History Main / PoorPredictableRock

26th Jul '16 2:56:06 AM Morgenthaler
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** In ''The Lost Age'', Agatio [[DiscussedTrope acknowledges this fact]] and [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy sets a trap to get Mia out of the picture before battling Isaac's party]].

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** In ''The Lost Age'', Agatio [[DiscussedTrope acknowledges this fact]] and [[DangerouslyGenreSavvy sets a trap to get Mia out of the picture before battling Isaac's party]].party.
14th Jul '16 4:38:39 PM Discar
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** Averted in a big way in ''Dark Dawn''. Not only were the baddies not Proxians or Mars Adepts at all, [[spoiler: they weren't even following the known elemental system, [[OutsideContextVillain something the player characters had no way of knowing about or dealing with]].]] Sadly, the timing of the reveal and the way it was handled made it look like an AssPull.

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** Averted in a big way in ''Dark Dawn''. Not only were the baddies not Proxians or Mars Adepts at all, [[spoiler: they weren't even following the known elemental system, [[OutsideContextVillain [[OutsideContextProblem something the player characters had no way of knowing about or dealing with]].]] Sadly, the timing of the reveal and the way it was handled made it look like an AssPull.
7th Jul '16 8:30:38 AM Androgeos
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*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in Generation III? Watch out—aversions of this trope on his team are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces the attacker's HP a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move; also causes moves like High Jump Kick to always miss, resulting in the attacker taking both crash damage ''and'' damage from Spiky Shield[[/note]].
*** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in Generation IV, averts this trope hard with all of his three Pokémon, each with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].

to:

*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in Generation III? Watch out—aversions of this trope on his team are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces damages the attacker's HP attacker a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move; attack; also causes moves like High Jump Kick to always miss, resulting in the attacker taking both crash damage ''and'' damage from Spiky Shield[[/note]].
*** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in Generation IV, averts this trope hard with all of his three Pokémon, each with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].
7th Jul '16 6:36:46 AM Androgeos
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** From Generation V onwards, Marill and Azumarill, both with the Water-type as their primary type, may avert this trope by having the Sap Sipper ability. Grass-type moves will increase their Attack stat instead of doing damage.

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** From Generation V onwards, Marill and Azumarill, both with the Water-type as their primary type, may avert this trope by having the Sap Sipper ability. Grass-type moves will increase their Attack stat instead of doing super-effective damage.



*** Got those Steel- and Poison-type attacks to take on Valerie's Fairy-type Pokémon in Generation VI? Her first one is [[OxymoronicBeing the Steel/Fairy Mawile]], which averts this trope as it takes regular damage from Steel-type attacks and is ''completely damn immune'' to Poison-type moves!

to:

*** Got those Steel- and Poison-type attacks to take on Valerie's Fairy-type Pokémon in Generation VI? Her first one is [[OxymoronicBeing the Steel/Fairy dual Steel/Fairy-type Mawile]], which averts this trope as it takes regular damage from Steel-type attacks and is ''completely damn immune'' to Poison-type moves!
7th Jul '16 6:33:08 AM Androgeos
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*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in Generation III? Watch out—aversions of this trope on his team are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces the attacks HP a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move[[/note]].

to:

*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in Generation III? Watch out—aversions of this trope on his team are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces the attacks attacker's HP a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move[[/note]].move; also causes moves like High Jump Kick to always miss, resulting in the attacker taking both crash damage ''and'' damage from Spiky Shield[[/note]].
2nd Jul '16 7:38:20 AM Androgeos
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** Generation III introduced the Wonder Guard ability, which takes this trope to its logical extreme by making the Pokémon that has it completely immune to any attack that does not do super-effective damage.
** Generation IV subverts this trope with the introduction of the Solid Rock and Filter abilities, which reduce the power of super-effective attacks by 25%. The Solid Rock ability, however, plays with this trope even further and double subverts it as the only Pokémon that can naturally have this ability are dual-type Pokémon with a 4x weakness to another type; [[UselessUsefulSpell reducing a 4x weakness to a 3x weakness is unlikely to stop Camerupt or Rhyperior from fainting when they are hit by, say, Hydro Pump]].
** While it is entirely logical to attack the Water-type Goldeen or Seaking with an Electric-type move, the attacker might get a nasty surprise if said Goldeen/Seaking has the Lightning Rod ability, which averts this trope by not only making the Goldeen/Seaking immune to Electric-type attacks from Generation V onwards but also drawing all Electric-type moves to it and increasing its Special Attack by 1 stage each time it is hit by an Electric-type move.

