History Main / PreppyName

15th Jul '17 8:41:12 PM nombretomado
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%% * [[BenedictCumberbatch Benedict Timothy Carlton Cumberbatch]].
21st Jun '17 8:01:50 PM karstovich2
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In the eastern part of the Arab world--the part formerly controlled by or under the influence of the Ottoman Empire--names of Turkic or Caucasian origin have historically been seen as the "upper class" names. This is especially true with names for girls and ''especially'' true with names for girls with the "v" sound in them (which [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage doesn't exist in Arabic]]) like "Nivin" and "Mervat". Christians in that part of the world have their own variant, with wealthier Christians often taking Western--especially French--names essentially unmodified (e.g. "Georges" and "Michel"); more working-class and rural Christians tended to prefer older names taken more or less directly from Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek like Butrus (Peter, from Greek ''Petros'' via ArabBeobleTalk) and Yuhanna (the Arab Christian rendering of the Hebrew/Aramaic "Yochanan", i.e. "John"), or invented within the Arabic-speaking Muslim-dominated milieu (like Abdulmasih, literally "Slave/Servant of Christ", modeled after Muslim names that take the form of Abdul[Insert One of the 99 Names of God in Islam] like Abdullah or Abdulrahman).

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In the eastern part of the Arab world--the part formerly controlled by or under the influence of the Ottoman Empire--names of Turkic or Caucasian origin have historically been seen as the "upper class" names. This is especially true with names for girls and ''especially'' true with names for girls with the "v" sound in them (which [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage doesn't exist in Arabic]]) like "Nivin" and "Mervat". Christians in that part of the world have their own variant, with wealthier Christians often taking Western--especially French--names essentially unmodified (e.g. "Georges" and "Michel"); more "Michel"). More working-class and rural Christians tended to prefer older names taken more or less directly from Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek like Butrus (Peter, from Greek ''Petros'' via ArabBeobleTalk) and Yuhanna (the Arab Christian rendering of the Hebrew/Aramaic "Yochanan", i.e. "John"), or invented within the Arabic-speaking Muslim-dominated milieu (like Abdulmasih, literally "Slave/Servant of Christ", modeled after Muslim names that take the form of Abdul[Insert One of the 99 Names of God in Islam] like Abdullah or Abdulrahman).
21st Jun '17 8:00:54 PM karstovich2
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In the eastern part of the Arab world--the part formerly controlled by or under the influence of the Ottoman Empire--names of Turkic or Caucasian origin have historically been seen as the "upper class" names. This is especially true with names for girls and ''especially'' true with names for girls with the "v" sound in them (which [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage doesn't exist in Arabic]]) like "Nivin" and "Mervat". Christians in that part of the world have their own variant, with wealthier Christians often taking Western--especially French--names essentially unmodified (e.g. "Georges" and "Michel"); more working-class and rural Christians tended to prefer older names taken more or less directly from Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek like Butrus (Peter, from Greek ''Petros'' via ArabBeobleTalk) and Yuhanna (the Arab Christian rendering of the Hebrew/Aramaic "Yochanan", i.e. "John").

to:

In the eastern part of the Arab world--the part formerly controlled by or under the influence of the Ottoman Empire--names of Turkic or Caucasian origin have historically been seen as the "upper class" names. This is especially true with names for girls and ''especially'' true with names for girls with the "v" sound in them (which [[UsefulNotes/ArabicLanguage doesn't exist in Arabic]]) like "Nivin" and "Mervat". Christians in that part of the world have their own variant, with wealthier Christians often taking Western--especially French--names essentially unmodified (e.g. "Georges" and "Michel"); more working-class and rural Christians tended to prefer older names taken more or less directly from Aramaic, Hebrew, and Greek like Butrus (Peter, from Greek ''Petros'' via ArabBeobleTalk) and Yuhanna (the Arab Christian rendering of the Hebrew/Aramaic "Yochanan", i.e. "John").
"John"), or invented within the Arabic-speaking Muslim-dominated milieu (like Abdulmasih, literally "Slave/Servant of Christ", modeled after Muslim names that take the form of Abdul[Insert One of the 99 Names of God in Islam] like Abdullah or Abdulrahman).
17th Jun '17 4:38:03 PM Odacon_Spy
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* In the American port of ''VideoGame/CrashNTheBoys'', three of the five schools competing in the "Street Challenge" are upper-class high schools whose team members all have rather snobby names, in contrast to [[GhettoName the eponymous protagonists]] from Southside High School and the "Thornley All-Stars", who have names like "Bubba" and "Rocky". To whit:

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* In the American port of ''VideoGame/CrashNTheBoys'', three of the five schools competing in the "Street Challenge" are upper-class high schools whose team members all have rather snobby names, names (especially Lincoln High), in contrast to [[GhettoName the eponymous protagonists]] from Southside High School and the "Thornley All-Stars", who have names like "Bubba" and "Rocky". To whit:
10th Jun '17 3:04:56 PM nombretomado
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* The late Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Amusingly, this was the opposite of upper-class when he was born: "Arthur" was still a fairly common name in 1917, and "Schlesinger" would have been seen as too ethnic -- and particularly too ''Jewish''[[note]]Although Schlesinger was not himself Jewish, his paternal grandfather was a Jew from Prussia[[/note]] -- to be truly upper-class in that era (during which Jews were not considered white, and Germans were [[WorldWarOne for obvious reasons]] not well-trusted). Later in life, though, things changed.

