History Main / PragmaticAdaptation

28th May '17 10:09:20 AM MarkLungo
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* ''Manga/{{Area 88}}'': The anime adaptations of the manga leave out the quirky humor that occasionally showed up in the manga. It also wisely chose to leave out the quasi-ScienceFiction elements that seemed to belong more in ''GIJoe'' than a serious contemporary war melodrama. In the manga, the anti-government forces employed devices such as land-based aircraft carriers, robot-controlled F-18 fighters, a drill missile, laser sentries, and a massive air fortress. There was also an inexplicable connection between the Asran Civil War, TheMafia, Yamato Airlines, Communists, and various other groups, including a NebulousEvilOrganization.\\

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* ''Manga/{{Area 88}}'': The anime adaptations of the manga leave out the quirky humor that occasionally showed up in the manga. It also wisely chose to leave out the quasi-ScienceFiction elements that seemed to belong more in ''GIJoe'' ''Franchise/GIJoe'' than a serious contemporary war melodrama. In the manga, the anti-government forces employed devices such as land-based aircraft carriers, robot-controlled F-18 fighters, a drill missile, laser sentries, and a massive air fortress. There was also an inexplicable connection between the Asran Civil War, TheMafia, Yamato Airlines, Communists, and various other groups, including a NebulousEvilOrganization.\\
20th May '17 3:09:20 PM nombretomado
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* ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines''. The limits of a video game (and the action-heavy elements expected from them) meant that the game needed to drop a number of systems, simplify others, and gear things more towards combat as a baseline. One example is with the Tremere, and the Tremere PC's use of [[BloodMagic Thaumaturgy]]. The Path of Blood depicted in Bloodlines is much different than the one in the source material, being more directly [[BloodyMurder martial]] than the [[ThePowerOfBlood multi-purpose powers]] in the original. Then again, as a fledgling embraced outside the Pyramid, the Tremere PC receives no formal instruction on Thaumaturgy. So the ones he/she uses is [[FridgeBrilliance likely developed by the PC independently, according to their immediate needs.]]

to:

* ''VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines''.''VideoGame/VampireTheMasqueradeBloodlines''. The limits of a video game (and the action-heavy elements expected from them) meant that the game needed to drop a number of systems, simplify others, and gear things more towards combat as a baseline. One example is with the Tremere, and the Tremere PC's use of [[BloodMagic Thaumaturgy]]. The Path of Blood depicted in Bloodlines is much different than the one in the source material, being more directly [[BloodyMurder martial]] than the [[ThePowerOfBlood multi-purpose powers]] in the original. Then again, as a fledgling embraced outside the Pyramid, the Tremere PC receives no formal instruction on Thaumaturgy. So the ones he/she uses is [[FridgeBrilliance likely developed by the PC independently, according to their immediate needs.]]
13th May '17 10:06:50 PM mlsmithca
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* Films -- Live-Action
** ''PragmaticAdaptation/CaptainAmericaCivilWar''