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** [[VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire Generation III III]] introduced the Wonder Guard ability, which takes this trope to its logical extreme by making the Pokémon that has it completely immune to any attack that does not do super-effective damage.
** [[VideoGame/PokemonDiamondAndPearl Generation IV IV]] subverts this trope with the introduction of the Solid Rock and Filter abilities, which reduce the power of super-effective attacks by 25%. The Solid Rock ability, however, plays with this trope even further and double subverts double-subverts it as the only Pokémon that can naturally have this ability are dual-type Pokémon with a 4x weakness to another type; [[UselessUsefulSpell reducing a 4x weakness to a 3x weakness is unlikely to stop the Fire/Ground-type Camerupt or Rock/Ground-type Rhyperior from fainting when they are hit by, by a Water-type attack like, say, Hydro Pump]].
** While it is entirely logical to attack the Water-type Goldeen or Seaking with an Electric-type move, the attacker might get a nasty surprise from [[VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite Generation V]] onwards if said Goldeen/Seaking has the Lightning Rod ability, which averts this trope by not only making the Goldeen/Seaking immune to Electric-type attacks from Generation V onwards but also drawing all Electric-type moves to it and increasing its Special Attack by 1 stage each time it is hit by an Electric-type move.



** The Ice-type move Freeze-Dry, introduced in Generation VI, inverts this trope. Every other Ice-type attack does half damage against Water-type Pokémon; Freeze-Dry is super-effective against Water-types instead.

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** The Ice-type move Freeze-Dry, introduced in [[VideoGame/PokemonXAndY Generation VI, VI]], inverts this trope. Every other Ice-type attack does half damage against Water-type Pokémon; Freeze-Dry is super-effective against Water-types instead.



** Gym leaders from the earlier generations provide better examples of this trope being played straight. In particular, all the gym leaders in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' (like Blaine and his Fire-type Pokémon, pictured above) play this trope straight by focusing almost exclusively on one type; the strategy to beating them is simply to raise Pokémon that can learn moves capable of hitting theirs for super-effective damage (such as Water-type attacks against Blaine's Pokémon). Sabrina then subverts this trope, however, since Bug-type moves are pathetic in Generation I.

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** Gym leaders from the earlier generations provide better examples of this trope being played straight. In particular, all the gym leaders in ''VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue'' [[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Generation I]] (like Blaine and his Fire-type Pokémon, pictured above) play this trope straight by focusing almost exclusively on one type; the strategy to beating them is simply to raise Pokémon that can learn moves capable of hitting theirs for super-effective damage (such as Water-type attacks against Blaine's Pokémon). Sabrina then subverts this trope, however, since Bug-type moves are pathetic in Generation I.



