History Main / PoisonMushroom

19th Jan '18 7:46:36 AM EbrithilBowser
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*** The place of the classic poison mushrooms from TheLostLevels is now taken by the zombie mushrooms, which spawn from ?-blocks like items, but quickly show their true undead face and chase Mario as enemies.

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*** The place of the classic poison mushrooms from TheLostLevels VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels is now taken by the zombie mushrooms, which spawn from ?-blocks like items, but quickly show their true undead face and chase Mario as enemies.
19th Jan '18 7:45:58 AM EbrithilBowser
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Added DiffLines:

*** The place of the classic poison mushrooms from TheLostLevels is now taken by the zombie mushrooms, which spawn from ?-blocks like items, but quickly show their true undead face and chase Mario as enemies.
28th Dec '17 5:58:52 AM Midna
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* The arcade game ''VideoGame/MagicSword'' had plenty of powerups lying around, from stronger weapons, to gaining an infinite projectile attack for some time, to invincibility. And then there is a pair of scissors: pick it up, and your companion is instantly killed.

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* The arcade game ''VideoGame/MagicSword'' had has plenty of powerups lying around, from stronger weapons, to gaining an infinite projectile attack for some time, to invincibility. And then there is a pair of scissors: pick it up, and your companion is instantly killed.



** Several games in the series have, alongside the usual food items used to restore health, several rotten food items like "Rotten Meat" and "Spoiled Milk". In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow'', equipping a Ghoul soul allowed Soma to eat them safely. After which, against logic, they would heal disproportionately large amounts of heath -- apparently, to a ghoul, spoiled milk is more nutritious than an entire turkey is to a human.
** The Flesh Golem soul had the same effect in the previous game, ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow''. It's a kind of [[InvertedTrope inversion]] of ReviveKillsZombie.

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** Several games in the series have, alongside the usual food items used to restore health, several rotten food items like "Rotten Meat" and "Spoiled Milk". In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow'', equipping a Ghoul soul allowed allows Soma to eat them safely. After which, against logic, they would will heal disproportionately large amounts of heath -- apparently, to a ghoul, spoiled milk is more nutritious than an entire turkey is to a human.
** The Flesh Golem soul had has the same effect in the previous game, ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaAriaOfSorrow''. It's a kind of [[InvertedTrope inversion]] of ReviveKillsZombie.



** ''Vampire Killer'' had red books that would increase prices in the level's {{Dungeon Shop}}s, the opposite effect of the white books.

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** ''Vampire Killer'' had for the MSX has red books that would increase prices in the level's {{Dungeon Shop}}s, the opposite effect of the white books.



** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'' features "Rupoors", which would somehow ''reduce'' the number of Rupees Link is currently carrying when found. A minor key version of the series' trademark ItemGet fanfare would play when a Rupoor was found, complete with Link holding the item above his head but looking none too pleased about it. One area in the game consists of a maze with Rupoors for walls, requiring Link to walk carefully to avoid them. And to make it more difficult, Keese are flying around the area -- and half of your projectile weapons pick up Rupoors.

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** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'' features "Rupoors", which would somehow ''reduce'' the number of Rupees Link is currently carrying when found. A minor key version of the series' trademark ItemGet fanfare would play plays when a Rupoor was found, complete with Link holding the item above his head but looking none too pleased about it. One area in the game consists of a maze with Rupoors for walls, requiring Link to walk carefully to avoid them. And to make it more difficult, Keese are flying around the area -- and half of your projectile weapons pick up Rupoors.



** In some of the later dungeons in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', there are treasure chests that, upon Link opening them, will either freeze him like a Freezard would do with an ice wind or make a Floormaster fall from the ceiling towards him.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has Purple Chus, which leave behind Purple Chu Jelly when killed. Other types of Chu Jelly are very useful, either restoring a good amount of health or as a Lantern Oil substitute, so Purple Jelly should have a good effect too, right? Wrong, they have a ''random'' effect: while they can heal a random amount of Hearts, they can also ''hurt you'', even taking you down to one Heart. The Nasty Soup, which can be gotten where you get the Lantern, has the same effect. The main purposes of Purple Chus are to make you fight a Chu without getting anything good out of it, or to have them in the same area as useful Chus, forcing you to kill the useful ones and grab their jelly before the purple ones absorb them and take away their useful qualities. In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'', the Poes have the same effect when consumed.

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** In some of the later dungeons in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', there are treasure chests that, upon Link opening them, will either freeze him like a Freezard would do does with an ice wind or make a Floormaster fall from the ceiling towards him.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has Purple Chus, which leave behind Purple Chu Jelly when killed. Other types of Chu Jelly are very useful, either restoring a good amount of health or as a Lantern Oil substitute, so Purple Jelly should have a good effect too, right? Wrong, they have a ''random'' effect: while they can heal a random amount of Hearts, they can also ''hurt you'', even taking you down to one Heart. The Nasty Soup, which can be gotten where you get the Lantern, has the same effect. The main purposes of Purple Chus are to make you fight a Chu without getting anything good out of it, or to have them in the same area as useful Chus, forcing you to kill the useful ones and grab their jelly before the purple ones absorb them and take away their useful qualities. In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'', the Poes have the same effect when consumed.



* The ''{{Superman}}'' game for the NES had this in the form of green and red Kryptonite, which sapped your energy instead of giving it like the blue power crystals.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'''s minibosses tossed one of these when they hit low hp. Since they bounce randomly and cut off your vacuum (touching them shrinks Luigi to about a third of his size and immediately disable the ability to use the vacuum, meaning you WILL lose your grip; plus you lose change and can't open doors), they'd prevent good runs if you were unlucky. In addition, these may pop up out of Heart places when you vacuum them instead of actual hearts.
* ''[[Creator/LJNToys The Uncanny X-Men]]'' had magnets which, if picked up, paralyzed you for a ridiculous amount of time. How long you stay frozen is anyone's guess; you ''will'' die before it wears off.

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* The ''{{Superman}}'' ''Franchise/{{Superman}}'' game for the NES had has this in the form of green and red Kryptonite, which sapped sap your energy instead of giving it like the blue power crystals.
* ''VideoGame/LuigisMansion'''s minibosses tossed toss one of these when they hit low hp. HP. Since they bounce randomly and cut off your vacuum (touching them shrinks Luigi to about a third of his size and immediately disable the ability to use the vacuum, meaning you WILL lose your grip; plus you lose change and can't open doors), they'd they can prevent good runs if you were you're unlucky. In addition, these may pop up out of Heart places when you vacuum them instead of actual hearts.
* ''[[Creator/LJNToys The Uncanny X-Men]]'' had has magnets which, if picked up, paralyzed paralyze you for a ridiculous amount of time. How long you stay frozen is anyone's guess; you ''will'' die before it wears off.



* ''VideoGame/Bomberman64'' and ''VideoGame/Bomberman64TheSecondAttack!'' have "Bomb-Down," "Sandal," and "Fire-Down" items, which lower the amount of bombs you can place, your speed, and the blast radius of your bombs. These also occur throughout the multiplayer modes of most ''Bomberman'' games. ''Bomberman 64'' also featured an "Evil" item, which activated a stage-wide effect potentially affecting all players. Some effects include a tornado, maxing out everyone's bomb count and explosion size, shuffling the positions of all players, and an "evil disco light" that [[InterfaceScrew saturated the screen with bright colours]], making it hard to see the action. They became useful in one specific section of ''The Second Attack!'' which required the player to cross the reactor core of a spaceship. Reducing the Blast Radius to zero was the only way to safely cross the otherwise lethal reactor fluid. At zero radius, ice bombs would not blowback on the player if they were careful.

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* ''VideoGame/Bomberman64'' and ''VideoGame/Bomberman64TheSecondAttack!'' have "Bomb-Down," "Sandal," and "Fire-Down" items, which lower the amount of bombs you can place, your speed, and the blast radius of your bombs.bombs respectively. These also occur throughout the multiplayer modes of most ''Bomberman'' games. ''Bomberman 64'' also featured features an "Evil" item, which activated activates a stage-wide effect potentially affecting all players. Some effects include a tornado, maxing out everyone's bomb count and explosion size, shuffling the positions of all players, and an "evil disco light" that [[InterfaceScrew saturated saturates the screen with bright colours]], making it hard to see the action. They became become useful in one specific section of ''The Second Attack!'' which required requires the player to cross the reactor core of a spaceship. Reducing the Blast Radius to zero was is the only way to safely cross the otherwise lethal reactor fluid. At zero radius, ice bombs would not won't blowback on the player if they were they're careful.



* In ancient Atari 2600 game ''Fast Food'', among the delicacies flying at increasingly high speeds towards your disembodied mouth avatar were green pickles and purple pickles. Green pickles were the most valuable food to devour. Purple pickles made you lose a life.

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* In the ancient Atari 2600 game ''Fast Food'', among the delicacies flying at increasingly high speeds towards your disembodied mouth avatar were are green pickles and purple pickles. Green pickles were are the most valuable food to devour. Purple pickles made make you lose a life.



* In ''{{Gobliiins}}'', many items Dwayne can pick up will harm him and make him lose some of the energy bar. Sometimes, he will ''deliberately strike himself with the object''.

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* In ''{{Gobliiins}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Gobliiins}}'', many items Dwayne can pick up will harm him and make him lose some of the energy bar. Sometimes, he will ''deliberately strike himself with the object''.



* ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIVRogerWilcoAndTheTimeRippers'' comes from a long series where nearly every item you found had a plot-important use. Yet in this game, early on, you can find a piece of Unstable Ordinance. If you keep it in your inventory while moving to the next zone, you explode and die. Your only option was to put it back where you got it from... for which you received praise and points for doing something smart.
* In the Super Nintendo version of ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'', you can pick up a Shuriken. Basically, when you throw it, it arcs upward and comes back around to hit anyone it didn't already... Including you. That's right: A weapon that can kill you when you use it. Considering you could be on a moving platform with enemies flying around you, and you can only strike downwards, it's pretty much the worst weapon you could have in a game like this.

