History Main / PowerCreepPowerSeep

17th Jan '17 6:21:24 PM nombretomado
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* While one could see ''Manga/CardcaptorSakura'''s eponymous character matching the other mages in ''MagicalBattleArena'' power-wise, it's a little harder to imagine her being able to take hits as well [[MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha as renowned members of a multi-dimension spanning police force]] or [[LightNovel/{{Slayers}} veteran adventurers of a fantasy world]] considering how she kinda has the durability of an ordinary elementary school student.

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* While one could see ''Manga/CardcaptorSakura'''s eponymous character matching the other mages in ''MagicalBattleArena'' ''VideoGame/MagicalBattleArena'' power-wise, it's a little harder to imagine her being able to take hits as well [[MagicalGirlLyricalNanoha as renowned members of a multi-dimension spanning police force]] or [[LightNovel/{{Slayers}} veteran adventurers of a fantasy world]] considering how she kinda has the durability of an ordinary elementary school student.
11th Dec '16 9:35:07 PM X2X
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*** [[Franchise/AceAttorney Phoenix Wright]] is now in the ''Vs.'' series as off ''[=UMvC3=]''. His ultimate attack? [[MundaneMadeAwesome "The real culprit... IS YOU!"]] In other words, he can defeat a world-destroying horror ''by providing evidence of guilt and giving it the pointer finger!''

to:

*** [[Franchise/AceAttorney Phoenix Wright]] is now in the ''Vs.'' series as off of ''[=UMvC3=]''. His ultimate attack? [[MundaneMadeAwesome "The real culprit... IS YOU!"]] In other words, he can defeat a world-destroying horror ''by providing evidence of guilt and giving it the pointer finger!''
11th Dec '16 9:33:46 PM X2X
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* Happens in crossover titles in video games as well, as evidenced in [[VideoGame/CapcomVsWhatever Capcom crossover games]]. This is something of a necessity; how else could you expect [[Franchise/StreetFighter Dan Hibiki or Sakura]] to fight, say, the [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk Hulk]] or Comicbook/DoctorDoom without having a serious upgrade in strength? (Dan, of course, doesn't have a chance even with the upgrade, but he's a JokeCharacter anyway.) The concept was (lovingly) mocked in a segment on Series/XPlay where Blair Butler took a look back at the ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' series, noting in each game the number of fighters, adding that "none of them would stand a chance against TheHulk"; while not completely true, it gets the point across.
** It's even worse in the earlier games in the series, where freakin' ''Comicbook/{{Apocalypse}}'' and ''Comicbook/{{Onslaught}}'' were the final bosses, and yet the likes of Chun-Li and Ryu were able to take them down. Of course, ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'' ups the ante further with the Final Boss being ''Comicbook/{{Galactus}}''.
*** Discussed in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=fNYzhtH6oq0 this hilariously uber-nerdy Gamesradar video]] about how ridiculously Capcom overcompensated the power levels of their characters to match the Marvel characters on their character profile pages. While some of the featured Capcom characters are a lot stronger than many fans assume, if [[http://marvel.com/universe/OHOTMU:Power_Grids the official standards set down for reading the power charts]] and these levels are to be believed, Tron Bonne is an omniscient world-consuming EldritchAbomination who crushes worlds with a flick of her pinky.
*** It seems that the dev team of the original ''Marvel vs. Capcom 3'' didn't know how the ratings for the Marvel Power Grid should be issued for the Capcom characters (apparently believing that 4 was human average, when actually 2 is), so they've been changed to be more believable in ''Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3''. For one example, Tron was originally issued a 7 in Intelligence. According to the rating system, a 7 in Intelligence means she's "Omniscient"... as in, like an all-knowing god. Capcom must have assumed it meant "really smart". Most likely, after reading about the ratings, Tron was issued a 6 in Intelligence (meaning "Super-Genius"), which makes more sense.
*** Considering that many of Capcom's characters seem MUCH stronger, this can double as FridgeBrilliance. For example: Ryu can fire a much bigger Shinku Hadoken in comparison to his SF incarnation. [[http://streetfighter.wikia.com/wiki/Shinku_Hadoken See this comparison]].
*** [[UpToEleven It was only done to match with the over-the-top and frantic gameplay]] that has been present since ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'', with the exception of ''VideoGame/{{Capcom vs SNK|MillenniumFight2000}}'' and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken''. It mainly applies for the Street Fighter characters.
*** Then, there's the inclusion of [[DimensionLord Dormammu]], [[EldritchAbomination Shuma-Gorath]], and the like as playable characters. In their own continuities, they could just blink once and delete all of their opponents from existence. Which makes it kinda of funny when you see humans with no superpowers like Chris Redfield or Comicbook/{{Hawkeye}} [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu beat the snot out of an ultra-powerful, reality-warping god]].
*** [[Franchise/AceAttorney Phoenix Wright]] is now in the games. His ultimate attack? [[MundaneMadeAwesome "The real culprit...IS YOU!"]] In other words, he can defeat a world-destroying horror ''by providing evidence of guilt and giving it the pointer finger!''
*** Character weaknesses can't be exploited in this series. For example, Venom is no more weaker to [[PlayingWithFire fire-elemental attacks]] than any other character. In the comics, one of the symbiotes' major weaknesses are high temperatures. Sound vibrations are also another weakness of the symbiotes, but even with all of the loud sounds during battle, Venom isn't affected in the slightest by them.
*** If these games were more strict about characters' strengths and weaknesses during gameplay, [[EyeBeams optic blasts]] would be ''useless'' in [[MirrorMatch Cyclops vs. Cyclops matches]], no matter how powerful they are. They'd have to rely on [[BareFistedMonk martial arts]]. In the comics, Cyclops is resistant to his own powers.
*** In Marvel 3, every character has special dialogue with a few other fighters, and these and the game's various trailers have established certain Marvel/Capcom matchups as being rivals. In the first edition of the game, the Hulk was considered rivals with Mike Haggar from ''VideoGame/FinalFight''. A superhuman who can lift ''mountain ranges'' when sufficiently angry versus a middle-aged former pro wrestler who, on his best day, could flip a car. Needless to say, they had to fudge both character's power levels considerably to put them on even ground. The Ultimate edition of the game added Nemesis from ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'', an eight-foot-tall indestructible zombie, a much more fitting rival for the Hulk.
** The presence of Gold Lightan and the PTX-40A Vital Suit from ''VideoGame/LostPlanet'' in ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' (both of whom are utterly massive) asked for a massive power creep to [[Franchise/StreetFighter Alex]] (who is a grappler) as performing the Hyper Bomb on them can be translated as ''grabbing a giant robot's leg and effortlessly slamming him into the ground, including with an airborne drop''. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3J-kN2JIYM It has to be seen to be believed]].