* Most comic book inspired movies are like this, though many fans can't get past a TheyChangedItNowItSucks reaction. Examples:
** The original example is ''[[Film/{{Superman}} Superman: The Movie]]'' and its sequels. The first half of the film maintains the backstory of the characters, and Supes looks just like he does in the comics, as do many supporting characters. The film makes stylistic changes and alters the backstory (e.g. Clark was never Superboy), yet is still very much in tune with the spirit of the comics up to that point.
** ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'' removes or attempts to justify the more fantastic elements of the Batman mythos, in order to keep the theme of it being "realistic" and happening in a world [[LikeRealityUnlessNoted only slightly different from ours]]. Most critically, Joker wears make-up instead of being scarred by an acid bath (which also adds mightily to the theme that he has no OriginStory and is just doing everything himself), Bane doesn't use [[PsychoSerum venom]], and Ra's Al Ghul is only immortal [[LegacyCharacter in the figurative sense]]. The films also show some detail as to [[WhereDoesHeGetAllThoseWonderfulToys where Bats gets all those wonderful toys]], which most adaptations don't bother trying to explain.
** The ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' changed ILoveNuclearPower to GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke in regards to Spider-Man's SuperHeroOrigin, as it was slightly easier to HandWave a scientifically altered spider than a random million-to-one chance of an irradiated spider (and [[ArtisticLicensePhysics irradiating a spider wouldn't make it do that]]). The comic book's artificial webshooters were dropped because the movie didn't have time to believably show Peter inventing them (and because they felt that a single teenager being able to invent a wonder adhesive that 3M couldn't strained WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief). In fact, most of the first two films were this, and so was some of Part 3 in regards to the Symbiote.
** ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan'' has another nice take on it: Peter ''steals'' an experimental web formula from Oscorp, which he simply needs to refine a bit and build web-shooters for (based on the already-existing technology) to serve his purposes. Peter Parker does ''not'' begin his career with the 'ubergeek' personality. Someone capable of building gadgets [[note]]a talent that we see put into practice with more than just the webshooters, which he can't even take full credit for in this film[[/note]]like him would actually be considered pretty cool, so he's more of a loner here; the only one at his school who really looks down on him is Flash Thompson. Uncle Ben's role is expanded, but this just makes his death sadder. The 'wrestling' bit is left out, too. These changes are ''all'' needed to keep the film from being a retelling of the origin story as shown in the first film of the previous trilogy.
** The ''Film/{{X-Men}}'' movies, which focus on the human-mutant conflict, greatly simplify the Marvel universe, cutting out the magic powers, scheming alien empires, and the like. Several characters who aren't mutants are made into mutants for simplicity's sake, the Phoenix Force is [[spoiler:a destructive aspect of Jean Grey's personality which was [[MindRape psychically repressed]] by Prof. Xavier]], and [[ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames almost none of the characters are referred to by their "superhero" names except in passing]]. (That explanation for Jean's Phoenix powers was in fact the original one, before later comics {{RetCon}}ned them by creating the Phoenix Force as a godlike cosmic entity.) Rogue is unable to fly, has no fighting/combat abilities, and does not have super strength or invulnerability. This is because, unlike in the comic books, she has none of the abilities that she aquired from Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers).
** In the comics, Fred Dukes, A.K.A Blob, is a mutant whose specific abilities seem to revolve around being morbidly obese. In ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', however, Dukes is physically fit until he develops an eating disorder; his super strength is what allows him to carry his own weight.
** Given that in the comics, Sebastian Shaw's power is depicted by having him growing, and ''Film/XMenFirstClass'''s producers thought it was too [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk Hulk-like]], the VFX artists instead portrayed it in a way that resembles full body RapidFireFisticuffs.
** ''Film/TheWolverine'' is a loose adaptation of the Japan arc in the Creator/ChrisClaremont and ComicBook/FrankMillersWolverine series, with its own spins to the characters. Viper and Yukio, {{Badass Normal}}s in the source material, are mutants here, a PoisonousPerson and a [[PsychicPowers precognitive]] respectively.
** In ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', the ageless Wolverine gets sent back in time instead of Kitty Pryde, as film!Kitty wouldn't have been born in 1973.