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* ''VideoGame/SpaceQuestIVRogerWilcoAndTheTimeRippers'' comes from a long series where nearly every item you found had has a plot-important use. Yet in this game, early on, you can find a piece of Unstable Ordinance. If you keep it in your inventory while moving to the next zone, you explode and die. Your only option was is to put it back where you got it from... for which you received receive praise and points for doing something smart.
* In the Super Nintendo version of ''VideoGame/DragonsLair'', you can pick up a Shuriken. Basically, when you throw it, it arcs upward and comes back around to hit anyone it didn't already... Including you. That's right: A weapon that can kill you when you use it. Considering you could easily be on a moving platform with enemies flying around you, and you can only strike downwards, it's pretty much the worst weapon you could have in a game like this.



* ''VideoGame/TigerRoad'' had you regain health from gourds. Some gourds cost you health instead of restoring it; these could be identified by one feature -- they were upside-down.

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* ''VideoGame/TigerRoad'' had has you regain health from gourds. Some gourds cost you health instead of restoring it; these could can be identified by one feature -- they were they're upside-down.



** Fake Item Boxes in ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'' and beyond do about the same thing as Poison Mushrooms, whereas the normal item boxes are rainbow-colored or bluish and have a "?" while a fake one will be red and have a "¿". Both blocks look exactly the same from a distance (the fake one changing when you get closer), but most players can avoid them by memorizing where real items boxes should appear. The TropeNamer itself appears in the SNES original. The boxes can also be detected, at least in the DS version, by checking the game map. The fake ones appear different than the regular ones.

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** Fake Item Boxes in ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'' and beyond through ''Mario Kart Wii'' do about the same thing as Poison Mushrooms, whereas the normal item boxes are rainbow-colored or bluish and have a "?" while a fake one will be red and have a "¿". Both blocks look exactly the same from a distance (the fake one changing when you get closer), but most players can avoid them by memorizing where real items boxes should appear. The TropeNamer itself appears in the SNES original. The boxes can also be detected, at least in the DS version, by checking the game map. The fake ones appear different than the regular ones.



* ''VideoGame/CrashTeamRacing'' had green and red potions which served the same purpose as the fake item boxes in Mario Kart, allowing players to create their ''own'' poison mushrooms by planting the potions behind or inside item crates which would respawn and completely hide the trap within. This could be done with [=TNT=] and Nitro crates too, but it required near perfect angle and timing otherwise the trap would be somewhat visible.

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* ''VideoGame/CrashTeamRacing'' had has green and red potions which served serve the same purpose as the fake item boxes in Mario Kart, allowing players to create their ''own'' poison mushrooms by planting the potions behind or inside item crates which would will respawn and completely hide the trap within. This could can be done with [=TNT=] and Nitro crates too, but it required requires near perfect angle and timing otherwise the trap would be is somewhat visible.



** Pinball Mode causes you to bounce off objects at increased speed, causing thousands of damage in the first game and probably wrecking you instantly in the sequel. The best thing you can do is sit motionlessly and hoping nobody would hit you. There is also Bouncy Bouncy (your car jumps every few seconds), Jelly Suspension (your car wobbles and tips over), Jupiter Gravity (good luck getting uphill), and the second game has a ball and chain that attaches to your car and Ethereal Pedestrians (can't run over them, so you can't get extra time on your clock for 30 seconds - oops). The Drugs, Miniature Pedestrians, Turbo Opponents, basic exploding powerups, Hot Rod (speed boost combined with 'wheelie' suspension, great for blasting into a wall at 600 kph), Greased Tires and the various powerups that crumple up your car or make it break in two.
** The second game lets you buy any car you wrecked in a race. This is a good thing unless you end up buying a bad car, wasting all of your money and being worse off. Hint: almost everything you could buy in the early game is worse than your starting car. This becomes a problem near the end, where you ''need'' something very heavy to kill your opponents (who at that point are driving enormous logging trucks and buses with rocket engines) but almost all of the heavy vehicles are either insanely slow, have terrible driveability, get stuck under or between scenery all the time or all of the above. Then there are the racing missions which have the opposite problem: you need to figure out which cars have high speed and good handling.

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** Pinball Mode causes you to bounce off objects at increased speed, causing thousands of damage in the first game and probably wrecking you instantly in the sequel. The best thing you can do is sit motionlessly and hoping nobody would hit hits you. There is also Bouncy Bouncy (your car jumps every few seconds), Jelly Suspension (your car wobbles and tips over), Jupiter Gravity (good luck getting uphill), and the second game has a ball and chain that attaches to your car and Ethereal Pedestrians (can't run over them, so you can't get extra time on your clock for 30 seconds - oops). There's also The Drugs, Miniature Pedestrians, Turbo Opponents, basic exploding powerups, Hot Rod (speed boost combined with 'wheelie' suspension, great for blasting into a wall at 600 kph), Greased Tires and the various powerups that crumple up your car or make it break in two.
** The second game lets you buy any car you wrecked in a race. This is a good thing unless you end up buying a bad car, wasting all of your money and being worse off. Hint: almost everything you could can buy in the early game is worse than your starting car. This becomes a problem near the end, where you ''need'' something very heavy to kill your opponents (who at that point are driving enormous logging trucks and buses with rocket engines) but almost all of the heavy vehicles are either insanely slow, have terrible driveability, handling, get stuck under or between scenery all the time or all of the above. Then there are the racing missions which have the opposite problem: you need to figure out which cars have high speed and good handling.



** The Hammer present in both games and the Golden Hammer in ''Brawl'' both have a chance of being defective and completely harmless, which is a bit problematic when you can't voluntarily get rid of them. It's especially bad in the case of the former, as the head of the hammer falls off, afterwhich it can be used as an extremely powerful throwing weapon, with the most likely target being the defenseless wielder of the broken hammer (Now a useless stick). The Golden Hammer doesn't have such complications, but you can probably buy one in real life: The ''Golden'' Piko Piko Hammer. Complete with the cute squeaky sounds.

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** The Hammer present in both all games and the Golden Hammer in ''Brawl'' and ''SSB4'' both have a chance of being defective and completely harmless, which is a bit problematic when you can't voluntarily get rid of them. It's especially bad in the case of the former, as the head of the hammer falls off, afterwhich after which it can be used as an extremely powerful throwing weapon, with the most likely target being the defenseless wielder of the broken hammer (Now (now a useless stick). The Golden Hammer doesn't have such complications, but you can probably buy one in real life: The ''Golden'' Piko Piko Hammer. Complete with the cute squeaky sounds.Golden ''Squeaky'' Hammer.



** The Stopwatch in ''Brawl'' let your opponents move slowly so you can hit them easier. But there's a chance that all players can be slowed...and also, just you be slowed (one of the Assist Trophies in this game is [[VideoGame/SonicAdventure2 Shadow the Hedgehog]], whose Chaos Control is the same as the Stopwatch, but is guaranteed to slow your opponents down and not you)

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** The Stopwatch in ''Brawl'' let lets your opponents move slowly so you can hit them easier. But there's a chance that all players can be slowed...and also, or just you be slowed (one of the Assist Trophies in this game is [[VideoGame/SonicAdventure2 Shadow the Hedgehog]], whose Chaos Control is the same as the Stopwatch, but is guaranteed to slow your opponents down and not you)slowed.



** The Chocobo runs across the screen randomly jumbling each digit in both your own and your enemy's [[BreakMeter brave meter]], which often results in both players getting either a massive boost or a royal screw-over.

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** The Chocobo runs across the screen screen, randomly jumbling each digit in both your own and your enemy's [[BreakMeter brave meter]], which often results in both players getting either a massive boost or a royal screw-over.



* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' lets you smoke and drink booze. Smoking whittles away at your health, while the booze blurs your screen and sways your view for a time (though it can also heal you). While nothing forces the player to try either booze or cigarettes, the assumption that these droppable items must have some actual ''use'' may draw naive souls in. The Cigarettes can actually ''kill'' JC if he chain-smokes a truely heroic quantity of them; on the order of chain-smoking ten whole packs at once (because each time you smoke, you consume an entire pack, and each pack deals you 10 health damage to the torso). These items (minus the cigarettes) are carried over into the prequel, ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution''.
* ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' features various alcoholic beverages and cigarettes aboard the ships. The booze would mildly heal you at the cost of some of your [[ManaMeter psychic power points,]] and cigarettes would simply take a point off of your HP.

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* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' lets you smoke and drink booze. Smoking whittles away at your health, while the booze blurs your screen and sways your view for a time (though it can also heal you). While nothing forces the player to try either booze or cigarettes, the assumption that these droppable items must have some actual ''use'' may draw naive souls in. The Cigarettes can actually ''kill'' JC if he chain-smokes a truely heroic quantity of them; on the order of chain-smoking ten whole packs at once (because each time you smoke, you consume an entire pack, and each pack deals you 10 health damage to the torso). These items (minus the cigarettes) are Booze is carried over into the prequel, ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution''.
* ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' features various alcoholic beverages and cigarettes aboard the ships. The booze would mildly heal heals you at the cost of some of your [[ManaMeter psychic power points,]] and cigarettes would simply take a point off of your HP.



** The games have poison and Death hiding in treasure chests identical to food and potion chests. It's impossible to tell which is which without opening them. ''Gauntlet II'' had poisoned cider and poisoned blue potions. Shooting either of them would cause enemies to slow down. There was also "IT", which chased down a player and bonded to him or her, causing enemies to follow them. The IT effect persisted throughout the level and can only be mitigated by tagging another player ("Tag, you're IT!"), which simply passed the effect to that player.

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** The games have poison and Death hiding in treasure chests identical to food and potion chests. It's impossible to tell which is which without opening them. ''Gauntlet II'' had has poisoned cider and poisoned blue potions. Shooting either of them would cause causes enemies to slow down. There was There's also "IT", which chased chases down a player and bonded bonds to him or her, causing enemies to follow them. The IT effect persisted persists throughout the level and can only be mitigated by tagging another player ("Tag, you're IT!"), which simply passed passes the effect to that player.



