History Main / PreppyName

22nd Apr '17 8:42:46 PM nombretomado
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* [[SurvivalOfTheFittest SOTF-TV]]: A good portion of the kids in Silver Dragon Academy have this sort of name. Examples include Mae St. Clair, Leopold Sutherland, Bob Lazenby, and Renée Carlson.

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* [[SurvivalOfTheFittest [[Roleplay/SurvivalOfTheFittest SOTF-TV]]: A good portion of the kids in Silver Dragon Academy have this sort of name. Examples include Mae St. Clair, Leopold Sutherland, Bob Lazenby, and Renée Carlson.
19th Apr '17 4:33:13 AM lexii
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If the setting and characters ''are'' British, these types of names would be described as "posh", "rah" (as in "tally-ho, rah!", a stereotypically posh exclamation), or "Sloaney" names, the latter named for London's ''Sloane Square'', an upper-class haunt. Unlike in the US, Roman numerals would ''never'' be used, and would be viewed as uppity and vulgar. Given names will be either ''very'' traditional -- think [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily Royal]] names like William (Wills), Henry, Rupert for boys, and Catherine, Elizabeth, Victoria for girls, OR more unusual, quite eccentric names like Rafferty, Rollo, Crispin, Finnbar, Tarquin, Arabella, Pandora, Binky (yep), Cressida etc that sound like something straight out of Arthurian legend or Shakespeare. The surname will ''usually'' be [[MyNaymeIs peculiarly spelled]], often in a way that defies sense, and will ''always'' be hyphenated - commonly known as a 'double-barrel' surname - sounding as though it could be the name of a particularly expensive law firm if you slapped "LLP" on the end -- [[Series/CallTheMidwife Cholmondeley-Browne]], [[Series/ToTheManorBorn Fforbes-Hamilton]], [[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Wyndham-Pryce]], etc. Essentially, an English girl called something like "Araminta Fortescue-Thompson" probably has a flat on Sloane Square, does a bit of light PR as a "job", spends most of her time shopping on the King's Road, and has a family that owns half of Yorkshire.

Note -- although preppy ''last'' names in the US and UK will be very similar (as mentioned above, preppy last-names in the US will often suggest a British heritage), it's worth mentioning that there is a ''huge'' degree of cultural dissonance between the nations in terms of what are considered to be preppy / upper-class ''first'' names. For example, girls' names thought of as being preppy in the US, like the aformentioned "Chace" or "Blair", would be thought of as being a bit naff, overly "trendy", and at worst, flagrantly nouveau riche in the UK (especially "Chace" spelt with a 2nd "c"). Sometimes they will even be thought of as ''lower''-class. But equally, to a US audience, "Sloaney-pony", posh English girls' names like "Henrietta", "Jemima", or "Arabella" sound parochial, old-fashioned, and evoke down-home, country-bumpkin types -- funny, ain't it? There's also a whole segment of Celtic (mostly Irish) boys' names that are considered "[[GhettoName chavvy]]" in England and quite smart in the New World -- Aidan, Liam, Kieran and the like.

to:

If the setting and characters ''are'' British, these types of names would be described as "posh", "rah" (as in "tally-ho, rah!", a stereotypically posh exclamation), or "Sloaney" names, the latter named for London's ''Sloane Square'', an upper-class haunt. Unlike in the US, Roman numerals would ''never'' be used, and would be viewed as uppity and ''extremely'' vulgar. Given names will be either ''very'' traditional -- think [[UsefulNotes/TheBritishRoyalFamily Royal]] names like William (Wills), Henry, Rupert for boys, and Rupert, Catherine, Elizabeth, Victoria for girls, OR more unusual, quite eccentric names like Rafferty, Rollo, Crispin, Finnbar, Tarquin, Torquil, Candida, Arabella, Pandora, Binky (yep), (yep) and Cressida etc (etc) that sound like something straight out of Arthurian legend or Shakespeare. The surname will ''usually'' be [[MyNaymeIs peculiarly spelled]], often in a way that defies sense, and will ''always'' be hyphenated - -- commonly known as a 'double-barrel' surname - -- sounding as though it could be the name of a particularly expensive law firm if you slapped "LLP" on the end -- [[Series/CallTheMidwife Cholmondeley-Browne]], [[Series/ToTheManorBorn Fforbes-Hamilton]], [[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer Wyndham-Pryce]], etc. Essentially, an English girl called something like "Araminta Fortescue-Thompson" probably has a flat on Sloane Square, does a bit of light PR as a "job", spends most of her time shopping on the King's Road, and has a family that owns half of Yorkshire.

Note -- although preppy ''last'' names in the US and UK will be very similar (as mentioned above, preppy last-names in the US will often suggest a British heritage), it's worth mentioning that there is a ''huge'' degree of cultural dissonance between the nations in terms of what are considered to be preppy / upper-class ''first'' names. For example, girls' names thought of as being preppy in the US, like the aformentioned "Chace" or "Blair", would be thought of as being a bit naff, tacky, overly "trendy", and at worst, flagrantly nouveau riche in the UK (especially "Chace" spelt with a 2nd "c"). Sometimes they will even be thought of as ''lower''-class. But equally, to a US audience, "Sloaney-pony", posh English girls' names like "Henrietta", "Jemima", or "Arabella" sound parochial, old-fashioned, and evoke down-home, country-bumpkin types -- funny, ain't it? There's also a whole segment of Celtic (mostly Irish) boys' names that are considered "[[GhettoName chavvy]]" in England and quite smart in the New World -- Aidan, Liam, Kieran and the like.
25th Mar '17 2:21:36 PM EllaDeTroper
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* ''WesternANimation/WordGirl'': Theodore "Tobey"[=MacCallister=] III. My, but isn't that a mouthful?