** ''Film/IronMan'':
*** The [[Film/IronMan1 first movie]] changed Obadiah Stane to be an old friend of Tony's and his father's to heighten the sense of villainy and betrayal. Jarvis was changed from a butler with a fake English accent to an English-sounding talking computer, probably because another [[Franchise/{{Batman}} famous and popular superhero]] already had a British ServileSnarker.
*** The [[Film/IronMan2 sequel]] went a little bit further, [[CompositeCharacter conflating Whiplash and Crimson Dynamo into a single character]] and changing Justin Hammer's age to closely match that of Tony Stark.
*** The [[Film/IronMan3 third film]] took ''great'' liberties with its main villain, the Mandarin, while still having him faithful to the source material... in a way. [[spoiler:Trevor Slattery's In-Universe impersonation of the Mandarin was based in part on the same YellowPeril tropes that inspired the original version seen in the early ''Iron Man'' comics, while Aldritch Killian is based on modern versions of the character and claims to be the ''true'' Mandarin. However, it turns out that both Slattery ''and'' Killian merely stole the ''real'' Mandarin's persona; ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail The King]]'' reveals that the real one is not only still out there, but hungry for vengeance against those who stole his name]]. This was mostly to avoid the YellowPeril stereotype and make it appeal to the ever-growing Chinese film industry.
** Say what you will about the ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' [[Film/FantasticFour movies]], but at least they had a legitimate reason for Johnny and Sue to go out to space; Sue's a genetics researcher, and Johnny's an astronaut. They're also on a space ''station'', not a space ''ship''.
** The ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' [[Film/{{Watchmen}} film]] has ''numerous'' changes to the source material, most of them extrapolated from the comic. Two significant changes -- ([[spoiler:Dan Dreiberg seeing Rorschach's death and subsequently beating up Ozymandias, and changing some of the dialogue for the ending]]) -- were most likely done to prevent the audience leaving with a complete and horrible DownerEnding (though the graphic novel leaves the thread open). For the climax, they decided upon [[spoiler:a device that emulated Dr. Manhattan's energy signature, allowing the world to scapegoat ''him'', rather than the alien squid]]. People are undecided as to which works better ''overall,'' but it's definitely the best they could have done with that ending in film. The moment where Rorschach snaps was changed, mostly to avoid comparison with ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'', but the new scene also allows us to see the moment his mind snaps without an overabundance of narration.
** ''ComicBook/TheMightyThor'' [[Film/{{Thor}} film]] didn't use the [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe pseudo-Elizabethan English]] that the Asgardian characters spoke for many years in the comics, which they themselves have already dropped this highly campy element. However while movie Thor doesn't use the pseudo-Elizabethan English, he ''does'' still speak in the largely antiquated and hammy style of the comics to largely the same effect (just minus the "thou's" and "thy's"). It was also decided that Thor's iconic helmet would only make one appearance near the beginning of the film before being discarded due to looking a little ridiculous on the big screen.
** ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' took a number of liberties with the source material to make it more (in the film's view) palatable for a mainstream audience. Among the major changes were having ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} forego his classic purple costume in favor of his more realistic leather outfit from ''ComicBook/TheUltimates'', as well as both he and ComicBook/BlackWidow being made into founding members of the Avengers. The plot also combines elements of both the first issue of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' from back in the '60s as well as first storyline from ''The Ultimates''.
** ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' features the costume Cap wore in the comics, but it's for a propaganda show and he looks [[{{Camp}} utterly ridiculous]]. When he gets his actual fighting suit, it's radically different and much more plausible: changes include a helmet instead of a cowl, mere decals instead of large head wings, body armour, and the red of his costume is in the form of red utility straps rather than gaudy decorative stripes.
** ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' heavily alters the [[ComicBook/BuckyBarnes title villain]]'s origin to fit the context of the movie and its predecessor, while still maintaining much of his background. They also made ComicBook/TheFalcon into a V.A. counselor and former soldier to better justify his inclusion in the plot. Some changes were also made to [[spoiler:Arnim Zola]] to avoid him seeming too silly and "comic booky" to mainstream audiences.
** ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' has this both subtle and gross, most of which will only be picked up by fans of the original material. Examples include turning Drax's adversary from Thanos to Ronan (to give Drax a more obvious motive), a RaceLift and costume change for Korath the Pursuer, and Yondu as the leader of the [[SpacePirates Ravagers]].