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* Happens in crossover titles in video games as well, as evidenced in [[VideoGame/CapcomVsWhatever Capcom crossover games]]. This is something of a necessity; how else could you expect [[Franchise/StreetFighter Dan Hibiki or Sakura]] to fight, say, the [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk [[ComicBook/IncredibleHulk Hulk]] or Comicbook/DoctorDoom without having a serious upgrade in strength? (Dan, of course, doesn't have a chance even with the upgrade, but he's a JokeCharacter anyway.) The concept was (lovingly) mocked in a segment on Series/XPlay ''Series/XPlay'' where Blair Butler took a look back at the ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' series, noting in each game the number of fighters, adding that "none of them would stand a chance against TheHulk"; the Hulk"; while not completely true, it gets the point across.
** It's even worse in the earlier games in the series, where freakin' ''Comicbook/{{Apocalypse}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Apocalypse}}'' and ''Comicbook/{{Onslaught}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Onslaught}}'' were the final bosses, and yet the likes of Chun-Li and Ryu were able to take them down. Of course, ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom3'' ups the ante further with the Final Boss being ''Comicbook/{{Galactus}}''.
''ComicBook/{{Galactus}}''.
*** Discussed in [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=fNYzhtH6oq0 com/watch?v=fNYzhtH6oq0 this hilariously uber-nerdy Gamesradar video]] about how ridiculously Capcom overcompensated the power levels of their characters to match the Marvel characters on their character profile pages. While some of the featured Capcom characters are a lot stronger than many fans assume, if [[http://marvel.com/universe/OHOTMU:Power_Grids the official standards set down for reading the power charts]] and these levels are to be believed, [[VideoGame/MegaManLegends Tron Bonne Bonne]] is an omniscient world-consuming EldritchAbomination who crushes worlds with a flick of her pinky.
*** It seems that the dev team of the original ''Marvel vs. Capcom 3'' didn't know how the ratings for the Marvel Power Grid should be issued for the Capcom characters (apparently believing that 4 was human average, when actually 2 is), so they've been changed to be more believable in ''Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3''. For one example, Tron was originally issued a 7 in Intelligence. According to the rating system, a 7 in Intelligence means she's "Omniscient"... as in, like an all-knowing god. Capcom must have assumed it meant "really smart". smart." Most likely, after reading about the ratings, Tron was issued a 6 in Intelligence (meaning "Super-Genius"), which makes more sense.
*** Considering that many of Capcom's characters seem MUCH stronger, this can double as FridgeBrilliance. For example: Ryu can fire a much bigger Shinku Hadoken in comparison to his SF ''SF'' incarnation. [[http://streetfighter.wikia.com/wiki/Shinku_Hadoken See this comparison]].
comparison.]]
*** [[UpToEleven It was only done to match with the over-the-top and frantic gameplay]] that has been present since ''VideoGame/XMenChildrenOfTheAtom'', with the exception of ''VideoGame/{{Capcom vs SNK|MillenniumFight2000}}'' ''[[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNKMillenniumFight2000 Capcom]] [[VideoGame/CapcomVsSNK2MarkOfTheMillennium vs.]] [[VideoGame/SNKVsCapcomSVCChaos SNK]]'' and ''VideoGame/StreetFighterXTekken''. It mainly applies for the Street Fighter characters.
''Street Fighter'' characters, though there are other Capcom characters who benefit, such as [[Franchise/ResidentEvil Wesker]]'s superhuman speed and reflexes being interpreted as [[FlashStep outright teleportation]]. In fact, a very subtle example comes from [[VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}} Morrigan]], whose Soul Fist special move is actually the ES Special variant seen in her home series.
*** Then, there's the inclusion of [[DimensionLord Dormammu]], [[EldritchAbomination Shuma-Gorath]], and the like as playable characters. In their own continuities, they could just blink once and delete all of their opponents from existence. Which makes it kinda of funny when you see humans with no superpowers like [[Franchise/ResidentEvil Chris Redfield Redfield]] or Comicbook/{{Hawkeye}} ComicBook/{{Hawkeye}} [[DidYouJustPunchOutCthulhu beat the snot out of an ultra-powerful, reality-warping god]].
*** [[Franchise/AceAttorney Phoenix Wright]] is now in the games.''Vs.'' series as off ''[=UMvC3=]''. His ultimate attack? [[MundaneMadeAwesome "The real culprit... IS YOU!"]] In other words, he can defeat a world-destroying horror ''by providing evidence of guilt and giving it the pointer finger!''
*** Character weaknesses can't be exploited in this series. For example, Venom ComicBook/{{Venom}} is no more weaker to [[PlayingWithFire fire-elemental attacks]] than any other character. In the comics, one of the symbiotes' major weaknesses are high temperatures. Sound vibrations are also another weakness of the symbiotes, but even with all of the loud sounds during battle, Venom isn't affected in the slightest by them.
*** If these games were more strict about characters' strengths and weaknesses during gameplay, [[EyeBeams optic blasts]] would be ''useless'' in [[MirrorMatch Cyclops vs. Cyclops matches]], no matter how powerful they are. They'd have to rely on [[BareFistedMonk martial arts]]. In the comics, Cyclops is resistant to his own powers.
powers. Similarly, ComicBook/GhostRider's [[DeathGlare Penance Stare]] works on any normal-sized character (i.e. everyone not named Galactus), regardless of if the character ever inflicted pain and suffering on an innocent.
*** In Marvel 3, ''[=MvC3=]'', every character has special dialogue with a few other fighters, and these and the game's various trailers have established certain Marvel/Capcom matchups as being rivals. In the first edition of the game, the Hulk was considered rivals with Mike Haggar from ''VideoGame/FinalFight''. A superhuman who can lift ''mountain ranges'' when sufficiently angry versus a middle-aged former pro wrestler who, on his best day, could flip a car. Needless to say, they had to fudge both character's power levels considerably to put them on even ground. The Ultimate ''Ultimate'' edition of the game added Nemesis [[VideoGame/ResidentEvil3Nemesis Nemesis]] from ''Franchise/ResidentEvil'', an eight-foot-tall indestructible zombie, a much more fitting rival for the Hulk.
** The presence of Gold Lightan and the PTX-40A Vital Suit from ''VideoGame/LostPlanet'' in ''VideoGame/TatsunokoVsCapcom'' (both of whom are utterly massive) asked for a massive power creep to [[Franchise/StreetFighter [[VideoGame/StreetFighterIII Alex]] (who is a grappler) as performing the Hyper Bomb on them can be translated as ''grabbing a giant robot's leg and effortlessly slamming him into the ground, including with an airborne drop''. [[http://www.[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F3J-kN2JIYM It has to be seen to be believed]].believed.]]



* The ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' characters such as Cody, Guy and Maki are noticeably more powerful when they appear in ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' games than their own games. Of course if the characters had their ''Street Fighter'' abilities in the ''Final Fight'' series, the games would be pretty boring.

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* The ''VideoGame/FinalFight'' characters such as Cody, Guy and Maki are noticeably more powerful when they appear in ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' games than their own games. Of course if the characters had their ''Street Fighter'' abilities in the ''Final Fight'' series, the games would be pretty boring. The one exception to this is ''Final Fight 3'', where all the player characters [[http://rq87.flyingomelette.com/FF/F/3/chars.html had access to a greatly expanded repertoire of attacks,]] though Guy's moveset is not 100% identical between ''[=FF3=]'' and his ''Street Fighter'' appearances.



** In practically every game, especially those where Aliens are enemies only (like the Creator/{{Capcom}} brawler) Predators are more resilient than Aliens -- despite the fact that Predators have been killed by falling logs and humans in melee combat, while Aliens have survived plasma thruster engines, the vacuum of space and tons of molten lead.

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** In practically every game, especially those where Aliens are enemies only (like [[VideoGame/AlienVsPredatorCapcom the Creator/{{Capcom}} brawler) Capcom brawler]]) Predators are more resilient than Aliens -- despite the fact that Predators have been killed by falling logs and humans in melee combat, while Aliens have survived plasma thruster engines, the vacuum of space and tons of molten lead.



** ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' is interesting about this, because it brings up the question of who is really getting the creeps and seeps respectively, since there's Superman on the DC side, a god (Raiden) and a supernatural undead (Scorpion) on the ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' side, and a range of less powerful superheroes and flat-out humans scattered across both. The final explanation is that the merging of the two universes causes powers to fluctuate, strengthening some and weakening others. It gets lampshaded when, after ComicBook/TheJoker defeats Sonya, Comicbook/{{Deathstroke}} asks in bewilderment, "Since when can ''you'' beat anybody?!" (The Joker promptly trashes him afterwards and then decides to use his newfound strength to defeat Batman. He does but then [[VillainBall forgot]] the Bat's [[CrazyPrepared defining characteristic]] and got knocked out by a taser.)
*** As for Superman, remember that most of the ''Mortal Kombat'' cast are either inherently or powered by or using magic - and Superman is basically a mundane when it comes to magic (which he remarks after receiving a ''normal kick'' from Scorpion in the story). Only Sonya Blade, Kano and Jax as well as the other DC characters barring Franchise/WonderWoman and [[Comicbook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] are non-magical, so only they really need the HandWave above to face off effectively against the Man of Steel. This is even addressed in Superman's arcade ending, in which he asks Captain Marvel for training to make him as strong against magic as he is against everything else.
*** ''Videogame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' received much grousing from fans when it was initially announced, mainly because some people found the thought of characters like Comicbook/HarleyQuinn and Comicbook/{{Nightwing}} being able to punch out Superman and Wonder Woman to be absurd. Of course, nobody really plays fighting games for the plot or realism, do they? It's handwaved in-game with Kryptonian nanotech that makes the BadassNormal characters tough enough to go toe-to-toe with superpowered characters and in the comics is capable of making Alfred Pennyworth strong enough give Superman a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown.

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** ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' is interesting about this, because it brings up the question of who is really getting the creeps and seeps respectively, since there's Superman on the DC side, a god (Raiden) and a supernatural undead (Scorpion) on the ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' side, and a range of less powerful superheroes and flat-out humans scattered across both. The final explanation is that the merging of the two universes causes powers to fluctuate, strengthening some and weakening others. It gets lampshaded when, after ComicBook/TheJoker defeats Sonya, Comicbook/{{Deathstroke}} ComicBook/{{Deathstroke}} asks in bewilderment, "Since when can ''you'' beat anybody?!" (The Joker promptly trashes him afterwards and then decides to use his newfound strength to defeat Batman. He does but then [[VillainBall forgot]] the Bat's [[CrazyPrepared defining characteristic]] and got knocked out by a taser.)
*** As for Superman, remember that most of the ''Mortal Kombat'' cast are either inherently or powered by or using magic - -- and Superman is basically a mundane when it comes to magic (which he remarks after receiving a ''normal kick'' from Scorpion in the story). Only Sonya Blade, Kano and Jax as well as the other DC characters barring Franchise/WonderWoman and [[Comicbook/{{Shazam}} [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] are non-magical, so only they really need the HandWave above to face off effectively against the Man of Steel. This is even addressed in Superman's arcade ending, in which he asks Captain Marvel for training to make him as strong against magic as he is against everything else.
*** ''Videogame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' ''VideoGame/InjusticeGodsAmongUs'' received much grousing from fans when it was initially announced, mainly because some people found the thought of characters like Comicbook/HarleyQuinn ComicBook/HarleyQuinn and Comicbook/{{Nightwing}} ComicBook/{{Nightwing}} being able to punch out Superman and Wonder Woman to be absurd. Of course, nobody really plays fighting games for the plot or realism, do they? It's handwaved in-game with Kryptonian nanotech that makes the BadassNormal characters tough enough to go toe-to-toe with superpowered characters and in the comics is capable of making Alfred Pennyworth strong enough give Superman a NoHoldsBarredBeatdown.
30th Nov '16 12:27:30 AM Tron80
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* One cross-company crossover between Franchise/SpiderMan and Franchise/{{Superman}} had ComicBook/LexLuthor shoot Spidey with a "red-sun energy boost", making Big Blue vulnerable to his touch.

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* One cross-company crossover between Franchise/SpiderMan and Franchise/{{Superman}} ''Comicbook/SupermanVsTheAmazingSpiderMan'' had ComicBook/LexLuthor shoot Spidey with a "red-sun energy boost", making Big Blue vulnerable to his touch.touch. However the energy wears off, and it’s clear who has the upper hand.
21st Nov '16 4:52:53 PM ImpudentInfidel
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* Endemic in ''TableTopGame/StarWarsMiniatures'', since a player can set any faction from any era against any other and end up more or less balanced, depending solely on your team selection. So weapons were about as effective 4,000 years apart.
10th Nov '16 10:04:31 AM merotoker
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However, a problem occurs once you try a {{crossover}}. If the crossover involves characters who were never created to work together and have an obvious difference in scope or power, you're stuck at trying to make sure each is effective. This usually involves two scenarios where you either nerf the powerful character or boost the "weaker" one, because you get the inevitable "Why are they even useful in this situation?"

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However, a problem occurs once you try a {{crossover}}. If the crossover involves characters who were never created to work together and have an obvious difference in scope or power, you're stuck at trying to make sure each is effective. This usually involves two scenarios where you either nerf {{nerf}} the powerful character or boost the "weaker" one, because you get the inevitable "Why are they even useful in this situation?"



** One of the bigger points of contention about ''Anime/DigimonXrosWarsTheYoungHuntersLeapingThroughTime. The past leaders from all the other anime seasons show up and take place in a key battle. Of course some of the digimon , like the afformentioned Omnimon and Susanoomon (who's a whole tier above ''planet busting'' ) really should make most of the other characters irrelevant and ended the fight in seconds. They don't get to do much

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** One of the bigger points of contention about ''Anime/DigimonXrosWarsTheYoungHuntersLeapingThroughTime. The past leaders from all the other anime seasons show up and take place in a key battle. Of course some of the digimon , like the afformentioned aforementioned Omnimon and Susanoomon (who's a whole tier above ''planet busting'' ) really should make most of the other characters irrelevant and ended the fight in seconds. They don't get to do much



* ''Anime/SaintSeiyaSoulOfGold'' is a very unusual In-Universe example. The Gold Saints have long been established to be the most powerful non-god members of any army, being stronger than Poseidon's Generals and the other God Warriors, and being matched only by Hades' Judges, and even they get curb-stomped by the Golds stronger members. And, in a series where the Golds get God Cloths, the only ones who could possibly be a threat to them, power-wise, would be GODS. Hence, the series is constantly changing the power balance to give it a genuine sense of tension, first [[spoiler: giving the God Warriors a HomeFieldAdvantage that both makes them stronger AND drains the Golds' Cosmos, making the God Cloth a necesity for victory]], and, when that is taken care of, [[spoiler: giving the God Warriors an AmplifierArtifact]].

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* ''Anime/SaintSeiyaSoulOfGold'' is a very unusual In-Universe example. The Gold Saints have long been established to be the most powerful non-god members of any army, being stronger than Poseidon's Generals and the other God Warriors, and being matched only by Hades' Judges, and even they get curb-stomped by the Golds stronger members. And, in a series where the Golds get God Cloths, the only ones who could possibly be a threat to them, power-wise, would be GODS. Hence, the series is constantly changing the power balance to give it a genuine sense of tension, first [[spoiler: giving the God Warriors a HomeFieldAdvantage that both makes them stronger AND drains the Golds' Cosmos, making the God Cloth a necesity necessity for victory]], and, when that is taken care of, [[spoiler: giving the God Warriors an AmplifierArtifact]].



** ''Marvel vs. DC'' also had ComicBook/{{Storm}} besting Franchise/WonderWoman. Storm has a greater attack range, so this might have made sense if they hadn't actually shown her shrugging off a punch from Wonder Woman. (For reference, Storm's pretty toned for a being that's just one step above a baseline human, but Wonder Woman wasn't human to begin with.)



