History Main / PragmaticAdaptation

11th Sep '17 9:01:16 AM MCanter89
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Time is often a factor in this. When you're adapting a 600-page book (or, for that matter, a [[Franchise/{{Batman}} seventy-year old]] [[Franchise/{{Superman}} comic series]]) into a [[TheFilmOfTheBook two-hour movie]], something's gotta go. The reverse can also be true; stretching out a relatively short book into a much longer film and/or TV show often results in [[AdaptationExpansion changes]].

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Time is often a factor in this. When you're adapting a 600-page book (or, for that matter, a [[Franchise/{{Batman}} seventy-year old]] seventy-year-old]] [[Franchise/{{Superman}} comic series]]) into a [[TheFilmOfTheBook two-hour movie]], something's gotta go. The reverse can also be true; stretching out a relatively short book into a much longer film and/or TV show often results in [[AdaptationExpansion changes]].



The manga also included the successful use of nuclear weapons on several occasions, something that would have made worldwide headlines in the real world but, amazingly, went totally unnoticed by the public in the manga. The anime adaptations remove all of the byzantine subplots, conspiracies, eccentric guest characters, and soap opera twists. In the original manga, unlike the OVA, [[spoiler: Kanzaki's arrest]] is hardly the end of him. Like any villain worth his salt, he always has an escape plan and keeps coming back with another grandiose scheme. The anime's focus is on Shin's perceived loss of his humanity.\\

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The manga also included the successful use of nuclear weapons on several occasions, something that would have made worldwide headlines in the real world but, amazingly, went totally unnoticed by the public in the manga. The anime adaptations remove all of the byzantine subplots, conspiracies, eccentric guest characters, and soap opera twists. In the original manga, unlike the OVA, [[spoiler: Kanzaki's [[spoiler:Kanzaki's arrest]] is hardly the end of him. Like any villain worth his salt, he always has an escape plan and keeps coming back with another grandiose scheme. The anime's focus is on Shin's perceived loss of his humanity.\\



Also, it should be noted that the manga series, which lasted seven years (1979-1986), inexplicably lasted more than twice as long as Shin's forced mercenary contract of three years. It was still running when the original OVA was produced. The OVA's ending had to be different from the manga in order to avoid spoilers. The U.S. manga adaptation lasted briefly (42 issues and then briefly in ''Animerica'' magazine) and was nowhere close to the end, but by the time of the brief ''Animerica'' run, the series had already begun to JumpTheShark due to the meandering subplots. What little is known (to non-Japanese speaking readers) about the manga's ending is that fans feel it was a cop-out. [[spoiler: In the final battle, Shin gets his revenge on Kanzaki, but gets shot down, gets amnesia and forgets all about his experiences at Area 88. He and Ryoko get married and live happily ever after]]. The OVA's strong and powerful ending is widely considered preferable.

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Also, it should be noted that the manga series, which lasted seven years (1979-1986), inexplicably lasted more than twice as long as Shin's forced mercenary contract of three years. It was still running when the original OVA was produced. The OVA's ending had to be different from the manga in order to avoid spoilers. The U.S. manga adaptation lasted briefly (42 issues and then briefly in ''Animerica'' magazine) and was nowhere close to the end, but by the time of the brief ''Animerica'' run, the series had already begun to JumpTheShark due to the meandering subplots. What little is known (to non-Japanese speaking readers) about the manga's ending is that fans feel it was a cop-out. [[spoiler: In [[spoiler:In the final battle, Shin gets his revenge on Kanzaki, but gets shot down, gets amnesia and forgets all about his experiences at Area 88. He and Ryoko get married and live happily ever after]]. The OVA's strong and powerful ending is widely considered preferable.



* Creator/JunjiIto did a manga adaptation of ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' that patched a rather significant plot hole in the original work that would have been only more glaring to modern audiences. In the original story, Victor Frankenstein is threatened by the monster into creating a bride for him, but despite having everything on the line, he decides to destroy it before completion on the biologically nonsensical premise that the pair could spawn a whole race of similar monsters. In the manga, [[spoiler: Victor goes through with it, since to do otherwise is to put himself and those he loves at risk. In the end, though, the bride ends up a mindless, violent monster rather than the thinking being his first creation was. The monster assumes Victor deliberately sabotaged the work and seeks his revenge.]]