to:

* Most comic book inspired movies are like this, though many fans can't get past a TheyChangedItNowItSucks reaction. Examples:
**
The original example is ''[[Film/{{Superman}} Superman: The Movie]]'' and its sequels. The first half of the film maintains the backstory of the characters, and Supes looks just like he does in the comics, as do many supporting characters. The film makes stylistic changes and alters the backstory (e.g. Clark was never Superboy), yet is still very much in tune with the spirit of the comics up to that point.
** * ''Film/TheDarkKnightSaga'' removes or attempts to justify the more fantastic elements of the Batman mythos, in order to keep the theme of it being "realistic" and happening in a world [[LikeRealityUnlessNoted only slightly different from ours]]. Most critically, Joker wears make-up instead of being scarred by an acid bath (which also adds mightily to the theme that he has no OriginStory and is just doing everything himself), Bane doesn't use [[PsychoSerum venom]], and Ra's Al Ghul is only immortal [[LegacyCharacter in the figurative sense]]. The films also show some detail as to [[WhereDoesHeGetAllThoseWonderfulToys where Bats gets all those wonderful toys]], which most adaptations don't bother trying to explain.
** * The ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy'' changed ILoveNuclearPower to GeneticEngineeringIsTheNewNuke in regards to Spider-Man's SuperHeroOrigin, as it was slightly easier to HandWave a scientifically altered spider than a random million-to-one chance of an irradiated spider (and [[ArtisticLicensePhysics irradiating a spider wouldn't make it do that]]). The comic book's artificial webshooters were dropped because the movie didn't have time to believably show Peter inventing them (and because they felt that a single teenager being able to invent a wonder adhesive that 3M couldn't strained WillingSuspensionOfDisbelief). In fact, most of the first two films were this, and so was some of Part 3 in regards to the Symbiote.
** * ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderMan'' has another nice take on it: Peter ''steals'' an experimental web formula from Oscorp, which he simply needs to refine a bit and build web-shooters for (based on the already-existing technology) to serve his purposes. Peter Parker does ''not'' begin his career with the 'ubergeek' personality. Someone capable of building gadgets [[note]]a talent that we see put into practice with more than just the webshooters, which he can't even take full credit for in this film[[/note]]like him would actually be considered pretty cool, so he's more of a loner here; the only one at his school who really looks down on him is Flash Thompson. Uncle Ben's role is expanded, but this just makes his death sadder. The 'wrestling' bit is left out, too. These changes are ''all'' needed to keep the film from being a retelling of the origin story as shown in the first film of the previous trilogy.
** * The ''Film/{{X-Men}}'' movies, which focus on the human-mutant conflict, greatly simplify the Marvel universe, cutting out the magic powers, scheming alien empires, and the like. Several characters who aren't mutants are made into mutants for simplicity's sake, the Phoenix Force is [[spoiler:a destructive aspect of Jean Grey's personality which was [[MindRape psychically repressed]] by Prof. Xavier]], and [[ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames almost none of the characters are referred to by their "superhero" names except in passing]]. (That explanation for Jean's Phoenix powers was in fact the original one, before later comics {{RetCon}}ned them by creating the Phoenix Force as a godlike cosmic entity.) Rogue is unable to fly, has no fighting/combat abilities, and does not have super strength or invulnerability. This is because, unlike in the comic books, she has none of the abilities that she aquired from Ms. Marvel (Carol Danvers).
** * In the comics, Fred Dukes, A.K.A Blob, is a mutant whose specific abilities seem to revolve around being morbidly obese. In ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'', however, Dukes is physically fit until he develops an eating disorder; his super strength is what allows him to carry his own weight.
** * Given that in the comics, Sebastian Shaw's power is depicted by having him growing, and ''Film/XMenFirstClass'''s producers thought it was too [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk Hulk-like]], the VFX artists instead portrayed it in a way that resembles full body RapidFireFisticuffs.