* In one issue of ''Amazing Spider-Man'', Franchise/SpiderMan, who's strong (lifts ten tons) but not one of the big hitters of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, beat the ''cosmically'' powerful Firelord in a hand-to-hand duel. On comic boards this trope is often named Spider-man vs the Firelord. Then again, when Spider-Man fights ComicBook/SilverSurfer, he tends to smack him around pretty well. He often fights beyond his limits. The same can be said for the likes of ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} or ComicBook/CaptainAmerica as well. Sometimes, WolverinePublicity does that with characters who are popular but not very powerful.
** Similarly, a recent comic depicted Miles Morales beat Blackheart to a pulp. As in, the guy who is only a step or two below Mephisto. For further reference, Blackheart beat Toxin to death rather easily, and Toxin in turn can defeat Venom and Carnage at the same time while Spider-man is hard-pressed to even survive against one of those.

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* In one issue of ''Amazing Spider-Man'', Franchise/SpiderMan, who's strong (lifts ten tons) but not one of the big hitters of the Franchise/MarvelUniverse, beat the ''cosmically'' powerful Firelord in a hand-to-hand duel. On comic boards this trope is often named Spider-man vs the Firelord. Then again, when Spider-Man fights ComicBook/SilverSurfer, he tends to smack him around pretty well. He often fights beyond his limits. The same can be said for the likes of ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} or ComicBook/CaptainAmerica as well. Sometimes, WolverinePublicity does that with characters who are popular but not very powerful.
**
powerful. Similarly, a recent comic depicted Miles Morales beat beating Blackheart to a pulp. As in, the guy who is only a step or two below Mephisto. For further reference, Blackheart beat Toxin to death rather easily, and Toxin in turn can defeat Venom and Carnage at the same time while Spider-man Spider-Man is hard-pressed to even survive against one of those.



** This happened again during the Transformers' crossover with the Comicbook/NewAvengers. Heroes like ComicBook/CaptainAmerica, ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/TheFalcon were regulated to distractions or rescue work, while Comicbook/IronMan used a HumongousMecha, to latter just blast Megatron whith his normal repulsors after his Mecha got destroyed.
** Another crossover had a Venom/Superman fight in which ComicBook/{{Venom}} was smacking Supes around like a ragdoll. Not only is Superman way, way, ''way'' above Venom's level, but he also has powers (heat beams and supersonic voice) that are Venom's stated weaknesses. The writer tried to [[JustifiedTrope justify]] this by having Venom exclaim, "I've gone toe-to-toe with the Juggernaut!", which is even harder to believe.
*** Marvel did it right in the first issue of ''ComicBook/NewAvengers'' when their own Superman [[{{Expy}} stand-in]], ComicBook/TheSentry, tore the even more powerful Carnage in two with his bare hands [[ThouShaltNotKill Though Superman would have never acted to this extreme.]]

to:

** This happened again during the Transformers' crossover with the Comicbook/NewAvengers. Heroes like ComicBook/CaptainAmerica, ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} and ComicBook/TheFalcon were regulated to distractions or rescue work, while Comicbook/IronMan used a HumongousMecha, to latter just blast Megatron whith with his normal repulsors after his Mecha got destroyed.
** Another crossover had a Venom/Superman fight in which ComicBook/{{Venom}} was smacking Supes around like a ragdoll. Not only is Superman way, way, ''way'' above Venom's level, but he also has powers (heat beams and supersonic voice) that are Venom's stated weaknesses. The writer tried to [[JustifiedTrope justify]] {{justif|iedTrope}}y this by having Venom exclaim, "I've gone toe-to-toe with the Juggernaut!", which is even harder to believe.
*** Marvel did it right in the first issue of ''ComicBook/NewAvengers'' when their own Superman [[{{Expy}} stand-in]], ComicBook/TheSentry, tore the even more powerful Carnage in two with his bare hands [[ThouShaltNotKill Though though Superman would have never acted to this extreme.]]



** ''Marvel vs. DC'' also had ComicBook/{{Storm}} besting Franchise/WonderWoman. Storm has a greater attack range, so this might have made sense if they hadn't actually shown her shrugging off a punch from Wonder Woman. (For reference, Storm's pretty toned for a being that's just one step above a baseline human, but Wonder Woman wasn't human to begin with.)
* The finale of JLA/Avengers worked with this by having the JLA's [[TheCape cape]], Superman, fighting on the front lines wielding Thor's hammer and Captain America's shield, while the Avenger's [[TheCape cape]] Captain America himself, used his tactical skills to direct everyone else in the battle, allowing him to contribute without trying to handwave the fact that he's nowhere near Superman levels of power.
** This was also played with earlier when, [[LetsYouAndHimFight when the two teams were fighting each other]], Cap was pitted against Batman who he is much more evenly matched with.
* Franchise/{{Batman}} has appeared for decades simultaneously both in his own magazine, struggling against fairly normal muggers and crooks, and in ''Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'', battling cosmic foes like ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}. This has been dealt with in various ways over the years, sometimes successfully, sometimes not. The default [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] solution seemed to be using the Bat-Anti-Cosmically-Powered-Villain Spray, while the default [[UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks Modern Age]] solution tends toward emphasizing his willpower and intelligence, often in a MissionControl role.

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* ''ComicBook/JLAAvengers''
** ''Marvel vs. DC'' also had ComicBook/{{Storm}} besting Franchise/WonderWoman. Storm has One panel shows a greater attack range, so this might have made sense if they hadn't actually shown her shrugging off a punch from Wonder Woman. (For reference, Storm's pretty toned for a being that's just one step above a baseline human, but Wonder Woman wasn't human to begin with.)
* The finale
quick gag of JLA/Avengers worked with this by having the JLA's [[TheCape cape]], Superman, fighting on the front lines wielding Thor's hammer and DC's [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain America's shield, Marvel]] and Marvel's ComicBook/CaptainMarVell switching off against their respective adversary, with Marvel punching out Ronan the Accuser while the Avenger's [[TheCape cape]] Mar-Vell punches out ComicBook/BlackAdam. Captain America himself, used his tactical skills to direct everyone else Marvel taking down Ronan is pretty believable, but Mar-Vell's level of super strength is around the same level as Spider-Man's (he has other powers, but he was only punching in that panel), while Black Adam is one of the strongest villains in the battle, allowing him to contribute without trying to handwave the fact that he's nowhere near Superman levels of power.DCU, having taken down Superman-level characters. Then again, RuleOfFunny.
** The finale worked with this by having the JLA's [[TheCape cape]], Superman, fighting on the front lines wielding Thor's hammer and Captain America's shield, while the Avenger's [[TheCape cape]] Captain America himself, used his tactical skills to direct everyone else in the battle, allowing him to contribute without trying to handwave the fact that he's nowhere near Superman levels of power. This was also played with earlier when, [[LetsYouAndHimFight when the two teams were fighting each other]], other]]; Cap was pitted against Batman who he is much more evenly matched with.
* Franchise/{{Batman}} has appeared for decades simultaneously both in his own magazine, struggling against fairly normal muggers and crooks, and in ''Franchise/JusticeLeagueOfAmerica'', battling cosmic foes like ComicBook/{{Darkseid}}. This has been dealt with in various ways over the years, sometimes successfully, sometimes not. The default [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] solution seemed to be using the [[CrazyPrepared/{{Batman}} Bat-Anti-Cosmically-Powered-Villain Spray, Spray]], while the default [[UsefulNotes/TheModernAgeOfComicBooks Modern Age]] solution tends toward emphasizing his willpower and intelligence, often in a MissionControl role.



*** Batman v. Superman again in Creator/FrankMiller's ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''. Batman gears up all the way, breaks out all his reserve equipment, the story takes place right after Superman almost dies, and it is made clear that Superman is unwilling to try to kill Batman. It ends with Batman in a position where he can win, [[spoiler: and instead, he fakes his own death.]]

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*** Batman v. Superman again in Creator/FrankMiller's ''Comicbook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns''. Batman gears up all the way, breaks out all his reserve equipment, the story takes place right after Superman almost dies, and it is made clear that Superman is unwilling to try to kill Batman. It ends with Batman in a position where he can win, [[spoiler: and instead, he fakes his own death.]]death]].