*** Whitney is the WakeUpCallBoss in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' for only one reason: her Miltank. It's a Normal-type Pokémon, so it may initially look like Fighting-type bait. However, this trope gets subverted since the only Fighting-type Pokémon available at the point when the player has to defeat her is a Machop that is obtained from an in-game trade, and even with said Machop, Miltank's impressive Speed and bulk, coupled with its Stomp and Milk Drink moves, means that it can easily hold out against the Machop if the player is unlucky enough or unprepared[[note]]Stomp has a 30% chance of causing the Pokémon that was hit to flinch and not do anything for one turn—it is also stronger because it is a Normal-type move, so Miltank gets a same type attack bonus—which gives Miltank one extra turn to use Milk Drink, which restores up to 50% of its HP[[/note]].
*** Jasmine in ''Gold'', ''Silver'' and ''Crystal'' provides an example of this trope being deconstructed with her Steelix. Her two Magnemite will get one-shotted by a strong enough Fighting- or Ground-type attack, but because Steelix has one of the highest Defense stats in the games, even the strongest physical super-effective attacks are unlikely to knock Steelix out in one hit unless the attacking Pokémon is significantly overleveled.
*** Winona from ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' averts this trope by having a Flying-type team[[note]]weak to Electric-type moves[[/note]] that includes an Altaria which knows Earthquake[[note]]super-effective against Electric-type Pokémon[[/note]].
*** Juan averts this trope ''twice'' in ''Pokémon Emerald'' by having, in his Water-type lineup, the dual Water/Ground-type Whiscash[[note]]so it {{No Sell}}s Electric-type attacks[[/note]] and dual Water/Dragon-type Kingdra[[note]]which not only negates the effectiveness of any Grass-type attack that can otherwise sweep through all of Juan's other Pokémon, including the aforementioned Whiscash, but also negates the Water-type's weakness to Electric-type attacks[[/note]].
*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in ''Pokémon Ruby'', ''Sapphire'', ''Emerald'', ''Omega Ruby'' or ''Alpha Sapphire''? Watch out for aversions to this trope—his team includes a Shiftry that knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]] as well as, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', a Cacturne that knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces the attacks HP a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move[[/note]].
*** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in ''Diamond'', ''Pearl'' and ''Platinum'', may seem like a brainless LargeHam to some, but avert this trope he ''surely'' does. He has three Pokémon in his gym lineup, all Water-type, but with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].
*** Candice averts this trope in ''Diamond'' and ''Pearl'' by having a dual Fighting/Psychic-type Medicham in her otherwise Ice-type team. She still averts this trope in ''Platinum'' by replacing the Medicham with a Froslass, which is dual Ice/Ghost-type. Hitting either of these Pokémon with a Fighting-type attack is ''not'' going to work.
*** Burgh from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a Dwebble in his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.

to:

*** Whitney is the WakeUpCallBoss in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' [[VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver Generation II]] for only one reason: her Miltank. It's a Normal-type Pokémon, so it may initially look like Fighting-type bait. However, this trope gets subverted since the only Fighting-type Pokémon available at the point when the player has to defeat her is a Machop that is obtained from an in-game trade, and even with said Machop, Miltank's impressive Speed and bulk, coupled with its Stomp and Milk Drink moves, means that it can easily hold out against the Machop if the player is unlucky enough or unprepared[[note]]Stomp has a 30% chance of causing the Pokémon that was hit to flinch and not do anything for one turn—it is also stronger because it is a Normal-type move, so Miltank gets a same type attack bonus—which gives Miltank one extra turn to use Milk Drink, which restores up to 50% of its HP[[/note]].
*** Jasmine in ''Gold'', ''Silver'' and ''Crystal'' from Generation II provides an example of this trope being deconstructed with her Steelix. Her two Magnemite will get one-shotted by a strong enough Fighting- or Ground-type attack, but because Steelix has one of the highest Defense stats in the games, even the strongest physical super-effective attacks are unlikely to knock Steelix out in one hit unless the attacking Pokémon is significantly overleveled.
*** Winona from ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'' Generation III averts this trope by having a Flying-type team[[note]]weak to Electric-type moves[[/note]] that includes an Altaria which knows Earthquake[[note]]super-effective against Electric-type Pokémon[[/note]].
*** Juan averts this trope ''twice'' twice in ''Pokémon Emerald'' by having, in his Water-type lineup, the dual Water/Ground-type Whiscash[[note]]so it {{No Sell}}s Electric-type attacks[[/note]] and dual Water/Dragon-type Kingdra[[note]]which not only negates the effectiveness of any Grass-type attack that can otherwise sweep through all of Juan's other Pokémon, including the aforementioned Whiscash, but also negates the Water-type's weakness to Electric-type attacks[[/note]].
*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in ''Pokémon Ruby'', ''Sapphire'', ''Emerald'', ''Omega Ruby'' or ''Alpha Sapphire''? Generation III? Watch out for aversions to out—aversions of this trope—his trope on his team includes a Shiftry that are his Shiftry, which knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]] as well as, Pokémon[[/note]], and, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', a Cacturne that his Cacturne, which knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces the attacks HP a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move[[/note]].
*** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in ''Diamond'', ''Pearl'' and ''Platinum'', may seem like a brainless LargeHam to some, but avert Generation IV, averts this trope he ''surely'' does. He has hard with all of his three Pokémon in his gym lineup, all Water-type, but Pokémon, each with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].
*** Candice averts this trope in ''Diamond'' and ''Pearl'' by having a dual Fighting/Psychic-type Medicham in her otherwise Ice-type team. She still averts this trope in ''Platinum'' by replacing the Medicham with a Froslass, which is dual Ice/Ghost-type. Hitting either of these Pokémon with a Fighting-type attack is ''not'' going to work.
***
Burgh from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' Generation V has a Dwebble in on his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.