** * ''Film/TheWolverine'' is a loose adaptation of the Japan arc in the Creator/ChrisClaremont and ComicBook/FrankMillersWolverine series, with its own spins to the characters. Viper and Yukio, {{Badass Normal}}s in the source material, are mutants here, a PoisonousPerson and a [[PsychicPowers precognitive]] respectively.
** * In ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', the ageless Wolverine gets sent back in time instead of Kitty Pryde, as film!Kitty wouldn't have been born in 1973.
** * ''Film/IronMan'':
*** ** The [[Film/IronMan1 first movie]] changed Obadiah Stane to be an old friend of Tony's and his father's to heighten the sense of villainy and betrayal. Jarvis was changed from a butler with a fake English accent to an English-sounding talking computer, probably because another [[Franchise/{{Batman}} famous and popular superhero]] already had a British ServileSnarker.
*** ** The [[Film/IronMan2 sequel]] went a little bit further, [[CompositeCharacter conflating Whiplash and Crimson Dynamo into a single character]] and changing Justin Hammer's age to closely match that of Tony Stark.
*** ** The [[Film/IronMan3 third film]] took ''great'' liberties with its main villain, the Mandarin, while still having him faithful to the source material... in a way. [[spoiler:Trevor Slattery's In-Universe impersonation of the Mandarin was based in part on the same YellowPeril tropes that inspired the original version seen in the early ''Iron Man'' comics, while Aldritch Killian is based on modern versions of the character and claims to be the ''true'' Mandarin. However, it turns out that both Slattery ''and'' Killian merely stole the ''real'' Mandarin's persona; ''[[Film/MarvelOneShots All Hail The King]]'' reveals that the real one is not only still out there, but hungry for vengeance against those who stole his name]]. This was mostly to avoid the YellowPeril stereotype and make it appeal to the ever-growing Chinese film industry.
** * Say what you will about the ''ComicBook/FantasticFour'' [[Film/FantasticFour movies]], but at least they had a legitimate reason for Johnny and Sue to go out to space; Sue's a genetics researcher, and Johnny's an astronaut. They're also on a space ''station'', not a space ''ship''.
** * The ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' [[Film/{{Watchmen}} film]] has ''numerous'' changes to the source material, most of them extrapolated from the comic. Two significant changes -- ([[spoiler:Dan Dreiberg seeing Rorschach's death and subsequently beating up Ozymandias, and changing some of the dialogue for the ending]]) -- were most likely done to prevent the audience leaving with a complete and horrible DownerEnding (though the graphic novel leaves the thread open). For the climax, they decided upon [[spoiler:a device that emulated Dr. Manhattan's energy signature, allowing the world to scapegoat ''him'', rather than the alien squid]]. People are undecided as to which works better ''overall,'' but it's definitely the best they could have done with that ending in film. The moment where Rorschach snaps was changed, mostly to avoid comparison with ''Franchise/{{Saw}}'', but the new scene also allows us to see the moment his mind snaps without an overabundance of narration.
** * ''ComicBook/TheMightyThor'' [[Film/{{Thor}} film]] didn't use the [[YeOldeButcheredeEnglishe pseudo-Elizabethan English]] that the Asgardian characters spoke for many years in the comics, which they themselves have already dropped this highly campy element. However while movie Thor doesn't use the pseudo-Elizabethan English, he ''does'' still speak in the largely antiquated and hammy style of the comics to largely the same effect (just minus the "thou's" and "thy's"). It was also decided that Thor's iconic helmet would only make one appearance near the beginning of the film before being discarded due to looking a little ridiculous on the big screen.
** * ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'' took a number of liberties with the source material to make it more (in the film's view) palatable for a mainstream audience. Among the major changes were having ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} forego his classic purple costume in favor of his more realistic leather outfit from ''ComicBook/TheUltimates'', as well as both he and ComicBook/BlackWidow being made into founding members of the Avengers. The plot also combines elements of both the first issue of ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' from back in the '60s as well as first storyline from ''The Ultimates''.
** * ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheFirstAvenger'' features the costume Cap wore in the comics, but it's for a propaganda show and he looks [[{{Camp}} utterly ridiculous]]. When he gets his actual fighting suit, it's radically different and much more plausible: changes include a helmet instead of a cowl, mere decals instead of large head wings, body armour, and the red of his costume is in the form of red utility straps rather than gaudy decorative stripes.stripes.
* ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' completely upends [[ComicBook/CivilWar its comic book namesake]], changing the Superhero Registration Act into the Sokovia Accords, the reasoning for the accords (from a panicking Nitro setting off his expanded powers to kill ComicBook/TheNewWarriors and 600 others in Stanton to a suicide vest by Crossbones going off and killing bystanders in a botched Avengers mission), giving new reasoning between Captain America and Iron Man's disagreements (both the Accords and the possible innocence of the Winter Soldier) and increasing the importance of ComicBook/BlackPanther, Black Widow and ComicBook/ScarletWitch (who either had bit parts or weren't around in the comic story) while decreasing that of ComicBook/SpiderMan (who played a major part in the original comic).
** The film scales down the CrisisCrossover elements of ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' to focus on a ([[LoadsAndLoadsOfCharacters relatively]]) smaller conflict between various superheroes, along with the ideological conflict represented between Iron Man and Captain America.
** Since there are next to no {{secret identit|y}}ies in the MCU, the SuperRegistrationAct is instead about forcing heroes to work as agents of world governments.
** Spider-Man does not publicly reveal his SecretIdentity because of the change in the nature of the SuperRegistrationAct and because he makes his debut in the MCU here -- not to mention that he's still in high school when the movie occurs. He also [[spoiler:does not change sides.]]
** The ComicBook/NewWarriors and Nitro (the original instigators) do not currently exist in the MCU. Instead, the catalyst for the SuperRegistrationAct is an international incident involving the Avengers. Not to mention, the original catalyst -- a bunch of teenage superheroes causing a catastrophe simply to get more viewers for their reality show -- would sound a little too far-fetched for a live-action movie anyway. However, while Nitro isn't involved, the incident IS someone blowing himself up, just instead of Nitro, it's Crossbones.
** Elements of Creator/EdBrubaker's ''[[ComicBook/CaptainAmericaWinterSoldier Winter Soldier]]'' story arc are incorporated to tie ''Civil War'' into the [[Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier previous Cap film]].
** Characters who had only minor roles in the original comic book event (e.g. Black Panther, Black Widow, Hawkeye) have bigger roles due to the differences between the MCU in 2016 and the Franchise/MarvelUniverse circa 2006.
** Rather than ask us to believe all these heroes would literally go to war simply over a political issue, the film has the more concrete issue of the Avengers ''not'' having HeroInsurance and what to do with Bucky as the catalysts for the fighting.
** Most importantly, [[spoiler:none of the Avengers die. In the comics, Bill "Goliath" Foster and Captain America (and a bunch of C-list heroes and villains nobody cares about) died. The most serious casualty in the movie is Rhodey, who is paralyzed but mobile thanks to Stark Tech. Cap also does not surrender at the end of the fight, and instead remains a fugitive.]]
** Also, in the comic, S.H.I.E.L.D. attempted to arrest Captain America for simply saying he wouldn't personally enforce a law that hadn't been passed yet. Here, Cap isn't a target until he actually breaks the law to help Bucky and there is an earnest attempt to convince him to change his mind. Cap, for his part, doesn't break the law until he hears there's a kill-on-sight order out on Bucky - prior to that, he and Falcon were apparently just going to retire.

