History Main / PragmaticAdaptation

31st Jan '16 10:57:11 AM NotOnAnyFlatbread
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* ''Series/{{Shadowhunters}}'' follows the same basic story as ''Literature/TheMortalInstruments'' novels, but with several setting changes and plot developments revealed in a significantly different order. ** TheProtagonist Clary's mother tries to proactively tell her about her heritage and the associated dangers on her birthday (foiled by Clary rushing out the door) in contrast to the books, where she struggles to keep Clary in the dark until the villain strikes, [[IdiotBall even though she knows the ruse is crumbling and her daughter is in danger]]. ** The Shadowhunters use significantly more modern technology than their book counterparts. Their base includes banks of high-tech equipment and computer displays to quickly convey the sense of a bustling, organized agency in a visual medium. ** The circumstances of [[MuggleBestFriend Simon’s]] vampire encounter and [[spoiler:kidnapping]] was changed to be deliberate on the part of the vampires, in contrast to the book’s tangent involving the main characters [[ItMakesSenseInContext crashing a party and running afoul of a magical party trick]].
17th Jan '16 8:34:50 PM HeraldAlberich
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* The {{novelization}} of ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' written by Creator/MattStover. Obviously a book of the film loses the [[SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome visuals]], the [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic music]], and any appeal from various actors, so Stover takes advantage of the medium by delving far deeper into the thoughts and mindset of the characters than a film can, expanding on the motivations for Anakin's FaceHeelTurn [[note]]For example, the film presents Anakin's desire to be a Jedi Master (and his anger at the Council for denying the title to him) as just him being power hungry. The novel presents that being a Master would give Anakin access to all the secret Jedi holocrons, which he believes contain information that can save Padme, which goes a long way to explain his anger at he Jedi and his willingness to believe Sidious.[[/note]], explaining the machinations the Jedi and [[MagnificentBastard Sidious]] have going, and giving more focus to characters that lacked much screen time in the film like Grievous and Padme. The result is a combination of an adaptation and a supplement, glossing over things the film covers and focusing on things the films gloss over, as well as filling in some plot holes and returning cut sub-plots such as the "Birth of the Rebellion".
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* The ''Literature/RevengeOfTheSith'', the {{novelization}} of ''Franchise/StarWars: Film/RevengeOfTheSith'' written by Creator/MattStover. Obviously a book of the film loses the [[SugarWiki/VisualEffectsOfAwesome visuals]], the [[SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic music]], and any appeal from various actors, so Stover takes advantage of the medium by delving far deeper into the thoughts and mindset of the characters than a film can, expanding on the motivations for Anakin's FaceHeelTurn [[note]]For FaceHeelTurn,[[note]]For example, the film presents Anakin's desire to be a Jedi Master (and his anger at the Council for denying the title to him) as just him being power hungry. The novel presents that being a Master would give Anakin access to all the secret Jedi holocrons, which he believes contain information that can save Padme, Padmé, which goes a long way to explain his anger at he Jedi and his willingness to believe Sidious.[[/note]], [[/note]] explaining the machinations the Jedi and [[MagnificentBastard Sidious]] have going, and giving more focus to characters that lacked much screen time in the film film, like Grievous and Padme. Padmé. The result is a combination of an adaptation and a supplement, glossing over things the film covers and focusing on things the films gloss over, as well as filling in some plot holes and returning cut sub-plots sub-plots, such as the "Birth of the Rebellion".Rebellion."
17th Jan '16 12:29:01 AM Pichu-kun
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* The first adaptation of ''Theater/TheChildrensHour'' was censored considerably due to UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode. One of the changes was probably due to said code but worked in this sense as well. In the play [[spoiler:Martha is overly stressed and depressed over the recent events in her life and her [[{{gayngst}} feelings for Karen]]. She [[DrivenToSuicide kills herself]] in the climax.]] As the 1930s film has Martha and Karen fighting over the same guy the angst was toned down, as liking your best friends fiance isn't quite the same as [[spoiler:being in love with her in a homophobic era.]] Thus [[spoiler:the suicide aspect was [[SparedByTheAdaptation scrapped]]]] in ''These Three''. The TruerToTheText 1960 play keeps it but [[spoiler:kills off Martha after Karen talks with Mary's grandmother instead of beforehand.]]