* An interesting example is Hank [=McCoy=], aka The Beast. If you pick up a comic in which he is in the ComicBook/XMen, the writers tend to focus mostly on his intellect while his actual powers are secondary. When he was a member of ComicBook/TheAvengers, his strength and agility were the main focus and his intellect was rarely brought up. This was because the Avengers had plenty of geniuses: [[Comicbook/AntMan Hank Pym]], ComicBook/IronMan, ComicBook/TheVision, ComicBook/BlackPanther, etc. and didn't need another. [=McCoy=] was a LightningBruiser so his abilities were bumped up to the point where he was nearly as strong as ComicBook/IronMan and could move so fast that ComicBook/CaptainAmerica had trouble following him. When he went back to the X-Men, there were already a couple strongmen (Colossus and Rogue) and agile people (Nightcrawler, ComicBook/{{Gambit}}, Longshot, etc.). Even his animalistic nature was covered by ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}. They didn't have any geniuses, though, so Beast became TheSmartGuy nearly on the level of [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Reed Richards]].

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* An interesting example is Hank [=McCoy=], aka The Beast. If you pick up a comic in which he is in the ComicBook/XMen, the writers tend to focus mostly on his intellect while his actual powers are secondary. When he was a member of ComicBook/TheAvengers, his strength and agility were the main focus and his intellect was rarely brought up. This was because the Avengers had plenty of geniuses: [[Comicbook/AntMan Hank Pym]], ComicBook/IronMan, ComicBook/TheVision, ComicBook/BlackPanther, etc. and didn't need another. [=McCoy=] was a LightningBruiser so his abilities were bumped up to the point where he was nearly as strong as ComicBook/IronMan and could move so fast that ComicBook/CaptainAmerica had trouble following him. When he went back to the X-Men, there were already a couple strongmen (Colossus and Rogue) ComicBook/{{Rogue}}) and agile people (Nightcrawler, (ComicBook/{{Nightcrawler}}, ComicBook/{{Gambit}}, Longshot, ComicBook/{{Longshot}}, etc.). Even his animalistic nature was covered by ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}. They didn't have any geniuses, though, so Beast became TheSmartGuy nearly on the level of [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Reed Richards]].



* Any given CrisisCrossover will be rife with this. The need to use as many characters as possible often leads to some [[CListFodder crowd filler]] being far stronger than the main villain. The original ''Comicbook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'', for instance, has the [[SuperpowerLottery theoretically-omnipotent]] elemental transmuter Firestorm being forced to a stalemate by the Penguin's trick umbrella, or the obscure cosmic villain Maalor the Darklord, who once held his own against the entire Franchise/GreenLantern Corps, getting killed in one hit by Krona. The strength of the Anti-Monitor's shadow demons generally hits the exact amount needed to give their opponent a tough fight in swarms, whether it's [[PhysicalGod Alan Scott]] or [[BadassNormal Oliver Queen.]]

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* Any given CrisisCrossover will be rife with this. The need to use as many characters as possible often leads to some [[CListFodder crowd filler]] being far stronger than the main villain. The original ''Comicbook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'', for instance, has the [[SuperpowerLottery theoretically-omnipotent]] elemental transmuter Firestorm ComicBook/{{Firestorm}} being forced to a stalemate by the Penguin's trick umbrella, or the obscure cosmic villain Maalor the Darklord, who once held his own against the entire Franchise/GreenLantern Corps, getting killed in one hit by Krona. The strength of the Anti-Monitor's shadow demons generally hits the exact amount needed to give their opponent a tough fight in swarms, whether it's [[PhysicalGod Alan Scott]] or [[BadassNormal Oliver Queen.]]



* In the X-Men/Teen Titans crossover ApokalipsNow, this trope is entirely averted; the two teams operate on similar scales and power levels already, and they're not in conflict for most of the story, so no adjustments are needed.
* A panel of ''ComicBook/JLAAvengers'' shows a quick gag of DC's [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] and Marvel's ComicBook/CaptainMarVell switching off against their respective adversary, with Marvel punching out Ronan the Accuser while Mar-Vell punches out ComicBook/BlackAdam. Captain Marvel taking down Ronan is pretty believable, but Mar-Vell's level of super strength is around the same level as Spider-Man's (he has other powers, but he was only punching in that panel), while Black Adam is one of the strongest villains in the DCU, having taken down Superman-level characters. Then again, RuleOfFunny.

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* In the X-Men/Teen Titans ComicBook/XMen/ComicBook/TeenTitans crossover ApokalipsNow, this trope is entirely averted; the two teams operate on similar scales and power levels already, and they're not in conflict for most of the story, so no adjustments are needed.
* A panel of ''ComicBook/JLAAvengers'' shows a quick gag of DC's [[ComicBook/{{Shazam}} Captain Marvel]] and Marvel's ComicBook/CaptainMarVell switching off against their respective adversary, with Marvel punching out Ronan the Accuser while Mar-Vell punches out ComicBook/BlackAdam. Captain Marvel taking down Ronan is pretty believable, but Mar-Vell's level of super strength is around the same level as Spider-Man's (he has other powers, but he was only punching in that panel), while Black Adam is one of the strongest villains in the DCU, having taken down Superman-level characters. Then again, RuleOfFunny.
needed.



* This trope is in full effect in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', and a few of the other Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse films.
** ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', fitting the comics, is wildly inconsistent across the movies in terms of what he can take, which fits the nature of his character in that his strength is dependent on how angry and in control he is. In his first movie, he was knocked out by a tank round and was at least hurt by grenade rounds. The Hulk in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', on the other hand, shows only annoyance to being shot by aircraft-mounted cannon; it takes Thor to give him a serious challenge and only a concentrated barrage by over a dozen Chitauri aircraft are even able to give him a bloody nose. Even falling from the Helicarrier at terminal velocity only knocks him out and reverts him to Bruce Banner.

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* This trope is in full effect in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', and a few of the other Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse films.
**
films. ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', fitting the comics, is wildly inconsistent across the movies in terms of what he can take, which fits the nature of his character in that his strength is dependent on how angry and in control he is. In his first movie, he was knocked out by a tank round and was at least hurt by grenade rounds. The Hulk in ''Film/{{The Avengers|2012}}'', on the other hand, shows only annoyance to being shot by aircraft-mounted cannon; it takes Thor to give him a serious challenge and only a concentrated barrage by over a dozen Chitauri aircraft are even able to give him a bloody nose. Even falling from the Helicarrier at terminal velocity only knocks him out and reverts him to Bruce Banner.



** It's even more funny when the "C-show" ECW was still on. The ECW champion can be treated as a worthy opponent to the other champions or as effective as a jobber, depending on the storyline needs.

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** It's even more funny funnier when the "C-show" ECW was still on. The ECW champion can be treated as a worthy opponent to the other champions or as effective as a jobber, depending on the storyline needs.



* Happens in crossover titles in video games as well, as evidenced in [[VideoGame/CapcomVsWhatever Capcom crossover games]]. This is something of a necessity; how else could you expect [[Franchise/StreetFighter Dan Hibiki or Sakura]] to fight, say, the [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk Hulk]] or DoctorDoom without having a serious upgrade in strength? (Dan, of course, doesn't have a chance even with the upgrade, but he's a JokeCharacter anyway.) The concept was (lovingly) mocked in a segment on Series/XPlay where Blair Butler took a look back at the ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' series, noting in each game the number of fighters, adding that "none of them would stand a chance against TheHulk"; while not completely true, it gets the point across.

