History Main / RPGsEqualCombat

6th Apr '17 7:38:19 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''PlanescapeTorment'', where there are plenty of ''potential'' combat situations, but only about three people that absolutely have to be fought and one of those is part of the tutorial.

to:

* ''PlanescapeTorment'', ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'', where there are plenty of ''potential'' combat situations, but only about three people that absolutely have to be fought and one of those is part of the tutorial.
16th Mar '17 10:42:07 AM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** ''TheNamelessMod'' wisely follows this design philosophy. In fact, ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' had five required kills (though all are commonly [[SequenceBreaking skipped by hardcore players]].) ''TheNamelessMod'' has none.

to:

** ''TheNamelessMod'' ''VideoGame/TheNamelessMod'' wisely follows this design philosophy. In fact, ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' had five required kills (though all are commonly [[SequenceBreaking skipped by hardcore players]].) ''TheNamelessMod'' ''The Nameless Mod'' has none.
5th Mar '17 4:45:58 PM TotemicHero
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/DinsCurse'' is a rare case of this in the {{Roguelike}} genre. The Rogue class has the Trickster specialization, which gives you both stealth and the ability to SetAMookToKillAMook. Since quests only require certain monsters to die (and not you killing them), and you get experience points for disarming traps and completing quests, a Rogue can progress nicely through the game with a minimum of direct fighting, mainly using trap and quest XP to level up while having monsters kill other monsters for you.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DinsCurse'' is a rare case of this averted in the {{Roguelike}} genre. The Rogue class has the Trickster specialization, which gives you both stealth and the ability to SetAMookToKillAMook. Since quests only require certain monsters to die (and not you killing them), and you get experience points for disarming traps and completing quests, a Rogue can progress nicely through the game with a minimum of direct fighting, mainly using trap and quest XP to level up while having monsters kill other monsters for you.
5th Mar '17 10:03:02 AM TotemicHero
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''VideoGame/DinsCurse'' is a rare case of this in the {{Roguelike}} genre. The Rogue class has the Trickster specialization, which gives you both stealth and the ability to SetAMookToKillAMook. Since quests only require certain monsters to die (and not you killing them), and you get experience points for disarming traps and completing quests, a Rogue can progress nicely through the game with a minimum of direct fighting, mainly using trap and quest XP to level up while having monsters kill other monsters for you.
2nd Oct '16 12:58:35 AM DastardlyDemolition
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This trope does heavily stick out in the Mages Guild (or equivalent) questlines though: being set in universities or research institutions, NPC mages are often shown doing weird and wonderful things and investigating the fabric of the universe, but for obvious reasons the player is left unable to actually do anything with magic other than fight or buff using other people's spells. One of the weirdest examples of this is in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' with Arniel Gane; the Winterhold mage, Alteration professor, and researcher of the Dwemer tries to figure out what happened to them and recreate it. [[spoiler:He does]]. Later you can summon him (or rather, [[spoiler:his shade]]) and use it in combat. A three-part quest about the fascinating question on how the Dwemer disappeared spent running errands and combating Dwemer mechs only to get a (admittedly useful) Conjuring spell.

to:

** This trope does heavily stick out in the Mages Guild (or equivalent) questlines though: being set in universities or research institutions, NPC mages are often shown doing weird and wonderful things and investigating the fabric of the universe, but for obvious reasons the player is left unable to actually do anything with magic other than fight or buff using other people's spells. One of the weirdest examples of this is in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' with Arniel Gane; the Winterhold mage, Alteration professor, and researcher of the Dwemer tries to figure out what happened to them and recreate it. [[spoiler:He does]]. Later you can summon him (or rather, [[spoiler:his shade]]) and use it to aid in combat in combat. A three-part quest about the fascinating question on how the Dwemer disappeared spent running errands and combating Dwemer mechs only to get a (admittedly useful) Conjuring spell.
2nd Oct '16 12:55:59 AM DastardlyDemolition
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** This trope does heavily stick out in the Mages Guild (or equivalent) questlines though: being set in universities or research institutions, NPC mages are often shown doing weird and wonderful things and investigating the fabric of the universe, but for obvious reasons the player is left unable to actually do anything with magic other than fight or buff using other people's spells.

to:

** This trope does heavily stick out in the Mages Guild (or equivalent) questlines though: being set in universities or research institutions, NPC mages are often shown doing weird and wonderful things and investigating the fabric of the universe, but for obvious reasons the player is left unable to actually do anything with magic other than fight or buff using other people's spells. One of the weirdest examples of this is in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'' with Arniel Gane; the Winterhold mage, Alteration professor, and researcher of the Dwemer tries to figure out what happened to them and recreate it. [[spoiler:He does]]. Later you can summon him (or rather, [[spoiler:his shade]]) and use it in combat. A three-part quest about the fascinating question on how the Dwemer disappeared spent running errands and combating Dwemer mechs only to get a (admittedly useful) Conjuring spell.
24th Jul '16 12:38:57 PM TheKaizerreich
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Oneshot}}'' has no combat, only item puzzles and {{Fetch Quest}}s.
17th May '16 7:08:23 AM Koveras
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Of course, the way that character choice is expressed in rules-heavy [=RPGs=] is through your choice of character exerting a direct influence on how you are, and aren't, able to play the game. Since most computer games are primarily about combat, that character customization naturally boils down to choosing between different ways to kill things.

This is exacerbated if combat is the primary or sole source of ExperiencePoints, money, or other resources, so that ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption. But that's no problem, since there are MonstersEverywhere. However, it is possible that it is an actual legitimate RPG; it's just that everyone considers the [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory plot a side benefit at best]].