** ''Gauntlet: Dark Legacy'' had green apples (poison fruit that cost a player 50 health) and green drumsticks (poison meat costing 100 health). You could tell if food was poisoned if it was green, had two bones sticking out of it in an "X" and had a bite out of it. Good food (red apples and brown drumsticks) could become poisoned if it got hit with what came out of a green barrel (poison gas).

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** ''Gauntlet: Dark Legacy'' had has green apples (poison fruit that cost a player 50 health) and green drumsticks (poison meat costing 100 health). You could can tell if food was is poisoned if it was it's green, had has two bones sticking out of it in an "X" and had has a bite out of it. Good food (red apples and brown drumsticks) could can become poisoned if it got gets hit with what came comes out of a green barrel (poison gas).



* ''VideoGame/LadyBug'' had skulls scattered around the maze with the dots and other pickups. Running into a skull would lose a life for the player, but skulls were just as deadly to the enemies. There were more skulls on later levels than earlier ones.

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* ''VideoGame/LadyBug'' had has skulls scattered around the maze with the dots and other pickups. Running into a skull would causes the player to lose a life for the player, life, but skulls were are just as deadly to the enemies. There were are more skulls on later levels than earlier ones.



* The ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' series used to have Black Stars (called Ztars in ''Mario Party 5'') which would reduce your number of stars. Bowser loves giving these out. Extra points if you actually paid for them.

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* The ''VideoGame/MarioParty'' series used to have has Black Stars (called Ztars in ''Mario Party 5'') in some of the earlier games, which would reduce your number of stars. Bowser loves giving these out. Extra points if you actually paid for them.



* ''VideoGame/ToeJamAndEarl'' had these in two ways. First was the food that you could pick up to recover energy. Good food included bacon & eggs, cake, and fudge sundaes. Among this good food is bad food, like moldy cheese and fish bones (and a few which look innocuous at first, like the lettuce, which turns out to be old). These would cause you to LOSE energy. The game was also scattered with gift-wrapped presents -- their contents are at first a mystery, but opening a present (or consulting a [[BunnyEarsLawyer wise-man in a carrot suit]]) will identify all presents which have the same wrapping paper. The presents were mostly good, like weapons, 'vehicles', food and money. Others were not so nice -- instant death, bad food, a sleep spell, or the infamous Randomizer, which makes you start the identification process all over again.

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* ''VideoGame/ToeJamAndEarl'' had has these in two ways. First was is the food that you could can pick up to recover energy. Good food included includes bacon & eggs, cake, and fudge sundaes. Among this good food is bad food, like moldy cheese and fish bones (and a few which look innocuous at first, like the lettuce, which turns out to be old). These would cause you to LOSE energy. The game was is also scattered with gift-wrapped presents -- their contents are at first a mystery, but opening a present (or consulting a [[BunnyEarsLawyer wise-man in a carrot suit]]) will identify all presents which have the same wrapping paper. The presents were are mostly good, like weapons, 'vehicles', "vehicles", food and money. Others were are not so nice -- instant death, bad food, a sleep spell, or the infamous Randomizer, which makes you start the identification process all over again.



* ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim 2'' has a weapon known as the BubbleGun, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: It shoots out ''soap bubbles''. Obviously, it's not even remotely useful in trying to defeat enemies. What raises this above a mere PowerupLetdown is that (at least in the Genesis version) there was no way to switch weapons, so you were stuck with the last weapon you picked up until it ran out of ammo. This was a minor annoyance in the first level, where you could just stop and use it up, but a death sentence in the last level, a foot race against Psy-Crow, where you needed a useful weapon to clear away obstacles so you could beat him to the checkpoints, and using up the ammo wasted valuable time you didn't have. Failing to do so resulted in him [[StalkedByTheBell closing the gate behind him]] and triggering an inescapable DeathTrap (If you were ''lucky'' - if you weren't, a glitch would prevent the DeathTrap from firing, leaving you to [[{{Unwinnable}} sit in the now-sealed room until you gave up and reset the system]]). And even in the versions where you ''could'' switch weapons, you usually got the bubble gun at the worst possible moment.

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* ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim 2'' has a weapon known as the BubbleGun, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: It shoots out ''soap bubbles''. Obviously, it's not even remotely useful in trying to defeat enemies. What raises this above a mere PowerupLetdown is that (at least in the Genesis version) there was is no way to switch weapons, so you were you're stuck with the last weapon you picked pick up until it ran runs out of ammo. This was is a minor annoyance in the first level, where you could can just stop and use it up, but a death sentence in the last level, a foot race against Psy-Crow, where you needed need a useful weapon to clear away obstacles so you could can beat him to the checkpoints, and using up the ammo wasted wastes valuable time you didn't don't have. Failing to do so resulted results in him [[StalkedByTheBell closing the gate behind him]] and triggering an inescapable DeathTrap (If you were (if you're ''lucky'' - if you weren't, aren't, a glitch would will prevent the DeathTrap from firing, leaving you to [[{{Unwinnable}} sit in the now-sealed room until you gave give up and reset the system]]). And even in the versions where you ''could'' ''can'' switch weapons, you you'll usually got get the bubble gun at the worst possible moment.



* ''VideoGame/CrystalCaves'' has deadly green poison mushrooms appear in a number of levels. Pick one up, and it's a level restart, regardless of how much health you had left. Unfortunately, they're not the only mushrooms in the game which can be picked up (red ones are an actual powerup, and blue ones are worth a lot of points). Also, since it's a simple PlatformGame, by "picking up" we mean "touching" or even "brushing against ever so slightly".

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* ''VideoGame/CrystalCaves'' has deadly green poison mushrooms appear in a number of levels. Pick one up, and it's a level restart, regardless of how much health you had have left. Unfortunately, they're not the only mushrooms in the game which can be picked up (red ones are an actual powerup, and blue ones are worth a lot of points). Also, since it's a simple PlatformGame, by "picking up" we mean "touching" or even "brushing against ever so slightly".



* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfTheWizard'' had a poison item that was quite obvious, what with having a skull on it and everything. It would drain some of your life - not ''that'' big a deal unless you were badly damaged. The problem is that they're commonly dropped by enemies and can be difficult or impossible to avoid in narrow corridors, forcing you to wait for them to disappear. Graciously, you can walk past them, since the enemies have to [[DeathThrows plummet offscreen Mario-style]] before their spoils appear.

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* ''VideoGame/LegacyOfTheWizard'' had has a poison item that was is quite obvious, what with having a skull on it and everything. It would drain drains some of your life - not ''that'' big a deal unless you were you're badly damaged. The problem is that they're commonly dropped by enemies and can be difficult or impossible to avoid in narrow corridors, forcing you to wait for them to disappear. Graciously, you can walk past them, since the enemies have to [[DeathThrows plummet offscreen Mario-style]] before their spoils appear.



** There is also ''VideoGame/KirbyAirRide'', where hitting someone would put him to sleep too. But you still need a very good luck to hit someone when you can't turn...
** ''Air Ride's'' City trial mode has gray power up items, which reduce the stat they were for instead of raise it. There's also an event that made some power up items turn fake. These had a subtly changed sprite and cause a small amount of damage if you grabbed one.

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** There is also ''VideoGame/KirbyAirRide'', where hitting someone would will put him to sleep too. But you still need a very good luck to hit someone when you can't turn...
** ''Air Ride's'' City trial mode has gray power up items, which reduce the stat they were are for instead of raise it. There's also an event that made makes some power up items turn fake. These had have a subtly changed sprite and cause a small amount of damage if you grabbed grab one.



* ''VideoGame/TheQuestOfKi'', like ''VideoGame/TheTowerOfDruaga'', had one type of item found in chests that would make the level timer run out faster.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Athena}}'', among the items that could randomly drop were flasks of poison which running into would cause Athena's hit points to start draining. This could be countered either before or after by picking up an antidote flask. The harp item, that would let Athena keep her items after dying, had an evil version that instantly took all of them away. In the NES version, the hourglass item that affected the timer also had a broken version that would reduce rather than increase it.

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* ''VideoGame/TheQuestOfKi'', like ''VideoGame/TheTowerOfDruaga'', had has one type of item found in chests that would will make the level timer run out faster.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Athena}}'', among the items that could can randomly drop were are flasks of poison which running into would cause causes Athena's hit points to start draining. This could can be countered either before or after by picking up an antidote flask. The harp item, that would will let Athena keep her items after dying, had has an evil version that instantly took takes all of them away. In the NES version, the hourglass item that affected affects the timer also had has a broken version that would will reduce rather than increase it.



* ''Werewolf: The Last Warrior'' had a blue "W" which would cause you to be BroughtDownToNormal if you were a werewolf (the red "W" powerup effected the inverse transformation) or cause you damage if you were a human.

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* ''Werewolf: The Last Warrior'' had has a blue "W" which would will cause you to be BroughtDownToNormal if you were you're a werewolf (the red "W" powerup effected effects the inverse transformation) or cause you damage if you were you're a human.



* Pacman-like game ''Zoom!'' had a question mark powerup, which could randomly give you points, skip you to the next level, or kill you outright.
* The fairly unimportant '96 ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' clone named ''Twinblok'' had a powerup that temporarily transformed all balls on the field into tennis balls. They turned completely harmless to blocks and the sudden change in their behavior was often lethal, since you were still obligated to keep at least one in play.
** Another ''Breakout'' clone called ''[=MacBrickout=]'' has blocks randomly drop capsules. The majority of the capsules do useful things, such as increase the size of the paddle, allow the ball to stick to the paddle, or giving the player extra balls to juggle. A few, however, would have negative effects, such as shrinking the paddle; the worst was the red "X" capsule which made the paddle useless. And getting too many "paddle expand" capsules would actually cause ''half of the paddle to break off'', so if you're close to the breaking point, even they prove to be Poison Mushrooms.