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* Happens in crossover titles in video games as well, as evidenced in [[VideoGame/CapcomVsWhatever Capcom crossover games]]. This is something of a necessity; how else could you expect [[Franchise/StreetFighter Dan Hibiki or Sakura]] to fight, say, the [[Comicbook/IncredibleHulk Hulk]] or DoctorDoom Comicbook/DoctorDoom without having a serious upgrade in strength? (Dan, of course, doesn't have a chance even with the upgrade, but he's a JokeCharacter anyway.) The concept was (lovingly) mocked in a segment on Series/XPlay where Blair Butler took a look back at the ''VideoGame/MarvelVsCapcom'' series, noting in each game the number of fighters, adding that "none of them would stand a chance against TheHulk"; while not completely true, it gets the point across.



** ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' is interesting about this, because it brings up the question of who is really getting the creeps and seeps respectively, since there's Superman on the DC side, a god (Raiden) and a supernatural undead (Scorpion) on the ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' side, and a range of less powerful superheroes and flat-out humans scattered across both. The final explanation is that the merging of the two universes causes powers to fluctuate, strengthening some and weakening others. It gets lampshaded when, after SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker defeats Sonya, Comicbook/{{Deathstroke}} asks in bewilderment, "Since when can ''you'' beat anybody?!" (The Joker promptly trashes him afterwards and then decides to use his newfound strength to defeat Batman. He does but then [[VillainBall forgot]] the Bat's [[CrazyPrepared defining characteristic]] and got knocked out by a taser.)

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** ''VideoGame/MortalKombatVsDCUniverse'' is interesting about this, because it brings up the question of who is really getting the creeps and seeps respectively, since there's Superman on the DC side, a god (Raiden) and a supernatural undead (Scorpion) on the ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' side, and a range of less powerful superheroes and flat-out humans scattered across both. The final explanation is that the merging of the two universes causes powers to fluctuate, strengthening some and weakening others. It gets lampshaded when, after SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker ComicBook/TheJoker defeats Sonya, Comicbook/{{Deathstroke}} asks in bewilderment, "Since when can ''you'' beat anybody?!" (The Joker promptly trashes him afterwards and then decides to use his newfound strength to defeat Batman. He does but then [[VillainBall forgot]] the Bat's [[CrazyPrepared defining characteristic]] and got knocked out by a taser.)



*** And even in the case of both Dizzy and Noel, it could be {{handwave}}d that they are trying to avoid using their full power (Dizzy) or in Noel's case, [[spoiler:she's using her humanoid form and not her Mu-12 persona.]]

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*** And even in the case of both Dizzy and Noel, it could be {{handwave}}d that they are trying to avoid using their full power (Dizzy) or in Noel's case, [[spoiler:she's using her humanoid form and not her Mu-12 persona.]]persona]].



** Due to its very nature, characters from all around the power spectrum show up, either as playable characters or as bosses, which can lead to situations such as a [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius gruff trained mercenary with a BFS who has slayed a goddess]] being beaten by [[VideoGame/AnimalCrossing a kid with gardening tools]] (the former went from being a LightningBruiser to moving like he's [[MightyGlacier knee-deep in molasses]], the latter who had no combat in his series whatsoever); or [[LandSeaSky Rayquaza]], one of the most powerful [[OlympusMons Legendary]] [[Franchise/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]], being beaten by [[Franchise/DonkeyKong a monkey with a pop-gun.]] A power-up was pretty much mandatory for the WiiFit Trainer and DuckHunt dog.

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** Due to its very nature, characters from all around the power spectrum show up, either as playable characters or as bosses, which can lead to situations such as a [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius gruff trained mercenary with a BFS who has slayed a goddess]] being beaten by [[VideoGame/AnimalCrossing a kid with gardening tools]] (the former went from being a LightningBruiser to moving like he's [[MightyGlacier knee-deep in molasses]], the latter who had no combat in his series whatsoever); or [[LandSeaSky Rayquaza]], one of the most powerful [[OlympusMons Legendary]] [[Franchise/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]], Franchise/{{Pokemon}}, being beaten by [[Franchise/DonkeyKong a monkey with a pop-gun.]] A power-up was pretty much mandatory for the WiiFit ''VideoGame/WiiFit'' Trainer and DuckHunt ''VideoGame/DuckHunt'' dog.



** Some characters also get ability changes, for better or worse; for example, Kirby can use moves from his copy abilities in his base form, while Meta Knight loses his SwordBeam and becomes a strict close range fighter, Ness and Lucas retain none of their own PSI moves but their physical methods of attack like bats, sticks and the yo-yo become ludicrously powerful, Mario can now use fireballs in his normal form, all Fire Emblem reps except Robin can now use Counter without taking damage (although Robin gets access to spells that are supposed to be mutually exclusive to each other), MegaMan can use most of his Robot Master abilities from the start, etc.

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** Some characters also get ability changes, for better or worse; for example, Kirby can use moves from his copy abilities in his base form, while Meta Knight loses his SwordBeam and becomes a strict close range fighter, Ness and Lucas retain none of their own PSI moves but their physical methods of attack like bats, sticks and the yo-yo become ludicrously powerful, Mario can now use fireballs in his normal form, all Fire Emblem reps except Robin can now use Counter without taking damage (although Robin gets access to spells that are supposed to be mutually exclusive to each other), MegaMan VideoGame/{{Mega Man|Classic}} can use most of his Robot Master abilities from the start, etc.



** Played with Roy's sword in Melee; in ''Sword of Seals'' the titular weapon turned him into a [[OneManArmy walking machine of death]], and it only caught on fire when he landed a critical. In Melee, though he can set it on fire anytime he wants, these are toned down so they are normal attacks. The reason why this isn't a straight example is that Roy actually [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros ''did'' debut in Smash]].

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** Played with Roy's sword in Melee; ''Melee''; in ''Sword of Seals'' the titular weapon turned him into a [[OneManArmy walking machine of death]], and it only caught on fire when he landed a critical. In Melee, ''Melee'', though he can set it on fire anytime he wants, these are toned down so they are normal attacks. The reason why this isn't a straight example is that Roy actually [[MarthDebutedInSmashBros ''did'' debut in Smash]].



** Any video game that features Yajirobe as a non-JokeCharacter takes this trope to hilarious excess. He could neither fly nor use KiAttacks in the show, but in at least one game this is compensated by throwing rocks [[HyperspaceArsenal from nowhere]] and flying by ''waving his legs around like he's paddling through water''. He also gets {{Sword Beam}}s in some games.

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** Any video game that features Yajirobe as a non-JokeCharacter takes this trope to hilarious excess. He could neither fly nor use KiAttacks [[KiManipulation Ki Attacks]] in the show, but in at least one game this is compensated by throwing rocks [[HyperspaceArsenal from nowhere]] and flying by ''waving his legs around like he's paddling through water''. He also gets {{Sword Beam}}s in some games.



** Another good case is Hong Meiling, whose focus on martial arts almost makes her a fighting game character in a BulletHell universe. Yes, she is present in Hisoutensoku and she's no less powerful than characters like Yukari... but [[CloseRangeCombatant her ranged attacks are noticably worse than anyone else's]].

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** Another good case is Hong Meiling, whose focus on martial arts almost makes her a fighting game character in a BulletHell universe. Yes, she is present in Hisoutensoku and she's no less powerful than characters like Yukari... but [[CloseRangeCombatant her ranged attacks are noticably noticeably worse than anyone else's]].



* In ''VideoGame/SpiderManShatteredDimensions'', Amazing Spider-Man takes out TheJuggernaut in a fistfight. It's {{handwave}}d by suggesting that [[spoiler:the power of the [[MacGuffin Tablet Fragment]] is messing with Juggy's Gem of Cyttorak-given power.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/SpiderManShatteredDimensions'', Amazing Spider-Man takes out TheJuggernaut in a fistfight. It's {{handwave}}d by suggesting that [[spoiler:the power of the [[MacGuffin Tablet Fragment]] is messing with Juggy's Gem of Cyttorak-given power.]]power]].



* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' is full of examples. The most prominent examples are Mario and Luigi, whose only consistent abilities are that they jump really high and run at least moderately fast. Other than that, their strength, speed, and durability are HIGHLY variable depending on the game.
** JackOfAllStats used to be known as "The Mario", due to him usually having balanced stats in crossover games. This is still definitely Power Seep, he should be jumping higher than anyone else and at a minimum can break bricks by punching or ground pounding them. Neither of these should be considered "average", especially when crossovers involve normals.

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* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' is full of examples. The most prominent examples are Mario and Luigi, whose only consistent abilities are that they jump really high and run at least moderately fast. Other than that, their strength, speed, and durability are HIGHLY variable depending on the game.
**
game. JackOfAllStats [[Administrivia/RenamedTropes used to be known as "The Mario", Mario"]], due to him usually having balanced stats in crossover games. This is still definitely Power Seep, he should be jumping higher than anyone else and at a minimum can break bricks by punching or ground pounding them. Neither of these should be considered "average", especially when crossovers involve normals.



* In ''VideoGame/AsurasWrath'', one DLC has Asura facing off against ''Franchise/StreetFighter''[='s=] very own Ryu and Akuma[[spoiler: and their respective SuperpoweredEvilSide Evil Ryu and Oni]]. It's a pretty cool idea, except for the fact that, in his own game, Asura is so overwhemlingly powerful that's he's up there with Creator/{{Capcom}} characters like those of the ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}'' series or the ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' series as one of the strongest characters made with Capcom's name attached to it. In said DLC Ryu survives being punched all the way to the moon from Earth, Evil Ryu moves a mountain sized landmass [[spoiler: and the battle with Akuma/Oni destroys the moon!]]

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* In ''VideoGame/AsurasWrath'', one DLC has Asura facing off against ''Franchise/StreetFighter''[='s=] very own Ryu and Akuma[[spoiler: and their respective SuperpoweredEvilSide Evil Ryu and Oni]]. It's a pretty cool idea, except for the fact that, in his own game, Asura is so overwhemlingly overwhelmingly powerful that's he's up there with Creator/{{Capcom}} characters like those of the ''VideoGame/{{Darkstalkers}}'' series or the ''VideoGame/{{Okami}}'' series as one of the strongest characters made with Capcom's name attached to it. In said DLC Ryu survives being punched all the way to the moon from Earth, Evil Ryu moves a mountain sized landmass [[spoiler: and the battle with Akuma/Oni destroys the moon!]]moon]]!



* ''VideoGame/SDGundamCapsuleFighter'' has this in spades. Thanks to its awkward ranking scheme, the [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED Strike Gundam]] is the same level as [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing Wing Zero Gundam]], the [[Anime/MobileFighterGGundam Mermaid Gundam]], which put up a big fight against Dragon Gundam in the Gundam Fight finals, is labeled a C-rank alongside grunt units like [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam the Zaku]], and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack the Nu Gundam]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamF91 the F-91]], while powerful units in their own right, are right up there with walking arsenals like the [[Anime/AfterWarGundamX Double X]]

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* ''VideoGame/SDGundamCapsuleFighter'' has this in spades. Thanks to its awkward ranking scheme, the [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEED Strike Gundam]] is the same level as [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamWing Wing Zero Gundam]], the [[Anime/MobileFighterGGundam Mermaid Gundam]], which put up a big fight against Dragon Gundam in the Gundam Fight finals, is labeled a C-rank alongside grunt units like [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam the Zaku]], and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamCharsCounterattack the Nu Gundam]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamF91 the F-91]], while powerful units in their own right, are right up there with walking arsenals like the [[Anime/AfterWarGundamX Double X]]X]].



* Everyone in ''VideoGame/MushroomKingdomFusion'' has had this happen to them. Okay, the likes of Arthur from ''VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins'' still dies in two hits at full health and the Mario characters have health systems based on the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' series… but now they can take hits from and do significant damage to enemies from ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'', ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' among numerous others! You can even kill soldiers and things by jumping on them or using Sonic's spin attack or punching them in the face just once!

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* Everyone in ''VideoGame/MushroomKingdomFusion'' has had this happen to them. Okay, the likes of Arthur from ''VideoGame/GhostsNGoblins'' still dies in two hits at full health and the Mario characters have health systems based on the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' series… but now they can take hits from and do significant damage to enemies from ''VideoGame/MegaManClassic'', ''VideoGame/{{Mega Man|Classic}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Doom}}'' and ''Franchise/{{Halo}}'' among numerous others! You can even kill soldiers and things by jumping on them or using Sonic's spin attack or punching them in the face just once!



** A notable instance would be Godzilla vs Gamera, where the two are presented as being roughly the same size, while a major reason why [[spoiler: Godzilla wins is because of the sheer difference in size and strength between them.]]

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** A notable instance would be Godzilla vs Gamera, where the two are presented as being roughly the same size, while a major reason why [[spoiler: Godzilla wins is because of the sheer difference in size and strength between them.]]them]].



** Mostly averted in the Batman/Superman crossover episode [[Recap/SupermanTheAnimatedSeriesS2E16To18WorldsFinest "World's Finest"]]. SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker sets up a kryptonite-filled death trap for Supes and Batman has to race over there to rescue him. Later, Comicbook/LexLuthor sends a KillerRobot after Bats and all he can do is stall for time until Superman stomps it. Generally Superman used more brute strength while Batman used tactics and gadgets to survive.

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** Mostly averted in the Batman/Superman crossover episode [[Recap/SupermanTheAnimatedSeriesS2E16To18WorldsFinest "World's Finest"]]. SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker ComicBook/TheJoker sets up a kryptonite-filled death trap for Supes and Batman has to race over there to rescue him. Later, Comicbook/LexLuthor sends a KillerRobot after Bats and all he can do is stall for time until Superman stomps it. Generally Superman used more brute strength while Batman used tactics and gadgets to survive.



** This is {{handwave}}d by some heroes: specifically TheFlash and Superman. Flash ''intentionally'' seeps speed in races, as in the comics, because "those were for charity". Superman meanwhile takes hits "so the others don't have to." Basically, ''they aren't trying'', even though failure might mean somebody '''dies'''. The other heroes, *cough* Comicbook/MartianManhunter *cough*, have no such excuse.
*** When Comicbook/LexLuthor [[FreakyFridayFlip got control of]] Flash, he wiped the ''floor'' with basically the entire WatchTower, showing powers the Flash never did. Of course, we learn why the [[IncorruptiblePurePureness Flash]] would never use them, since they could easily result in people dying.

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** This is {{handwave}}d by some heroes: specifically TheFlash Franchise/TheFlash and Superman. Flash ''intentionally'' seeps speed in races, as in the comics, because "those were for charity". Superman meanwhile takes hits "so the others don't have to." Basically, ''they aren't trying'', even though failure might mean somebody '''dies'''. The other heroes, *cough* Comicbook/MartianManhunter *cough*, have no such excuse.
*** When Comicbook/LexLuthor [[FreakyFridayFlip got control of]] Flash, he wiped the ''floor'' with basically the entire WatchTower, [=WatchTower=], showing powers the Flash never did. Of course, we learn why the [[IncorruptiblePurePureness Flash]] would never use them, since they could easily result in people dying.
6th Oct '16 4:28:59 AM Adept
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* Largely averted in ''Attack on Avengers'', the ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'' / ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' crossover. The titans are on the receiving end of a CurbStompBattle, which, despite the dominance they display in their own series, is exactly what would happen to them when faced with Marvel's mightiest heroes. However, a notable exception comes in the form of the Colossal Titan; while the comic ends before it actually joins the battle, it's size is ''vastly'' upgraded from the series; it's official height is 60m, or about 196ft. Here, it's shown absolutely towering over the Statue of Liberty, which stands 93m/305ft.