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* The first adaptation of ''Theater/TheChildrensHour'' ''Theatre/TheChildrensHour'' was censored considerably due to UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode. One of the changes was probably due to said code but worked in this sense as well. In the play [[spoiler:Martha is overly stressed and depressed over the recent events in her life and her [[{{gayngst}} feelings for Karen]]. She [[DrivenToSuicide kills herself]] in the climax.]] As the 1930s film has Martha and Karen fighting over the same guy the angst was toned down, as liking your best friends fiance isn't quite the same as [[spoiler:being in love with her in a homophobic era.]] Thus [[spoiler:the suicide aspect was [[SparedByTheAdaptation scrapped]]]] in ''These Three''. The TruerToTheText 1960 play keeps it but [[spoiler:kills off Martha after Karen talks with Mary's grandmother instead of beforehand.]]
16th Jan '16 10:59:55 AM Pichu-kun
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* The anime version of ''Manga/SchoolLive'' had to change numerous things in order to fit in Taroumaru, who originally was an OneshotCharacter. The ending episode was changed considerably. No mention of the rescue helicopter is made and thus [[spoiler:there's no scene with it crashing and blowing up]]. The TearJerker is instead [[spoiler:how Taroumaru doesn't make it even with the anti-zombir vaccine]]. The episode ends on a ''considerably'' less dark turn due to [[spoiler:Miki and Kurumi lacking injuries, Yuuri never having her breakdown, and Yuki never killing a zombie and her world crashing on her], though it still has a BittersweetEnding.
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* The anime version of ''Manga/SchoolLive'' had to change numerous things in order to fit in Taroumaru, who originally was an OneshotCharacter. The ending episode was changed considerably. No mention of the rescue helicopter is made and thus [[spoiler:there's no scene with it crashing and blowing up]]. The TearJerker is instead [[spoiler:how Taroumaru doesn't make it even with the anti-zombir anti-zombie vaccine]]. The episode ends on a ''considerably'' less dark turn due to [[spoiler:Miki and Kurumi lacking injuries, Yuuri never having her breakdown, and Yuki never killing a zombie and her world crashing on her], her]], though it still has a BittersweetEnding.
16th Jan '16 10:59:00 AM Pichu-kun
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* The anime version of ''Manga/SchoolLive'' had to change certain things in order to fit in Taroumaru, who originally was an OneshotCharacter. The ending episode was changed considerably. No mention of the rescue helicopter is made and thus [[spoiler:there's no scene with it crashing and blowing up]]. The TearJerker is instead [[spoiler:how Taroumaru doesn't make it even with the anti-zombir vaccine]]. The episode ends on a considerably less dark turn due to [[spoiler:Miki and Kurumi lacking injuries, and Yuuri never having her breakdown]], though it still has a BittersweetEnding.
to:
* The anime version of ''Manga/SchoolLive'' had to change certain numerous things in order to fit in Taroumaru, who originally was an OneshotCharacter. The ending episode was changed considerably. No mention of the rescue helicopter is made and thus [[spoiler:there's no scene with it crashing and blowing up]]. The TearJerker is instead [[spoiler:how Taroumaru doesn't make it even with the anti-zombir vaccine]]. The episode ends on a considerably ''considerably'' less dark turn due to [[spoiler:Miki and Kurumi lacking injuries, and Yuuri never having her breakdown]], breakdown, and Yuki never killing a zombie and her world crashing on her], though it still has a BittersweetEnding.