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* Pacman-like The ''Pac-Man''-like game ''Zoom!'' had has a question mark powerup, which could randomly can either give you points, skip you to the next level, or kill you outright.
* The fairly unimportant '96 ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' clone named ''Twinblok'' had has a powerup that temporarily transformed transforms all balls on the field into tennis balls. They turned turn completely harmless to blocks and the sudden change in their behavior was is often lethal, since you were you're still obligated to keep at least one in play.
** Another ''Breakout'' clone called ''[=MacBrickout=]'' has blocks randomly drop capsules. The majority of the capsules do useful things, such as increase the size of the paddle, allow the ball to stick to the paddle, or giving the player extra balls to juggle. A few, however, would have negative effects, such as shrinking the paddle; the worst was is the red "X" capsule which made makes the paddle useless. And getting too many "paddle expand" capsules would will actually cause ''half of the paddle to break off'', so if you're close to the breaking point, even they prove to be Poison Mushrooms.



** ''[=BeeBop=] II'' had a block that took away your missiles, but had to be hit anyway along with all the other blocks.

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** ''[=BeeBop=] II'' had has a block that took takes away your missiles, but had has to be hit anyway along with all the other blocks.



* The original ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'' had a Potion of Poison, a hallucinogenic potion, and the infamous [[InterfaceScrew "cloak of darkness"]] potion.

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* The original ''VideoGame/{{Rogue}}'' had has a Potion of Poison, a hallucinogenic potion, and the infamous [[InterfaceScrew "cloak of darkness"]] potion.



* ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon: Explorers of Sky'' has the Lookalike items. The first one you'll likely come across (Or''e''n Berries) does the opposite of what it's supposed to do, but there are a few like the Slip Seed which are beneficial. However, the fact that you can throw items at enemies to forcefully apply their effect to them means even the bad items have their uses. Funniest of which is probably the Revi'''s'''er seed, which ''does'' revive the Pokémon... only for them to realize that there's an S instead of a V, upon which they faint again from bursting into spontaneous laughter.

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* ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon: Explorers of Sky'' has the Lookalike items. The first one you'll likely come across (Or''e''n Berries) does the opposite of what it's supposed to do, but there are a few like the Slip Seed which are beneficial. However, the fact that you can throw items at enemies to forcefully apply their effect to them means even the bad items have their uses. Funniest The funniest of which these is probably the the Revi'''s'''er seed, which ''does'' revive the Pokémon... only for them to realize that there's an S instead of a V, upon which they faint again from bursting into spontaneous laughter.



* ''VideoGame/{{Faxanadu}}'' had vials of poison that looked very similar to health potions.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Faxanadu}}'' had has vials of poison that looked look very similar to health potions.



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' has the Tent, an item that normally restores the party's HP and MP to full when used at a save point or on the world map. Tents can also be used in battle for a single character, but there's a random chance that the character would be bit by a snake inside the tent, causing Poison. Blind, and Silence on them. However, [[ViolationOfCommonSense you can also use the Tent on enemies and hope they also get hit by the status ailments, including boss characters.]]

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyIX'' has the Tent, an item that normally restores the party's HP and MP to full when used at a save point or on the world map. Tents can also be used in battle for a single character, but there's a random chance that the character would will be bit by a snake inside the tent, causing Poison. Blind, and Silence on them. However, [[ViolationOfCommonSense you can also use the Tent on enemies and hope they also get hit by the status ailments, including boss characters.]]



** Half the unidentified items are actually cursed items, a bottle that looks like a Potion of Mirror eyes (the protects from petrification) may instead turn you into stone, or an obviously magical sword is cursed to put the character in a permament Berserker state. Or the boots of double-speed, faster than the speed-boots, but causes fatigue and renders the user unable to attack. However, the programmers unintentionally gave a way for savvy players to know what unidentified items are cursed (Hint: even Bards with High Lore can't identify them on the spot). This is a continuation of the classical cursed items from ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' such as the Boots of Dancing, or a Dagger of Lycanthrope Sympathy (instead of killing Werewolves good, they're good at attracting them). Classic cursed items in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' also included weapons and armor that gave AC and to-hit-and-damage ''penalties'' instead of bonuses, such as a -1 sword or a suit of -2 armor. Naturally, once you equipped them, you couldn't take them off or otherwise be rid of them until a mage or cleric could cast a Remove Curse spell on you.

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** Half the unidentified items are actually cursed items, a items. A bottle that looks like a Potion of Mirror eyes (the Eyes (which protects from against petrification) may instead turn you into stone, or an stone. An obviously magical sword is cursed to could put the character in a permament permanent Berserker state. Or Then there's the boots of double-speed, which are faster than the speed-boots, speed boots, but causes cause fatigue and renders render the user unable to attack. However, the programmers unintentionally gave a way for savvy players to know what unidentified items are cursed (Hint: (hint: even Bards with High Lore can't identify them on the spot). This is a continuation of the classical cursed items from ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' such as the Boots of Dancing, or a Dagger of Lycanthrope Sympathy (instead of killing Werewolves good, well, they're good at attracting them). attract them well). Classic cursed items in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' also included include weapons and armor that gave give AC and to-hit-and-damage ''penalties'' instead of bonuses, such as a -1 sword or a suit of -2 armor. Naturally, once you equipped equip them, you couldn't can't take them off or otherwise be rid of them until a mage or cleric could can cast a Remove Curse spell on you.



** The Girdle of [[GenderBender Gender Change]]. Its in-game effects of this were minimal.

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** The Girdle of [[GenderBender Gender Change]]. Its The in-game effects of this were are minimal.



** In ''Book I and II'', you find an Evil Ring in Darm Tower, which drains your health(or kills you instantly in non-TGCD versions) if you equip it and don't also have the Blue Necklace equipped. It is in fact required to rescue Lair later in the tower. Somewhat of a GuideDangIt.

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** In ''Book I and II'', you find an Evil Ring in Darm Tower, which drains your health(or health (or kills you instantly in non-TGCD versions) if you equip it and don't also have the Blue Necklace equipped. It is in fact required to rescue Lair later in the tower. Somewhat of a GuideDangIt.



** Some weapons and armor the later half of the game found in chests are cursed. They usually appear quite powerful, but in reality, they give you lousy stats and cannot be unequipped unless you remove the curse. You can guess the item is cursed by its appearance and their description does warn you shouldn't try equipping it.

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** Some weapons and armor the later half of the game found in chests are cursed. They usually appear quite powerful, but in reality, they give you lousy stats and cannot be unequipped unless you remove the curse. You can guess the item is cursed by its appearance and their the description does warn warning you shouldn't try equipping not to equip it.



** Subverted In VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII [[spoiler: The protagonist can equip cursed items due to his Dragonian linage (Unaffected by curses except those of his own race)]]

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** Subverted In VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII''. [[spoiler: The protagonist can equip cursed items due to his Dragonian linage (Unaffected (he is unaffected by curses except those of his own race)]]race).]]



* Late in ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'', you can fight a rematch with [[QuirkyMinibossSquad Ozzie, Flea, and Slash]]. You can steal some decent equipment from Flea and Slash, but Ozzie yields the Ozzie Pants, which is inexplicably worn on your head. It provides great defense, but puts you in Confusion status at the start of every battle.
* The original ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' had cursed armor, adding a bit of a gamble when you identified magical items. Cursed armor reduced attributes and didn't sell for much money.

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* Late in ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'', you can fight a rematch with [[QuirkyMinibossSquad Ozzie, Flea, and Slash]]. You can steal some decent equipment from Flea and Slash, but Ozzie yields the Ozzie Pants, which is are inexplicably worn on your head. It provides They provide great defense, but puts put you in Confusion status at the start of every battle.
* The original ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' had has cursed armor, adding a bit of a gamble when you identified identify magical items. Cursed armor reduced reduces attributes and didn't doesn't sell for much money.



* An old N64 game called ''Chopper Attack'', featured different bonuses if you blew up a certain base. These bonuses were random, sometimes giving health or ammo. Or other times it was a black box that jumped up and exploded in front of you.
* ''VideoGame/{{Parodius}}'' features an ''!?/OH ('''MY GOD''')!'' "powerup" on the power meter, which nullifies every powerup you have. Well, ''[[AllThereInTheManual ''It's hardly worth being called a power up'']]''. Normally, it's simple to avoid; just don't power up when it's highlighted. But throw in the "powerup roulette" feature that activates by random (though actually specific) power pods, and you'll see its [[ScrappyMechanic true purpose]]. Thankfully in [[UpdatedReRelease Jikkyo Oshaberi Parodius: Forever With Me]] features an option to change the ''!?'' into a slot machine roulette, which not only reduces greatly the chances of getting that dreadful powerup, but also rewards you with upgraded versions of the bell powerups in the game, and also extra lives.

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* An old N64 game called ''Chopper Attack'', featured Attack'' features different bonuses if you blew blow up a certain base. These bonuses were are random, sometimes giving health or ammo. Or other times it was it's a black box that jumped jumps up and exploded explodes in front of you.
* ''VideoGame/{{Parodius}}'' features an ''!?/OH ('''MY GOD''')!'' "powerup" on the power meter, which nullifies every powerup you have. Well, ''[[AllThereInTheManual ''It's "[[AllThereInTheManual It's hardly worth being called a power up'']]''. up]]." Normally, it's simple to avoid; just don't power up when it's highlighted. But throw in the "powerup roulette" feature that activates by random (though actually specific) power pods, and you'll see its [[ScrappyMechanic true purpose]]. Thankfully in [[UpdatedReRelease Thankfully, ''[[UpdatedReRelease Jikkyo Oshaberi Parodius: Forever With Me]] Me]]'' features an option to change the ''!?'' into a slot machine roulette, which not only reduces greatly the chances of getting that dreadful powerup, but also rewards you with upgraded versions of the bell powerups in the game, and also extra lives.



*** Money thieves occur from time to time. If you get three blue ones, the money thieved explode into even more money when killed than they normally do.
*** Three green ones causes a multiplier to spawn at the beginning of meteorstorms, one of the more common bonus rounds.
*** Three red skulls will cause a gem counter to be added to the interface. you can make it permanent by playing 5000 levels total, though that may be overkill for such a minor detail.
*** A red, then green, then blue in order drastically upgrades your speed, and will also upgrade your weapon to super triple if it's lower than that.
** Far worse than skulls are weapon powerups, which can change your weapon to either single(you will lose if you pick up this one past level [=XX25=](they cycle, every 100th level is the same but a bit faster)), double, triple(the normal kind, not super triple) or quadruple(this one's kind of rare, and doesn't suck so much). There isn't much of a problem on undeveloped accounts(in this game, achievements unlock significant, permanent bonuses) but on higher levels and/or highly developed accounts, this can suck because your weapons are far better than those. Heck, some achievements allow you to START OUT with quadruple or super triple.

