History Main / PoorPredictableRock

9th Sep '17 10:37:51 PM Androgeos
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** Whitney is the WakeUpCallBoss in [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]] for only one reason: her Miltank. It's a Normal-type Pokémon, so it may initially look like Fighting-type bait. However, this trope gets subverted since the only Fighting-type Pokémon available at the point when the player has to defeat her is a Machop that is obtained from an in-game trade, and even with said Machop, Miltank's impressive Speed and bulk, coupled with its Stomp and Milk Drink moves, means that it can easily hold out against the Machop if the player is unlucky enough or unprepared[[note]]Stomp has a 30% chance of causing the Pokémon that was hit to flinch and not do anything for one turn—it is also stronger because it is a Normal-type move, so Miltank gets a same type attack bonus—which gives Miltank one extra turn to use Milk Drink, which restores up to 50% of its HP[[/note]].
*** It's even worse in the remakes, where Miltank comes packing the Scrappy ability, which allows it to hit Ghost types. Thought you were being smart by catching a Ghastly in Bellsprout Tower? Nope.
** Jasmine from Generation II provides an example of this trope being slightly subverted with her Steelix. Her two Magnemite will get one-shotted by a strong enough Fighting- or Ground-type attack, but because Steelix has one of the highest Defense stats in the games, even the strongest physical super-effective attacks are unlikely to knock Steelix out in one hit unless the attacking Pokémon is significantly overleveled.
** Winona from Generation III averts this trope by having a Flying-type team[[note]]weak to Electric-type moves[[/note]] that includes an Altaria which knows Earthquake[[note]]super-effective against Electric-type Pokémon[[/note]].
** Juan averts this trope twice in ''Pokémon Emerald'' by having, in his Water-type lineup, the dual Water/Ground-type Whiscash[[note]]so it {{No Sell}}s Electric-type attacks[[/note]] and dual Water/Dragon-type Kingdra[[note]]which not only negates the effectiveness of any Grass-type attack that can otherwise sweep through all of Juan's other Pokémon, including the aforementioned Whiscash, but also negates the Water-type's weakness to Electric-type attacks[[/note]].
** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in Generation III? Watch out—aversions of this trope on his team are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and damages the attacker a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical attack; also causes moves like High Jump Kick to miss, resulting in the attacker taking both crash damage ''and'' damage from Spiky Shield[[/note]].
** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in Generation IV, averts this trope with all of his three Pokémon, each with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].
** Burgh from Generation V has a Dwebble on his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.
** [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] was screwed by an aversion of this trope when he reviewed ''White''; specifically, when he went up against [[ShockAndAwe Elesa]]:

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** *** Whitney is the WakeUpCallBoss in [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]] for only one reason: her Miltank. It's a Normal-type Pokémon, so it may initially look like Fighting-type bait. However, this trope gets subverted since the only Fighting-type Pokémon available at the point when the player has to defeat her is a Machop that is obtained from an in-game trade, and even with said Machop, Miltank's impressive Speed and bulk, coupled with its Stomp and Milk Drink moves, means that it can easily hold out against the Machop if the player is unlucky enough or unprepared[[note]]Stomp has a 30% chance of causing the Pokémon that was hit to flinch and not do anything for one turn—it is also stronger because it is a Normal-type move, so Miltank gets a same type attack bonus—which gives Miltank one extra turn to use Milk Drink, which restores up to 50% of its HP[[/note]].
***
HP[[/note]]. It's even worse in the remakes, where Miltank comes packing the Scrappy ability, which allows it to hit Ghost types.Ghost-types. Thought you were being smart by catching a Ghastly in Bellsprout Tower? Nope.
** *** Jasmine from Generation II provides an example of this trope being slightly subverted with her Steelix. Her two Magnemite will get one-shotted by a strong enough Fighting- or Ground-type attack, but because Steelix has one of the highest Defense stats in the games, even the strongest physical super-effective attacks are unlikely to knock Steelix out in one hit unless the attacking Pokémon is significantly overleveled.
** *** Winona from Generation III averts this trope by having a Flying-type team[[note]]weak to Electric-type moves[[/note]] that includes an Altaria which knows Earthquake[[note]]super-effective against Electric-type Pokémon[[/note]].
** *** Juan averts this trope twice in ''Pokémon Emerald'' by having, in his Water-type lineup, the dual Water/Ground-type Whiscash[[note]]so it {{No Sell}}s Electric-type attacks[[/note]] and dual Water/Dragon-type Kingdra[[note]]which not only negates the effectiveness of any Grass-type attack that can otherwise sweep through all of Juan's other Pokémon, including the aforementioned Whiscash, but also negates the Water-type's weakness to Electric-type attacks[[/note]].
** *** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in Generation III? Watch out—aversions of this trope on his team are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and damages the attacker a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical attack; also causes moves like High Jump Kick to miss, resulting in the attacker taking both crash damage ''and'' damage from Spiky Shield[[/note]].
** *** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in Generation IV, averts this trope with all of his three Pokémon, each with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].
** *** Burgh from Generation V has a Dwebble on his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.
** *** [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] was screwed by an aversion of this trope when he reviewed ''White''; specifically, when he went up against [[ShockAndAwe Elesa]]:



** Roxie provides an interesting subversion with her Poison-type gym in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2''. Although both her Pokémon are weak to Psychic- and Ground-type attacks, none of the Pokémon the player has met so far will learn such attacks within their immediate level range.
** Marlon from ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'' plays this trope straight with his Water-type Pokémon. Although his Carracosta has [[LastChanceHitPoint Sturdy]], his entire team is still easy prey for Grass- and Electric-type attacks.
** Shauntal and Caitlin, the Ghost- and Psychic-type Unova Elite Four respectively in Generation V, play this trope straight, with all their Pokémon sharing a common weakness to Dark-type attacks. A single Krookodile can Crunch both their teams into dust.
** Viola from Generation VI averts this trope by running the dual Bug/Water-type Surskit in her Bug-type team, which can counter Fire-type Pokémon (such as Fennekin, the Fire-type starter) with Water Sport[[note]]halves the power of Fire-type moves[[/note]] and Bubble[[note]]super-effective against Fire-types and may also lower their Speed stat[[/note]]. Her other Pokémon, Vivillon, plays this trope straight as it doesn't know its signature move, Powder, which [[HoistByHisOwnPetard blows Fire-type attacks up in the attacker's face]].
** There's also Grant, the Generation VI Rock-type gym leader, whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual Rock/Dragon-type Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.
** Generation VI's Grass-type gym leader, Ramos, plays this trope nearly dead straight. Apart from his Gogoat knowing Bulldoze, which can do a number on non-flying Fire-type Pokémon, his entire team is pure fodder for Flying- and Fire-type attacks.
** Got those Steel- and Poison-type attacks to take on Valerie's Fairy-type Pokémon in Generation VI? Her first one is [[OxymoronicBeing the dual Steel/Fairy-type Mawile]], which averts this trope as it takes regular damage from Steel-type attacks and is ''completely damn immune'' to Poison-type moves! What's more is that it's Fairy type negates Steel's weakness to Fighting.
** Wulfric's Ice-type team in Generation VI plays with this trope in at least two ways on their own (and he even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades it]]). Abomasnow plays it straight with its 4x weakness to Fire-type moves and average defences, Cryogonal's high Special Defense deconstructs this trope versus special moves, and Avalugg's extremely high Defense stat—only slightly lower than Steelix's—deconstructs this trope versus physical moves.
** Wikstrom, the Kalos Elite Four who specialises in Steel-type Pokémon, does a grand job averting this trope with three of his four Pokémon—Klefki, a part Fairy-type, takes neutral damage from Fighting-type moves, Probopass takes neutral damage from Fire-type moves due to its secondary Rock-type and has Sturdy as its ability, and Aegislash, being a part Ghost-type, is immune to Fighting-type moves and has King's Shield, a move that nullifies damage taken for one turn in addition to reducing the attacking Pokémon's Attack stat if they used a physical attack against it.