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* The anime version first adaptation of ''Manga/SchoolLive'' had to change certain things in order to fit in Taroumaru, who originally ''Theater/TheChildrensHour'' was an OneshotCharacter. The ending episode was changed considerably. No mention of the rescue helicopter is made and thus [[spoiler:there's no scene with it crashing and blowing up]]. The TearJerker is instead [[spoiler:how Taroumaru doesn't make it even with the anti-zombir vaccine]]. The episode ends on a censored considerably less dark turn due to [[spoiler:Miki UsefulNotes/TheHaysCode. One of the changes was probably due to said code but worked in this sense as well. In the play [[spoiler:Martha is overly stressed and Kurumi lacking injuries, depressed over the recent events in her life and Yuuri never having her breakdown]], though it still [[{{gayngst}} feelings for Karen]]. She [[DrivenToSuicide kills herself]] in the climax.]] As the 1930s film has Martha and Karen fighting over the same guy the angst was toned down, as liking your best friends fiance isn't quite the same as [[spoiler:being in love with her in a BittersweetEnding.homophobic era.]] Thus [[spoiler:the suicide aspect was [[SparedByTheAdaptation scrapped]]]] in ''These Three''. The TruerToTheText 1960 play keeps it but [[spoiler:kills off Martha after Karen talks with Mary's grandmother instead of beforehand.]]
14th Jan '16 2:07:24 AM Sabrewing
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* Various video game adapations of the exploits of ComicBook/{{Superman}} have struggled with how to show off the character's iconic borderline invincibility, powers and strength while still presenting a game that possesses both a fair challenge and lose conditions. The ''Film/SupermanReturns'' game took a novel approach to this -- instead of giving Supes a health bar, Metropolis ''itself'' is the life bar, and you have to let it suffer as little collateral damage as possible in order to succeed in a given mission. In fact, the final boss isn't even a person or machine. It's a tornado, a force of nature, that you have to put out before it wrecks everything.
10th Jan '16 3:37:44 PM LentilSandEater
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wall of text no long as wall-e, I hope.
* ''Manga/{{Area 88}}'': The anime adaptations of the manga leave out the quirky humor that occasionally showed up in the manga. It also wisely chose to leave out the quasi-ScienceFiction elements that seemed to belong more in ''GIJoe'' than a serious contemporary war melodrama. In the manga, the anti-government forces employed devices such as land based aircraft carriers, robot controlled F-18 fighters, a drill missile, laser sentries, and a massive air fortress. There was also an inexplicable connection between the Asran Civil War, TheMafia, Yamato Airlines, Communists, and various other groups including a NebulousEvilOrganization. The manga also included the successful use of nuclear weapons on several occasions, something that would have made worldwide headlines in the real world but amazingly went totally unnoticed by the average public in the manga. The anime adaptations remove all of the byzantine subplots, conspiracies, eccentric guest characters, and soap opera twists. In the original manga unlike the OVA, [[spoiler: Kanzaki's arrest]] is hardly the end of him. Like any villain worth his salt, he always has an escape plan and keeps coming back with another grandiose scheme. The anime's focus is on Shin's perceived loss of his humanity. Also, it should be noted that the manga series, which lasted seven years (1979-1986) inexplicably lasted more than twice as long than Shin's forced mercenary contract of three years. It was still running when the original OVA was produced. The OVA's ending had to be different from the manga in order to avoid spoilers. The U.S. manga adaptation lasted briefly (42 issues and then briefly in Animerica magazine) and was nowhere close to the end but by the time of the brief Animerica run, the series had already began to JumpTheShark due to the meandering subplots. What little is known (to non-Japanese speaking readers) about the manga's ending is that fans feel it was a copout [[spoiler: In the final battle, Shin gets his revenge on Kanzaki, but gets shot down, gets amnesia and forgets all about his experiences at Area 88. He and Ryoko get married and live happily ever after]]. The OVA's strong and powerful ending is widely considered preferable.