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* Creator/JunjiIto did a manga adaptation of ''Literature/{{Frankenstein}}'' that patched a rather significant plot hole in the original work that would have been only more glaring to modern audiences. In the original story, Victor Frankenstein is threatened by the monster into creating a bride for him, but despite having everything on the line, he decides to destroy it before completion on the biologically nonsensical premise that the pair could spawn a whole race of similar monsters. In the manga, [[spoiler: Victor [[spoiler:Victor goes through with it, since to do otherwise is to put himself and those he loves at risk. In the end, though, the bride ends up a mindless, violent monster rather than the thinking being his first creation was. The monster assumes Victor deliberately sabotaged the work and seeks his revenge.]]



* While the ''Anime/AceAttorney'' anime is very faithful to the games, some changes in the progression of the cases were made due to time constraints, and others to better suit the story's pacing. This results in some gags (Sahwit hilariously throwing his wig at Phoenix's face) and optional content [[RunningGag (the ladder/stepladder debate)]] being cut out, and changes in locales (Cody's interrogation taking place during the investigation).

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* While the ''Anime/AceAttorney'' anime is very faithful to the games, some changes in the progression of the cases were made due to time constraints, and others to better suit the story's pacing. This results in some gags (Sahwit hilariously throwing his wig at Phoenix's face) and optional content [[RunningGag (the ([[RunningGag the ladder/stepladder debate)]] debate]]) being cut out, and changes in locales (Cody's interrogation taking place during the investigation).



[[folder: Comic Books]]

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[[folder: Comic [[folder:Comic Books]]



** Disney's ''Disney/TheAdventuresOfIchabodAndMrToad'': Very much so in the Mr. Toad segment. It does avoid being an InNameOnly adaptation by keeping Toad's personality the same as in the book (even if other characters are very different) and staying true to the basic story structure of the Toad parts of Literature/TheWindInTheWillows, but it does change a few things up, attempting to make Toad more sympathetic by [[AdaptationalHeroism having him be innocent of the crime he's imprisoned for.]] The Sleepy Hollow segment, on the other hand, is quite true to [[Literature/TheLegendOfSleepyHollow the original tale]], both story- and character-wise, though a few other liberties were taken.

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** Disney's ''Disney/TheAdventuresOfIchabodAndMrToad'': Very much so in the Mr. Toad segment. It does avoid being an InNameOnly adaptation by keeping Toad's personality the same as in the book (even if other characters are very different) and staying true to the basic story structure of the Toad parts of Literature/TheWindInTheWillows, but it does change a few things up, attempting to make Toad more sympathetic by [[AdaptationalHeroism having him be innocent of the crime he's imprisoned for.]] for]]. The Sleepy Hollow segment, on the other hand, is quite true to [[Literature/TheLegendOfSleepyHollow the original tale]], both story- and character-wise, though a few other liberties were taken.



** Disney's adaptation of ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek mythology in general -- were as family-unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance. The basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this. The studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]: it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), plot points, and setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story) and reworks everything else, such as expanding Hades's role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]. Ultimately, this makes the film less an adaptation of Greek mythology and more like a [[JustForFun/XMeetsY mashup of]] ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]

to:

** Disney's adaptation of ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek mythology in general -- were as family-unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance. The basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this. The studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]: it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), plot points, and setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story) and reworks everything else, such as expanding Hades's role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]. Ultimately, this makes the film less an adaptation of Greek mythology and more like a [[JustForFun/XMeetsY mashup of]] ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]Greece]].



* Most comic book inspired movies are like this, though many fans can't get past a TheyChangedItNowItSucks reaction. The original example is ''[[Film/{{Superman}} Superman: The Movie]]'' and its sequels. The first half of the film maintains the backstory of the characters, and Supes looks just like he does in the comics, as do many supporting characters. The film makes stylistic changes and alters the backstory (e.g. Clark was never Superboy), yet is still very much in tune with the spirit of the comics up to that point.

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* Most comic book inspired book–inspired movies are like this, though many fans can't get past a TheyChangedItNowItSucks reaction. The original example is ''[[Film/{{Superman}} Superman: The Movie]]'' and its sequels. The first half of the film maintains the backstory of the characters, and Supes looks just like he does in the comics, as do many supporting characters. The film makes stylistic changes and alters the backstory (e.g. Clark was never Superboy), yet is still very much in tune with the spirit of the comics up to that point.



* ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan'' has another nice take on it: Peter ''steals'' an experimental web formula from Oscorp, which he simply needs to refine a bit and build web-shooters for (based on the already-existing technology) to serve his purposes. Peter Parker does ''not'' begin his career with the 'ubergeek' personality. Someone capable of building gadgets [[note]]a talent that we see put into practice with more than just the webshooters, which he can't even take full credit for in this film[[/note]]like him would actually be considered pretty cool, so he's more of a loner here; the only one at his school who really looks down on him is Flash Thompson. Uncle Ben's role is expanded, but this just makes his death sadder. The 'wrestling' bit is left out, too. These changes are ''all'' needed to keep the film from being a retelling of the origin story as shown in the first film of the previous trilogy.
* The ''Film/XMen'' movies, which focus on the human-mutant conflict, greatly simplify the Marvel universe, cutting out the magic powers, scheming alien empires, and the like. Several characters who aren't mutants are made into mutants for simplicity's sake, the Phoenix Force is [[spoiler:a destructive aspect of Jean Grey's personality which was [[MindRape psychically repressed]] by Prof. Xavier]], and [[ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames almost none of the characters are referred to by their "superhero" names except in passing]]. (That explanation for Jean's Phoenix powers was in fact the original one, before later comics {{RetCon}}ned them by creating the Phoenix Force as a godlike cosmic entity.) Rogue is unable to fly, has no fighting/combat abilities, and does not have super strength or invulnerability. This is because, unlike in the comic books, she has none of the abilities that she acquired from Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers).
* In the comics, Fred Dukes, A.K.A Blob, is a mutant whose specific abilities seem to revolve around being morbidly obese. In ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', however, Dukes is physically fit until he develops an eating disorder; his super strength is what allows him to carry his own weight.

to:

* ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan'' has another nice take on it: Peter ''steals'' an experimental web formula from Oscorp, which he simply needs to refine a bit and build web-shooters for (based on the already-existing technology) to serve his purposes. Peter Parker does ''not'' begin his career with the 'ubergeek' personality. Someone capable of building gadgets [[note]]a gadgets[[note]]a talent that we see put into practice with more than just the webshooters, which he can't even take full credit for in this film[[/note]]like film[[/note]] like him would actually be considered pretty cool, so he's more of a loner here; the only one at his school who really looks down on him is Flash Thompson. Uncle Ben's role is expanded, but this just makes his death sadder. The 'wrestling' bit is left out, too. These changes are ''all'' needed to keep the film from being a retelling of the origin story as shown in the first film of the previous trilogy.
trilogy.
* The ''Film/XMen'' movies, which focus on the human-mutant human–mutant conflict, greatly simplify the Marvel universe, cutting out the magic powers, scheming alien empires, and the like. Several characters who aren't mutants are made into mutants for simplicity's sake, the Phoenix Force is [[spoiler:a destructive aspect of Jean Grey's personality which was [[MindRape psychically repressed]] by Prof. Xavier]], and [[ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames almost none of the characters are referred to by their "superhero" names except in passing]]. (That explanation for Jean's Phoenix powers was in fact the original one, before later comics {{RetCon}}ned {{retcon}}ned them by creating the Phoenix Force as a godlike cosmic entity.) Rogue is unable to fly, has no fighting/combat abilities, and does not have super strength or invulnerability. This is because, unlike in the comic books, she has none of the abilities that she acquired from Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers).
Danvers).
* In the comics, Fred Dukes, A.K.A Blob, is a mutant whose specific abilities seem to revolve around being morbidly obese. In ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', however, Dukes is physically fit until he develops an eating disorder; his super strength is what allows him to carry his own weight.



** The [[Film/IronMan3 third film]] took ''great'' liberties with its main villain, the Mandarin, while still having him faithful to the source material... in a way. [[spoiler:Trevor Slattery's In-Universe impersonation of the Mandarin was based in part on the same YellowPeril tropes that inspired the original version seen in the early ''Iron Man'' comics, while Aldritch Killian is based on modern versions of the character and claims to be the ''true'' Mandarin. However, it turns out that both Slattery ''and'' Killian merely stole the ''real'' Mandarin's persona; ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail The King]]'' reveals that the real one is not only still out there, but hungry for vengeance against those who stole his name]]. This was mostly to avoid the YellowPeril stereotype and make it appeal to the ever-growing Chinese film industry.

to:

** The [[Film/IronMan3 third film]] took ''great'' liberties with its main villain, the Mandarin, while still having him faithful to the source material... in a way. [[spoiler:Trevor Slattery's In-Universe in-universe impersonation of the Mandarin was based in part on the same YellowPeril tropes that inspired the original version seen in the early ''Iron Man'' comics, while Aldritch Killian is based on modern versions of the character and claims to be the ''true'' Mandarin. However, it turns out that both Slattery ''and'' Killian merely stole the ''real'' Mandarin's persona; ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail The King]]'' reveals that the real one is not only still out there, but hungry for vengeance against those who stole his name]]. This was mostly to avoid the YellowPeril stereotype and make it appeal to the ever-growing Chinese film industry.



