History Main / PragmaticAdaptation

9th Feb '18 11:07:41 PM Anicomicgeek
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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamByGaslight'' took some liberties to make its version of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper mystery work better than simply adapt the suspect of [[ComicBook/GothamByGaslight the original comic]]. Namely, [[AlternateHistory limiting Jack's crimes to Gotham]] and [[spoiler:while [[DemotedToExtra demoting Jack Packer, the book's Ripper, to a voiceless cameo]] and making [[AdaptationalVillany Commissioner Gordon]] is the film's Ripper.]]

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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamByGaslight'' took some liberties to make its version of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper mystery work better than simply adapt the suspect of [[ComicBook/GothamByGaslight the original comic]]. Namely, [[AlternateHistory limiting Jack's crimes to Gotham]] and [[spoiler:while [[DemotedToExtra demoting Jack Packer, the book's Ripper, to a voiceless cameo]] and making [[AdaptationalVillany [[AdaptationalVillainy Commissioner Gordon]] is the film's Ripper.]]
9th Feb '18 12:39:35 AM Anicomicgeek
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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSpectacularSpiderMan'' made a number of slight visual changes to Spider-Man's supporting cast, notably [[RaceLift making several white characters into minorities for the sake of diversity]] and giving slightly modernized designs to a some of Spidey's villains.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSpectacularSpiderMan'' made a number of slight visual changes to Spider-Man's supporting cast, notably [[RaceLift making several white characters into minorities for the sake of diversity]] and giving slightly modernized designs to a some of Spidey's villains.
9th Feb '18 12:34:20 AM Anicomicgeek
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* ''WesternAnimation/BatmanGothamByGaslight'' took some liberties to make its version of the UsefulNotes/JackTheRipper mystery work better than simply adapt the suspect of [[ComicBook/GothamByGaslight the original comic]]. Namely, [[AlternateHistory limiting Jack's crimes to Gotham]] and [[spoiler:while [[DemotedToExtra demoting Jack Packer, the book's Ripper, to a voiceless cameo]] and making [[AdaptationalVillany Commissioner Gordon]] is the film's Ripper.]]
31st Jan '18 7:12:04 PM AgentKyles
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[[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]

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[[folder:Film -- Live-Action]]Live-Action (Superhero)]]


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[[folder:Film -- Live-Action (Other)]]
31st Jan '18 5:21:02 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Jackson's adaptation(s) of ''Film/TheHobbit'' are also highly improvised; in the source material, Azog the Orc is actually already dead, having been killed by Dain long before the events of the story, and the hazards that the traveling party face are more localized. This makes for a somewhat incohesive film, though, so Jackson kept Azog alive thus and a primary driving force for Bilbo and the dwarves.

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* Jackson's Creator/PeterJackson's adaptation(s) of ''Film/TheHobbit'' are also highly improvised; have quite a few differences from the original; in the source material, Azog the Orc is actually already dead, having been killed by Dain long before the events of the story, and the hazards that the traveling party face are more localized. This makes for a somewhat incohesive film, though, so Jackson kept Azog alive thus and a primary driving force for Bilbo and the dwarves.
29th Jan '18 11:58:12 PM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* Jackson's adaptation(s) of ''Film/TheHobbit'' are also highly improvised; in the source material, Azog the Orc is actually already dead, having been killed by Thorin long before the events of the story, and the hazards that the traveling party face are more localized. This makes for a somewhat incohesive film, though, so Jackson kept Azog alive thus and a primary driving force for Bilbo and the dwarves.

to:

* Jackson's adaptation(s) of ''Film/TheHobbit'' are also highly improvised; in the source material, Azog the Orc is actually already dead, having been killed by Thorin Dain long before the events of the story, and the hazards that the traveling party face are more localized. This makes for a somewhat incohesive film, though, so Jackson kept Azog alive thus and a primary driving force for Bilbo and the dwarves.
24th Jan '18 7:38:52 PM fusilcontrafusil
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** The movies' change from Denethor being well-meaning but ultimately quite flawed to [[TookALevelInJerkass a cartoonish jerk]] could be for the same reason: if Denethor was a good, competent Steward of Gondor, the audience would see no real reason for Aragorn to take back the throne beyond the Rule of Law, "he's the heir so he has to". (As it happens in the book, Aragorn was also acclaimed as ruler by the people of Minas Tirith for saving the day and [[HealingHands for healing the sick and wounded]]. The coronation was more of a formality.)