*** Shauntal and Caitlin, the Ghost- and Psychic-type Unova Elite Four respectively, in ''Black'' and ''White'', as well as their sequels, play this trope straight, with all their Pokémon sharing a common weakness to Dark-type attacks. A single Krookodile can Crunch both their teams into dust.
*** Viola from ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'' averts this trope by running the dual Bug/Water-type Surskit in her Bug-type team, which can counter Fire-type Pokémon (such as Fennekin, the Fire-type starter) with Water Sport[[note]]halves the power of Fire-type moves[[/note]] and Bubble[[note]]super-effective against Fire-types and may also lower their Speed stat[[/note]].
*** There's also Grant, the Rock-type gym leader from ''X'' and ''Y'', whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual Rock/Dragon-type Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.
*** Got those Steel- and Poison-type attacks to take on Valerie's Fairy-type Pokémon in ''X'' and ''Y''? Her first one is [[OxymoronicBeing the Steel/Fairy Mawile]], which averts this trope as it takes regular damage from Steel-type attacks and is ''completely damn immune'' to Poison-type moves!
*** Wulfric's Ice-type team in ''X'' and ''Y'' plays with this trope in at least two ways on their own (and he even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades it]]). Abomasnow plays it straight with its 4x weakness to Fire-type moves and average defences, Cryogonal's high Special Defense deconstructs this trope versus special moves, and Avalugg's extremely high Defense stat—only slightly lower than Steelix's—deconstructs this trope versus physical moves.

to:

*** Shauntal and Caitlin, the Ghost- and Psychic-type Unova Elite Four respectively, respectively in ''Black'' and ''White'', as well as their sequels, Generation V, play this trope straight, with all their Pokémon sharing a common weakness to Dark-type attacks. A single Krookodile can Crunch both their teams into dust.
*** Viola from ''VideoGame/PokemonXAndY'' Generation VI averts this trope by running the dual Bug/Water-type Surskit in her Bug-type team, which can counter Fire-type Pokémon (such as Fennekin, the Fire-type starter) with Water Sport[[note]]halves the power of Fire-type moves[[/note]] and Bubble[[note]]super-effective against Fire-types and may also lower their Speed stat[[/note]].
*** There's also Grant, the Generation VI Rock-type gym leader from ''X'' and ''Y'', leader, whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual Rock/Dragon-type Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.
*** Generation VI's Grass-type gym leader, Ramos, plays this trope nearly dead straight. Apart from his Gogoat knowing Bulldoze, which can do a number on non-flying Fire-type Pokémon, his entire team is pure fodder for Flying- and Fire-type attacks.
***
Got those Steel- and Poison-type attacks to take on Valerie's Fairy-type Pokémon in ''X'' and ''Y''? Generation VI? Her first one is [[OxymoronicBeing the Steel/Fairy Mawile]], which averts this trope as it takes regular damage from Steel-type attacks and is ''completely damn immune'' to Poison-type moves!
*** Wulfric's Ice-type team in ''X'' and ''Y'' Generation VI plays with this trope in at least two ways on their own (and he even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades it]]). Abomasnow plays it straight with its 4x weakness to Fire-type moves and average defences, Cryogonal's high Special Defense deconstructs this trope versus special moves, and Avalugg's extremely high Defense stat—only slightly lower than Steelix's—deconstructs this trope versus physical moves.
2nd Jul '16 6:10:43 AM Androgeos
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*** Burgh from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a Dwebble in his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual-type Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.

to:

*** Burgh from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a Dwebble in his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual-type dual Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.
2nd Jul '16 6:08:03 AM Androgeos
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** From Generation V onwards, Marill and Azumarill, both with the Water-type as their primary type, may avert this trope by having the Sap Sipper ability. Grass-type moves will have no effect against them.

to:

** From Generation V onwards, Marill and Azumarill, both with the Water-type as their primary type, may avert this trope by having the Sap Sipper ability. Grass-type moves will have no effect against them.increase their Attack stat instead of doing damage.