* The ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' [[Film/{{Watchmen}} film]] has ''numerous'' changes to the source material, most of them extrapolated from the comic. Two significant changes -- ([[spoiler:Dan Dreiberg seeing Rorschach's death and subsequently beating up Ozymandias, and changing some of the dialogue for the ending]]) -- were most likely done to prevent leaving the audience with a complete and horrible DownerEnding (though the graphic novel leaves the thread open). For the climax, they decided on [[spoiler:a device that emulated Dr. Manhattan's energy signature, allowing the world to scapegoat ''him'', rather than the alien squid]]. People are undecided as to which works better ''overall,'' but it's definitely the best they could have done with that ending in film. The moment where Rorschach snaps was changed, mostly to avoid comparison with ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'', but the new scene also allows us to see the moment his mind snaps without an overabundance of narration.
* ''ComicBook/TheMightyThor'' [[Film/{{Thor}} film]] didn't use the [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe pseudo-Elizabethan English]] that the Asgardian characters spoke for many years in the comics, which they themselves have already dropped this highly campy element. However while movie Thor doesn't use the pseudo-Elizabethan English, he ''does'' still speak in the largely antiquated and hammy style of the comics to largely the same effect (just minus the "thou's" and "thy's"). It was also decided that Thor's iconic helmet would only make one appearance near the beginning of the film before being discarded due to looking a little ridiculous on the big screen.

to:

* The ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' [[Film/{{Watchmen}} film]] has ''numerous'' changes to the source material, most of them extrapolated from the comic. Two significant changes -- ([[spoiler:Dan Dreiberg seeing Rorschach's death and subsequently beating up Ozymandias, and changing some of the dialogue for the ending]]) -- were most likely done to prevent leaving the audience with a complete and horrible DownerEnding (though the graphic novel leaves the thread open). For the climax, they decided on [[spoiler:a device that emulated Dr. Manhattan's energy signature, allowing the world to scapegoat ''him'', rather than the alien squid]]. People are undecided as to which works better ''overall,'' ''overall'', but it's definitely the best they could have done with that ending in film. The moment where Rorschach snaps was changed, mostly to avoid comparison with ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'', but the new scene also allows us to see the moment his mind snaps without an overabundance of narration.
* ''ComicBook/TheMightyThor'' [[Film/{{Thor}} film]] didn't use the [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe pseudo-Elizabethan English]] that the Asgardian characters spoke for many years in the comics, which they themselves have already dropped this highly campy element. However However, while movie Thor doesn't use the pseudo-Elizabethan English, he ''does'' still speak in the largely antiquated and hammy style of the comics to largely the same effect (just minus the "thou's" and "thy's"). It was also decided that Thor's iconic helmet would only make one appearance near the beginning of the film before being discarded due to looking a little ridiculous on the big screen.



* ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' features the costume Cap wore in the comics, but it's for a propaganda show and he looks [[{{Camp}} utterly ridiculous]]. When he gets his actual fighting suit, it's radically different and much more plausible: changes include a helmet instead of a cowl, mere decals instead of large head wings, body armour, and the red of his costume is in the form of red utility straps rather than gaudy decorative stripes.
* ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' completely upends [[ComicBook/CivilWar its comic book namesake]], changing the Superhero Registration Act into the Sokovia Accords, the reasoning for the accords (from a panicking Nitro setting off his expanded powers to kill ComicBook/TheNewWarriors and 600 others in Stanton to a suicide vest worn by Crossbones going off and killing bystanders in a botched Avengers mission), giving new reasoning between Captain America and Iron Man's disagreements (both the Accords and the possible innocence of the Winter Soldier) and increasing the importance of ComicBook/BlackPanther, Black Widow and ComicBook/ScarletWitch (who either had bit parts or weren't around in the comic story) while decreasing that of ComicBook/SpiderMan (who played a major part in the original comic).

to:

* ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' features the costume Cap wore in the comics, but it's for a propaganda show and he looks [[{{Camp}} utterly ridiculous]]. When he gets his actual fighting suit, it's radically different and much more plausible: changes include a helmet instead of a cowl, mere decals instead of large head wings, body armour, armor, and the red of his costume is in the form of red utility straps rather than gaudy decorative stripes.
* ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' completely upends [[ComicBook/CivilWar its comic book namesake]], changing the Superhero Registration Act into the Sokovia Accords, the reasoning for the accords (from a panicking Nitro setting off his expanded powers to kill ComicBook/TheNewWarriors and 600 others in Stanton to a suicide vest worn by Crossbones going off and killing bystanders in a botched Avengers mission), giving new reasoning between Captain America and Iron Man's disagreements (both the Accords and the possible innocence of the Winter Soldier) and increasing the importance of ComicBook/BlackPanther, Black Widow Widow, and ComicBook/ScarletWitch (who either had bit parts or weren't around in the comic story) while decreasing that of ComicBook/SpiderMan (who played a major part in the original comic).



