History Main / PressureSensitiveInterface

30th May '17 10:20:39 AM Macecurb
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[[folder:RealLife]]
* TruthInTelevision. A common way of expressing frustration. Say you're in a hurry and you're trying to cross the street, and you pushed the button to cross, but the crosswalk light isn't changing. It's not uncommon in this circumstance to futilely press the button over and over. Similarly, if you click/double-click something on a computer and nothing happens, you'll be sorely tempted to do it again, even though this may just slow the action down further. People playing fighting games start mashing the buttons harder as they get more desperate, even when it's just an ordinary digital button and they're only destroying the controller.
* Sometimes, buttons that have become worn or dirty ''do'' need a second attempt with a bit more force in order to close the contact, which is why elevator controls and the like usually light up and/or sound a tone to signal the fact that they've been activated.
* All British pedestrian crossings have an indicator which lights when the button is pressed (on older versions, it's an illuminated WAIT sign, and on newer versions a red light). People still press the button repeatedly.
** Irish crossings have the light too. But sometimes no light means "no signal" and a light means "signal received"; sometimes it's dim light: no signal, bright light: signal received; and sometimes it's permanently a dim light. So people press it over anyway.
* Some crosswalks at intersections that have been converted back to pure timer operation have their buttons disconnected, and pressing does nothing. People are already used to waiting, so nobody notices any difference.
* On at least one computer system, pressing buttons repeatedly will make it realize that you're impatient, and it will speed up. The system was designed to give programs that interacted with the user a higher priority than background processes that didn't. Pressing random keys during a long calculation would make it treat the task as interactive, so the calculation finished sooner.
** A lot of PC GUI applications scroll this way. If you drag to select text or pixels, and your pointer leaves the scrollable part of the window, the will slowly start to scroll. Some apps scroll faster if the user moves the mouse because they scroll one unit per "event", and the mouse sends an event every time it has moved one or more pixels since the display was last updated.
** Some poorly-written applications on old cooperative multi-tasked computers would do their processing only in response to OS messages. Meaning, the processing would go faster if you wiggled the mouse, or slammed on the keyboard, or otherwise did something to make the OS send more messages than usual. This could happen in Mac Classic applications, and 16-bit Windows applications.
* Some car remotes do react to multiple presses, for instance 3 presses of "lock" will start the engine.
* "Close door" lift buttons are a special case.
** If the lift is not in operator mode, the button has no effect. The lift doors don't close any quicker, but you feel as if you're in control.
** If the lift is in operator mode (which requires a key), the buttons give you total control. The doors remain open until you select a floor or close them. You can even override the doors and leave them open as you travel.
* This is actually a function in many graphics programs (like Photoshop) when using a tablet: The stylus is pressure sensitive, and the mark you create is either bigger or more opaque --or both-- depending on how hard you press down (and the "brush" you're using). You can even adjust your pressure on the fly, so you can make a thick-to-thin line, or a transparent-to-opaque brush stroke.
* Notes played on the piano are louder when the keys are pressed hard, and quieter when they are pressed more lightly. This is a great improvement over earlier instruments such as the harpsichord. This sensitivity is also built in to modern electric keyboards.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:



[[folder:RealLife]]
* TruthInTelevision. A common way of expressing frustration. Say you're in a hurry and you're trying to cross the street, and you pushed the button to cross, but the crosswalk light isn't changing. It's not uncommon in this circumstance to futilely press the button over and over. Similarly, if you click/double-click something on a computer and nothing happens, you'll be sorely tempted to do it again, even though this may just slow the action down further. People playing fighting games start mashing the buttons harder as they get more desperate, even when it's just an ordinary digital button and they're only destroying the controller.
* Sometimes, buttons that have become worn or dirty ''do'' need a second attempt with a bit more force in order to close the contact, which is why elevator controls and the like usually light up and/or sound a tone to signal the fact that they've been activated.
* All British pedestrian crossings have an indicator which lights when the button is pressed (on older versions, it's an illuminated WAIT sign, and on newer versions a red light). People still press the button repeatedly.
** Irish crossings have the light too. But sometimes no light means "no signal" and a light means "signal received"; sometimes it's dim light: no signal, bright light: signal received; and sometimes it's permanently a dim light. So people press it over anyway.
* Some crosswalks at intersections that have been converted back to pure timer operation have their buttons disconnected, and pressing does nothing. People are already used to waiting, so nobody notices any difference.
* On at least one computer system, pressing buttons repeatedly will make it realize that you're impatient, and it will speed up. The system was designed to give programs that interacted with the user a higher priority than background processes that didn't. Pressing random keys during a long calculation would make it treat the task as interactive, so the calculation finished sooner.
** A lot of PC GUI applications scroll this way. If you drag to select text or pixels, and your pointer leaves the scrollable part of the window, the will slowly start to scroll. Some apps scroll faster if the user moves the mouse because they scroll one unit per "event", and the mouse sends an event every time it has moved one or more pixels since the display was last updated.
** Some poorly-written applications on old cooperative multi-tasked computers would do their processing only in response to OS messages. Meaning, the processing would go faster if you wiggled the mouse, or slammed on the keyboard, or otherwise did something to make the OS send more messages than usual. This could happen in Mac Classic applications, and 16-bit Windows applications.
* Some car remotes do react to multiple presses, for instance 3 presses of "lock" will start the engine.
* "Close door" lift buttons are a special case.
** If the lift is not in operator mode, the button has no effect. The lift doors don't close any quicker, but you feel as if you're in control.
** If the lift is in operator mode (which requires a key), the buttons give you total control. The doors remain open until you select a floor or close them. You can even override the doors and leave them open as you travel.
* This is actually a function in many graphics programs (like Photoshop) when using a tablet: The stylus is pressure sensitive, and the mark you create is either bigger or more opaque --or both-- depending on how hard you press down (and the "brush" you're using). You can even adjust your pressure on the fly, so you can make a thick-to-thin line, or a transparent-to-opaque brush stroke.
* Notes played on the piano are louder when the keys are pressed hard, and quieter when they are pressed more lightly. This is a great improvement over earlier instruments such as the harpsichord. This sensitivity is also built in to modern electric keyboards.
[[/folder]]
15th Jan '17 9:13:08 AM nombretomado
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** ''LuigisMansion'' used this function to control the Poltergust, pressing the button hard increased suction power, and pressing it all the way down makes Luigi stationary.

to:

** ''LuigisMansion'' ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'' used this function to control the Poltergust, pressing the button hard increased suction power, and pressing it all the way down makes Luigi stationary.
5th Oct '16 12:01:24 PM Morgenthaler
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** The elevator example appears in the ''HancocksHalfHour'' TV episode "The Lift".

to:

** The elevator example appears in the ''HancocksHalfHour'' ''Series/HancocksHalfHour'' TV episode "The Lift".
4th Jun '16 8:02:13 PM nombretomado
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* Every button on the PS2 controller worked like this. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3'' were practically the only games that did anything with it, though. If you push the fire button and let go, you shoot, but if you push the button and ''lightly'' let go, you'll holster your gun without firing a shot. It was tricky as hell.
** When the first game was remade for the Gamecube with mostly PS2 controls, they got around the Gamecube controller not having pressure sensitive buttons by having you press Y, then A, in succession to holster your weapon.
** Also, another Kojima game, ''Zone of the Enders'', had a weapon that made use of the pressure-sensitive PS2 buttons. A light push would result in a wide-angle, point-blank spray, while a hard one would increase the range from "melee" to merely "short" with a narrower spread.

to:

* Every button on the PS2 [=PS2=] controller worked like this. ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2'' and ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3'' were practically the only games that did anything with it, though. If you push the fire button and let go, you shoot, but if you push the button and ''lightly'' let go, you'll holster your gun without firing a shot. It was tricky as hell.
** When the first game was remade for the Gamecube with mostly PS2 [=PS2=] controls, they got around the Gamecube controller not having pressure sensitive buttons by having you press Y, then A, in succession to holster your weapon.
** Also, another Kojima game, ''Zone of the Enders'', had a weapon that made use of the pressure-sensitive PS2 [=PS2=] buttons. A light push would result in a wide-angle, point-blank spray, while a hard one would increase the range from "melee" to merely "short" with a narrower spread.
22nd May '16 8:56:30 PM nombretomado
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* The difficult-but-rewarding "Second-Stage Quickboost" tactic in ''VideoGame/ArmoredCore 4''/for Answer relies on the 360/PS3's pressure sensitive buttons. Specifically, pressing the quickboost button ordinarily will unleash the ordinary burst. However, by pressing the button to the point such that it ''almost'' activates, and then activating it with a light pressure will trigger this. Quick Boost is intended to be an emergency get-out-of-the-way burst of speed; properly applied, Second Stage boosting can and will outrun enemies using their supposedly faster Overed Boost.

