History Main / RandomNumberGod

7th Feb '17 3:14:35 PM Raikoh
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** The first game was eventually patched to increase RNG odds of both the bonus objective appearing and drop rates, though it was still obnoxious without a doubt. [[VideoGame/DragonBallXenoverse2 The second game]] fixed the bonus objective problem by having it always, without fail, occur so long as the conditions were fulfilled. But the RNG still remains to taunt and flaunt your much-desired drops infront of your face, ''especially'' if it just gives you the shoes or hands part of a costume you really want. And if a drop you're aiming for is in a [[NintendoHard Expert Mission]], expect much agony as you either keep doing drawn-out boss fights just to get what you want, or keep restarting them because [[GameBreakingBug the boss teleported out of the arena and can't get back in, or killed your entire party unavoidably by spamming Gigantic Ki blasts.]]
16th Jan '17 7:13:20 AM Morgenthaler
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* In the back of the ''{{Hackmaster}} 2nd Edition'' rulebook, there's actually a list of various dice rituals that are prescribed for the game, including rubbing the dice clockwise for higher rolls and counter clockwise for lower rolls.

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* In the back of the ''{{Hackmaster}} ''TabletopGame/{{Hackmaster}} 2nd Edition'' rulebook, there's actually a list of various dice rituals that are prescribed for the game, including rubbing the dice clockwise for higher rolls and counter clockwise for lower rolls.
12th Jan '17 10:56:29 AM ZombieAladdin
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[[folder:Pinball]]
* This is such a big thing among pinball fans that they have adopted this term in recent years too as they have intermingled with fans of tabletop games and video games. It is no longer in the same sense as it used to be, however: Whereas older games were full of bumpers, slingshots, and other bouncy things to make the path of the ball unpredictable, more recent machines allow the player greater control of the ball and it is no longer nearly as much of an issue as it used to be. The main issue, now, are [[RandomlyDrops random awards]], benefits given to a player upon fulfilling certain conditions chosen randomly (or pseudo-randomly) from a list. If you're playing, say, ''Pinball/FamilyGuy'', and you really could use an Extra Ball, expect the game to just give you 100 points instead (which is [[PinballScoring ludicrously small]]).
* There is one that continues to persist to this day though: The "house ball," in which the ball, upon launching, falls into the drain without it having gone anywhere near the flippers--in other words, losing a ball with nothing the player could've done to influence it. Recent games where the ball must pass through bumpers after the launch, like ''Pinball/BramStokersDracula'' or ''Pinball/TheWalkingDead'', are particularly vulnerable to this.
* In ''Pinball/KissStern'', shooting the ball into Gene Simmons's head will hold the ball on a magnet on a spinning disk hidden inside his head, then spun and spat back out at the player. Because the ball is spinning, it will take a random and arced path back down. The ball has fallen between the flippers and straight into the drain so often that the game was [[ObviousRulePatch issued a patch a month after it first came out]] that returns the ball back to the player with no penalty if the ball goes down there the next 3 seconds after Gene lets go of the ball.
* The central pulsing magnet in ''Pinball/TheAddamsFamily'' causes the ball to get flung in wild and random directions whenever it's active, which happens pretty often.[[note]]It is always active in "Seance," any time a multiball is ready to begin, and continuously throughout all multiballs.[[/note]] It has caused so many tragic moments that it's standard in competitions to physically remove this magnet from the machine.
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* Items appearing at random times and from random places in the ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'' series have caused a lot of resentment and frustration, such that nearly all tournaments, official or not, turn them off. Among high-level players, or at least players for whom Smash Bros. is SeriousBusiness, they loathe the random nature of the items so much that most Smash Bros. {{Game Mod}}s leave items completely untouched, even if the mods might cause them to crash (Brawl Minus is the only high-profile exception), under the assumption that everyone who will play with these mods will never play with items to begin with.
3rd Jan '17 7:59:18 AM Jasin_Moridin
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*** A related more-general "rule" is to never roll red dice for armor saves, because they're for killing.
*** And, with Games Workshop occasionally doing promotional faction-specific dice, those are of course, far luckier if you're playing ''that specific faction''.
8th Dec '16 6:11:19 AM Kazmahu
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** Fire Emblem is an especially jarring and infuriating series for this trope, due to how many players handle their odds. To most players, anything under 50% is a guaranteed miss, and anything over about 75% is a guaranteed hit. [[note]]In the GBA games, this was actually reasonable. Due to the hit probability display and the actual calculation using different metrics, [[ArtisticLicenseStatistics the latter of which being programmed by someone with a poor grasp of basic math]], any deviation either side of 50% actually was exponentially more or less likely than it appeared. A 75% chance was closer to 90%.[[/note]] When this rule is defied, cue lots of rage and a likely restart because the player wagered an important unit on the odds.