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** The movies' change from Denethor being well-meaning but ultimately quite flawed to [[TookALevelInJerkass a cartoonish jerk]] could be for the same reason: if Denethor was a good, competent Steward of Gondor, the audience would see no real reason for Aragorn to take back the throne beyond the Rule of Law, "he's the heir so he has to".can if he wants". (As it happens in the book, Aragorn was also acclaimed as ruler by the people of Minas Tirith for saving the day and [[HealingHands for healing the sick and wounded]]. The coronation was more of a formality.)
24th Jan '18 7:36:51 PM fusilcontrafusil
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** The alterations of Faramir's actions and motivations in ''The Two Towers'' are a result of this. The Shelob scene that provided the cliffhanger in the book doesn't chronologically take place until the battle of Minas Tirith, so according to Jackson something else had to form the climax of the second movie for Frodo and Sam. Further, it was noted that every other character in the films had an adverse reaction to being in the presence of the Ring, and for Faramir to let them go without a second glance felt somewhat off to Jackson and company. Narrative concerns helped, too; with Shelob moved to ''Return of the King'' (since Jackson rightly felt that anything would pale after Helm's Deep), Frodo and Sam needed to be placed in peril ''somehow'', and Faramir was there.

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** Once the Fellowship separates, Frodo and Sam's journeys are recounted in separate chapters (taking up whole Books) from Aragorn and the rest without intercutting until they finally all reunite at the end. The films, like Ralph Bakshi's before them, take a more conventional approach.
** The alterations of Faramir's actions and motivations in ''The Two Towers'' are a result of this. The Shelob scene that provided the cliffhanger in the book doesn't chronologically take place until the battle of Minas Tirith, so according to Jackson something else had to form the climax of the second movie for Frodo and Sam. Further, it was noted that every other character in the films had an adverse reaction to being in the presence of the Ring, and for Faramir to let them go without a second glance at it felt somewhat off to Jackson and company. (This is more due to the films exaggerating the effect the Ring has on people; Faramir doesn't actually see the Ring in the book, but does briefly contemplate holding the hobbits prisoner once he finds out about it.) Narrative concerns helped, too; with Shelob moved to ''Return of the King'' (since Jackson rightly felt that anything would pale after Helm's Deep), Frodo and Sam needed to be placed in peril ''somehow'', and Faramir was there.



** In the books Aragorn is ([[HeroicBSOD usually]]) quietly confident in himself and his status as the rightful heir to the throne of Gondor, willing to become King if [[BecauseDestinySaysSo that is his fate]], and letting out some {{Badass Boast}}s about his heritage at certain times just like heroic kings and princes of ancient and medieval literature. However, the filmmakers thought this could lead to ValuesDissonance for a modern audience, so Aragorn becomes full of self-doubt and only fully accepts his royal heritage and destiny in the third film. One way this is enforced is by giving Aragorn the ancient sword of kings, [[NamedWeapons Narsil/Andúril]], only in the third film, while in the books he carries it from his first appearance (he uses a generic sword before that). Also, before the sword is reforged by the elves, Aragorn fights in the books with the broken Narsil, which Peter Jackson thought would look ridiculous on screen.
** The movies' change from Denethor being well-meaning but ultimately quite flawed to [[TookALevelInJerkass a jerk]] could be for the same reason: if Denethor was a good, competent Steward of Gondor, the audience would see no real reason for Aragorn to take back the throne beyond "he's the king so he has to".

to:

** In the books Aragorn is ([[HeroicBSOD usually]]) quietly confident in himself and his status as the rightful heir to the throne of Gondor, willing to become King if [[BecauseDestinySaysSo that is his fate]], and letting out some {{Badass Boast}}s about his heritage at certain times just like heroic kings and princes of ancient and medieval literature. However, the filmmakers thought this could lead to ValuesDissonance for a modern audience, so Aragorn becomes full of self-doubt and only fully accepts his royal heritage and destiny in the third film. One way this is enforced is by giving Aragorn the ancient sword of kings, [[NamedWeapons Narsil/Andúril]], only in the third film, while in the books he carries it from his first appearance (he uses a generic sword before that). Also, before the sword is reforged by the elves, Aragorn fights in the books with reveals the broken Narsil, Narsil with him in his introductory scene, which Peter Jackson thought would look ridiculous on screen.
** The movies' change from Denethor being well-meaning but ultimately quite flawed to [[TookALevelInJerkass a cartoonish jerk]] could be for the same reason: if Denethor was a good, competent Steward of Gondor, the audience would see no real reason for Aragorn to take back the throne beyond the Rule of Law, "he's the king heir so he has to".to". (As it happens in the book, Aragorn was also acclaimed as ruler by the people of Minas Tirith for saving the day and [[HealingHands for healing the sick and wounded]]. The coronation was more of a formality.)