** Spider-Man does not publicly reveal his SecretIdentity because of the change in the nature of the SuperRegistrationAct and because he makes his debut in the MCU here -- not to mention that he's still in high school when the movie occurs. He also [[spoiler:does not change sides.]]
** The ComicBook/NewWarriors and Nitro (the original instigators) do not currently exist in the MCU. Instead, the catalyst for the SuperRegistrationAct is an international incident involving the Avengers. Not to mention, the original catalyst -- a bunch of teenage superheroes causing a catastrophe simply to get more viewers for their reality show -- would sound a little too far-fetched for a live-action movie anyway. However, while Nitro isn't involved, the incident IS someone blowing himself up, just instead of Nitro, it's Crossbones.

to:

** Spider-Man does not publicly reveal his SecretIdentity because of the change in the nature of the SuperRegistrationAct and because he makes his debut in the MCU here -- not to mention that he's still in high school when the movie occurs. He also [[spoiler:does not change sides.]]
sides]].
** The ComicBook/NewWarriors and Nitro (the original instigators) do not currently exist in the MCU. Instead, the catalyst for the SuperRegistrationAct is an international incident involving the Avengers. Not to mention, the original catalyst -- a bunch of teenage superheroes causing a catastrophe simply to get more viewers for their reality show -- would sound a little too far-fetched for a live-action movie anyway. However, while Nitro isn't involved, the incident IS ''is'' someone blowing himself up, just instead of Nitro, it's Crossbones.



** Also, in the comic, S.H.I.E.L.D. attempted to arrest Captain America for simply saying he wouldn't personally enforce a law that hadn't been passed yet. Here, Cap isn't a target until he actually breaks the law to help Bucky and there is an earnest attempt to convince him to change his mind. Cap, for his part, doesn't break the law until he hears there's a kill-on-sight order out on Bucky - prior to that, he and Falcon were apparently just going to retire.

to:

** Also, in the comic, S.H.I.E.L.D. attempted to arrest Captain America for simply saying he wouldn't personally enforce a law that hadn't been passed yet. Here, Cap isn't a target until he actually breaks the law to help Bucky Bucky, and there is an earnest attempt to convince him to change his mind. Cap, for his part, doesn't break the law until he hears there's a kill-on-sight order out on Bucky - prior to that, he and Falcon were apparently just going to retire. retire.



* ''Literature/{{Filth}}'' is an adaptation of one of Irvine Welsh's novels, considered to be "unfilmable." The movie manages to stay relatively close to the source material and is faithful to the novel's spirit; however, it does cut several aspects of the book that wouldn't work in film in order to make a more cohesive work. Bruce's cruelty is (very slightly) toned down to make him less irredeemable (although he is far from sanitized) and [[spoiler: The Self/The Tapeworm is played down,]] with his role being given to Bruce's psychiatrist, Dr. Rossi. [[spoiler: It still makes a brief appearance in one of the film's most intense scenes.]]

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* ''Literature/{{Filth}}'' is an adaptation of one of Irvine Welsh's novels, considered to be "unfilmable." The movie manages to stay relatively close to the source material and is faithful to the novel's spirit; however, it does cut several aspects of the book that wouldn't work in film in order to make a more cohesive work. Bruce's cruelty is (very slightly) toned down to make him less irredeemable (although he is far from sanitized) and [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:The Self/The Tapeworm is played down,]] down]], with his role being given to Bruce's psychiatrist, Dr. Rossi. [[spoiler: It [[spoiler:It still makes a brief appearance in one of the film's most intense scenes.]]



