History Main / PoorPredictableRock

18th Jun '17 2:57:14 AM SLOOGOVS
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* In the billiards (you know, pool) manga ''Breakshot'', practically every opposing player has one major strength and sticks to it 90% of the time. Jimmy and Oki's masse shots, Aono's center shots, Ryoji's shotgun shot (which, as it happens, is actually prety ''un''predictable in its effect, but he's still guaranteed to use it), Jeffrey's miracle shot, and main character Chinmi himself is inordinately fond of jump shots.

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* In the billiards (you know, pool) manga ''Breakshot'', ''Manga/{{Breakshot}}'', practically every opposing player has one major strength and sticks to it 90% of the time. Jimmy and Oki's masse shots, Aono's center shots, Ryoji's shotgun shot (which, as it happens, is actually prety ''un''predictable in its effect, but he's still guaranteed to use it), Jeffrey's miracle shot, and main character Chinmi himself is inordinately fond of jump shots.



* In Manga/{{Beelzebub}} the group on main characters decide to choose their leader through RPS. The eponymous Beelzebub instantly wins with paper since everybody else used rock.

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* In Manga/{{Beelzebub}} ''Manga/{{Beelzebub}}'' the group on main characters decide to choose their leader through RPS. The eponymous Beelzebub instantly wins with paper since everybody else used rock.



* In ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', this is built right into the game's mechanics. Each of the five colors lends itself to two or three basic strategies and weaknesses, but adding more colors to cover for each other makes it difficult to play spells reliably. On the other hand, Magic (and TabletopGame/YuGiOh) allow the use of fifteen-card side decks in three-round matches, so between games you can swap out cards to counter your opponent's strategies or cover for particular vulnerabilities your opponent is hitting. Of course, nobody in the anime or manga plays three-round matches, making their extreme-theming all the sillier.

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* In ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', this is built right into the game's mechanics. Each of the five colors lends itself to two or three basic strategies and weaknesses, but adding more colors to cover for each other makes it difficult to play spells reliably. On the other hand, Magic (and TabletopGame/YuGiOh) ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh'') allow the use of fifteen-card side decks in three-round matches, so between games you can swap out cards to counter your opponent's strategies or cover for particular vulnerabilities your opponent is hitting. Of course, nobody in the anime or manga plays three-round matches, making their extreme-theming all the sillier.



* In Literature/{{Gone}}, Sam does paper and loses, so he has to be the first to go into the nuclear plant.

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* In Literature/{{Gone}}, ''Literature/{{Gone}}'', Sam does paper and loses, so he has to be the first to go into the nuclear plant.



* Most psionic attacks used by Psychic Warriors in TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons do acid damage. Then the subversion kicks in when you realize very few enemies are acid resistant.

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* Most psionic attacks used by Psychic Warriors in TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' do acid damage. Then the subversion kicks in when you realize very few enemies are acid resistant.



* In the fangame TabletopGame/PokemonTabletopAdventures, the Advanced Class Elemental Expert embodies this trope of specialization like the gym leaders from the games, but there is a payoff. First the Pokemon of that type that they own gain an experience bonus (which stacks with the experience bonus from their base class), meaning that their mon level at a very fast pace. They also gain bonuses to finding and catching that type of mon, so they can more easily gain the benefits of this class. Finally, attacks of that type deal bonus damage even if their mon isn't that type.

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* In the fangame TabletopGame/PokemonTabletopAdventures, ''TabletopGame/PokemonTabletopAdventures'', the Advanced Class Elemental Expert embodies this trope of specialization like the gym leaders from the games, but there is a payoff. First the Pokemon of that type that they own gain an experience bonus (which stacks with the experience bonus from their base class), meaning that their mon level at a very fast pace. They also gain bonuses to finding and catching that type of mon, so they can more easily gain the benefits of this class. Finally, attacks of that type deal bonus damage even if their mon isn't that type.



* Several raid bosses in ''WorldOfWarcraft'' suffer from this, to the point that the encounter can be trivialized by amassing the appropriate resistance stat, even though this usually makes your other stats suffer (most resistance gear offers little to nothing in terms of offensive stats). Early raids were infamous for having an obsession with fire-based encounters (entire Molten Core, the dragon Onyxia and a good portion of Blackwing Lair (mostly dragons)), but it got more varied later on. There is even a holy-based encounter, to which there is no easy counter because holy resistance does not exist.

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* Several raid bosses in ''WorldOfWarcraft'' ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' suffer from this, to the point that the encounter can be trivialized by amassing the appropriate resistance stat, even though this usually makes your other stats suffer (most resistance gear offers little to nothing in terms of offensive stats). Early raids were infamous for having an obsession with fire-based encounters (entire Molten Core, the dragon Onyxia and a good portion of Blackwing Lair (mostly dragons)), but it got more varied later on. There is even a holy-based encounter, to which there is no easy counter because holy resistance does not exist.