to:

* The difficult-but-rewarding "Second-Stage Quickboost" tactic in ''VideoGame/ArmoredCore 4''/for Answer relies on the 360/PS3's 360/[=PS3=]'s pressure sensitive buttons. Specifically, pressing the quickboost button ordinarily will unleash the ordinary burst. However, by pressing the button to the point such that it ''almost'' activates, and then activating it with a light pressure will trigger this. Quick Boost is intended to be an emergency get-out-of-the-way burst of speed; properly applied, Second Stage boosting can and will outrun enemies using their supposedly faster Overed Boost.
8th May '16 11:36:09 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' has a kind of psycho {{Gonk}} called Attenborough who appears to be in charge of using the giant mechs' cannons. He [[BeamSpam never does any aiming or anything]], mind you. And he often acts so rash that he puts the whole team in danger. Presumably he's only in this position because [[TriggerHappy he pushes those buttons very enthusiastically]], and ''really damn hard''.

to:

* ''TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' ''Anime/TengenToppaGurrenLagann'' has a kind of psycho {{Gonk}} called Attenborough who appears to be in charge of using the giant mechs' cannons. He [[BeamSpam never does any aiming or anything]], mind you. And he often acts so rash that he puts the whole team in danger. Presumably he's only in this position because [[TriggerHappy he pushes those buttons very enthusiastically]], and ''really damn hard''.
22nd Jan '16 3:43:41 PM GrammarNavi
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** ''SuperSmashBros. Melee'' also used this function. The shoulder buttons were used for shielding: lightly pushing the button made a larger but more translucent, and likely weaker, shield; pushing the button harder made the shield more compact as well as more durable and opaque.

to:

** ''SuperSmashBros. Melee'' ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'' also used this function. The shoulder buttons were used for shielding: lightly pushing the button made a larger but more translucent, and likely weaker, shield; pushing the button harder made the shield more compact as well as more durable and opaque.
20th Sep '15 10:59:03 AM nombretomado
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** The GameCube installments of the ''Rogue Squadron'' series mapped the accelerator to the right trigger. Clicking the button underneath would (depending on your craft) either trigger a rechargeable booster, or close your S-foils (giving you increased speed but disabling your weapons). To accelerate to max speed normally, you would need to hold down the trigger without pressing the button underneath.

to:

** The GameCube UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube installments of the ''Rogue Squadron'' series mapped the accelerator to the right trigger. Clicking the button underneath would (depending on your craft) either trigger a rechargeable booster, or close your S-foils (giving you increased speed but disabling your weapons). To accelerate to max speed normally, you would need to hold down the trigger without pressing the button underneath.



** Interestingly enough, the idea was reused for the ''[[UpdatedRerelease EO]]'' versions of ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2MarkOfTheMillennium Capcom vs. SNK 2]]''. The strengths of punches and kicks are determined by the pressure exerted on the L and R buttons in an attempt to simplify the controls for the GameCube and XBox.

to:

** Interestingly enough, the idea was reused for the ''[[UpdatedRerelease EO]]'' versions of ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2MarkOfTheMillennium Capcom vs. SNK 2]]''. The strengths of punches and kicks are determined by the pressure exerted on the L and R buttons in an attempt to simplify the controls for the GameCube UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube and XBox.UsefulNotes/XBox.
28th May '15 4:18:21 PM nombretomado
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* In one episode of ''BattleOfThePlanets'' the guy pounds the firing button with his fist, full strength. The missile practically explodes its way out of the launcher.

to:

* In one episode of ''BattleOfThePlanets'' ''Anime/BattleOfThePlanets'' the guy pounds the firing button with his fist, full strength. The missile practically explodes its way out of the launcher.
14th May '15 4:49:54 PM nombretomado
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** ''GranTurismo IV'' had the cars go faster the harder you push the X button.

to:

** ''GranTurismo ''VideoGame/GranTurismo IV'' had the cars go faster the harder you push the X button.
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