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** *** Roxie provides an interesting subversion with her Poison-type gym in ''VideoGame/PokemonBlack2AndWhite2''. Although both her Pokémon are weak to Psychic- and Ground-type attacks, none of the Pokémon the player has met so far will learn such attacks within their immediate level range.
** *** Marlon from ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'' plays this trope straight with his Water-type Pokémon. Although his Carracosta has [[LastChanceHitPoint Sturdy]], his entire team is still easy prey for Grass- and Electric-type attacks.
** *** Shauntal and Caitlin, the Ghost- and Psychic-type Unova Elite Four respectively in Generation V, play this trope straight, with all their Pokémon sharing a common weakness to Dark-type attacks. A single Krookodile can Crunch both their teams into dust.
** *** Viola from Generation VI averts this trope by running the dual Bug/Water-type Surskit in her Bug-type team, which can counter Fire-type Pokémon (such as Fennekin, the Fire-type starter) with Water Sport[[note]]halves the power of Fire-type moves[[/note]] and Bubble[[note]]super-effective against Fire-types and may also lower their Speed stat[[/note]]. Her other Pokémon, Vivillon, plays this trope straight as it doesn't know its signature move, Powder, which [[HoistByHisOwnPetard blows Fire-type attacks up in the attacker's face]].
** *** There's also Grant, the Generation VI Rock-type gym leader, whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual Rock/Dragon-type Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.
** *** Generation VI's Grass-type gym leader, Ramos, plays this trope nearly dead straight. Apart from his Gogoat knowing Bulldoze, which can do a number on non-flying Fire-type Pokémon, his entire team is pure fodder for Flying- and Fire-type attacks.
** *** Got those Steel- and Poison-type attacks to take on Valerie's Fairy-type Pokémon in Generation VI? Her first one is [[OxymoronicBeing the dual Steel/Fairy-type Mawile]], which averts this trope as it takes regular damage from Steel-type attacks and is ''completely damn immune'' to Poison-type moves! What's more is that it's Fairy type negates Steel's weakness to Fighting.
** *** Wulfric's Ice-type team in Generation VI plays with this trope in at least two ways on their own (and he even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades it]]). Abomasnow plays it straight with its 4x weakness to Fire-type moves and average defences, Cryogonal's high Special Defense deconstructs this trope versus special moves, and Avalugg's extremely high Defense stat—only slightly lower than Steelix's—deconstructs this trope versus physical moves.
** *** Wikstrom, the Kalos Elite Four who specialises in Steel-type Pokémon, does a grand job averting this trope with three of his four Pokémon—Klefki, a part Fairy-type, takes neutral damage from Fighting-type moves, Probopass takes neutral damage from Fire-type moves due to its secondary Rock-type and has Sturdy as its ability, and Aegislash, being a part Ghost-type, is immune to Fighting-type moves and has King's Shield, a move that nullifies damage taken for one turn in addition to reducing the attacking Pokémon's Attack stat if they used a physical attack against it.
26th Jul '17 7:44:27 PM Geostomp
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* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', Deidara's sole means of attack are Earth element clay birds. He picks a fight with Sasuke, whose primary attack this point is the Lightning element Chidori and variants thereof. As Deidara loses in ElementalRockPaperScissors, this ends badly for him. He still manages to be one hell of a WakeUpCall boss for Sasuke though.