*** Lorelei from Generation I subverts this trope, as she runs a predominantly Ice-type team, except for her Slowbro, which is a dual Water/''Psychic''-type Pokémon, so an attempt to sweep her with a Fighting-type Pokémon might actually end quite badly.
*** Agatha in ''Pokémon Yellow'' averts this trope with her Golbat, which is the only Poison-type Pokémon on her team that is also a Flying-type. Good luck [[NoSell trying to knock it out]] with [[DishingOutDirt Earthquake or Dig]]...
*** Jasmine in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' provides an example of this trope being deconstructed with her Steelix. Her two Magnemite will get one-shotted by a strong enough Fighting- or Ground-type attack, but because Steelix has one of the highest Defense stats in the games, even the strongest physical super-effective attacks are unlikely to knock Steelix out in one hit unless the attacking Pokémon is significantly overleveled.

to:

*** Lorelei from Generation I subverts this trope, as she runs a predominantly Ice-type team, except for her Slowbro, which is a dual Water/''Psychic''-type Water/Psychic-type Pokémon, so an attempt to sweep her with a Fighting-type Pokémon might actually end quite badly.
*** Agatha in ''Pokémon Yellow'' from Generation I averts this trope with her Golbat, which is the only Poison-type Pokémon on her team that is also a Flying-type. Good luck [[NoSell trying to knock it out]] with [[DishingOutDirt Earthquake or Dig]]...
*** Jasmine Whitney is the WakeUpCallBoss in ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' for only one reason: her Miltank. It's a Normal-type Pokémon, so it may initially look like Fighting-type bait. However, this trope gets subverted since the only Fighting-type Pokémon available at the point when the player has to defeat her is a Machop that is obtained from an in-game trade, and even with said Machop, Miltank's impressive Speed and bulk, coupled with its Stomp and Milk Drink moves, means that it can easily hold out against the Machop if the player is unlucky enough or unprepared[[note]]Stomp has a 30% chance of causing the Pokémon that was hit to flinch and not do anything for one turn—it is also stronger because it is a Normal-type move, so Miltank gets a same type attack bonus—which gives Miltank one extra turn to use Milk Drink, which restores up to 50% of its HP[[/note]].
*** Jasmine in ''Gold'', ''Silver'' and ''Crystal''
provides an example of this trope being deconstructed with her Steelix. Her two Magnemite will get one-shotted by a strong enough Fighting- or Ground-type attack, but because Steelix has one of the highest Defense stats in the games, even the strongest physical super-effective attacks are unlikely to knock Steelix out in one hit unless the attacking Pokémon is significantly overleveled.



*** Candice averts this trope in ''Diamond'' and ''Pearl'' by having a dual Fighting/Psychic-type Medicham in her otherwise pure Ice-type team. She still averts this trope in ''Platinum'' by replacing the Medicham with a Froslass, which is dual Ice/Ghost-type. Hitting either of these Pokémon with a Fighting-type attack is ''not'' going to work.

to:

*** Thinking of using a Fighting-type Pokémon against Elite Four Sidney in ''Pokémon Ruby'', ''Sapphire'', ''Emerald'', ''Omega Ruby'' or ''Alpha Sapphire''? Watch out for aversions to this trope—his team includes a Shiftry that knows Extrasensory[[note]]does super-effective damage against Fighting-type Pokémon[[/note]] as well as, in ''Omega Ruby'' and ''Alpha Sapphire'', a Cacturne that knows Spiky Shield[[note]]blocks any physical attack, of which most Fighting-type attacks are, and reduces the attacks HP a little if Spiky Shield blocked a physical move[[/note]].
*** Crasher Wake, the Water-type gym leader in ''Diamond'', ''Pearl'' and ''Platinum'', may seem like a brainless LargeHam to some, but avert this trope he ''surely'' does. He has three Pokémon in his gym lineup, all Water-type, but with varying secondary types and/or movepools to handle ''both'' Electric- and Grass-type Pokémon—Gyarados to weaken physical attackers with its Intimidate ability and slow down Grass-types due to its Water/Flying-type making Grass-type moves do normal, instead of super-effective, damage; Quagsire to wall Electric-types with its dual Water/Ground-typing; and Floatzel, a fast and powerful Water-type Pokémon packing a moveset that includes Crunch[[note]]a relatively powerful Dark-type attack that may also reduce the target's Defense[[/note]] and Ice Fang[[note]]to deal immense damage to Grass-type Pokémon, especially the Turtwig line[[/note]].
*** Candice averts this trope in ''Diamond'' and ''Pearl'' by having a dual Fighting/Psychic-type Medicham in her otherwise pure Ice-type team. She still averts this trope in ''Platinum'' by replacing the Medicham with a Froslass, which is dual Ice/Ghost-type. Hitting either of these Pokémon with a Fighting-type attack is ''not'' going to work.



