History Main / PragmaticAdaptation

20th Feb '17 2:10:31 PM KeithM
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** ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' (the straight adaptation starring Creator/DanielCraig, not the David Niven sendup from [[Film/CasinoRoyale1967 the 1960s]]) featured one in the change of [[Literature/CasinoRoyale the book]]'s card game from baccarat to poker. While admittedly playing into the fact that Texas Hold 'Em is wildly popular these days, it allows the audience to understand what's going on without an explanation (as more people are familiar with poker than baccarat). An additional benefit comes from the nature of the game itself: baccarat does not involve bluffing or other forms of trying to read the other players--which poker certainly does--and becomes critical when Le Chiffre cons Bond by faking his "tell" and causes Bond to eventually realize that at least one of the people working with him is a traitor.

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** ''Film/CasinoRoyale2006'' (the straight adaptation starring Creator/DanielCraig, not the David Niven sendup from [[Film/CasinoRoyale1967 the 1960s]]) featured one in the change of [[Literature/CasinoRoyale the book]]'s card game from baccarat to poker. While admittedly playing into the fact that Texas Hold 'Em is wildly popular these days, it allows the audience to understand what's going on without an explanation (as more people are familiar with poker than baccarat). An additional benefit comes from the nature of the game itself: baccarat does not involve bluffing or other forms of trying to read the other players--which poker certainly does--and becomes critical when Le Chiffre cons Bond by faking his "tell" and causes Bond to eventually realize that at least one of the people working with him is a traitor. Baccarat, depending on the specific version, is also purely based on chance and the skill of the player is therefore irrelevant. Poker, on the other hand, requires a great deal of skill to play at a high level and, as M explicitly pointed out, the only reason she was sending Bond in the first place after his series of high-profile misadventures thus far was that he was the best poker player they had among their agents.
20th Feb '17 1:35:26 PM gb00393
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** Due to the unconventional structuring of the story, Season 5 had to fit two books into one season. (The first two seasons of the show adapted a book each, while the massive third book was split into seasons 3 and 4. The fourth and fifth books, however, are actually one narrative that is told from the perspective of two sets characters. The reason for this is that if all of the characters appeared in one book it would be over 2000 pages long, while the story didn't have any one good moment to divide the book chronologically). The showrunners faced the same problem in adapting it, as there is way too much story for one season but theres no good way to cut it in half like there is the third book. The solution the showrunners devised was to include some storylines in season 4 (Bran's story and some of the Reek material), delay some stories for season 6 (Sam going to Oldtown to become a maester) and merge a few others (Jaime goes to Dorne instead of the Riverlands while Ramsay marries Sansa instead of Jeyne Poole). The results have been controversial but a surprising amount of material has been compressed into just ten hours.

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** Due to the unconventional structuring of the story, Season 5 had to fit two books into one season. (The The first two seasons of the show adapted a book each, while the massive third book was split into seasons 3 and 4. The fourth and fifth books, however, are actually one narrative that is told from the perspective of two sets characters. The reason for this is that if all of the characters appeared in one book it would be over 2000 pages long, while the story didn't have any one good moment to divide the book chronologically).chronologically. The showrunners faced the same problem in adapting it, as there is way too much story for one season but theres no good way to cut it in half like there is the third book. The solution the showrunners devised was to include some storylines in season 4 (Bran's story and some of the Reek material), delay some stories for season 6 (Sam going to Oldtown to become a maester) and merge a few others (Jaime goes to Dorne instead of the Riverlands while Ramsay marries Sansa instead of Jeyne Poole). The results have been controversial but a surprising amount of material has been compressed into just ten hours.
20th Feb '17 1:32:52 PM gb00393
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** Related to the cutting of the second shadowbaby, Storm's End, Penrose was cut and Stannis's bastard nephew Edric Storm was replaced by Gendry in Season 3. Stannis's family was also cut from Season 2. However, his wife and daughter were cast for Season 3. Considering that Stannis does not do much except sulk in Book 3 [[spoiler: until serving as the BigDamnHeroes for Jon at the Wall]], moving the Storm's End and Stannis's family plot to Season 3 may have been the most pragmatic way to adapt that storyline, especially since the third book was spread out over two seasons.