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** Fire Emblem is an especially jarring and infuriating series for this trope, due to how many players handle their odds. To most players, anything under 50% is a guaranteed miss, and anything over about 75% is a guaranteed hit. [[note]]In some of the GBA games, the lion's share of which being ones that made it to English-speaking players, this was actually reasonable. Due to a system called "True Hit" by fans, the hit probability display and the actual calculation using different metrics, [[ArtisticLicenseStatistics the latter of which being programmed by someone with a poor grasp of basic math]], any math]]. Any deviation either side of 50% actually was exponentially more or less likely than it appeared. A appeared, with a 75% chance was closer to 90%.[[/note]] When this rule is defied, cue lots of rage and a likely restart because the player wagered an important unit on the odds.



** [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou Mission-critical characters]] or even entire armies used to get crippled by the RNG repeatedly giving few or no stat increases during level-ups, possibly to the point of [[UnwinnableByMistake wedging an entire playthrough]]. Some mercy was finally applied to the RNG in the most recent installments - ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' will re-roll a level that doesn't give at least one stat point[[note]]unless three consecutive attempts yield nothing because every stat is already capped[[/note]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' further normalizes stats by increasing or decreasing the chance or a stat increasing if it's behind or ahead of average appropriately.

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** [[WeCannotGoOnWithoutYou Mission-critical characters]] or even entire armies used to get crippled by the RNG repeatedly giving few or no stat increases during level-ups, possibly to the point of [[UnwinnableByMistake wedging an entire playthrough]]. Some mercy was finally applied to the RNG in the most more recent installments - ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius'' onward will re-roll a level that doesn't give at least one stat point[[note]]unless three consecutive attempts yield nothing because every stat is already capped[[/note]], point[[note]]As of ''Awakening'', which allowed for gleeful abuse of the system, you can still get an empty level if most stats are capped already[[/note]], and ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' further normalizes stats by increasing or decreasing the chance or a stat increasing if it's behind or ahead of average appropriately.
6th Dec '16 1:59:13 PM PDL
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** The RNG is also what determines a Pokémon's ability, nature, IVs, and by extent, shininess.[[labelnote:Note]]Shininess is determined by IVs in Generation II, while starting from Generation III it is determined by a complex calculation revolving around the original trainer's ID number, the current trainer's secret ID number (a hidden serial code used to ensure that no two save files are treated alike, as OT ID numbers are able to be identical between trainers), and the Pokémon's personality value (which determines its gender and ability; in Generations III and IV, it also determined its nature).[[/labelnote]] Because of how diverse the range is for all of these (excluding abilities, which are limited to two at most [apart from hidden abilities]), it is very difficult to get a perfect Pokémon for your party. For instance, it is very likely that the shiny Pokémon you just encountered has poor enough stats to serve as nothing more than a trophy, or that Pokémon you found with the ability you want is severely crippled by its IV-altering nature. Conversely, it is possible for a good ability to perfectly compensate for a bad nature, and a shiny Pokémon could be just enough to carry you a long way as a trainer. The fact that [[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY Generation VI]] now includes Super Training and Pokémon Amie, two surefire ways to efficiently EV train your party to GameBreaker status helps alleviate some of the RNG's flaws.