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* The late Arthur M. Schlesinger, Jr. Amusingly, this was the opposite of upper-class when he was born: "Arthur" was still a fairly common name in 1917, and "Schlesinger" would have been seen as too ethnic -- and particularly too ''Jewish''[[note]]Although Schlesinger was not himself Jewish, his paternal grandfather was a Jew from Prussia[[/note]] -- to be truly upper-class in that era (during which Jews were not considered white, and Germans were [[WorldWarOne [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarI for obvious reasons]] not well-trusted). Later in life, though, things changed.
30th May '17 10:30:17 PM EponymousKid
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Want to make your character sound wealthy? Just give them a snobby rich kid name. In American works, this is for those names like Chase (or [[MyNaymeIs Chace]]), [[Literature/GossipGirl Blair]], or in older programs, [[AlphaBitch Libby]] (which is a name more strongly associated with commoners now). For extra pretentiousness points, add a Roman numeral at the end to indicate that the name itself is a legacy. "The Third" seems to be the most popular. Girls may also be given [[GenderBlenderName traditionally male names]] such as [[Series/PrettyLittleLiars Spencer]], [[Series/GilmoreGirls Logan]], or [[Series/GossipGirl Blake]]. Men with names like Stacey or Ashley also apply. The character may also have more than one middle name. Their last names will often be of more than one word such as St. John, St. Claire, or a Dutch heritage name like Van (de/der) -something or Something-son/sen (even all in one), especially if the character is supposed to be a New Yorker, (see, e.g., [[Series/MadMen Dyckman]], [[Series/GossipGirl van der Woodsen]]). Most often, the last name will suggest a [[BritishStuffiness British heritage]] to lend that all-important [[WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant Founding Fathers]] touch, and will often be derived from a British place-name -- Hastings, Winchester, or Montgomery.

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Want to make your character sound wealthy? Just give them a snobby rich kid name. In American works, this is for those names like Chase (or [[MyNaymeIs Chace]]), [[Literature/GossipGirl Blair]], or in older programs, [[AlphaBitch Libby]] (which is a name more strongly associated with commoners now). For extra pretentiousness points, add a Roman numeral at the end to indicate that the name itself is a legacy. "The Third" seems to be the most popular. Occasionally, first or middle initial is seen (as in, for instance, "V. Marcus Wellesley" or "Harrison E. Vandenberg"). Girls may also be given [[GenderBlenderName traditionally male names]] such as [[Series/PrettyLittleLiars Spencer]], [[Series/GilmoreGirls Logan]], or [[Series/GossipGirl Blake]]. Men with names like Stacey or Ashley also apply. The character may also have more than one middle name. Their last names will often be of more than one word such as St. John, St. Claire, or a Dutch heritage name like Van (de/der) -something or Something-son/sen (even all in one), especially if the character is supposed to be a New Yorker, (see, e.g., [[Series/MadMen Dyckman]], [[Series/GossipGirl van der Woodsen]]). Most often, the last name will suggest a [[BritishStuffiness British heritage]] to lend that all-important [[WhiteAngloSaxonProtestant Founding Fathers]] touch, and will often be derived from a British place-name -- Hastings, Winchester, or Montgomery.



* Emmett Fitz-Hume in ''Film/SpiesLikeUs''. Aykroyd's character

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* Emmett Fitz-Hume in ''Film/SpiesLikeUs''. Aykroyd's character
11th May '17 10:02:51 PM Ninjinister
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Added DiffLines:

* This is oddly common with the real names of rappers. KendrickLamar Duckworth, Calvin Cordozar Broadus, Jr. (SnoopDogg), Earl Simmons (DMX), Reginald Noble (RedMan), Marshall Mathers (Eminem), Curtis James Jackson III (50Cent), and Percy Robert Miller (MasterP), just to name a few.
29th Apr '17 6:38:01 PM nombretomado
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* The English version of ''TokyoMewMew'' gave us [[PunnyName Corina Bucksworth]] (aka [[TheOjou Aizawa Minto]]).

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* The English version of ''TokyoMewMew'' ''Anime/TokyoMewMew'' gave us [[PunnyName Corina Bucksworth]] (aka [[TheOjou Aizawa Minto]]).
22nd Apr '17 8:42:46 PM nombretomado
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* [[SurvivalOfTheFittest SOTF-TV]]: A good portion of the kids in Silver Dragon Academy have this sort of name. Examples include Mae St. Clair, Leopold Sutherland, Bob Lazenby, and Renée Carlson.