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** Related to the cutting of the second shadowbaby, Storm's End, End and Penrose was were cut and Stannis's bastard nephew Edric Storm was replaced by Gendry in Season 3. Stannis's family was also cut from Season 2. However, his wife and daughter were cast for Season 3. Considering that Stannis does not do much except sulk in Book 3 [[spoiler: until serving as the BigDamnHeroes for Jon at the Wall]], moving the Storm's End and Stannis's family plot to Season 3 may have been the most pragmatic way to adapt that storyline, especially since the third book was spread out over two seasons.
20th Feb '17 1:31:45 PM gb00393
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** The show excises flashbacks and prophecies almost completely (in fact, the first flashback doesn't appear until season 5). Flashbacks would require the expense of hiring an entirely different cast, while prophecies are tricky to write and pay off in a satisfactory manner. Because of this, Daenerys' hallucinations focus on her own story, rather than long-dead characters or those that live on a different continent; Ned's memories of his sister's demise are replaced with other foreshadowing devices; the mysterious masked Quaithe's role is altered from prophecy sounding board to a foil for Jorah Mormont and Bran and Jojen's prophetic dreams provide directions as often as not.. Arguably, this streamlines and improves the series greatly.

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** The show excises flashbacks and prophecies almost completely (in fact, the first flashback doesn't appear until season 5). Flashbacks would require the expense of hiring an entirely different cast, while prophecies are tricky to write and pay off in a satisfactory manner. Because of this, Daenerys' hallucinations focus on her own story, rather than long-dead characters or those that live on a different continent; Ned's memories of his sister's demise are replaced with other foreshadowing devices; the mysterious masked Quaithe's role is altered from prophecy sounding board to a foil for Jorah Mormont and Bran and Jojen's prophetic dreams provide directions as often as not..not. Arguably, this streamlines and improves the series greatly.
20th Feb '17 1:30:48 PM gb00393
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** The show excises flashbacks and prophecies almost completely (in fact, the first flashback doesn't appear until season 5). Flashbacks would require the expense of hiring an entirely different cast, while prophecies are tricky to write and pay off in a satisfactory manner. Because of this, Daenerys' hallucinations focus on her own story, rather than long-dead characters or those that live on a different continent; Ned's memories of his sister's demise are replaced with other foreshadowing devices; while the mysterious masked Quaithe's role is altered from prophecy sounding board to a foil for Jorah Mormont. Arguably, this streamlines and improves the series greatly.

to:

** The show excises flashbacks and prophecies almost completely (in fact, the first flashback doesn't appear until season 5). Flashbacks would require the expense of hiring an entirely different cast, while prophecies are tricky to write and pay off in a satisfactory manner. Because of this, Daenerys' hallucinations focus on her own story, rather than long-dead characters or those that live on a different continent; Ned's memories of his sister's demise are replaced with other foreshadowing devices; while the mysterious masked Quaithe's role is altered from prophecy sounding board to a foil for Jorah Mormont.Mormont and Bran and Jojen's prophetic dreams provide directions as often as not.. Arguably, this streamlines and improves the series greatly.



** Due to the POV structure of the book, we needed two shadowbaby assassins birthed by Melisandre in order to understand how they came to be and what they did: the one that kills Renly (which we see in action from Catelyn's point of view) and later the one that ultimately kills Cortnay Penrose (which we see birthed from Davos's point of view). In the show, we see the same shadowbaby being born (with Davos smuggling Melisandre somewhere close enough so that the assassin can kill Renly, which is seen from Catelyn and Brienne's point of view.
** Related to the cutting of the second shadowbaby, Storm's End, Penrose, and the entire subplot surrounding Stannis wanting his bastard nephew's blood was cut. Stannis's family was also cut from Season 2. However, with the casting of his wife and daughter in season 3, it remains to be seen how much, if any of Stannis's family drama and Storm's End is repurposed for Season 3. Considering that Stannis does not do much except sulk in Book 3 [[spoiler: until serving as the BigDamnHeroes for Jon at the Wall]], moving the Storm's End and Stannis's family plot to Season 3 may be the most pragmatic way to adapt that storyline, especially since the third book is going to be spread out over two seasons.

to:

** Due to the POV structure of the book, we needed two shadowbaby assassins birthed by Melisandre in order to understand how they came to be and what they did: the one that kills Renly (which we see in action from Catelyn's point of view) and later the one that ultimately kills Cortnay Penrose (which we see birthed from Davos's point of view). In the show, we see the same shadowbaby being born (with Davos smuggling Melisandre somewhere close enough so that the assassin can kill Renly, which is seen from Catelyn and Brienne's point of view.view).
** Related to the cutting of the second shadowbaby, Storm's End, Penrose, Penrose was cut and the entire subplot surrounding Stannis wanting his Stannis's bastard nephew's blood nephew Edric Storm was cut.replaced by Gendry in Season 3. Stannis's family was also cut from Season 2. However, with the casting of his wife and daughter in season 3, it remains to be seen how much, if any of Stannis's family drama and Storm's End is repurposed were cast for Season 3. Considering that Stannis does not do much except sulk in Book 3 [[spoiler: until serving as the BigDamnHeroes for Jon at the Wall]], moving the Storm's End and Stannis's family plot to Season 3 may be have been the most pragmatic way to adapt that storyline, especially since the third book is going to be was spread out over two seasons.