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* ''Manga/{{Area 88}}'': The anime adaptations of the manga leave out the quirky humor that occasionally showed up in the manga. It also wisely chose to leave out the quasi-ScienceFiction elements that seemed to belong more in ''GIJoe'' than a serious contemporary war melodrama. In the manga, the anti-government forces employed devices such as land based aircraft carriers, robot controlled F-18 fighters, a drill missile, laser sentries, and a massive air fortress. There was also an inexplicable connection between the Asran Civil War, TheMafia, Yamato Airlines, Communists, and various other groups including a NebulousEvilOrganization. \\ \\ The manga also included the successful use of nuclear weapons on several occasions, something that would have made worldwide headlines in the real world but amazingly went totally unnoticed by the average public in the manga. The anime adaptations remove all of the byzantine subplots, conspiracies, eccentric guest characters, and soap opera twists. In the original manga unlike the OVA, [[spoiler: Kanzaki's arrest]] is hardly the end of him. Like any villain worth his salt, he always has an escape plan and keeps coming back with another grandiose scheme. The anime's focus is on Shin's perceived loss of his humanity. \\ \\ Also, it should be noted that the manga series, which lasted seven years (1979-1986) inexplicably lasted more than twice as long than Shin's forced mercenary contract of three years. It was still running when the original OVA was produced. The OVA's ending had to be different from the manga in order to avoid spoilers. The U.S. manga adaptation lasted briefly (42 issues and then briefly in Animerica magazine) and was nowhere close to the end but by the time of the brief Animerica run, the series had already began to JumpTheShark due to the meandering subplots. What little is known (to non-Japanese speaking readers) about the manga's ending is that fans feel it was a copout [[spoiler: In the final battle, Shin gets his revenge on Kanzaki, but gets shot down, gets amnesia and forgets all about his experiences at Area 88. He and Ryoko get married and live happily ever after]]. The OVA's strong and powerful ending is widely considered preferable.
9th Jan '16 8:18:33 AM rjung
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* ''Film/BridgeOfSpies'' is seen as a fairly accurate representation of RealLife events, all things considered, with a few minor liberties taken for dramatic effect.
1st Jan '16 12:11:46 PM StFan
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* ''WesternAnimation/AvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' often condenses or alters origins for various characters in order to cut down on the time required to introduce them. For example, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} and ComicBook/BlackWidow are SHIELD agents rather than reformed Iron Man villains, and ComicBook/TheFalcon is a member of Code Red rather than [[CaptainAmerica Cap's]] sidekick.
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* ''WesternAnimation/AvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' ''WesternAnimation/TheAvengersEarthsMightiestHeroes'' often condenses or alters origins for various characters in order to cut down on the time required to introduce them. For example, ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} and ComicBook/BlackWidow are SHIELD S.H.I.E.L.D. agents rather than reformed Iron Man villains, and ComicBook/TheFalcon is a member of Code Red rather than [[CaptainAmerica Cap's]] ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's sidekick.
17th Dec '15 12:04:01 PM Pichu-kun
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* The anime version of ''Manga/SchoolLive'' had to change certain things in order to fit in Taroumaru, who originally was an OneshotCharacter. The ending episode was changed considerably. No mention of the rescue helicopter is made and thus [[spoiler:there's no scene with it crashing and blowing up]]. The TearJerker is instead [[spoiler:how Taroumaru doesn't make it even with the anti-zombir vaccine]]. The episode ends on a considerably less dark turn due to [[spoiler:Miki and Kurumi lacking injuries, and Yuuri never having her breakdown]], though it still has a BittersweetEnding.

* The "War of the Symbiotes" arc in ''Comicbook/UltimateSpiderMan'' adapted the events of the now-CanonDiscontinuity ''VideoGame/UltimateSpiderMan'' video game. Among other things, the arc shortened the plot and omitted characters like {{Wolverine}} and [[ComicBook/NormanOsborn Green Goblin]], while also reconciling the fact that the game and comics had two ''entirely'' different versions of Carnage (in the game it was Peter, in the comics Carnage was established as Gwen Stacy).
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* The "War of the Symbiotes" arc in ''Comicbook/UltimateSpiderMan'' adapted the events of the now-CanonDiscontinuity now-[[CanonDiscontinuity non canon]] ''VideoGame/UltimateSpiderMan'' video game. Among other things, the arc shortened the plot and omitted characters like {{Wolverine}} and [[ComicBook/NormanOsborn Green Goblin]], while also reconciling the fact that the game and comics had two ''entirely'' different versions of Carnage (in the game it was Peter, in the comics Carnage was established as Gwen Stacy).
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