*** There's also Grant, the Rock-type gym leader from ''X'' and ''Y'', whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual-type Rock/Dragon Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.

to:

*** There's also Grant, the Rock-type gym leader from ''X'' and ''Y'', whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual-type Rock/Dragon dual Rock/Dragon-type Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.


Added DiffLines:

*** Wikstrom, the Kalos Elite Four who specialises in Steel-type Pokémon, does a grand job averting this trope with three of his four Pokémon—Klefki, a part Fairy-type, takes neutral damage from Fighting-type moves, Probopass takes neutral damage from Fire-type moves due to its secondary Rock-type and has Sturdy as its ability, and Aegislash, being a part Ghost-type, is immune to Fighting-type moves and has King's Shield, a move that nullifies damage taken for one turn in addition to reducing the attacking Pokémon's Attack stat if they used a physical attack against it.
2nd Jul '16 4:31:48 AM Androgeos
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*** There's also Grant, the Rock-type gym leader from ''X'' and ''Y'', whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters&mdashAmaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual-type Rock/Dragon Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.

to:

*** There's also Grant, the Rock-type gym leader from ''X'' and ''Y'', whose two Fossil Pokémon avert this trope with their respective counters&mdashAmaura counters—Amaura has a secondary Ice-type as well as the Refrigerate ability, which turns its Take Down attack into an Ice-type move that can easily annihilate any Grass-type Pokémon it is pitted against; Tyrunt is a dual-type Rock/Dragon Pokémon, which on its own negates the super-effectiveness of Water- and Grass-type moves against it.



*** Wulfric's Ice-type team in ''X'' and ''Y'' plays with this trope in at least two ways ''on their own'' (and he even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades it]]). Abomasnow plays it straight with its 4x weakness to Fire-type moves and average defences, Cryogonal's high Special Defense deconstructs this trope versus special moves, and Avalugg's extremely high Defense stat—only slightly lower than Steelix's—deconstructs this trope versus physical moves.

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*** Wulfric's Ice-type team in ''X'' and ''Y'' plays with this trope in at least two ways ''on on their own'' own (and he even [[LampshadeHanging lampshades it]]). Abomasnow plays it straight with its 4x weakness to Fire-type moves and average defences, Cryogonal's high Special Defense deconstructs this trope versus special moves, and Avalugg's extremely high Defense stat—only slightly lower than Steelix's—deconstructs this trope versus physical moves.
2nd Jul '16 4:27:24 AM Androgeos
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*** Burgh from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a Dwebble in his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as is a dual-type Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.
*** [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] was screwed by the aversion of this trope when he reviewed ''White''; specifically, when he went up against [[ShockAndAwe Elesa]]:

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*** Burgh from ''VideoGame/PokemonBlackAndWhite'' has a Dwebble in his Bug-type team. Dwebble averts this trope as it is a dual-type Bug/Rock-type, which negates the effectiveness of Fire- and Flying-type attacks on it.
*** [[WebAnimation/ZeroPunctuation Yahtzee]] was screwed by the an aversion of this trope when he reviewed ''White''; specifically, when he went up against [[ShockAndAwe Elesa]]:



*** Marlon from ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'' plays this trope straight with his Water-type Pokémon. Although his Carracosta has [[LastChanceHitPoint Sturdy]], his entire team is easy prey for Grass- and Electric-type attacks.

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*** Marlon from ''Black 2'' and ''White 2'' plays this trope straight with his Water-type Pokémon. Although his Carracosta has [[LastChanceHitPoint Sturdy]], his entire team is still easy prey for Grass- and Electric-type attacks.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PoorPredictableRock