* Jackson's adaptation(s) of ''Film/TheHobbit'' are also highly improvised; in the source material, the Grey Orc is actually already dead, having been killed by Thorin long before the events of the story, and the hazards that the traveling party face are more localized. This makes for a somewhat incohesive film, though, so Jackson kept the Grey Orc alive thus and a primary driving force for Bilbo and the dwarves.

to:

* Jackson's adaptation(s) of ''Film/TheHobbit'' are also highly improvised; in the source material, Azog the Grey Orc is actually already dead, having been killed by Thorin long before the events of the story, and the hazards that the traveling party face are more localized. This makes for a somewhat incohesive film, though, so Jackson kept the Grey Orc Azog alive thus and a primary driving force for Bilbo and the dwarves.
17th Jan '18 6:02:04 AM JaneStValentine
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** The girls (except Flora) cut school and go to Earth, where Aisha, Stella and Musa are stopped by a police officer and asked why they're not in school. In the original, Layla gives the excuse that they have permission from their parents to be out of school and offers to give the cop the phone numbers, but the cop declines and lets them go. In 4kids, Aisha speaks a different language, making the cop think they're not from Gardenia and so he lets them go. The 4kids version is more believable because, by law, the cop should've taken in all three girls and called their parents (not that he could call them, but you get it) since skipping school (aka truancy) is illegal.

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** The girls (except Flora) cut school and go to Earth, where Aisha, Aisha/Layla, Stella and Musa are stopped by a police officer and asked why they're not in school. In the original, Layla Aisha gives the excuse that they have permission from their parents to be out of school and offers to give the cop the phone numbers, but the cop declines and lets them go. In 4kids, Aisha 4Kids, Layla speaks a different language, making the cop think they're not from Gardenia and so he lets them go. The 4kids 4Kids version is more believable because, by law, the cop should've taken in all three girls and called their parents (not that he could call them, but you get it) since skipping school (aka truancy) is illegal.
14th Jan '18 8:06:54 PM Angeldeb82
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* ''ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman'' was given a novel treatment ''while the story was still going'', just to be released when the finale was. Doing this compressed a lot of the story and excised a lot of things, including everyone in the DC Universe outside of the then-established Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}}, WonderWoman and Franchise/{{Batman}}, removed anything involving the monstrous Underworlders and the orphan Keith by replacing them with the Newsboy Legion and condensed a lot of the adventures of the four replacement Supermen before getting into the meat of the story. Oddly, despite [[spoiler:Coast City being obliterated still, GreenLantern]] does not show up.

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* ''ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman'' was given a novel treatment ''while the story was still going'', just to be released when the finale was. Doing this compressed a lot of the story and excised a lot of things, including everyone in the DC Universe outside of the then-established Franchise/{{Justice League|of America}}, WonderWoman Franchise/WonderWoman and Franchise/{{Batman}}, removed anything involving the monstrous Underworlders and the orphan Keith by replacing them with the Newsboy Legion and condensed a lot of the adventures of the four replacement Supermen before getting into the meat of the story. Oddly, despite [[spoiler:Coast City being obliterated still, GreenLantern]] ComicBook/GreenLantern]] does not show up.



* ''Literature/{{Wicked}}'' the novel was about anarchy, cruel dictatorship, persecution, and watching a woman's descent into insanity. [[Theatre/{{Wicked}} The Broadway musical]] changed around the story into being about [[LighterAndSofter friendship, shoes, and drama over stolen boyfriends.]] The [[WordofGay Les]] [[{{Hoyay}} Yay]] between Elphaba and Glinda is also toned down, at least slightly: in the book, it's less noticeable on Elphaba's side, but arguably more noticeable on Glinda's side. Another change, albeit a minor one, is that Elphaba's sister Nessa doesn't have arms in the book. Obviously difficult to portray onstage, so they just stick her in a wheelchair instead. The biggest change is that [[spoiler: Elphaba and Fiyero live]]. The compressed timeline is part of this too: the book spans nearly 40 years, but it would stretch suspension of disbelief to have the same actress playing a character at 18 and 38.