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* In ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'', Deidara's sole means of attack are Earth element clay birds. He picks a fight with Sasuke, whose primary attack this point is the Lightning element Chidori and variants thereof. As Deidara loses in ElementalRockPaperScissors, this ends badly for him. He still manages to be one hell of a WakeUpCall boss WakeUpCallBoss for Sasuke though.
11th Jul '17 11:37:00 PM SpideyTerry
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* On ''WesernAnimation/RobotAndMonster'', Robot had this history because of his design. Whereas his obnoxious brother Gart had four-fingered hands, Robot only had clamps, so he had no choice but to always use rock and constantly lose. In the featured episode ("Between Brothers"), Robot has to beat Gart at the game in order to win back his apartment, so he invents a device that allows him to do an extra move (i.e. literally place a piece of paper on the rock fist that Gart used).
18th Jun '17 2:57:14 AM SLOOGOVS
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* In the billiards (you know, pool) manga ''Breakshot'', practically every opposing player has one major strength and sticks to it 90% of the time. Jimmy and Oki's masse shots, Aono's center shots, Ryoji's shotgun shot (which, as it happens, is actually prety ''un''predictable in its effect, but he's still guaranteed to use it), Jeffrey's miracle shot, and main character Chinmi himself is inordinately fond of jump shots.

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* In the billiards (you know, pool) manga ''Breakshot'', ''Manga/{{Breakshot}}'', practically every opposing player has one major strength and sticks to it 90% of the time. Jimmy and Oki's masse shots, Aono's center shots, Ryoji's shotgun shot (which, as it happens, is actually prety ''un''predictable in its effect, but he's still guaranteed to use it), Jeffrey's miracle shot, and main character Chinmi himself is inordinately fond of jump shots.



* In Manga/{{Beelzebub}} the group on main characters decide to choose their leader through RPS. The eponymous Beelzebub instantly wins with paper since everybody else used rock.

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* In Manga/{{Beelzebub}} ''Manga/{{Beelzebub}}'' the group on main characters decide to choose their leader through RPS. The eponymous Beelzebub instantly wins with paper since everybody else used rock.



* In ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', this is built right into the game's mechanics. Each of the five colors lends itself to two or three basic strategies and weaknesses, but adding more colors to cover for each other makes it difficult to play spells reliably. On the other hand, Magic (and TabletopGame/YuGiOh) allow the use of fifteen-card side decks in three-round matches, so between games you can swap out cards to counter your opponent's strategies or cover for particular vulnerabilities your opponent is hitting. Of course, nobody in the anime or manga plays three-round matches, making their extreme-theming all the sillier.

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* In ''TabletopGame/MagicTheGathering'', this is built right into the game's mechanics. Each of the five colors lends itself to two or three basic strategies and weaknesses, but adding more colors to cover for each other makes it difficult to play spells reliably. On the other hand, Magic (and TabletopGame/YuGiOh) ''TabletopGame/YuGiOh'') allow the use of fifteen-card side decks in three-round matches, so between games you can swap out cards to counter your opponent's strategies or cover for particular vulnerabilities your opponent is hitting. Of course, nobody in the anime or manga plays three-round matches, making their extreme-theming all the sillier.



* In Literature/{{Gone}}, Sam does paper and loses, so he has to be the first to go into the nuclear plant.

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* In Literature/{{Gone}}, ''Literature/{{Gone}}'', Sam does paper and loses, so he has to be the first to go into the nuclear plant.



* Most psionic attacks used by Psychic Warriors in TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons do acid damage. Then the subversion kicks in when you realize very few enemies are acid resistant.

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* Most psionic attacks used by Psychic Warriors in TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' do acid damage. Then the subversion kicks in when you realize very few enemies are acid resistant.



* In the fangame TabletopGame/PokemonTabletopAdventures, the Advanced Class Elemental Expert embodies this trope of specialization like the gym leaders from the games, but there is a payoff. First the Pokemon of that type that they own gain an experience bonus (which stacks with the experience bonus from their base class), meaning that their mon level at a very fast pace. They also gain bonuses to finding and catching that type of mon, so they can more easily gain the benefits of this class. Finally, attacks of that type deal bonus damage even if their mon isn't that type.