So many [=RPGs=] do this, it's easier just to list the aversions.

Where other genres are concerned, this leads into RPGElements, which usually work exactly the same.

to:

Of course, the way that character choice is expressed in rules-heavy [=RPGs=] is through your choice of character exerting a direct influence on how you are, and aren't, able to play the game. Since most computer games are primarily about combat, that character customization naturally boils down to choosing between different ways to kill things.

things. This is exacerbated if combat is the primary or sole source of ExperiencePoints, money, or other resources, so that ViolenceIsTheOnlyOption. But that's no problem, since there are MonstersEverywhere. However, it is possible that it is an actual legitimate RPG; it's just that everyone considers the [[PlayTheGameSkipTheStory plot a side benefit at best]].

This trope is also often in effect in {{Tabletop RPG}}s, as most of them are still aimed at "action" genres, where combat is a common mode of conflict resolution by definition. Since combat is supposed to be dangerous and exciting, yet also "fair" so the players don't feel cheated if their character suffers appropriate consequences, such games tend to have combat systems that can easily be an order of magnitude or two more complex than their rules for resolving ''non''-combat challenges (which frequently are handled with just a die roll or two before moving on). This quite naturally tends to reinforce the impression that this trope is in effect regardless of how things actually work out at any individual gaming table in practice.

Some pen-and-paper RPG designers, however, maintain that putting a combat system distinct from the rest of the resolution system leads the players to rely mostly on fights (similarly, the presence of an elaborate magic system would hint the importance of supernatural forces in the verse). Most games with no focus on combat do solve conflicts of any nature the same way, be it a rough negotiation or a duel. Games like ''sweet agatha'' or ''breaking the ice'', focusing on investigation and romance respectively, do not have such systems at all, since it is unlikely any physical confrontation will happen.

So many [=RPGs=] do this, it's easier just to list the aversions.

aversions. Where other genres are concerned, this leads into RPGElements, which usually work exactly the same.



* Since most tabletop [=RPGs=] are still aimed at "action" genres, where combat is a common mode of conflict resolution by definition, and since combat is also supposed to be dangerous and exciting (yet also preferably "fair" so the players don't feel cheated if their character suffers appropriate consequences) and thus nothing to be passed over with just a couple of die rolls before moving on with the plot, games still tend to have combat systems that can easily be an order of magnitude or two more complex than their rules for resolving ''non''-combat challenges (which frequently ''are'' handled with just a die roll or two before moving on). This quite naturally tends to reinforce the impression that this trope is in effect regardless of how things actually work out at any individual gaming table in practice.
* However, some [=RPGs=]' creators avert this and state that putting a combat system distinct from the rest of the resolution system leads the players to rely mostly on fights (similarly, the presence of a magic system would hint the importance of supernatural forces in the verse). Most games with no focus on combat do solve conflicts of any nature the same way, be it a rough negotiation or a duel.Games like ''sweet agatha'' or ''breaking the ice'', focusing on investigation and romance respectively do not have such systems, since it is unlikely any physical confrontation will happen.



* The TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade and TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem are supposed to be more about politics, intrigue, social interaction, background fluff and the internal struggles of its characters as they try to avoid becoming monsters, so combat is intended as more of a climactic experience, rather than an everyday occurence. A pure combat-built character generally wouldn't make it long in vampiric society without political allies to shield them from betrayal, at least in theory. In practice, many groups prefered to ditch the whole psychological horror aspect and play it as an action game instead.

to:

* The TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade ''TabletopGame/VampireTheMasquerade'' and TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem ''TabletopGame/VampireTheRequiem'' are supposed to be more about politics, intrigue, social interaction, background fluff and the internal struggles of its characters as they try to avoid becoming monsters, so combat is intended as more of a climactic experience, rather than an everyday occurence. A pure combat-built character generally wouldn't make it long in vampiric society without political allies to shield them from betrayal, at least in theory. In practice, many groups prefered to ditch the whole psychological horror aspect and play it as an action game instead.



9th Apr '16 2:10:59 PM TotemicHero
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' is mostly combat oriented, but you also get experience from discovering new areas, completing quests that don't involve combat such as most fishing and cooking dailies, gathering herbs and ore and surveying for archeology fragments.* One player infamously averted this and made it to the maximum level in vanilla [=WoW=] (Level 50) without ever killing anything or setting foot in a dungeon, opting only to gather materials, craft, explore, and do errand quests. The developers gave them a custom title "The Pacifist" as proof.

to:

* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' is mostly combat oriented, but you also get experience from discovering new areas, completing quests that don't involve combat such as most fishing and cooking dailies, gathering herbs and ore and surveying for archeology fragments.* One player infamously averted A handful of players attempted to avert this and made make it to the maximum level in vanilla [=WoW=] (Level 50) (varied depending on which expansion they did it during) without ever killing anything or setting foot in a dungeon, opting only to gather materials, craft, explore, and do errand quests. explore. The developers gave them a custom title "The Pacifist" as proof.most recent reported case was [[http://www.polygon.com/2012/10/14/3502778/pacifist-world-of-warcraft-player-maxes-level-without-killing the druid Irenic]], who made it to level 90 during ''Mists of Pandaria''.
24th Feb '16 9:18:44 AM supergod
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''PlanescapeTorment'', where there are exactly two people that absolutely have to be fought and one of those is part of the tutorial.

to:

* ''PlanescapeTorment'', where there are exactly two plenty of ''potential'' combat situations, but only about three people that absolutely have to be fought and one of those is part of the tutorial.
This list shows the last 10 events of 115. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.RPGsEqualCombat