** Arwen has a [[AffirmativeActionGirl much more active role]] in the first movie than in the book. A grand total of three scenes featuring Aragorn and Arwen were added, none of which happened in the books and all of them [[RomanticPlotTumor eating up tons of screen-time.]] This was probably done in part to help prevent the movies from being a sausagefest, which for the most part the books were. Arwen was also intended to fight in the Battle of Helm's Deep, but the filmmakers thought this was a bridge too far. You can still see her very briefly in the background of wide shots, wearing pink and on a white horse.
** The alterations of Faramir's actions and motivations in ''The Two Towers'' are a result of this. The Shelob scene that provided the cliffhanger in the book doesn't chronologically take place until the battle of Minas Tirith, so according to Jackson something else had to form the climax of the second movie for Frodo and Sam. Further, it was noted that every other character in the films had an adverse reaction to being in the presence of the Ring, and for Faramir to let them go without a second glance felt somewhat off to Jackson and company. Narrative concerns helped too; with Shelob moved to ''Return of the King'' (since Jackson rightly felt that anything would pale after Helm's Deep), Frodo and Sam needed to be placed in peril ''somehow'', and Faramir was there.

to:

** Arwen has a [[AffirmativeActionGirl much more active role]] in the first movie than in the book. A grand total of three scenes featuring Aragorn and Arwen were added, none of which happened in the books and all of them [[RomanticPlotTumor eating up tons of screen-time.]] screen-time]]. This was probably done in part to help prevent the movies from being a sausagefest, which for the most part the books were. Arwen was also intended to fight in the Battle of Helm's Deep, but the filmmakers thought this was a bridge too far. You can still see her very briefly in the background of wide shots, wearing pink and on a white horse.
** The alterations of Faramir's actions and motivations in ''The Two Towers'' are a result of this. The Shelob scene that provided the cliffhanger in the book doesn't chronologically take place until the battle of Minas Tirith, so according to Jackson something else had to form the climax of the second movie for Frodo and Sam. Further, it was noted that every other character in the films had an adverse reaction to being in the presence of the Ring, and for Faramir to let them go without a second glance felt somewhat off to Jackson and company. Narrative concerns helped helped, too; with Shelob moved to ''Return of the King'' (since Jackson rightly felt that anything would pale after Helm's Deep), Frodo and Sam needed to be placed in peril ''somehow'', and Faramir was there.



** In the books Aragorn is ([[HeroicBSOD usually]]) quietly confident in himself and his status as the rightful heir to the throne of Gondor, willing to become King if [[BecauseDestinySaysSo that is his fate]], and letting out some {{Badass Boast}}s about his heritage at certain times - just like heroic kings and princes of ancient and medieval literature. However, the filmmakers thought this could lead to ValuesDissonance for a modern audience, so Aragorn becomes full of self-doubt and only fully accepts his royal heritage and destiny in the third film. One way this is enforced is by giving Aragorn the ancient sword of kings, [[NamedWeapons Narsil/Andúril]], only in the third film, while in the books he carries it from his first appearance (he uses a generic sword before that).

to:

** In the books Aragorn is ([[HeroicBSOD usually]]) quietly confident in himself and his status as the rightful heir to the throne of Gondor, willing to become King if [[BecauseDestinySaysSo that is his fate]], and letting out some {{Badass Boast}}s about his heritage at certain times - just like heroic kings and princes of ancient and medieval literature. However, the filmmakers thought this could lead to ValuesDissonance for a modern audience, so Aragorn becomes full of self-doubt and only fully accepts his royal heritage and destiny in the third film. One way this is enforced is by giving Aragorn the ancient sword of kings, [[NamedWeapons Narsil/Andúril]], only in the third film, while in the books he carries it from his first appearance (he uses a generic sword before that).
3rd Sep '17 2:33:16 AM SeptimusHeap
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* The ''Film/{{X-Men}}'' movies, which focus on the human-mutant conflict, greatly simplify the Marvel universe, cutting out the magic powers, scheming alien empires, and the like. Several characters who aren't mutants are made into mutants for simplicity's sake, the Phoenix Force is [[spoiler:a destructive aspect of Jean Grey's personality which was [[MindRape psychically repressed]] by Prof. Xavier]], and [[ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames almost none of the characters are referred to by their "superhero" names except in passing]]. (That explanation for Jean's Phoenix powers was in fact the original one, before later comics {{RetCon}}ned them by creating the Phoenix Force as a godlike cosmic entity.) Rogue is unable to fly, has no fighting/combat abilities, and does not have super strength or invulnerability. This is because, unlike in the comic books, she has none of the abilities that she acquired from Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers).

to:

* The ''Film/{{X-Men}}'' ''Film/XMen'' movies, which focus on the human-mutant conflict, greatly simplify the Marvel universe, cutting out the magic powers, scheming alien empires, and the like. Several characters who aren't mutants are made into mutants for simplicity's sake, the Phoenix Force is [[spoiler:a destructive aspect of Jean Grey's personality which was [[MindRape psychically repressed]] by Prof. Xavier]], and [[ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames almost none of the characters are referred to by their "superhero" names except in passing]]. (That explanation for Jean's Phoenix powers was in fact the original one, before later comics {{RetCon}}ned them by creating the Phoenix Force as a godlike cosmic entity.) Rogue is unable to fly, has no fighting/combat abilities, and does not have super strength or invulnerability. This is because, unlike in the comic books, she has none of the abilities that she acquired from Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers).
30th Aug '17 4:23:09 AM OlmoJV
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* There is at least one remarkable change in the ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' fanfic ''Fanfic/TheUltimateEvil'': while Uncle's spell banishes Shendu's astral form from Jade's body in the retelling of the episode ''Project A, For Astral'', the Demon Sorcerer isn't trapped in his statue prison. He's still able to wander around in his spirit form, allowing him to [[StalkerWithACrush spy]] on [[OriginalCharacter Valerie]] (though for the sake of not altering the plot too much, he's made unable to go near the Chans or their home).

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* There is at least one remarkable change in the The ''WesternAnimation/JackieChanAdventures'' fanfic ''Fanfic/TheUltimateEvil'': while ''Fanfic/TheUltimateEvil'' has one. While Uncle's spell banishes Shendu's astral form from Jade's body in the retelling of the episode ''Project A, For Astral'', the Demon Sorcerer isn't trapped in his statue prison. He's still able to wander around in his spirit form, allowing him to [[StalkerWithACrush spy]] on spy on]] his eventual [[VillainousCrush love interest]] [[OriginalCharacter Valerie]] Valerie Payne]] (though for the sake of not altering the plot too much, he's made unable to go near the Chans or their home).home).
** Unlike in canon, the [[RewritingReality Book of Ages]] is actually [[ThresholdGuardian guarded by a powerful entity]] whom Shendu has to outsmart before being able to tamper with the reality. At the conclusion of the [[VillainWorld Demon World]] arc, [[spoiler:the Guardian uses the Book to seal the gateway to the Book and render Shendu's spirit unable to leave the Netherworld]], giving plausible explanations to why in canon the Book was never again sought out by the villains and why Shendu never again left the Netherworld until [[spoiler:Daolon Wong resurrected him]].
28th Aug '17 9:25:08 AM StardustSoldier
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** In the movie version of ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban Prisoner of Azkaban]]'', nearly the entire Quidditch season is cut. In ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban the book]], [[spoiler:it was Oliver Wood's last year as captain of Gryffindor team, and the first year Harry actually won the House Cup. The movie only shows Harry being attacked by dementors while chasing the snitch]]. Also in the movie, the conflict between Harry, Ron, and Hermione over Harry receiving a new broom from a mysterious source is largely removed, giving Hermione a reason why she was alone to use the time-turner in the book.

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** In the movie version of ''[[Film/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban Prisoner of Azkaban]]'', nearly the entire Quidditch season is cut. In ''[[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban [[Literature/HarryPotterAndThePrisonerOfAzkaban the book]], [[spoiler:it was Oliver Wood's last year as captain of Gryffindor team, and the first year Harry actually won the House Cup. The movie only shows Harry being attacked by dementors while chasing the snitch]]. Also in the movie, the conflict between Harry, Ron, and Hermione over Harry receiving a new broom from a mysterious source is largely removed, giving Hermione a reason why she was alone to use the time-turner in the book.
26th Aug '17 10:05:20 PM shawnvw
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** In the book, Gulliver returns home after each of four separate voyages. The 1996 TV movie adds a framing story that increases the overall tension: after finally returning home (the adventures all happened consecutively, keeping Gulliver from getting home), Gulliver has been committed to an insane asylum, and is testifying, by flashback, to convince them that his stories are true.
** This is one of the very few adaptations that shows the third and fourth voyages -- that is, the ones other than Lilliput and Brobdingnang. One might consider this "pragmatic", because it makes the movie stand out from all those other versions.
23rd Aug '17 8:29:27 AM CosmicFerret
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* ''Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles'' started as a violent and gory (if satirical) black and white independent ComicBook with an ongoing storyline. ([[spoiler:Shredder dies messily in the very first issue; later his surviving minions feed what is left of him to a colony of worms that take his form and his intelligence. Worm-Shredder destroys the Turtles' and April's home, and nearly kills Leonardo. After a year of healing, Leo heads back to New York, chops off Worm-Shredder's head, and burns him.]]) In the early process of licensing and adaptation, the Turtles developed a litany of catch phrases, color coded costumes, a {{Garfield}}-like food fetish, and an army of ineffective recurring villains; Raphael changed from a sociopathic {{Jerkass}} to "cool but rude", Baxter Stockman was changed from a homicidal black man to a feeble white guy, Splinter's whole backstory was rewritten to avoid the question of death; they abandoned character and plot development for syndication-friendly standalone episodes... and yet it all kind of worked. The 2003 series is a much closer adaptation of the comics (even bearing some traits of AdaptationDistillation); any carry-over from earlier adaptations (such as Michaelangelo's use of lingo from the earlier show) is generally [[LampshadeHanging Lampshade-hung]]. There's still much conflict over which cartoon was actually better -- ratings and profit wise, they did the same.