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* [[SurvivalOfTheFittest [[Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest SOTF-TV]]: A good portion of the kids in Silver Dragon Academy have this sort of name. Examples include Mae St. Clair, Leopold Sutherland, Bob Lazenby, and Renée Carlson.
19th Apr '17 4:33:13 AM lexii
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If the setting and characters ''are'' British, these types of names would be described as "posh", "rah" (as in "tally-ho, rah!", a stereotypically posh exclamation), or "Sloaney" names, the latter named for London's ''Sloane Square'', an upper-class haunt. Unlike in the US, Roman numerals would ''never'' be used, and would be viewed as uppity and vulgar. Given names will be either ''very'' traditional -- think [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily Royal]] names like William (Wills), Henry, Rupert for boys, and Catherine, Elizabeth, Victoria for girls, OR more unusual, quite eccentric names like Rafferty, Rollo, Crispin, Finnbar, Tarquin, Arabella, Pandora, Binky (yep), Cressida etc that sound like something straight out of Arthurian legend or Shakespeare. The surname will ''usually'' be [[MyNaymeIs peculiarly spelled]], often in a way that defies sense, and will ''always'' be hyphenated - commonly known as a 'double-barrel' surname - sounding as though it could be the name of a particularly expensive law firm if you slapped "LLP" on the end -- [[Series/CallTheMidwife Cholmondeley-Browne]], [[Series/ToTheManorBorn Fforbes-Hamilton]], [[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Wyndham-Pryce]], etc. Essentially, an English girl called something like "Araminta Fortescue-Thompson" probably has a flat on Sloane Square, does a bit of light PR as a "job", spends most of her time shopping on the King's Road, and has a family that owns half of Yorkshire.

Note -- although preppy ''last'' names in the US and UK will be very similar (as mentioned above, preppy last-names in the US will often suggest a British heritage), it's worth mentioning that there is a ''huge'' degree of cultural dissonance between the nations in terms of what are considered to be preppy / upper-class ''first'' names. For example, girls' names thought of as being preppy in the US, like the aformentioned "Chace" or "Blair", would be thought of as being a bit naff, overly "trendy", and at worst, flagrantly nouveau riche in the UK (especially "Chace" spelt with a 2nd "c"). Sometimes they will even be thought of as ''lower''-class. But equally, to a US audience, "Sloaney-pony", posh English girls' names like "Henrietta", "Jemima", or "Arabella" sound parochial, old-fashioned, and evoke down-home, country-bumpkin types -- funny, ain't it? There's also a whole segment of Celtic (mostly Irish) boys' names that are considered "[[GhettoName chavvy]]" in England and quite smart in the New World -- Aidan, Liam, Kieran and the like.

to:

If the setting and characters ''are'' British, these types of names would be described as "posh", "rah" (as in "tally-ho, rah!", a stereotypically posh exclamation), or "Sloaney" names, the latter named for London's ''Sloane Square'', an upper-class haunt. Unlike in the US, Roman numerals would ''never'' be used, and would be viewed as uppity and ''extremely'' vulgar. Given names will be either ''very'' traditional -- think [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily Royal]] names like William (Wills), Henry, Rupert for boys, and Rupert, Catherine, Elizabeth, Victoria for girls, OR more unusual, quite eccentric names like Rafferty, Rollo, Crispin, Finnbar, Tarquin, Torquil, Candida, Arabella, Pandora, Binky (yep), (yep) and Cressida etc (etc) that sound like something straight out of Arthurian legend or Shakespeare. The surname will ''usually'' be [[MyNaymeIs peculiarly spelled]], often in a way that defies sense, and will ''always'' be hyphenated - -- commonly known as a 'double-barrel' surname - -- sounding as though it could be the name of a particularly expensive law firm if you slapped "LLP" on the end -- [[Series/CallTheMidwife Cholmondeley-Browne]], [[Series/ToTheManorBorn Fforbes-Hamilton]], [[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Wyndham-Pryce]], etc. Essentially, an English girl called something like "Araminta Fortescue-Thompson" probably has a flat on Sloane Square, does a bit of light PR as a "job", spends most of her time shopping on the King's Road, and has a family that owns half of Yorkshire.

Note -- although preppy ''last'' names in the US and UK will be very similar (as mentioned above, preppy last-names in the US will often suggest a British heritage), it's worth mentioning that there is a ''huge'' degree of cultural dissonance between the nations in terms of what are considered to be preppy / upper-class ''first'' names. For example, girls' names thought of as being preppy in the US, like the aformentioned "Chace" or "Blair", would be thought of as being a bit naff, tacky, overly "trendy", and at worst, flagrantly nouveau riche in the UK (especially "Chace" spelt with a 2nd "c"). Sometimes they will even be thought of as ''lower''-class. But equally, to a US audience, "Sloaney-pony", posh English girls' names like "Henrietta", "Jemima", or "Arabella" sound parochial, old-fashioned, and evoke down-home, country-bumpkin types -- funny, ain't it? There's also a whole segment of Celtic (mostly Irish) boys' names that are considered "[[GhettoName chavvy]]" in England and quite smart in the New World -- Aidan, Liam, Kieran and the like.
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