** Changes made to the Red Wedding were controversial in the fandom, but mostly guided by pragmatism: the musicians were competent because horrible musicians are a lot more fun to read about than listen to; Catelyn's reaction would have been laughably melodramatic on screen, but worked fine on the page.

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** Changes made to the Red Wedding were controversial in the fandom, but mostly guided by pragmatism: in the books, the musicians at Edmure's wedding are described as terrible, which foreshadows the fact that they're actually crossbowmen, not real musicians but in the show the musicians were competent because horrible musicians are a lot more fun to read about than listen to; Catelyn's reaction would have been laughably melodramatic on screen, but worked fine on the page.



** In the books, Euron Greyjoy wears an eyepatch. He has both eyes in the show to make it easier for the actor to film action scenes.

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** The books often deliver character development and exposition in narration or internal monologue, so the show must find creative ways to deliver the information in dialogue, such as Littlefinger telling his backstory to his prostitutes, Tyrion detailing his first marriage during a drinking game, or Davos and Stannis having AsYouKnow conversations about their past.
** Daenerys encounters two sellsword companies at Yunkai in the novels: The Storm Crows and the Second Sons. The series fuses the characters of both into the Second Sons.
** Characters with unusual appearances or impractical-to-create afflictions are given more conventional looks to save on makeup/costuming and to avoid looking ridiculous on screen:
*** The vibrantly coloured surcoats and enamelled armor of the lords and knights described in the books is generally muted, as are the garish costumes of characters like Daario Naharis and Salladhor Saan.
*** The outrageous hairdos of Slaver's Bay are omitted, as are Daario's flamboyant blue-dyed hair and Lord Tywin's shaved head and muttonchops.
*** Daenerys and Viserys' purple eyes were left out because the contact lenses interfered with the actors' performances.
*** Tyrion in the books is deformed as well as a dwarf and loses most of his nose. Peter Dinklage portrays him without the deformity and a prominent scar instead of a grotesque one.
*** The criminal Rorge also lacks a nose in the books but keeps it in the show.
***
In the books, the ruling class of Slaver's Bay wear overly elaborate garments called ''tokars'' that must be handled very carefully and held by one hand to keep from falling off. Since they would be a nightmare for the cast and crew to work with, the ''tokars'' were switched out for simpler robes.
*** In Braavos, the upper class wear dark, severe-looking outfits while the lower class dress in gaudy, brightly-colored outfits. Since this cultural element would have to be explained, the shows instead simplifies the class distinction by making it work the way it does in Westeros: nobility in rich, colorful fabrics and peasants in rough, plain, brown and grey fabrics.
*** In the books, Arya's companion in the House of Black and White looks like a waifish child but is really an adult whose growth was stunted by poisons. In the show, she's a normal looking, fully grown young woman.
***
Euron Greyjoy in the books wears an eyepatch. He eyepatch over his mysterious "Crow's Eye" and has both eyes in blue lips from drinking the show Warlocks' shade of the evening. In the show, he has a scar near his eye instead of an eyepatch to make it easier for the actor to film action scenes.scenes and no blue lips.
*** The three-eyed crow's real form is a one-eyed albino man with a faded birthmark over his neck and cheek, revealing his former identity as Brynden Rivers, AKA Bloodraven. In the show, he's just a normal-looking old man with a white beard.
** Due to the unconventional structuring of the story, Season 5 had to fit two books into one season. (The first two seasons of the show adapted a book each, while the massive third book was split into seasons 3 and 4. The fourth and fifth books, however, are actually one narrative that is told from the perspective of two sets characters. The reason for this is that if all of the characters appeared in one book it would be over 2000 pages long, while the story didn't have any one good moment to divide the book chronologically). The showrunners faced the same problem in adapting it, as there is way too much story for one season but theres no good way to cut it in half like there is the third book. The solution the showrunners devised was to include some storylines in season 4 (Bran's story and some of the Reek material), delay some stories for season 6 (Sam going to Oldtown to become a maester) and merge a few others (Jaime goes to Dorne instead of the Riverlands while Ramsay marries Sansa instead of Jeyne Poole). The results have been controversial but a surprising amount of material has been compressed into just ten hours.
13th Feb '17 12:32:41 PM rahalstmin
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** ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' completely upends [[ComicBook/CivilWar its comic book namesake]], changing the Superhero Registration Act into the Sovoka Accords, the reasoning for the accords (from a panicking Nitro setting off his expanded powers to kill ComicBook/TheNewWarriors and 600 others in Stanton to a suicide vest by Crossbones going off and killing bystanders in a botched Avengers mission), giving new reasoning between Captain America and Iron Man's disagreements (both the Accords and the possible innocence of the Winter Soldier) and increasing the importance of ComicBook/BlackPanther, Black Widow and ComicBook/ScarletWitch (who either had bit parts or weren't around in the comic story) while decreasing that of ComicBook/SpiderMan (who played a major part in the original comic).