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* ''Franchise/TeenageMutantNinjaTurtles'' started as a violent and gory (if satirical) black and white independent ComicBook with an ongoing storyline. ([[spoiler:Shredder dies messily in the very first issue; later his surviving minions feed what is left of him to a colony of worms that take his form and his intelligence. Worm-Shredder destroys the Turtles' and April's home, and nearly kills Leonardo. After a year of healing, Leo heads back to New York, chops off Worm-Shredder's head, and burns him.]]) In the early process of licensing and adaptation, the Turtles developed a litany of catch phrases, color coded costumes, a {{Garfield}}-like ComicStrip/{{Garfield}}-like food fetish, and an army of ineffective recurring villains; Raphael changed from a sociopathic {{Jerkass}} to "cool but rude", Baxter Stockman was changed from a homicidal black man to a feeble white guy, Splinter's whole backstory was rewritten to avoid the question of death; they abandoned character and plot development for syndication-friendly standalone episodes... and yet it all kind of worked. The 2003 series is a much closer adaptation of the comics (even bearing some traits of AdaptationDistillation); any carry-over from earlier adaptations (such as Michaelangelo's use of lingo from the earlier show) is generally [[LampshadeHanging Lampshade-hung]]. There's still much conflict over which cartoon was actually better -- ratings and profit wise, they did the same.
21st Aug '17 9:55:01 PM JMQwilleran
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* In the original ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', the Struggle in Twilight Town had a mechanic involving knocking your opponent about, then collecting colored orbs that seem to come out of the Strugglers' bodies, with the winner being the one with the most orbs. In the [[Manga/KingdomHeartsII manga adaptation]], this was depicted as the Strugglers wearing suits of these orbs. For the novel, the rule is "fight with the provided weapons and whoever gets knocked over first loses."

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* In the original ''VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII'', the Struggle in Twilight Town had a mechanic involving knocking your opponent about, then collecting colored orbs that seem to come out of the Strugglers' bodies, with the winner being the one with the most orbs. In the [[Manga/KingdomHeartsII manga adaptation]], this was depicted as the Strugglers wearing suits of these orbs. For [[Literature/KingdomHeartsII the novel, novel]], the rule is "fight with the provided weapons and whoever gets knocked over first loses."
13th Aug '17 10:23:52 AM nombretomado
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** Disney's adaptation of ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek mythology in general -- were as family-unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance. The basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this. The studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]: it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), plot points, and setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story) and reworks everything else, such as expanding Hades's role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]. Ultimately, this makes the film less an adaptation of Greek mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]

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** Disney's adaptation of ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek mythology in general -- were as family-unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance. The basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this. The studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]: it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), plot points, and setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story) and reworks everything else, such as expanding Hades's role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]. Ultimately, this makes the film less an adaptation of Greek mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY [[JustForFun/XMeetsY mashup of]] ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]
10th Aug '17 10:58:46 PM Nicoaln
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** Harry Dresden in the TV series drives a jeep instead of the blue beetle. This was to make it easier to film scenes inside the car, and as it turns out, [[WordOfGod a jeep is the kind of car Harry would drive]].
7th Aug '17 5:50:48 PM ClintEastwood
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* Some of the old Target Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations broaden the stories and provide insights into the characters' thoughts and evoke wonderful moods not necessarily shown in the televised stories. The novelisations for "The Crusade", "The Daemons" and "The Silurians" are particularly good examples.

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* Some of the old Target Literature/DoctorWhoNovelisations broaden the stories and provide insights into the characters' thoughts and evoke wonderful moods not necessarily shown in the televised stories. The novelisations for "The Crusade", "The Daemons" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS2E6TheCrusade The Crusade]]", "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians The Silurians]]" and "The Silurians" "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS8E5TheDaemons The Daemons]]" are particularly good examples.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PragmaticAdaptation