}}'' had a short-lived and completely forgotten series starring Robert Hays from ''Film/{{Airplane}}''.

to:

* ''Film/{{Starman}}'' had a short-lived and completely forgotten forgotten, but actually not terrible, series starring [[Film/{{Airplane}} Robert Hays from ''Film/{{Airplane}}''.Hays]]. Conversion to a series required retconning the one-use magic gum-ball-sized metal spheres so that there was one re-usable sphere, passed on to the alien's son, and the alien brought another with him when he returned to help his progeny.
1st Aug '17 6:28:37 AM jormis29
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* In 1966, ''{{Shane}}'' got turned into a TV series. Because David Carradine is the natural substitute for Alan Ladd.

to:

* In 1966, ''{{Shane}}'' ''Film/{{Shane}}'' got turned into a TV series. Because David Carradine is the natural substitute for Alan Ladd.Creator/AlanLadd.
28th Jul '17 11:16:18 AM Morgenthaler
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* Coming in second, ''Series/StargateSG1'' replaced the entire cast (save for a few minor characters), but was able to leverage the implied potential of the movie's set-up with minimal retconning. They later reversed the process by making two DTV movies in turn [[TheMovie based off the series]].

to:

* Coming in second, ''Series/StargateSG1'' replaced the entire cast (save for a few minor characters), but was able to leverage the implied potential of the movie's set-up with minimal retconning. It spawned two spin-offs of its own, collectively accounting for more than 300 episodes worth of content. They later reversed the process by making two DTV movies in turn [[TheMovie based off the series]].
25th Jul '17 7:08:20 PM jormis29
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* ''Spider-Man: The New Animated Series'' takes place after the first live-action movie. It was canceled after one season.

to:

* ''Spider-Man: The New Animated Series'' ''WesternAnimation/SpiderManTheNewAnimatedSeries'' takes place after the [[Film/SpiderMan1 first live-action movie.movie]]. It was canceled after one season.
25th Jul '17 6:59:20 PM jormis29
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** ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' is getting its own show, [[http://www.ew.com/article/2015/06/02/disney-channel-tangled-animated-series-mandy-moore-zachary-levi set for debut in 2017]]. So is ''Disney/BigHero6''.

to:

** ''Disney/{{Tangled}}'' is getting its own show, [[http://www.ew.com/article/2015/06/02/disney-channel-tangled-animated-series-mandy-moore-zachary-levi set for debut in 2017]]. So is ''Disney/BigHero6''.has ''WesternAnimation/TangledTheSeries''.
** ''Disney/BigHero6'' has ''WesternAnimation/BigHero6TheSeries''.
15th May '17 9:43:45 AM wuggles
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Film/DearWhitePeople'' was made into a Netflix series in 2017, which is more or less a direct sequel to the events of the movie.
22nd Apr '17 6:32:51 PM Golondrina
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* The radio series ''The Adventures of Harry Lime'', a prequel spun off from the film ''Film/TheThirdMan''. OrsonWelles returned to the role he'd made famous in the film.

to:

* The radio series ''The Adventures of Harry Lime'', a prequel spun off from the film ''Film/TheThirdMan''. OrsonWelles Creator/OrsonWelles returned to the role he'd made famous in the film.
25th Mar '17 3:05:11 AM erforce
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* Allegedly there was even talk of doing one of these for the ''Film/AlienTrilogy'' of all franchises, but apparently that was a bridge too far and it never got past the planning stages. Some of the weirder entries in the toyline originated with this concept.
* ''Starship Troopers'' spawned a CGI-series ''The Roughneck Chronicles''. It was surprisingly well done, but massive ongoing behind-the-scenes production problems doomed it.

to:

* Allegedly there was even talk of doing one of these for the ''Film/AlienTrilogy'' ''Franchise/{{Alien}}'' of all franchises, but apparently that was a bridge too far and it never got past the planning stages. Some of the weirder entries in the toyline originated with this concept.
* ''Starship Troopers'' ''Film/StarshipTroopers'' spawned a CGI-series ''The Roughneck Chronicles''. It was surprisingly well done, but massive ongoing behind-the-scenes production problems doomed it.
20th Mar '17 4:59:48 PM nombretomado
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* All three of Creator/JimCarrey's 1994 breakout hits (''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', ''Film/DumbAndDumber'', and ''Film/TheMask'') were made into Saturday morning cartoons, despite their mature content (though all three cartoons did have a sizeable amount of risque jokes that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar slipped by the censors]]). Out of the trio of Jim Carrey movies made into cartoons, ''WesternAnimation/TheMask'' was probably the most-remembered by 1990s cartoon nostalgists and had a longer shelf life (three seasons; two seasons ran on Creator/{{CBS}} and one ran in syndication). ''Film/DumbAndDumber'' lasted only a season on Creator/{{ABC}}. ''Ace Ventura'' had a good run on both Creator/{{CBS}} and {{Nickelodeon}} (and even had Creator/SethMacFarlane as a show writer), but was mostly memorable for having a pair of {{Crossover}} episodes with ''WesternAnimation/TheMask'' ("The Aceman Cometh," which was the series finale of "The Mask" and "Have Mask, Will Travel," which was the season finale of ''Ace Ventura'''s second season).

to:

* All three of Creator/JimCarrey's 1994 breakout hits (''Film/AceVenturaPetDetective'', ''Film/DumbAndDumber'', and ''Film/TheMask'') were made into Saturday morning cartoons, despite their mature content (though all three cartoons did have a sizeable amount of risque jokes that [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar slipped by the censors]]). Out of the trio of Jim Carrey movies made into cartoons, ''WesternAnimation/TheMask'' was probably the most-remembered by 1990s cartoon nostalgists and had a longer shelf life (three seasons; two seasons ran on Creator/{{CBS}} and one ran in syndication). ''Film/DumbAndDumber'' lasted only a season on Creator/{{ABC}}. ''Ace Ventura'' had a good run on both Creator/{{CBS}} and {{Nickelodeon}} {{Creator/Nickelodeon}} (and even had Creator/SethMacFarlane as a show writer), but was mostly memorable for having a pair of {{Crossover}} episodes with ''WesternAnimation/TheMask'' ("The Aceman Cometh," which was the series finale of "The Mask" and "Have Mask, Will Travel," which was the season finale of ''Ace Ventura'''s second season).
This list shows the last 10 events of 143. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RecycledTheSeries