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* ''Literature/{{Wicked}}'' the novel was about anarchy, cruel dictatorship, persecution, and watching a woman's descent into insanity. [[Theatre/{{Wicked}} The Broadway musical]] changed around the story into being about [[LighterAndSofter friendship, shoes, and drama over stolen boyfriends.]] boyfriends]]. The [[WordofGay [[WordOfGay Les]] [[{{Hoyay}} [[HoYay Yay]] between Elphaba and Glinda is also toned down, at least slightly: in the book, it's less noticeable on Elphaba's side, but arguably more noticeable on Glinda's side. Another change, albeit a minor one, is that Elphaba's sister Nessa doesn't have arms in the book. Obviously difficult to portray onstage, so they just stick her in a wheelchair instead. The biggest change is that [[spoiler: Elphaba and Fiyero live]]. The compressed timeline is part of this too: the book spans nearly 40 years, but it would stretch suspension of disbelief to have the same actress playing a character at 18 and 38.



* The musical adaptation of ''Theatre/BeautyAndTheBeast'' does this in regard to the Enchantress's curse. Instead of instantly transforming the servants into [[AnimateInanimateObject talking objects]], the spell slowly changes them into fully inanimate bric-a-brac, gradually replacing their human features and clothing with parts of their item. While largely a pragmatic choice--it's a lot easier to costume a woman to ''resemble'' a teapot than it is to build a believable special effect--it also makes the curse more painful, as the castle's inhabitants are [[AndIMustScream aware of what's happening to them, but completely powerless to stop it.]]

to:

* The musical adaptation of ''Theatre/BeautyAndTheBeast'' does this in regard to the Enchantress's curse. Instead of instantly transforming the servants into [[AnimateInanimateObject talking objects]], the spell slowly changes them into fully inanimate bric-a-brac, gradually replacing their human features and clothing with parts of their item. While largely a pragmatic choice--it's a lot easier to costume a woman to ''resemble'' a teapot than it is to build a believable special effect--it also makes the curse more painful, as the castle's inhabitants are [[AndIMustScream aware of what's happening to them, but completely powerless to stop it.]] it]].



* [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] in ''Film/TheMatrix: Path of Neo'', where the Wachowskis literally stop time and interrupt the game to explain that the sacrificial ending to the movie wouldn't have worked in a videogame, so instead the player gets to fight a FinalBoss made up of [[IAmLegion every Smith in the level]].

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* [[InvokedTrope Invoked]] {{Invoked|Trope}} in ''Film/TheMatrix: Path of Neo'', where the Wachowskis literally stop time and interrupt the game to explain that the sacrificial ending to the movie wouldn't have worked in a videogame, so instead the player gets to fight a FinalBoss made up of [[IAmLegion every Smith in the level]].



** ''Living Legends'' diverges heavily from the previous games in balance, asset usage (such as having useful aircraft, PowerArmor, and [[TankGoodness tanks]]), and basic game mechanics - all of which were changed for competitive multiplayer balance centered around objective-based gameplay. The end result is that while it still plays much like a [=MechWarrior=] game, the spirit is much more like the original wargame, ''[=BattleTech=]''. The DesignItYourselfEquipment was purposely delayed til the end of the public UsefulNotes/BetaTest ([[ScrewedByTheLawyers that never came]]) in order to allow the developers to balance out weapons and battlemechs on their own sake in order to avoid the [[FranchiseOriginalSin terminal min-maxing that has plagued the series]].

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** ''Living Legends'' diverges heavily from the previous games in balance, asset usage (such as having useful aircraft, PowerArmor, and [[TankGoodness tanks]]), {{tank|Goodness}}s), and basic game mechanics - all of which were changed for competitive multiplayer balance centered around objective-based gameplay. The end result is that while it still plays much like a [=MechWarrior=] game, the spirit is much more like the original wargame, ''[=BattleTech=]''. The DesignItYourselfEquipment was purposely delayed til the end of the public UsefulNotes/BetaTest ([[ScrewedByTheLawyers that never came]]) in order to allow the developers to balance out weapons and battlemechs on their own sake in order to avoid the [[FranchiseOriginalSin terminal min-maxing that has plagued the series]].


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* ''VideoGame/{{Cuphead}}'': While the game otherwise sticks to emulating classic cartoons to the T, the racist depictions of racial minorities is purposely avoided, [[ValuesDissonance and for good reason]]. The most that happens is giving Djimmi the Great clear Egyptian influences (when genies are Arabic), and that is terribly minor in comparison while still being a possible throwback.
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