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* ''WesternANimation/WordGirl'': Theodore "Tobey"[=MacCallister=] "Tobey" [=McCallister=] III. My, but isn't Isn't that a mouthful?
13th Mar '17 9:51:48 PM Micah
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* ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'': The Voorhees family: besides having a classic New York Dutch last name, the ''unspeakably'' rich family (Jacqueline Voorhees calls ''$12 million'' "peanuts") that hires Kimmy as (basically) a gofer includes two children named Xanthippe and Buckley.

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* ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'': ''Series/UnbreakableKimmySchmidt'':
**
The unspeakably rich Voorhees family: besides having a family, with their classic New York Dutch last name, the ''unspeakably'' rich family (Jacqueline Voorhees calls ''$12 million'' "peanuts") that hires Kimmy as (basically) a gofer includes two children named Xanthippe [[Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire Lannister]] and Buckley. Buckley.
** When Kimmy herself is pretending to be rich to fit in at one of their parties, she claims that her name is "Kimberly Tiara von Lobster".
12th Mar '17 5:34:08 PM nombretomado
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As for French first names, medieval names or names of obscure saints such as Enguerrand, Foulque, Hubert or Eudes are far more common than among the general population; vaguely Victorian-sounding names like Joséphine or Apolline for girls. Oddly, High Middle Ages-sounding names like Clovis or Harald seem to be making a comeback among the ''middle class''. Or, using the opposite of the most common usage of a unisex name: Camille, but only for a boy, or Claude, but only for a girl. Stock {{Preppy Name}}s (or at least "BCBG" names) in French fiction will usually include unusual combinations of hyphenated first names, such as Jean-Gabriel or Marie-Chantal or Charles-Édouard or [[TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool Saison-Marguerite]]; note that if you have "Marie" in a hyphenated boys' name, like "Jean-Marie" or "Charles-Marie", you're dealing with someone who may be an aristocrat, is likely rather conservative, and almost certainly a very serious Catholic--and if not, his parents were. On the opposite side of the social spectrum, Kevinism is in full swing, generally attributed to working-class mothers from the late Cold War drawing baby-names from poorly-produced American soap operas, Kevin and Vanessa being the most stereotypical examples possibly due to ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' being extremely well-known in France (as "Les feux de l'amour") and syndicated to this day.

to:

As for French first names, medieval names or names of obscure saints such as Enguerrand, Foulque, Hubert or Eudes are far more common than among the general population; vaguely Victorian-sounding names like Joséphine or Apolline for girls. Oddly, High Middle Ages-sounding names like Clovis or Harald seem to be making a comeback among the ''middle class''. Or, using the opposite of the most common usage of a unisex name: Camille, but only for a boy, or Claude, but only for a girl. Stock {{Preppy Name}}s (or at least "BCBG" names) in French fiction will usually include unusual combinations of hyphenated first names, such as Jean-Gabriel or Marie-Chantal or Charles-Édouard or [[TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool [[WebAnimation/TheMostPopularGirlsInSchool Saison-Marguerite]]; note that if you have "Marie" in a hyphenated boys' name, like "Jean-Marie" or "Charles-Marie", you're dealing with someone who may be an aristocrat, is likely rather conservative, and almost certainly a very serious Catholic--and if not, his parents were. On the opposite side of the social spectrum, Kevinism is in full swing, generally attributed to working-class mothers from the late Cold War drawing baby-names from poorly-produced American soap operas, Kevin and Vanessa being the most stereotypical examples possibly due to ''Series/TheYoungAndTheRestless'' being extremely well-known in France (as "Les feux de l'amour") and syndicated to this day.
19th Feb '17 5:20:51 AM CynicalBastardo
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* English actor Blake Harrison noted that when he was in acting school, he was expected and practically [[{{Typecasting}} expected]] to play educated, intelligent actors, and wound up utter subverting it by becoming best known for playing [[TheDitz borderline terminally stupid]] [[Series/TheInbetweeners Neil Sutherland]].

to:

* English actor Blake Harrison noted that when he was in acting school, he was expected and practically [[{{Typecasting}} expected]] typecast]] to play educated, intelligent actors, characters, and wound up utter subverting it by becoming best known for playing [[TheDitz borderline terminally stupid]] [[Series/TheInbetweeners Neil Sutherland]].
19th Feb '17 5:19:47 AM CynicalBastardo
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Added DiffLines:

* English actor Blake Harrison noted that when he was in acting school, he was expected and practically [[{{Typecasting}} expected]] to play educated, intelligent actors, and wound up utter subverting it by becoming best known for playing [[TheDitz borderline terminally stupid]] [[Series/TheInbetweeners Neil Sutherland]].
7th Jan '17 11:47:04 PM bombadil211
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* [[Creator/KieferSutherland Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland ]].

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* [[Creator/KieferSutherland Kiefer William Frederick Dempsey George Rufus Sutherland ]]. Sutherland]]. He likes to joke that his [[Creator/DonaldSutherland father]] owed a lot of money and favors to a lot of people and gave away naming rights as recompense.
5th Dec '16 5:00:19 PM mirisu92
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** ''Literature/{{Tree}}'': Espiridion, TheNarrator's father, who works as a farm administrator.

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** ''Literature/{{Tree}}'': Espiridion, TheNarrator's father, who works as a farm administrator.administrator, although not exactly part of the landowning oligarchy himself.



** Alistair Cheng, who probably takes the fifty-million-dollar, six-storey cake.

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** Alistair Cheng, who probably takes the fifty-million-dollar, six-storey cake.and several others.
29th Nov '16 10:37:11 PM mirisu92
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Added DiffLines:

** ''Literature/{{Tree}}'': Espiridion, TheNarrator's father, who works as a farm administrator.
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