** * ''Film/CaptainAmericaTheWinterSoldier'' heavily alters the [[ComicBook/BuckyBarnes title villain]]'s origin to fit the context of the movie and its predecessor, while still maintaining much of his background. They also made ComicBook/TheFalcon into a V.A. counselor and former soldier to better justify his inclusion in the plot. Some changes were also made to [[spoiler:Arnim Zola]] to avoid him seeming too silly and "comic booky" to mainstream audiences.
** * ''Film/GuardiansOfTheGalaxy'' has this both subtle and gross, most of which will only be picked up by fans of the original material. Examples include turning Drax's adversary from Thanos to Ronan (to give Drax a more obvious motive), a RaceLift and costume change for Korath the Pursuer, and Yondu as the leader of the [[SpacePirates Ravagers]].
5th May '17 1:31:47 PM BoyNinja
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** This trope is often a general aspect that occurs on a daily basis in the anime by ''really'' changing plot points in the games for more "child-friendly" versions to accommodate the plot...or altering it completely, often ending with mixed results. The Team Flare plot goes off-the-rails by importing a "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Legendary Giant Rock]]" all the way from Hoenn, while in the original there was no such connections with Hoenn and Kalos.

to:

** This trope is often a general aspect that occurs on a daily basis in the anime by ''really'' changing plot points in the games for more "child-friendly" versions to accommodate the plot...or altering it completely, often ending with mixed results. The Team Flare plot goes off-the-rails by importing a "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Legendary Giant Rock]]" all the way from Hoenn, while in the original there was no such connections with Hoenn and Kalos. This was done to avoid showing on the big screen how [[spoiler:the Ultimate Weapon was essentially a nuke powered up by living organisms that it would leave them dead]].
5th May '17 1:29:24 PM BoyNinja
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** The anime couldn't adapt [[PokemonBlackAndWhite N]]'s original goal (to release Pokemon from their Trainers, as he compared owning them to slavery) because it would make zero sense in the anime: it's [[AdaptationExpansion been established in anime canon]] that Pokemon can leave their Trainers (one suggested origin of Ash's Snivy), battling is actually beneficial to a Pokemon's growth, and Pokemon regularly choose if they get captured or not. Furthermore, the protagonist is an AllLovingHero. Thus, the anime's story with Team Plasma takes place after an event similar to the climax of Black and White, and has N already against Team Plasma for exploiting Pokemon. His BW traits are either downplayed or immediately changed when he realizes how good Ash is to his Pokemon.

to:

** The anime couldn't adapt [[PokemonBlackAndWhite N]]'s original goal (to release Pokemon from their Trainers, as he compared owning them to slavery) because it would make zero sense in the anime: it's [[AdaptationExpansion been established in anime canon]] that Pokemon can leave their Trainers (one suggested origin of Ash's Snivy), battling is actually beneficial to a Pokemon's growth, and Pokemon regularly choose if they get captured or not. Furthermore, the protagonist is an AllLovingHero. Thus, the anime's story with Team Plasma takes place after an event similar to the climax of Black and White, and has N already against Team Plasma for exploiting Pokemon. His BW traits are either downplayed or immediately changed when he realizes how good Ash is to his Pokemon. On the other hand, other reasons why it wasn't adapted at all was because [[DarkerAndEdgier the game plot itself was too dark for younger viewers]] or because of the 2011 Tohoku Earthquake happening right at the time a plot-important episode involved a mass city blackout.


Added DiffLines:

** This trope is often a general aspect that occurs on a daily basis in the anime by ''really'' changing plot points in the games for more "child-friendly" versions to accommodate the plot...or altering it completely, often ending with mixed results. The Team Flare plot goes off-the-rails by importing a "[[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Legendary Giant Rock]]" all the way from Hoenn, while in the original there was no such connections with Hoenn and Kalos.
1st May '17 8:08:08 AM Vrahno
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Animation/SonOfTheWhiteHorse'' was originally meant to be a mashup of several old Hungarian and Avarian folk stories and origin myths, with which the director wanted to express his beliefs about the cyclic nature of time. Given that this idea didn't sit well at all with the communist censors, he was forced to dial it back, and so the movie became a drastically reimagined version of the fable it shares its name with. Many folklorists were not amused.
23rd Apr '17 9:44:49 AM nombretomado
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* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland'' is often praised as one of the best efforts in the franchise, with legitimately frightening villains and scenes. And yet, it's origins are not of ''Scooby-Doo'', but, of all shows, ''SwatKats''; it was an [[RecycledScript unfinished script]] that involved a succubus. Inbetween the cancellation of ''SK'' and ''Zombie Island'', it was also partially recycled for an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuestTheRealAdventures''.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland'' is often praised as one of the best efforts in the franchise, with legitimately frightening villains and scenes. And yet, it's origins are not of ''Scooby-Doo'', but, of all shows, ''SwatKats''; ''WesternAnimation/SwatKats''; it was an [[RecycledScript unfinished script]] that involved a succubus. Inbetween the cancellation of ''SK'' and ''Zombie Island'', it was also partially recycled for an episode of ''WesternAnimation/JonnyQuestTheRealAdventures''.
17th Apr '17 9:54:49 AM omnicritic
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* In the original ''Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight'' novel, Virgil Tibbs is a quiet, deferential African American detective who never seems to lose his temper or ever seem annoyed working in a deep south town even as the racial slurs are thrown at him. For the film version, director Norman Jewison realized that this would never fly in the late 1960s, nor would the star, Creator/SidneyPoitier, would want to play this kind of character yet again. So, the film was rewritten with Tibbs being someone who does not hesitate to assert his status to bigoted neanderthals with a hearty "TheyCallMeMisterTibbs!" or instantly striking back at a bigot slapping him, a bold action for an African American hero to do on film at that time.