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*** Money thieves occur from time to time. If you get three blue ones, the money thieved thieves explode into even more money when killed than they normally do.
*** Three green ones causes cause a multiplier to spawn at the beginning of meteorstorms, meteor storms, one of the more common bonus rounds.
*** Three red skulls will cause a gem counter to be added to the interface. you You can make it permanent by playing 5000 levels total, though that may be overkill for such a minor detail.
*** A red, then green, then blue blue, in order order, drastically upgrades your speed, and will also upgrade your weapon to super triple if it's lower than that.
** Far worse than skulls are weapon powerups, which can change your weapon to either single(you will lose if you pick up this one past level [=XX25=](they [=XX25=] (they cycle, every 100th level is the same but a bit faster)), faster), double, triple(the triple (the normal kind, not super triple) or quadruple(this quadruple (this one's kind of rare, and doesn't suck so much). There isn't much of a problem on undeveloped accounts(in accounts (in this game, achievements unlock significant, permanent bonuses) bonuses), but on higher levels and/or highly developed accounts, this can suck because your weapons are far better than those. Heck, some achievements allow you to START OUT with quadruple or super triple.



* The {{UsefulNotes/MSX}} version of ''VideoGame/TwinBee'' had a black bell that would kill you if you tried to collect it. Most later ''[=TwinBee=]'' games used the black bell as a Speed Down.
* ''VideoGame/KingsKnight'' had up arrows that acted as health restoration items. The landscape was also littered with down arrows, which ''decreased'' your life force, and grabbing one while your health was low would kill you.
* ''VideoGame/The3DBattlesOfWorldRunner'' had literal poison mushrooms. Items could be made to drop by bumping into columns, and mushrooms were the one bad kind of item.
* ''Battlemania''[=/=]''Trouble Shooter'' on the Genesis had a Speed Down item. They usually appeared in levels where slower speed was necessary for survival, though.

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* The {{UsefulNotes/MSX}} version of ''VideoGame/TwinBee'' had has a black bell that would will kill you if you tried try to collect it. Most later ''[=TwinBee=]'' games used use the black bell as a Speed Down.
* ''VideoGame/KingsKnight'' had has up arrows that acted act as health restoration items. The landscape was is also littered with down arrows, which ''decreased'' ''decrease'' your life force, and grabbing one while your health was is low would will kill you.
* ''VideoGame/The3DBattlesOfWorldRunner'' had has literal poison mushrooms. Items could can be made to drop by bumping into columns, and mushrooms were are the one bad kind of item.
* ''Battlemania''[=/=]''Trouble Shooter'' on the Genesis had has a Speed Down item. They usually appeared appear in levels where slower speed was is necessary for survival, though.



** When you recover your inventory after being tortured in the first ''MGS'', it has a TimeBomb in it that you must discard before it explodes. Another bomb can be picked up while searching for the keycard in the drainage ditch. This is a carryover from the original ''Metal Gear'': When you recover your inventory after being captured then, a transponder is hidden in your equipment. Until you notice and discard it, enemies will be waiting for you at each new screen you entered.

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** When As a CallBack to the first ''Metal Gear'', when you recover your inventory after being tortured in the first ''MGS'', ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid'', it has a TimeBomb in it that you must discard before it explodes. Another bomb can be picked up while searching for the keycard in the drainage ditch. This is a carryover from the original ''Metal Gear'': When you recover your inventory after being captured then, a transponder is hidden in your equipment. Until you notice and discard it, enemies will be waiting for you at each new screen you entered.



* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic 2'' has the Tax Lien (Makes you lose gold every day), the Hideous Mask (Monsters will never join you), and the Fizbin of Misfortune (Ruins your morale). You can see them on the map and avoid them, but sometimes you'd find them in treasure chests with no warning. The Fizbin is at least as old as ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic 3'' (not the "Heroes of" strategy series, but the [=RPGs=]), where it doubled shop prices. It also eradicates you in the Slithercult Saloon if you have it in your inventory and try one of the slot machines. However, with it you can take a treasure hoard you couldn't otherwise.

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* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic 2'' has the Tax Lien (Makes (makes you lose gold every day), the Hideous Mask (Monsters (monsters will never join you), and the Fizbin of Misfortune (Ruins (ruins your morale). You can see them on the map and avoid them, but sometimes you'd you'll find them in treasure chests with no warning. The Fizbin is at least as old as ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic 3'' (not the "Heroes of" strategy series, but the [=RPGs=]), where it doubled doubles shop prices. It also eradicates you in the Slithercult Saloon if you have it in your inventory and try one of the slot machines. However, with it you can take a treasure hoard you couldn't can't otherwise.



* In the game ''WayOfTheSamurai 2'', the rice ball restores 200 HP, the ''rotten'' rice ball costs you 200 (it can't kill you, but it does come very unpleasant in the middle of a heated battle). The difference? Color and description, but who would read it in a battle? Furthermore, most thugs drop this and the real variety. The safer alternative is to just go for better health item, such as the (so-described non-perishable) dried fish, yum.

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* In the game ''WayOfTheSamurai ''VideoGame/WayOfTheSamurai 2'', the rice ball restores 200 HP, the ''rotten'' rice ball costs you 200 (it can't kill you, but it does come very unpleasant in the middle of a heated battle). The difference? Color and description, but who would read it in a battle? Furthermore, most thugs drop this and the real variety. The safer alternative is to just go for better health item, such as the (so-described non-perishable) dried fish, yum.



* The 2005 remake of ''VideoGame/{{NARC}}'' also has a few somewhat useless drugs, Ludes reveals which persons are enemies and which ones aren't, another drug just zooms in and shows you close-ups of enemies for a few seconds, and Weed just slows you down, and your character will get addictions from all of them, though they're less severe than the addictions you get form the more useful drugs like Crack and Ecstasy.

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* The 2005 remake of ''VideoGame/{{NARC}}'' also has a few somewhat useless drugs, drugs. Ludes reveals which persons are enemies and which ones aren't, another drug just zooms in and shows you close-ups of enemies for a few seconds, and Weed just slows you down, and your down. Your character will get addictions from all of them, though they're less severe than the addictions you get form the more useful drugs like Crack and Ecstasy.



** Lava Golem and Volcanic Queen as well, both of them have high ATK and are played on your opponents field rather than yours, but inflict 1000 damage to the controller on their standby and end phase, respectively. They did have a plus-side for your opponent, though. Despite the negative effects, they are still 3000 ATK and 2500 ATK monsters respectively. There also exists a monster called Ameba that causes 2000 points of damage if you use another card such as Creature Swap to give control of it to your opponent. There also is an equip card called Vengeful Servant that gives any monster equipped with it a similar effect. Even better is Number 30: Acid Golem of Destruction, which has 3000 attack and is extremely easy to summon but at the cost of only being able to attack for a few turns making you take 2000 damage per turn after that and making you unable special summon, so a good way to use it is to give control of it to the opponent with another card after the turns it can attack run out, making it play a similar role as Lava golem, but worse. Lava golem's main advantage over this is that you sacrifice your opponent's monsters to summon it instead of your own.

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** Lava Golem and Volcanic Queen as well, both well. Both of them have high ATK and are played on your opponents field rather than yours, but inflict 1000 damage to the controller on their standby and end phase, respectively. They did do have a plus-side for your opponent, though. Despite the negative effects, they are still 3000 ATK and 2500 ATK monsters respectively. There also exists a monster called Ameba that causes 2000 points of damage if you use another card such as Creature Swap to give control of it to your opponent. There also is an equip card called Vengeful Servant that gives any monster equipped with it a similar effect. Even better is Number 30: Acid Golem of Destruction, which has 3000 attack and is extremely easy to summon but at the cost of only being able to attack for a few turns turns, making you take 2000 damage per turn after that that, and making you unable to special summon, so a good way to use it is to give control of it to the opponent with another card after the turns it can attack run out, making it play a similar role as Lava golem, Golem, but worse. Lava golem's Golem's main advantage over this is that you sacrifice your opponent's monsters to summon it instead of your own.



** Another strategy that uses this trope centers around the cards [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Nurse_Reficule_the_Fallen_One Nurse Reficule the Fallen One]] and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Bad_Reaction_to_Simochi Bad Reaction to Simochi.]] When either of these two cards are on your side of the field, any effect that would heal the opponent's life points will damage them instead, so you can pack your deck with cards that heal your opponent and use them to rapidly burn your opponent's life points.

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** Another strategy that uses this trope centers around the cards [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Nurse_Reficule_the_Fallen_One Nurse Reficule the Fallen One]] and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Bad_Reaction_to_Simochi Bad Reaction to Simochi.]] When either of these two cards are on your side of the field, any effect that would otherwise heal the opponent's life points will damage them instead, so you can pack your deck with cards that heal your opponent and use them to rapidly burn your opponent's life points.



** Several campaigns feature poison found in a treasure haul, in addition to your regular potions. Characters that drank it suffered anything from hit point damage to outright death if they failed their saving throw.
** Classic cursed items in ''D&D'' include weapons and armor that gave AC and to-hit-and-damage ''penalties'' instead of bonuses, such as a -1 sword or a suit of -2 armor. Naturally, once you equipped them, you couldn't take them off or otherwise be rid of them until a mage or cleric could cast a Remove Curse, Dispel Evil or other such spell on you. Not to speak of the various other major cursed items you could run across (see ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' above for more examples).

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** Several campaigns feature poison found in a treasure haul, in addition to your regular potions. Characters that drank drink it suffered suffer anything from hit point damage to outright death if they failed fail their saving throw.
** Classic cursed items in ''D&D'' include weapons and armor that gave AC and to-hit-and-damage ''penalties'' instead of bonuses, such as a -1 sword or a suit of -2 armor. Naturally, once you equipped equip them, you couldn't can't take them off or otherwise be rid of them until a mage or cleric could can cast a Remove Curse, Dispel Evil or other such spell on you. Not to speak of the various other major cursed items you could can run across (see ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' above for more examples).