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* In the fangame TabletopGame/PokemonTabletopAdventures, ''TabletopGame/PokemonTabletopAdventures'', the Advanced Class Elemental Expert embodies this trope of specialization like the gym leaders from the games, but there is a payoff. First the Pokemon of that type that they own gain an experience bonus (which stacks with the experience bonus from their base class), meaning that their mon level at a very fast pace. They also gain bonuses to finding and catching that type of mon, so they can more easily gain the benefits of this class. Finally, attacks of that type deal bonus damage even if their mon isn't that type.



* Several raid bosses in ''WorldOfWarcraft'' suffer from this, to the point that the encounter can be trivialized by amassing the appropriate resistance stat, even though this usually makes your other stats suffer (most resistance gear offers little to nothing in terms of offensive stats). Early raids were infamous for having an obsession with fire-based encounters (entire Molten Core, the dragon Onyxia and a good portion of Blackwing Lair (mostly dragons)), but it got more varied later on. There is even a holy-based encounter, to which there is no easy counter because holy resistance does not exist.

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* Several raid bosses in ''WorldOfWarcraft'' ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' suffer from this, to the point that the encounter can be trivialized by amassing the appropriate resistance stat, even though this usually makes your other stats suffer (most resistance gear offers little to nothing in terms of offensive stats). Early raids were infamous for having an obsession with fire-based encounters (entire Molten Core, the dragon Onyxia and a good portion of Blackwing Lair (mostly dragons)), but it got more varied later on. There is even a holy-based encounter, to which there is no easy counter because holy resistance does not exist.



* In ''Videogame/{{Mardek}}'' powerful highly elementally aligned monsters have a spell, Inversion (of that element), which deals damage to the party based on how much elemental resistance they have to that element. Come in with 110% resistance to fire? Then Inversion: Fire does 110% of your health as damage. Due to this, it's best to apply a moderate degree of elemental resistance in these battles. Also played strait with [[BonusBoss the Security Demon and Animus]], both of which are almost unbeatable normally, but can be beaten with a particular trick that neutralizes much of their power.
* In VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresII, units tend to be strong against some types and weak against others (cavalry are good against archers but weak against pikemen) and certain factions may be better at some types of units than others, especially taking into account what their unique units are. Amusingly enough, at one point in the development, a bug in the AI of the enemies of the third Joan of Arc mission caused the AI to keep building rams until they had an army that, while unable to fight well against player units, destroyed the player's town.

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* In ''Videogame/{{Mardek}}'' powerful highly elementally aligned monsters have a spell, Inversion (of that element), which deals damage to the party based on how much elemental resistance they have to that element. Come in with 110% resistance to fire? Then Inversion: Fire does 110% of your health as damage. Due to this, it's best to apply a moderate degree of elemental resistance in these battles. Also played strait straight with [[BonusBoss the Security Demon and Animus]], both of which are almost unbeatable normally, but can be beaten with a particular trick that neutralizes much of their power.
* In VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresII, ''VideoGame/AgeOfEmpiresII'' units tend to be strong against some types and weak against others (cavalry are good against archers but weak against pikemen) and certain factions may be better at some types of units than others, especially taking into account what their unique units are. Amusingly enough, at one point in the development, a bug in the AI of the enemies of the third Joan of Arc mission caused the AI to keep building rams until they had an army that, while unable to fight well against player units, destroyed the player's town.



* Web game example: The USA Rock Paper Scissors League (!) has a politically themed Flash game on its website: "[[http://www.usarps.com/barack_paper_scissors/ Barack Paper Scissors]]." In the game, the player takes the part of Democratic US presidential candidate Barack Obama and plays Rock Paper Scissors against a number of other political opponents. The first opponent the player faces is [[StrawmanPolitical former US President George W. Bush, who always chooses Rock]].