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** ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' completely upends [[ComicBook/CivilWar its comic book namesake]], changing the Superhero Registration Act into the Sovoka Sokovia Accords, the reasoning for the accords (from a panicking Nitro setting off his expanded powers to kill ComicBook/TheNewWarriors and 600 others in Stanton to a suicide vest by Crossbones going off and killing bystanders in a botched Avengers mission), giving new reasoning between Captain America and Iron Man's disagreements (both the Accords and the possible innocence of the Winter Soldier) and increasing the importance of ComicBook/BlackPanther, Black Widow and ComicBook/ScarletWitch (who either had bit parts or weren't around in the comic story) while decreasing that of ComicBook/SpiderMan (who played a major part in the original comic).
6th Feb '17 3:01:43 AM erforce
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** Disney's adaptation of ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek Mythology in general -- were as family-unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance. The basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this. The studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]: it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), plot points, and setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story) and reworks everything else, such as expanding Hades's role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]. Ultimately, this makes the film less an adaptation of Greek Mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] Film/SupermanTheMovie and Film/{{Rocky}} [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]

to:

** Disney's adaptation of ''Disney/{{Hercules}}'': The [[Myth/ClassicalMythology original Heracles myth]] -- and Greek Mythology in general -- were as family-unfriendly as you can get and had a ''lot'' of built-in ValuesDissonance. The basic conflict ''alone'' was unacceptable for a family film, since Hercules is a product of Zeus' adultery with a mortal, and Hera, Zeus' wife, is the villain who constantly makes Hercules' life miserable because of this. The studio was forced to [[DisneyFication heavily rework the concept]]: it borrows the character names (not so much the personalities), plot points, and setting from the myths, but [[AdaptedOut throws out]] and [[CanonImmigrant adds in]] things from other parts of Greek myth (such as Pegasus and the Muses, who were not in the original Heracles story) and reworks everything else, such as expanding Hades's role in the story [[EveryoneHatesHades by turning him into the main villain]]. Ultimately, this makes the film less an adaptation of Greek Mythology and more like a [[XMeetsY mashup of]] Film/SupermanTheMovie ''Film/SupermanTheMovie'' and Film/{{Rocky}} ''Film/{{Rocky}}'' [[RecycledInSpace set in a]] [[TheThemeParkVersion burlesque of Ancient Greece.]]
30th Jan '17 1:24:42 PM SnoopyComet
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** Near the end, instead of [[spoiler:Kana having a turn and dying like everyone else]], in the anime, [[spoiler:Kokopelli tries to manipulate Kana into contracting, but Jun and Youko manage to turn the tables on him and kill him, leaving Kana as the SoleSurvivor]].

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** Near the end, instead of [[spoiler:Kana having a turn and dying like everyone else]], in the anime, [[spoiler:Kokopelli [[spoiler:Dung Beetle tries to manipulate Kana into contracting, but Jun and Youko manage to turn the tables on him and kill him, leaving Kana as the SoleSurvivor]].
19th Jan '17 8:05:17 PM DoomTay
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Film/TheWizardOfOz'', Dorothy's silver slippers are changed to ruby-colored, likely because silver slippers didn't look good on film
18th Jan '17 8:24:08 PM PaulA
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* ''{{Film/She|1965}}'': The 1965 film dumps all of the first part of the novel--Leo's dying father turns five-year-old Leo over to Holly, Holly raises Leo to adulthood, Leo and Holly later examine the ring and potsherd left behind by Leo's father, Leo and Holly set off for Africa. In this version Leo and Holly are war buddies who find themselves in Cairo in 1918 after the Armistice. Billali and Ustane kidnap Leo on behalf of She, who pops up fifteen minutes in, much earlier than her first appearance in the book. And then it's She who gives Leo the ring and the map and sends Leo off on his quest.
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