to:

* In the original ''Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight'' novel, Virgil Tibbs is a quiet, deferential African American detective who never seems to lose his temper or ever seem annoyed working in a deep south town even as the racial slurs are thrown at him. For the film version, director Norman Jewison realized that this would never fly in the late 1960s, nor would the star, Creator/SidneyPoitier, would want to play this kind type of character yet again. So, the film was rewritten with Tibbs being someone who does not hesitate to assert his status to bigoted neanderthals with a hearty "TheyCallMeMisterTibbs!" or instantly striking back at a bigot slapping him, a bold action for an African American hero to do on film at that time.
17th Apr '17 9:53:02 AM omnicritic
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* In original ''Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight'' novel, Virgil Tibbs is a quiet, deferential African American detective who never seems to lose his temper or ever seem annoyed working in a deep south town even as the racial slurs are thrown at him. For the film version, director Norman Jewison realized that this would never fly in the late 1960s, nor would the star, Creator/SidneyPoitier, would want to play this kind of character yet again. So, the film was rewritten with Tibbs being someone who does not hesitate to assert his status to bigoted neanderthals with a hearty "TheyCallMeMisterTibbs!" or instantly striking back at a bigot slapping him, a bold action for an African American hero to do on film at that time.

to:

* In the original ''Film/InTheHeatOfTheNight'' novel, Virgil Tibbs is a quiet, deferential African American detective who never seems to lose his temper or ever seem annoyed working in a deep south town even as the racial slurs are thrown at him. For the film version, director Norman Jewison realized that this would never fly in the late 1960s, nor would the star, Creator/SidneyPoitier, would want to play this kind of character yet again. So, the film was rewritten with Tibbs being someone who does not hesitate to assert his status to bigoted neanderthals with a hearty "TheyCallMeMisterTibbs!" or instantly striking back at a bigot slapping him, a bold action for an African American hero to do on film at that time.
13th Apr '17 11:33:20 PM BB8ForPresident
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** ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'' was much more deviant than its predecessor. AngstWhatAngst is again invoked in the book, as the Pevensies seem to have had no trouble returning to their lives as children. The majority of the book is Trumpkin retelling what has happened to the kids, and at the end of the book, not a word is mentioned when they hand Caspian the crown of Narnia and leave for London. Compare to the movie.
*** The kids (Peter being the worst) have ''not'' completely adjusted back to life in London.

to:

** ''Literature/PrinceCaspian'' was much more deviant than its predecessor. AngstWhatAngst is again invoked in the book, as the Pevensies seem to have had no trouble returning to their lives as children.children in England after growing up in Narnia and then no issues returning to Narnia to discover everyone they knew died thousands of years before and the lands and people they ruled have been conquered and almost wiped out. The majority of the book is Trumpkin retelling what has happened to the kids, and at the end of the book, not a word is mentioned when they hand Caspian the crown of Narnia and leave for London. Compare to the movie.
*** The kids (Peter being the worst) have ''not'' completely adjusted back to life in London.London and don't fit in with anymore thanks to having years of memories in a different world that no one knows about.
*** When the four of them return to Narnia and realise they've come back centuries later because their old home (Cair Paravel) is in ruins they're grief-stricken and actually acknowledge that all their old friends (the Beavers, Tumnus)are dead.
*** They also spend the rest of the film dealing with the fact that Narnia has changed, and their reign and all their achievements are remembered only as legend now. The director even mentions that the heart of the film was about that feeling of returning to a place that no longer exists anymore.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PragmaticAdaptation