** The ''Go To Jail'' cards play this straight early on, then is considered to be subverted later in the game (especially when houses and hotels come into play, as it delays the possibilities of you running into a fully developed property). Unless someone owns two of the three areas immediately after the Jail square (in which it is played straight again).
* In the 6th edition of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', there were mysterious objectives which could contain a shield, AntiAir: They could also be ''booby trapped'', thus damaging your troops. Worse, these objectives could cause damage multiple times. There also were mysterious forests, which usually had fairly helpful effects, but they could also contain a nest of psychic-eating killer bugs which attacked absolutely every psychic model on the field. The Grey Knights, an army entirely composed of psychics, could reasonably count to lose half its troops just due to this one mishap. That's the reason why these things were removed in the next edition.

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** The ''Go To Jail'' cards play this straight early on, then is are considered to be subverted later in the game (especially when houses and hotels come into play, as it delays the possibilities of you running into a fully developed property). Unless someone owns two of the three areas immediately after the Jail square (in which it is played straight again).
* In the 6th edition of ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'', there were are mysterious objectives which could can contain a shield, AntiAir: They could can also be ''booby trapped'', thus damaging your troops. Worse, these objectives could can cause damage multiple times. There also were are mysterious forests, which usually had have fairly helpful effects, but they could can also contain a nest of psychic-eating killer bugs which attacked attack absolutely every psychic model on the field. The Grey Knights, an army entirely composed of psychics, could can reasonably count to lose half its troops just due to this one mishap. That's the reason why these things were removed in the next edition.
26th Nov '17 11:05:31 PM Sabrewing
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Added DiffLines:

** Also in the first ''Metal Gear'', when you recover your inventory after being captured, there is a Transmitter slipped in that will instantly alert every screen of enemies until you dispose of it.
19th Nov '17 6:52:09 PM MegaMarioMan
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** ''VideoGame/MarioKartWii'' has a storm cloud item. It floats over your head, charging up lightning. If you don't give it away by hitting somebody else in time, it will electrocute and shrink you.

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** ''VideoGame/MarioKartWii'' has a storm cloud item. It floats over and the ''Arcade GP'' series play with this via the Thunder Cloud. When you get it, it automatically gets used. While it's active, your head, charging up lightning. If speed increases, and you don't give can drive offroad with no penalty to speed. However, it away by hitting somebody else in time, it will electrocute and shrink you.eventually strikes you with lightning, shrinking you like a regular lightning bolt... unless you [[HotPotato ram your kart into someone else's, forcing them to deal with it]].



* In ''VideoGame/SyobonAction'', you will die if you touch anything that looks like a ''SuperMarioBros'' powerup (not only the Poison Mushroom). On the one hand, this means you should take care not to hit certain blocks (and yes, some of them are {{Invisible Block}}s) from underneath, because you'll need to jump on them when they don't have a lethal item sitting on them. On the other hand, some of the game's puzzles are solved by feeding these items to enemies.

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* In ''VideoGame/SyobonAction'', you will die if you touch anything that looks like a ''SuperMarioBros'' ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' powerup (not only the Poison Mushroom). On the one hand, this means you should take care not to hit certain blocks (and yes, some of them are {{Invisible Block}}s) from underneath, because you'll need to jump on them when they don't have a lethal item sitting on them. On the other hand, some of the game's puzzles are solved by feeding these items to enemies.



* ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' lets you equip some badges that have a negative effect on you, allowing you to make the game more challenging if you wish. Unlike the normal badges, they don't require any badge points. It and its sequel also have some recipe items that sometimes have adverse effects (such as negative status or damage). Additionally, in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', Mario can get 3 Poison Mushroom cards, which give him an array of nasty effects.

to:

* ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' lets ''VideoGame/PaperMario'':
** [[VideoGame/PaperMario64 The first]] [[VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor 2 games]] let
you equip some badges that have a negative effect on you, allowing you to make the game more challenging if you wish. Unlike the normal badges, they don't require any badge points. It and its sequel
** They
also have some recipe items that sometimes have adverse effects (such as negative status or damage). Additionally, damage).
** The [[http://www.mariowiki.com/Mystery_Box_(item) Mystery (Box)]]
in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', the first 2 games can have good effects, like healing Mario or damaging the enemies, but there are a few bad effects, like an actual Poison Mushroom or a rock that hurts Mario.
** In ''The Thousand Year Door'',
Mario can get 3 Poison Mushroom cards, which give him an array of nasty effects.effects.
** ''VideoGame/SuperPaperMario'' has actual poison mushrooms that you can hold onto. They're mainly useful for recipes.
** ''TTYD'' and ''Super'' both have [[http://www.mariowiki.com/Trial_Stew Trial Stew]]. In the former game, it [[HPToOne takes all but 1 HP from Mario and his partner]], and takes away all of his [[{{Mana}} FP]], but fill his Star Power and triples Star Power gain for a limited time. In the latter game, it still takes away all but 1 HP from the character, but gives you XP equal to the amount of health you lost multiplied by 100.
10th Nov '17 6:55:07 AM case
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Rhythm Game]]
* VideoGame/SuperBeatSports: One of the items in Buddy Ball is a Bomb, which immediately takes away a heart from any player who hits it.
[[/folder]]
8th Nov '17 8:46:20 PM MyFinalEdits
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** In some of the later dungeons in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'', there are treasure chests that, upon Link opening them, will either freeze him like a Freezard would do with an ice wind or make a Floormaster fall from the ceiling towards him.



* An old ''Series/TheAddamsFamily'' game, ''Fester's Quest'' for the NES, had red power downs for your gun and whip, as well as the blue powerups.

to:

* An old ''Series/TheAddamsFamily'' game, ''Fester's Quest'' for the NES, had has red power downs for your gun and whip, as well as the blue powerups.



* The "Sleep" ability in ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' is absolutely useless; it puts Kirby to sleep, for approximately 5-10 seconds, leaving you vulnerable to any sort of enemy attacks.
** ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'' actually uses the ability as part of a challenge during "The Great Cave Offensive": one room has a number of Sleep powerup spots, a wind blowing towards the entrance, and a treasure at the far end. The trick is to get to the treasure without hitting a Sleep powerup, which will cause Kirby to fall asleep and be blown back to the entrance.

to:

* ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'':
**
The "Sleep" ability in ''VideoGame/{{Kirby}}'' is absolutely useless; it puts Kirby to sleep, for approximately 5-10 seconds, leaving you vulnerable to any sort of enemy attacks.
**
attacks. ''VideoGame/KirbySuperStar'' actually uses the ability as part of a challenge during "The Great Cave Offensive": one room has a number of Sleep powerup spots, a wind blowing towards the entrance, and a treasure at the far end. The trick is to get to the treasure without hitting a Sleep powerup, which will cause Kirby to fall asleep and be blown back to the entrance.



*** ''Air Ride's'' City trial mode had gray power up items, which reduce the stat they were for instead of raise it. There's also an event that made some power up items turn fake. These had a subtly changed sprite and cause a small amount of damage if you grabbed one.

to:

*** ** ''Air Ride's'' City trial mode had has gray power up items, which reduce the stat they were for instead of raise it. There's also an event that made some power up items turn fake. These had a subtly changed sprite and cause a small amount of damage if you grabbed one.



* ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarisaLand'' has the blue mushroom, which turns Marisa into a Yukkuri. In this form, she can very easily spin out of control, and whatever form she was in before is lost. Similarly, there's the UFO Suit, which is slow and reverts back to small Marisa after a short time. While these powerups have their uses, they more often than not exist to make life difficult for the player.

to:

* ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarisaLand'' ''VideoGame/NewSuperMarisaLand'':
** The game
has the blue mushroom, which turns Marisa into a Yukkuri. In this form, she can very easily spin out of control, and whatever form she was in before is lost. Similarly, there's the UFO Suit, which is slow and reverts back to small Marisa after a short time. While these powerups have their uses, they more often than not exist to make life difficult for the player.



* In ''VideoGame/AlexKidd in Miracle World'', some blocks contain a GrimReaper that homes in on and kills you.
** Ignoring the "?" he spawns in will often shift him to another one later in the level. The one he shifts to if ignored normally contains a powerup or even an extra life, so it's in your best interests to "risk" him at the first opportunity and try to escape or glitch him out of existence.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/AlexKidd in Miracle World'', some blocks contain a GrimReaper that homes in on and kills you.
**
you. Ignoring the "?" he spawns in will often shift him to another one later in the level. The one he shifts to if ignored normally contains a powerup or even an extra life, so it's in your best interests to "risk" him at the first opportunity and try to escape or glitch him out of existence.



* ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon: Explorers of Sky'' has the Lookalike items. The first one you'll likely come across (Or''e''n Berries) does the opposite of what it's supposed to do, but there are a few like the Slip Seed which are beneficial. However, the fact that you can throw items at enemies to forcefully apply their effect to them means even the bad items have their uses.
** Funniest of which is probably the Revi'''s'''er seed, which ''does'' revive the Pokémon... only for them to realize that there's an S instead of a V, upon which they faint again from bursting into spontaneous laughter.
* ''VideoGame/DungeonsOfDredmor'' has the "Potion of Replenishment" with the description that says it will replenish your health and mana. It also has the "Potion of Repunishment" with the description that says it will repunish your health and mana. The rest of the descriptions and image are identical.
** There's also a literal example with the Mud Wen. Most other MagicMushroom will give a buff or recover HP or MP, but the Mud Wen is just poisonous. Since you can use ItemCrafting to craft poison arrows and bombs, it's still useful.

to:

* ''VideoGame/PokemonMysteryDungeon: Explorers of Sky'' has the Lookalike items. The first one you'll likely come across (Or''e''n Berries) does the opposite of what it's supposed to do, but there are a few like the Slip Seed which are beneficial. However, the fact that you can throw items at enemies to forcefully apply their effect to them means even the bad items have their uses.
**
uses. Funniest of which is probably the Revi'''s'''er seed, which ''does'' revive the Pokémon... only for them to realize that there's an S instead of a V, upon which they faint again from bursting into spontaneous laughter.
* ''VideoGame/DungeonsOfDredmor'' has the "Potion of Replenishment" with the description that says it will replenish your health and mana. It also has the "Potion of Repunishment" with the description that says it will repunish your health and mana. The rest of the descriptions and image are identical.
**
identical. There's also a literal example with the Mud Wen. Most other MagicMushroom will give a buff or recover HP or MP, but the Mud Wen is just poisonous. Since you can use ItemCrafting to craft poison arrows and bombs, it's still useful.



* ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' lets you equip some badges that have a negative effect on you, allowing you to make the game more challenging if you wish. Unlike the normal badges, they don't require any badge points.
** It and its sequel also had some recipe items that sometimes had adverse effects (such as negative status or damage). Additionally, in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', Mario could get 3 Poison Mushroom cards, which would give him an array of nasty effects.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' had some equipment that gave godly stat boosts, but the trade off was forever status ailments (depending on what it caused) until you took the item off.
** These have been around in previous ''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games. The ''Thorn Crown'' (found in 5 and 6) was a very strong headgear but caused a slow loss of {{Hit Point}}s, the ''Bone Mail'' (found in 5) was incredibly powerful armor but made you undead, [[ReviveKillsZombie which made magical healing hurt you instead]]. Another one was the sword Excalipoor (found in 5, used by a [[SummonMagic summon]] in 8) which made all your attacks do only one point of damage. And then there is the ''Cursed Shield'' (found in 6) which was very bad, but transformed into an incredibly good shield if you kept it equipped for 255 battles.

to:

* ''VideoGame/PaperMario'' lets you equip some badges that have a negative effect on you, allowing you to make the game more challenging if you wish. Unlike the normal badges, they don't require any badge points.
**
points. It and its sequel also had have some recipe items that sometimes had have adverse effects (such as negative status or damage). Additionally, in ''VideoGame/PaperMarioTheThousandYearDoor'', Mario could can get 3 Poison Mushroom cards, which would give him an array of nasty effects.
* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyXII'' had some equipment that gave godly stat boosts, but the trade off was forever status ailments (depending on what it caused) until you took the item off.
** These have been around in previous
''Franchise/FinalFantasy'' games. has some equipment that gives godly stat boosts, but the trade off is forever status ailments (depending on what it causes) until you take the item off. The ''Thorn Crown'' (found in 5 and 6) was is a very strong headgear but caused causes a slow loss of {{Hit Point}}s, the ''Bone Mail'' (found in 5) was is incredibly powerful armor but made makes you undead, [[ReviveKillsZombie which made and thus makes magical healing hurt you instead]]. Another one was is the sword Excalipoor (found in 5, used by a [[SummonMagic summon]] in 8) which made makes all your attacks do only one point of damage. And then there is the ''Cursed Shield'' (found in 6) which was is very bad, but transformed transforms into an incredibly good shield if you kept keep it equipped for 255 battles.



* In ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', there's an item called Fresh Milk that will restore 80 HP, but after only about a minute it turns into Spoiled Milk, which barely recovers anything. However, after about ten or fifteen minutes the Spoiled Milk will turn into Yogurt, restoring the 80 HP-recovery ability.
** Similarly, the game gives you Eggs, which are okay healing items. Hop into a hot spring with an egg and it becomes a Fried Egg, which is even better. But if you don't, Eggs will eventually hatch into useless Chicks, which grow up into useless Chickens (though at least Chickens can be sold for more than Eggs are worth.)

to:

* In ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', there's an item called Fresh Milk that will restore 80 HP, but after only about a minute it turns into Spoiled Milk, which barely recovers anything. However, after about ten or fifteen minutes the Spoiled Milk will turn into Yogurt, restoring the 80 HP-recovery ability.
** Similarly, the
ability. The game also gives you Eggs, which are okay healing items. Hop into a hot spring with an egg and it becomes a Fried Egg, which is even better. But if you don't, Eggs will eventually hatch into useless Chicks, which grow up into useless Chickens (though at least Chickens can be sold for more than Eggs are worth.)



* In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series, half the unidentified items are actually cursed items, a bottle that looks like a Potion of Mirror eyes (the protects from petrification) may instead turn you into stone, or an obviously magical sword is cursed to put the character in a permament Berserker state. Or the boots of double-speed, faster than the speed-boots, but causes fatigue and renders the user unable to attack. However, the programmers unintentionally gave a way for savvy players to know what unidentified items are cursed (Hint: even Bards with High Lore can't identify them on the spot)
** Which is a continuation of the classical cursed items from ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' such as the Boots of Dancing, or a Dagger of Lycanthrope Sympathy (instead of killing Werewolves good, they're good at attracting them).
*** Classic cursed items in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' also included weapons and armor that gave AC and to-hit-and-damage ''penalties'' instead of bonuses, such as a -1 sword or a suit of -2 armor. Naturally, once you equipped them, you couldn't take them off or otherwise be rid of them until a mage or cleric could cast a Remove Curse spell on you.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'' series, half series:
** Half
the unidentified items are actually cursed items, a bottle that looks like a Potion of Mirror eyes (the protects from petrification) may instead turn you into stone, or an obviously magical sword is cursed to put the character in a permament Berserker state. Or the boots of double-speed, faster than the speed-boots, but causes fatigue and renders the user unable to attack. However, the programmers unintentionally gave a way for savvy players to know what unidentified items are cursed (Hint: even Bards with High Lore can't identify them on the spot)
** Which
spot). This is a continuation of the classical cursed items from ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' such as the Boots of Dancing, or a Dagger of Lycanthrope Sympathy (instead of killing Werewolves good, they're good at attracting them).
***
them). Classic cursed items in ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' also included weapons and armor that gave AC and to-hit-and-damage ''penalties'' instead of bonuses, such as a -1 sword or a suit of -2 armor. Naturally, once you equipped them, you couldn't take them off or otherwise be rid of them until a mage or cleric could cast a Remove Curse spell on you.



*** ''[[HealingShiv At least you can heal your ally by swinging Vampire's Revenge toward them.]]''
** And who could forget the [[NightmareFuel Girdle of]] [[GenderBender Gender Change]]? Sadly the in-game effects of this were minimal.
* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' brings us the Red Skull pin, which slows down Neku's movement in battle. What the hell is the point of this pin, and why can't we sell it? Well, one mission revolves around [[spoiler:making this pin the next big thing, and to make it so you have to wear it in battle until the Gatito brand becomes #1 on the Scramble Crossing trend charts.]] And then plot-wise, this pin has a much worse effect: [[spoiler:during Kitaniji's [[AssimilationPlot super happy fun brainwashing time]], anyone wearing it but not the black Player Pin goes into [[MadnessMantra "To right the countless wrongs of our day"]] mode.]]
** It also has an unintentional amusing GoodBadBug use: by equipping it and then getting swarmed by tadpole enemies that also slow you down, Neku's speed loops around to negative, causing him moonwalk backwards away from where you point the stylus.
* In ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} Book I and II'', you find an Evil Ring in Darm Tower, which drains your health(or kills you instantly in non-TGCD versions) if you equip it and don't also have the Blue Necklace equipped. It is in fact required to rescue Lair later in the tower. Somewhat of a GuideDangIt.

to:

*** ''[[HealingShiv At least you can heal your ally by swinging Vampire's Revenge toward them.]]''
** And who could forget the [[NightmareFuel The Girdle of]] of [[GenderBender Gender Change]]? Sadly the Change]]. Its in-game effects of this were minimal.
* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' brings us the Red Skull pin, which slows down Neku's movement in battle. What the hell is the point of this pin, and why can't we sell it? Well, one mission revolves around [[spoiler:making this pin the next big thing, and to make it so you have to wear it in battle until the Gatito brand becomes #1 on the Scramble Crossing trend charts.]] And then plot-wise, this pin has a much worse effect: [[spoiler:during Kitaniji's [[AssimilationPlot super happy fun brainwashing time]], anyone wearing it but not the black Player Pin goes into [[MadnessMantra "To right the countless wrongs of our day"]] mode.]]
**
]] It also has an unintentional amusing GoodBadBug use: by equipping it and then getting swarmed by tadpole enemies that also slow you down, Neku's speed loops around to negative, causing him moonwalk backwards away from where you point the stylus.
* ''VideoGame/{{Ys}}'':
**
In ''VideoGame/{{Ys}} Book ''Book I and II'', you find an Evil Ring in Darm Tower, which drains your health(or kills you instantly in non-TGCD versions) if you equip it and don't also have the Blue Necklace equipped. It is in fact required to rescue Lair later in the tower. Somewhat of a GuideDangIt.



** ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' has fake chests that, upon opening, "punch" you and drain your HP or SP. Pretty scary if you're not expecting it. These chests are not present in [[UpdatedRerelease the Vita remake]].

to:

** * ''VideoGame/{{Persona 4}}'' has fake chests that, upon opening, "punch" you and drain your HP or SP. Pretty scary if you're not expecting it. These chests are not present in [[UpdatedRerelease the Vita remake]].



* In ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean'', many item magnus undergo spoilage, resulting in what are usually very poor attack magnus. One particularly devious example, which you might not even see if you go straight to the end of the game as quickly as possible, is Yesterday's Wine. Deluxe Red Wine is a fairly decent healing item (though it gets outclassed later in the game), but after 24 hours (yes, of playing), it becomes Yesterday's Wine, which just gives you a Headache.
** Oh, and just for bonus points, you ''need' to get each and every one of these for HundredPercentCompletion. Be careful not to use them by mistake.
** However, items in Baten Kaitos can be used on both allies and enemies. This means that if your healing magnus spoils and turns harmful, you can simply use it on your enemies to damage them. Think of it as a card's purpose changing over time.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/BatenKaitos: Eternal Wings and the Lost Ocean'', many item magnus undergo spoilage, resulting in what are usually very poor attack magnus. One particularly devious example, which you might not even see if you go straight to the end of the game as quickly as possible, is Yesterday's Wine. Deluxe Red Wine is a fairly decent healing item (though it gets outclassed later in the game), but after 24 hours (yes, of playing), it becomes Yesterday's Wine, which just gives you a Headache.
** Oh, and just for bonus points,
Headache. And you ''need' to get each and every one of these for HundredPercentCompletion. Be careful not to use them by mistake.
** However, items in Baten Kaitos can be used on both allies and enemies. This means that if your healing magnus spoils and turns harmful, you can simply use it on your enemies to damage them. Think of it as a card's purpose changing over time.
mistake.