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** The RNG is also what determines a Pokémon's ability, nature, IVs, and by extent, shininess.[[labelnote:Note]]Shininess is determined by IVs in Generation II, while starting from Generation III it is determined by a complex calculation revolving around the original trainer's ID number, the current trainer's secret ID number (a hidden serial code used to ensure that no two save files are treated alike, as OT ID numbers are able to be identical between trainers), and the Pokémon's personality value (which determines its gender and ability; in Generations III and IV, it also determined its nature).[[/labelnote]] Because of how diverse the range is for all of these (excluding abilities, which are limited to two at most [apart from hidden abilities]), it is very difficult to get a perfect Pokémon for your party. For instance, it is very likely that the shiny Pokémon you just encountered has poor enough stats to serve as nothing more than a trophy, or that Pokémon you found with the ability you want is severely crippled by its IV-altering nature. Conversely, it is possible for a good ability to perfectly compensate for a bad nature, and a shiny Pokémon could be just enough to carry you a long way as a trainer. The fact that [[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY Generation VI]] now includes Super Training and Pokémon Amie, two surefire ways to efficiently EV train your party to GameBreaker status helps alleviate some of the RNG's flaws. [[VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon Gen VII]] introduces Hyper Training, which can increase a Level 100 Pokemon's stats to their possible maximum[[note]]It doesn't actually change the Pokemon's IV itself but "flags" it so that the stat is "simulated" as a maximum IV[[/note]]. This and the Ability Capsule (an item that can change the non-hidden ability of a Pokemon with 2 possible abilities) means that the only thing one needs to worry about when it comes to making a competitive monster is its nature and possibly if it has its regular ability(s) or its hidden ability.
26th Nov '16 9:20:37 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''FullFrontalNerdity'' carries this to a ludicrous extreme when Lewis attempts to dispose of a 'cursed' die that can seemingly only roll 1s. The die rises from the grave and the curse is so strong that every random number generation device in the world becomes incapable of generating any number other than 1.

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* ''FullFrontalNerdity'' ''Webcomic/FullFrontalNerdity'' carries this to a ludicrous extreme when Lewis attempts to dispose of a 'cursed' die that can seemingly only roll 1s. The die rises from the grave and the curse is so strong that every random number generation device in the world becomes incapable of generating any number other than 1.



* A ''College Humor'' sketch about VideoGame/{{Tetris}} called "[[http://www.collegehumor.com/video/5767906/the-tetris-god The Tetris God]]" involves the eponymous character manually choosing which piece will be next.

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* A ''College Humor'' Website/CollegeHumor sketch about VideoGame/{{Tetris}} called "[[http://www.collegehumor.com/video/5767906/the-tetris-god The Tetris God]]" involves the eponymous character manually choosing which piece will be next.
23rd Nov '16 11:51:55 PM Eisabel
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* [[UsefulNotes/QuantumPhysics Quantum Tunneling]] can be [[QuantumMechanicsCanDoAnything at the bottom end of everything]]. Atoms, or at least parts of it, can be automatically displaced anywhere, anytime and at any size, and this happens constantly. This ensures that there is no ''absolute'' zero or one-hundred percent chance that an instance of an object is bound to happen. Some theorize that an EarthShatteringKaboom could happen in [[ParanoiaFuel an instance Quantum Tunneling occurs]].
** You'd think rolling a ball from a shorter hill to another taller one is never going to happen. In that instance, the ball may actually get there with an impossibly small chance that an atom of it is displaced somewhere.
** The same effects can also happen in a computer, where electrons in a circuit are randomly displaced no matter how heavily systematized the connections may be, thus glitching occurs.
2nd Nov '16 10:53:37 PM sparrowspera2
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* ''WebVideo/CriticalRole'' is...strange. On the one hand, it's a livestreamed D&D game, so absolutely nothing is staged. Chance should be king. And yet sometimes the dice seem to obey the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality in that players are prone to getting [[CriticalHit Natural 20s]] at the ''best possible times''. Examples include Percy rolling a crit to maintain concentration on his Hex against his arch-nemesis, Dr. Ripley; Grog ''killing'' [[spoiler: Kevdak, his uncle]], with a life-or-death critical hit; and Vex rolling two crits in a row when Vax is [[spoiler: knocked unconscious by the Briarwoods]]. The dice even believe in TrueLovesKiss, apparently - when Vex kisses [[spoiler: Percy during his resurrection ritual]], she rolls a Natural 20 on her persuasion check to [[spoiler: help convince his soul to return]]. Apparently, the On the other hand, Creator/WilWheaton has a brief guest spot, and maintains his streak of absolutely miserable luck known as "the Wheaton dice curse", rolling five or less an ''absurd'' number of times.
** Even their failures are oddly appropriate for the narrative! In Whitestone, the lingering undead atmosphere causes the entire party to need to make saves against "corruption" once a day. The only person who has failed the saves so far is Percy, who is ''already'' acting more violent and being corrupted by the smoky entity from his dream. (It helps that Mercer is an excellent storyteller and readily makes the die rolls make sense).