* In ''Videogame/{{Mardek}}'' powerful highly elementally aligned monsters have a spell, Inversion (of that element), which deals damage to the party based on how much elemental resistance they have to that element. Come in with 110% resistance to fire? Then Inversion: Fire does 110% of your health as damage. Due to this, it's best to apply a moderate degree of elemental resistance in these battles. Also played strait with [[BonusBoss the Security Demon and Animus]], both of which are almost unbeatable normally, but can be beaten with a particular trick that neutralizes much of their power.
* In VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresII, units tend to be strong against some types and weak against others (cavalry are good against archers but weak against pikemen) and certain factions may be better at some types of units than others, especially taking into account what their unique units are. Amusingly enough, at one point in the development, a bug in the AI of the enemies of the third Joan of Arc mission caused the AI to keep building rams until they had an army that, while unable to fight well against player units, destroyed the player's town.

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* In ''Videogame/{{Mardek}}'' powerful highly elementally aligned monsters have a spell, Inversion (of that element), which deals damage to the party based on how much elemental resistance they have to that element. Come in with 110% resistance to fire? Then Inversion: Fire does 110% of your health as damage. Due to this, it's best to apply a moderate degree of elemental resistance in these battles. Also played strait straight with [[BonusBoss the Security Demon and Animus]], both of which are almost unbeatable normally, but can be beaten with a particular trick that neutralizes much of their power.
* In VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresII, ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresII'' units tend to be strong against some types and weak against others (cavalry are good against archers but weak against pikemen) and certain factions may be better at some types of units than others, especially taking into account what their unique units are. Amusingly enough, at one point in the development, a bug in the AI of the enemies of the third Joan of Arc mission caused the AI to keep building rams until they had an army that, while unable to fight well against player units, destroyed the player's town.



* Web game example: The USA Rock Paper Scissors League (!) has a politically themed Flash game on its website: "[[http://www.usarps.com/barack_paper_scissors/ Barack Paper Scissors]]." In the game, the player takes the part of Democratic US presidential candidate Barack Obama and plays Rock Paper Scissors against a number of other political opponents. The first opponent the player faces is [[StrawmanPolitical former US President George W. Bush, who always chooses Rock]].

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* Web game example: The USA Rock Paper Scissors League (!) has a politically themed Flash game on its website: "[[http://www.''[[http://www.usarps.com/barack_paper_scissors/ Barack Paper Scissors]]." Scissors]]''. In the game, the player takes the part of Democratic US presidential candidate Barack Obama and plays Rock Paper Scissors against a number of other political opponents. The first opponent the player faces is [[StrawmanPolitical former US President George W. Bush, who always chooses Rock]].
21st May '17 8:29:35 PM FuzzyWulfe
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** It should be pointed out that Shishio learns from each battle and takes steps to counter every way he is attacked. Saito's sword thrust to the head failed because Shishio has been attacked by a stab to the forehead before, which is why he has the metal headband.
29th Apr '17 11:43:53 AM JohnnyHuang
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* In ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'', Doraemon, due to having FingerlessHands, can only play rock in "rock, paper, scissors".
22nd Apr '17 7:43:59 AM TheTitanPrince
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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III]] introduced the Wonder Guard ability, which takes this trope to its logical extreme by making the Pokémon that has it completely immune to any attack that does not do super-effective damage.

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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III]] introduced the Wonder Guard ability, which takes this trope to its logical extreme by making the Pokémon that has it completely immune to any attack that does not do super-effective damage.damage[[note]]Though non-standard types of damage, like weather effects, will still do damage[[/note]]. However, the only Pokémon with this ability is a OneHitpointWonder with four elemental weaknesses, [[KryptoniteIsEverywhere including Flying type, which almost every team is guaranteed to have at least one of]].
*** It's possible, though only in double battles, to use the move Skill Swap to move it to one that has much less weaknesses, or with certain Pokémon, ''[[GameBreaker none at all]]''. Later generations [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] this, though.
3rd Apr '17 5:42:55 PM nombretomado
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* In ''HunterXHunter'', Gon's special attack is explicitly based on Rock-Paper-Scissors, with his "Rock" attack being by far his strongest, and the only one capable of ending fights against stronger enemies. And stronger enemies will catch on to that pretty fast. Winning when your opponent knows you have to throw Rock to win? That takes talent.