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* Web game example: The USA Rock Paper Scissors League (!) has a politically themed Flash game on its website: "[[http://www.''[[http://www.usarps.com/barack_paper_scissors/ Barack Paper Scissors]]." Scissors]]''. In the game, the player takes the part of Democratic US presidential candidate Barack Obama and plays Rock Paper Scissors against a number of other political opponents. The first opponent the player faces is [[StrawmanPolitical former US President George W. Bush, who always chooses Rock]].
21st May '17 8:29:35 PM FuzzyWulfe
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** It should be pointed out that Shishio learns from each battle and takes steps to counter every way he is attacked. Saito's sword thrust to the head failed because Shishio has been attacked by a stab to the forehead before, which is why he has the metal headband.
29th Apr '17 11:43:53 AM JohnnyHuang
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* In ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'', Doraemon, due to having FingerlessHands, can only play rock in "rock, paper, scissors".
22nd Apr '17 7:43:59 AM TheTitanPrince
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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III]] introduced the Wonder Guard ability, which takes this trope to its logical extreme by making the Pokémon that has it completely immune to any attack that does not do super-effective damage.

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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III]] introduced the Wonder Guard ability, which takes this trope to its logical extreme by making the Pokémon that has it completely immune to any attack that does not do super-effective damage.damage[[note]]Though non-standard types of damage, like weather effects, will still do damage[[/note]]. However, the only Pokémon with this ability is a OneHitpointWonder with four elemental weaknesses, [[KryptoniteIsEverywhere including Flying type, which almost every team is guaranteed to have at least one of]].
*** It's possible, though only in double battles, to use the move Skill Swap to move it to one that has much less weaknesses, or with certain Pokémon, ''[[GameBreaker none at all]]''. Later generations [[{{Nerf}} nerfed]] this, though.
3rd Apr '17 5:42:55 PM nombretomado
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* In ''HunterXHunter'', Gon's special attack is explicitly based on Rock-Paper-Scissors, with his "Rock" attack being by far his strongest, and the only one capable of ending fights against stronger enemies. And stronger enemies will catch on to that pretty fast. Winning when your opponent knows you have to throw Rock to win? That takes talent.

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* In ''HunterXHunter'', ''Manga/HunterXHunter'', Gon's special attack is explicitly based on Rock-Paper-Scissors, with his "Rock" attack being by far his strongest, and the only one capable of ending fights against stronger enemies. And stronger enemies will catch on to that pretty fast. Winning when your opponent knows you have to throw Rock to win? That takes talent.
31st Mar '17 8:12:47 AM MisterVercetti
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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that Eagle will send an all air unit force against his island fortress so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with a ton of anti-air units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units despite having a weakness against them (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages all of your units at once while simultaneously healing all of his).

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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that air specialist Eagle will send an all a massive air unit force against his island fortress fortress, so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with a ton ''ton'' of anti-air units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units army despite having a sginificant weakness against them it (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages all of your units at once while simultaneously healing all of his).
31st Mar '17 8:10:47 AM MisterVercetti
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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that Eagle will send an all air unit force against his island fortress so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with LOTS of AA units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units despite having a weakness against them (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages ALL your units at once...).
** In another mission, he keeps Eagle's Air Force out of the battle by staging an offensive next to a volcano, which air units cannot even get near to. However, he didn't seem to anticipate the skills of vehicle unit specialist Jess...

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* A rare example where the ''villain'' takes advantage of this occurs in ''VideoGame/AdvanceWars 2'': one mission involves Hawke correctly anticipating that Eagle will send an all air unit force against his island fortress so he does the logical thing and surrounds it with LOTS a ton of AA anti-air units. Thus, the player is faced with the tough challenge of destroying all his units despite having a weakness against them (not to mention Hawke's CO power, which damages ALL all of your units at once...).
once while simultaneously healing all of his).
** In another mission, he keeps Eagle's Air Force out of the battle tries to do this again by staging an offensive next to a volcano, which air units cannot can't even get near close to. However, [[SpannerInTheWorks he didn't seem to anticipate the skills of vehicle unit count on vehicular specialist Jess...Jess entering the fray]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PoorPredictableRock