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* ''WebVideo/CriticalRole'' is...strange. On the one hand, it's a livestreamed D&D game, so absolutely nothing is staged. Chance should be king. And yet sometimes the dice seem to obey the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality in that players are prone to getting [[CriticalHit Natural 20s]] at the ''best possible times''. Examples include Percy rolling a crit to maintain concentration on his Hex against his arch-nemesis, Dr. Ripley; Grog ''killing'' [[spoiler: Kevdak, his uncle]], with a life-or-death critical hit; and Vex rolling two crits in a row when Vax is [[spoiler: knocked unconscious by the Briarwoods]]. The dice even believe in TrueLovesKiss, apparently - when Vex kisses [[spoiler: Percy during his resurrection ritual]], she rolls a Natural 20 on her persuasion check to [[spoiler: help convince his soul to return]]. Apparently, the On the other hand, Creator/WilWheaton has a brief guest spot, and maintains his streak of absolutely miserable luck known as "the Wheaton dice curse", rolling five or less an ''absurd'' number of times.
** Even their failures are oddly appropriate for the narrative! In Whitestone, the lingering undead atmosphere causes the entire party to need to make saves against "corruption" once a day. The only person who has failed the saves so far is Percy, who is ''already'' acting more violent and being corrupted by the smoky entity from his dream. (It helps that Mercer is an excellent storyteller and readily makes the die rolls make sense). Similarly, Kaylie [[spoiler: Shorthalt]] has a perfect opportunity to attack Scanlan and rolls a 1, as if she can't bring herself to [[spoiler: stab her own father]].
2nd Nov '16 10:51:46 PM sparrowspera2
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* ''WebVideo/CriticalRole'' is...strange. On the one hand, it's a livestreamed D&D game, so absolutely nothing is staged. Chance should be king. And yet sometimes the dice seem to obey the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality in that players are prone to getting [[CriticalHit Natural 20s]] at the ''best possible times''. Examples include Percy rolling a crit on a save against a fear effect after one of his homemade bombs successfully explodes, Vax rolling a crit to [[TheTrickster prank Grog]] by shaving his beard, and Vex rolling not one but ''two'' crits in succession when [[spoiler: Vax is downed by the Briarwoods.]] On the other hand, Creator/WilWheaton has a brief guest spot, and maintains his streak of absolutely miserable luck known as "the Wheaton dice curse", rolling five or less an ''absurd'' number of times.

to:

* ''WebVideo/CriticalRole'' is...strange. On the one hand, it's a livestreamed D&D game, so absolutely nothing is staged. Chance should be king. And yet sometimes the dice seem to obey the TheoryOfNarrativeCausality in that players are prone to getting [[CriticalHit Natural 20s]] at the ''best possible times''. Examples include Percy rolling a crit to maintain concentration on a save his Hex against a fear effect after one of his homemade bombs successfully explodes, Vax rolling a crit to [[TheTrickster prank Grog]] by shaving arch-nemesis, Dr. Ripley; Grog ''killing'' [[spoiler: Kevdak, his beard, uncle]], with a life-or-death critical hit; and Vex rolling not one but ''two'' two crits in succession a row when Vax is [[spoiler: Vax is downed knocked unconscious by the Briarwoods.]] Briarwoods]]. The dice even believe in TrueLovesKiss, apparently - when Vex kisses [[spoiler: Percy during his resurrection ritual]], she rolls a Natural 20 on her persuasion check to [[spoiler: help convince his soul to return]]. Apparently, the On the other hand, Creator/WilWheaton has a brief guest spot, and maintains his streak of absolutely miserable luck known as "the Wheaton dice curse", rolling five or less an ''absurd'' number of times.
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