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* In ''HunterXHunter'', ''Manga/HunterXHunter'', Gon's special attack is explicitly based on Rock-Paper-Scissors, with his "Rock" attack being by far his strongest, and the only one capable of ending fights against stronger enemies. And stronger enemies will catch on to that pretty fast. Winning when your opponent knows you have to throw Rock to win? That takes talent.
31st Mar '17 8:12:47 AM MisterVercetti
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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that Eagle will send an all air unit force against his island fortress so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with a ton of anti-air units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units despite having a weakness against them (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages all of your units at once while simultaneously healing all of his).

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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that air specialist Eagle will send an all a massive air unit force against his island fortress fortress, so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with a ton ''ton'' of anti-air units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units army despite having a sginificant weakness against them it (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages all of your units at once while simultaneously healing all of his).
31st Mar '17 8:10:47 AM MisterVercetti
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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that Eagle will send an all air unit force against his island fortress so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with LOTS of AA units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units despite having a weakness against them (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages ALL your units at once...).
** In another mission, he keeps Eagle's Air Force out of the battle by staging an offensive next to a volcano, which air units cannot even get near to. However, he didn't seem to anticipate the skills of vehicle unit specialist Jess...

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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that Eagle will send an all air unit force against his island fortress so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with LOTS a ton of AA anti-air units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units despite having a weakness against them (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages ALL all of your units at once...).
once while simultaneously healing all of his).
** In another mission, he keeps Eagle's Air Force out of the battle tries to do this again by staging an offensive next to a volcano, which air units cannot can't even get near close to. However, [[SpannerInTheWorks he didn't seem to anticipate the skills of vehicle unit count on vehicular specialist Jess...Jess entering the fray]].
26th Mar '17 9:14:57 AM nombretomado
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*** Player characters learn of a [[PlayingWithFire red dragon]], stock up on anti-red-dragon equipment and raid the lair... [[{{Nodwick}} only to learn that the townspeople are all red-green color blind]] (green dragons have an entirely different set of weaknesses and strengths, and spit acid rather than fire).

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*** Player characters learn of a [[PlayingWithFire red dragon]], stock up on anti-red-dragon equipment and raid the lair... [[{{Nodwick}} [[ComicStrip/{{Nodwick}} only to learn that the townspeople are all red-green color blind]] (green dragons have an entirely different set of weaknesses and strengths, and spit acid rather than fire).
8th Feb '17 3:06:40 PM SpinAttaxx
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** In [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Generation I]], almost every Pokémon's natural moveset consists entirely of moves of their type(s) and Normal-type moves, leaving little in the way of variety or coverage. While most are capable of using [=TMs=] to have more varied movesets, said [=TMs=] are single-use items and are often only attainable once per game. Later generations would let more Pokémon naturally learn moves of different types, however.
26th Jan '17 8:35:53 AM Morgenthaler
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* The villains of MagiNation (the video game mind you) always use Core (shadow) Dream creatures, and said creatures are always the sole monsters in any of the Shadow Geysers, the Shadow Hold, or the Core itself. And since this game uses not-quite-random encounters anywhere where you won't encounter Core creatures, you can go nearly the whole game without fighting anything but them, except for two occasions. The first creature type you find, Naroom (leaf) is strong against Core types while being weak against them in turn though, so it may be a decent idea to bolster your creatures with Fire, Earth, Air or Water elements later on. Those types, meanwhile, have their own rock paper scissors, and since you'll need to grind like crazy between Shadow Geysers, you may want to have an advantage against the locals.
* Entertainingly enough, on the Korean professional {{Starcraft}} scene there is a player who calls himself Rock. And he always builds Carriers (which are, surprisingly, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin basically aircraft carriers]] InSpace and With Aliens), and 80% of the time he loses because his opponent knows he'll do this. The rest of the time he wins because he really is that good with the units.

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* The villains of MagiNation ''VideoGame/MagiNation'' (the video game mind you) always use Core (shadow) Dream creatures, and said creatures are always the sole monsters in any of the Shadow Geysers, the Shadow Hold, or the Core itself. And since this game uses not-quite-random encounters anywhere where you won't encounter Core creatures, you can go nearly the whole game without fighting anything but them, except for two occasions. The first creature type you find, Naroom (leaf) is strong against Core types while being weak against them in turn though, so it may be a decent idea to bolster your creatures with Fire, Earth, Air or Water elements later on. Those types, meanwhile, have their own rock paper scissors, and since you'll need to grind like crazy between Shadow Geysers, you may want to have an advantage against the locals.
* Entertainingly enough, on the Korean professional {{Starcraft}} ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'' scene there is a player who calls himself Rock. And he always builds Carriers (which are, surprisingly, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin basically aircraft carriers]] InSpace and With Aliens), and 80% of the time he loses because his opponent knows he'll do this. The rest of the time he wins because he really is that good with the units.
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