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* Largely averted in ''Attack on Avengers'', the ''Manga/AttackOnTitan'' / ''ComicBook/TheAvengers'' crossover. The titans are on the receiving end of a CurbStompBattle, which, despite the dominance they display in their own series, is exactly what would happen to them when faced with Marvel's mightiest heroes. However, a notable exception comes in the form of the Colossal Titan; while the comic ends before it actually joins the battle, it's its size is ''vastly'' upgraded from the series; it's official height is 60m, or about 196ft. Here, it's shown absolutely towering over the Statue of Liberty, which stands 93m/305ft.
21st Sep '16 6:44:31 PM nombretomado
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* This trope hits [[Franchise/{{Ben10}} Ben]] hard in ''[[WesternAnimation/Ben10GeneratorRexHeroesUnited Ben 10/Generator Rex: Heroes United]]''. Due to his alien forms having an incredibly huge amount of abilities[[note]] SuperStrength, SuperSpeed, {{Flight}}, [[MakeMeWannaShout Sonic Screams]], [[PlayingWithFire Fire Manipulation]], ColdFlames, [[ExtremeOmnivore Using eaten objects as makeshift projectiles]], {{Intangibility}}, RollingAttack, [[SuperNotDrowningSkills Underwater Breathing]], MagnetismManipulation, SelfDuplication, [[ShockAndAwe Electricity Manipulation]], TimeTravel, and many ''many'' more[[/note]] compared to [[ShapeShifterWeapon Rex]], he ends up having his Ultimatrix hacked by Alpha and not working properly for most of the final act. Considering [[Ben10AlienForce his]] [[Ben10UltimateAlien main]] [[Ben10Omniverse series]] also had trouble keeping his abilities in check, it [[FridgeBrilliance doesn't feel out of place]].

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* This trope hits [[Franchise/{{Ben10}} Ben]] hard in ''[[WesternAnimation/Ben10GeneratorRexHeroesUnited Ben 10/Generator Rex: Heroes United]]''. Due to his alien forms having an incredibly huge amount of abilities[[note]] SuperStrength, SuperSpeed, {{Flight}}, [[MakeMeWannaShout Sonic Screams]], [[PlayingWithFire Fire Manipulation]], ColdFlames, [[ExtremeOmnivore Using eaten objects as makeshift projectiles]], {{Intangibility}}, RollingAttack, [[SuperNotDrowningSkills Underwater Breathing]], MagnetismManipulation, SelfDuplication, [[ShockAndAwe Electricity Manipulation]], TimeTravel, and many ''many'' more[[/note]] compared to [[ShapeShifterWeapon Rex]], he ends up having his Ultimatrix hacked by Alpha and not working properly for most of the final act. Considering [[Ben10AlienForce [[WesternAnimation/Ben10AlienForce his]] [[Ben10UltimateAlien [[WesternAnimation/Ben10UltimateAlien main]] [[Ben10Omniverse [[WesternAnimation/Ben10Omniverse series]] also had trouble keeping his abilities in check, it [[FridgeBrilliance doesn't feel out of place]].
21st Sep '16 3:36:22 PM FurryKef
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'''Not to be confused''' with PowerCreep, which happens to Games when new additional content is added that over-powers the previous one.

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'''Not to be confused''' with PowerCreep, which happens to Games games when new additional content is added that over-powers the previous one.
overpowers existing content.
8th Aug '16 8:02:47 PM Galacton
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** Due to its very nature, characters of all around the power spectrum show up, either as playable characters or as bosses, which can lead to situations such as a [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius gruff trained mercenary with a BFS who has slayed a goddess]] being beaten by [[VideoGame/AnimalCrossing a kid with gardening tools]] (the former who used to be a LightningBruiser and now moves like he's [[MightyGlacier knee-deep in molasses]], the latter who had no combat in his series whatsoever); or [[OlympusMons Rayquaza]], one of the most powerful [[Franchise/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]] in it's native series, being beaten by [[Franchise/DonkeyKong a monkey with a pop-gun.]] This was pretty much mandatory for the WiiFit Trainer and DuckHunt.
** The "winner" of this phenomenon is most likely Jigglypuff: In its home series, Jigglypuff is a very weak character who unlike Pikachu, doesn't benefit from any sort of power boosting item and even its evolution isn't considered a top tier character, with only its HP being its best stat while everything else is kind of bad. It also learns a move called Rest, which makes it fall asleep to recover HP... In Smash Bros., it uses Rest to instantly K.O opponents (provided that the move actually connects). It also has incredible recovery (as in "getting back onto the stage after being knocked off" as opposed to gaining health back) and aerial game, which are mechanics that don't exist in a turn-based [=RPG=] like the main ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games. These traits make Jigglypuff the poster child of {{Lethal Joke Character}}s.
** Some characters also get ability changes, for better or worse; for example, Kirby can use moves from his copy abilities in his base form, while Ness and Lucas retain none of their own PSI moves, while their physical methods of attack like bats, sticks and the yo-yo become ludicrously powerful, Mario can now use fireballs in his normal form, all Fire Emblem reps except Robin can now use Counter without taking damage (although Robin gets access to spells that are supposed to be mutually exclusive to each other), MegaMan can use most of his Robot Master abilities from the start, etc.

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** Due to its very nature, characters of from all around the power spectrum show up, either as playable characters or as bosses, which can lead to situations such as a [[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius gruff trained mercenary with a BFS who has slayed a goddess]] being beaten by [[VideoGame/AnimalCrossing a kid with gardening tools]] (the former who used to be went from being a LightningBruiser and now moves to moving like he's [[MightyGlacier knee-deep in molasses]], the latter who had no combat in his series whatsoever); or [[OlympusMons [[LandSeaSky Rayquaza]], one of the most powerful [[OlympusMons Legendary]] [[Franchise/{{Pokemon}} Pokémon]] in it's native series, Pokémon]], being beaten by [[Franchise/DonkeyKong a monkey with a pop-gun.]] This A power-up was pretty much mandatory for the WiiFit Trainer and DuckHunt.
DuckHunt dog.
** The "winner" of this phenomenon is most likely Jigglypuff: In its home series, Jigglypuff is a very weak character who unlike Pikachu, doesn't benefit from any sort of power boosting item and even its evolution isn't considered a top tier character, with only its HP being is its best stat while everything else is kind of bad. It also learns a move called Rest, which makes it fall asleep to recover HP... In Smash Bros., it uses Rest to instantly K.O opponents (provided that the move actually connects). It connects) and also has incredible recovery (as in "getting back onto the stage after being knocked off" as opposed to gaining health back) and aerial game, which are mechanics that don't exist in a turn-based [=RPG=] like the main ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' games. These traits make Jigglypuff the poster child of {{Lethal Joke Character}}s.
** Some characters also get ability changes, for better or worse; for example, Kirby can use moves from his copy abilities in his base form, while Meta Knight loses his SwordBeam and becomes a strict close range fighter, Ness and Lucas retain none of their own PSI moves, while moves but their physical methods of attack like bats, sticks and the yo-yo become ludicrously powerful, Mario can now use fireballs in his normal form, all Fire Emblem reps except Robin can now use Counter without taking damage (although Robin gets access to spells that are supposed to be mutually exclusive to each other), MegaMan can use most of his Robot Master abilities from the start, etc.



** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] at least in Brawl in that the characters are all toys being played with.

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** [[JustifiedTrope Justified]] at least in Brawl ''Brawl'' in that the characters are all toys being played with.trophies brought to life.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PowerCreepPowerSeep