* The chests left by defeated enemies in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' may hold helpful supplies and other goodies. Then again they may only contain a booby trap, which can really mess you up. When you get a 'fake chest' which [[OneHitKill splatters]] the Girl and the Sprite and sends the Hero screaming like a little girl all the way to the nearest inn, you may decide to stop opening those things.
** There is a way to avoid this - the Identify spell (on the Girl's list of Jinn spells) disarms all traps. Of course, [[GuideDangIt it's only mentioned in one obscure spot]].
* A recurring trope in the ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' series. Some weapons and armor the later half of the game found in chests are cursed. They usually appear quite powerful, but in reality, they give you lousy stats and cannot be unequipped unless you remove the curse. You can guess the item is cursed by its appearance and their description does warn you shouldn't try equipping it.

to:

* The chests left by defeated enemies in ''VideoGame/SecretOfMana'' may hold helpful supplies and other goodies. Then again they may only contain a booby trap, which can really mess you up. When you get a 'fake chest' which [[OneHitKill splatters]] the Girl and the Sprite and sends the Hero screaming like a little girl all the way to the nearest inn, you may decide to stop opening those things.
**
things. There is a way to avoid this - the Identify spell (on the Girl's list of Jinn spells) disarms all traps. Of course, [[GuideDangIt it's only mentioned in one obscure spot]].
* A recurring trope in the ''VideoGame/DragonQuest'' series. series.
**
Some weapons and armor the later half of the game found in chests are cursed. They usually appear quite powerful, but in reality, they give you lousy stats and cannot be unequipped unless you remove the curse. You can guess the item is cursed by its appearance and their description does warn you shouldn't try equipping it.



*** Subverted In VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII [[spoiler: The protagonist can equip cursed items due to his Dragonian linage (Unaffected by curses except those of his own race)]]

to:

*** ** Subverted In VideoGame/DragonQuestVIII [[spoiler: The protagonist can equip cursed items due to his Dragonian linage (Unaffected by curses except those of his own race)]]



* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' DLC ''Mothership Zeta'' has the Alien Biogel, which restores 24 HP with the side effect of "Biochemical Anomalies"([[StandardStatusEffects random status effects]]). Elliot Tercorien can convert it into Adapted Biogel, which restores a lot more HP, but still has the side effects.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' 3}}'':
** The
DLC ''Mothership Zeta'' has the Alien Biogel, which restores 24 HP with the side effect of "Biochemical Anomalies"([[StandardStatusEffects random status effects]]). Elliot Tercorien can convert it into Adapted Biogel, which restores a lot more HP, but still has the side effects.



* In the ''VideoGame/MonsterHunter'' series, prior to starting a quest in a zone, the player character can eat a combo of meals available in the village or city they're currently in. Most of the combos give special benefits, such as higher defense, higher attack power, and more health and/or stamina. But some combos can also leave the hunter tipsy, which in turn will activate an unfavorable effect known as "Unlucky Cat". It reduces drastically the Stamina capacity and also takes away 90% of the HP upon the start of the accepted quest.



* ''VideoGame/{{Parodius}}'' features an ''!?/OH ('''MY GOD''')!'' "powerup" on the power meter, which nullifies every powerup you have. Well, ''[[AllThereInTheManual ''It's hardly worth being called a power up'']]''.
** Normally, it's simple to avoid; just don't power up when it's highlighted. But throw in the "powerup roulette" feature that activates by random (though actually specific) power pods, and you'll see its [[ScrappyMechanic true purpose]].
*** Thankfully in [[UpdatedReRelease Jikkyo Oshaberi Parodius: Forever With Me]] featured an option to change the ''!?'' into a slot machine roulette, which not only reduces greatly the chances of getting that dreadful powerup, but also rewards you with upgraded versions of the bell powerups in the game, and also extra lives.
*** On more positive side, the [[GratuitousEnglish funny voiceover]] shouts the words '''[[OhCrap "OH MY GOD!!"]]''' loudly at Gokujyo Parodius, which truly shows the alarmed and frustrated feeling you get from that powerup. Sexy Parodius even gives every playable character their own shocked exclamations reacting to the selection of ''!?''-powerup.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Parodius}}'' features an ''!?/OH ('''MY GOD''')!'' "powerup" on the power meter, which nullifies every powerup you have. Well, ''[[AllThereInTheManual ''It's hardly worth being called a power up'']]''.
**
up'']]''. Normally, it's simple to avoid; just don't power up when it's highlighted. But throw in the "powerup roulette" feature that activates by random (though actually specific) power pods, and you'll see its [[ScrappyMechanic true purpose]].
***
purpose]]. Thankfully in [[UpdatedReRelease Jikkyo Oshaberi Parodius: Forever With Me]] featured features an option to change the ''!?'' into a slot machine roulette, which not only reduces greatly the chances of getting that dreadful powerup, but also rewards you with upgraded versions of the bell powerups in the game, and also extra lives.
*** On more positive side, the [[GratuitousEnglish funny voiceover]] shouts the words '''[[OhCrap "OH MY GOD!!"]]''' loudly at Gokujyo Parodius, which truly shows the alarmed and frustrated feeling you get from that powerup. Sexy Parodius even gives every playable character their own shocked exclamations reacting to the selection of ''!?''-powerup.
lives.



* ''VideoGame/{{Enigmata}}'' has a number of them, marked with an "X" (except one). These usually cause InterfaceScrew such as money loss, taking damage, jamming your weapons or making you unable to move (or move in the opposite direction). Many of these can be negated/nullified with the right skills and equipment, and you can also decrease the chances of negative powerups occuring.
** The WORST one of these, however, is the "Bonus Killer", marked with a "Z". There's an item that makes your bonus weapons permanent, and a skill that locks your bonus weapon to avert PowerUpLetdown. The bonus killer on the other hand bypasses this- it turns your weapon back to the starting weapon, severely dampening your firepower. Worst of all, not even the negative effect nullifier will protect against it.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Enigmata}}'' has a number of them, marked with an "X" (except one). These usually cause InterfaceScrew such as money loss, taking damage, jamming your weapons or making you unable to move (or move in the opposite direction). Many of these can be negated/nullified with the right skills and equipment, and you can also decrease the chances of negative powerups occuring.
** The WORST one of these, however, is
occuring. Then there's the "Bonus Killer", marked with a "Z". There's an item that makes your bonus weapons permanent, and a skill that locks your bonus weapon to avert PowerUpLetdown. The bonus killer on the other hand bypasses this- it turns your weapon back to the starting weapon, severely dampening your firepower. Worst of all, not even the negative effect nullifier will protect against it.



* In the original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'', [[DrugsAreBad the cigarettes kill you]].
** Unless you use them at the end of the game, which somehow increases the TimedMission timer.

to:

* ''Franchise/MetalGear'':
**
In the original ''VideoGame/MetalGear'', [[DrugsAreBad the cigarettes kill you]].
**
you]]. Unless you use them at the end of the game, which somehow increases the TimedMission timer.



** When you recover your inventory after being tortured in the first ''MGS'', it has a TimeBomb in it that you must discard before it explodes. Another bomb can be picked up while searching for the keycard in the drainage ditch.
*** This is a carryover from the original ''Metal Gear''. When you recovered your inventory after being captured then, a transponder is hidden in your equipment. Until you noticed and discarded it, enemies would be waiting for you at each new screen you entered.
* ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' has poisonous food items. These have one beneficial use: if The Fear is damaged enough, he will retreat from attacking you to find any Rations or Food around the battlefield, to heal himself. If you collect all of them and plant a Poisonous item, he will eat it without a second thought, further hurting his Stamina. Excellent for those trying to do Stamina-defeats on the bosses.
** [[MythologyGag Like the example in the original Metal Gear]], ''Snake Eater'' also had a tracking device get planted on you during the torture segment. Not removing it in the cure screen caused [[EliteMooks Ocelot Soldiers]] to show up while escaping along the riverside, but led to a [[EasterEgg bonus scene]].

to:

** When you recover your inventory after being tortured in the first ''MGS'', it has a TimeBomb in it that you must discard before it explodes. Another bomb can be picked up while searching for the keycard in the drainage ditch.
***
ditch. This is a carryover from the original ''Metal Gear''. Gear'': When you recovered recover your inventory after being captured then, a transponder is hidden in your equipment. Until you noticed notice and discarded discard it, enemies would will be waiting for you at each new screen you entered.
* ** ''VideoGame/MetalGearSolid3SnakeEater'' has poisonous food items. These have one beneficial use: if The Fear is damaged enough, he will retreat from attacking you to find any Rations or Food around the battlefield, to heal himself. If you collect all of them and plant a Poisonous item, he will eat it without a second thought, further hurting his Stamina. Excellent for those trying to do Stamina-defeats on the bosses.
** [[MythologyGag Like the example in the original Metal Gear]], ''Snake Eater'' also had has a tracking device get planted on you during the torture segment. Not removing it in the cure screen caused causes [[EliteMooks Ocelot Soldiers]] to show up while escaping along the riverside, but led leads to a [[EasterEgg bonus scene]].



* [[TomeOfEldritchLore "Fragments from the Book of Abdul" and "De Vermis Mysteriis"]] in ''Videogame/AloneInTheDark1992''. The first book drains your health, the second kills you immediately [[spoiler:unless you read them while standing on a very specific spot in a secret room.]]



** [[TomeOfEldritchLore "Fragments from the Book of Abdul" and "De Vermis Mysteriis"]] in [[Videogame/AloneInTheDark1992 the first game]]. The first book drains your health, the second kills you immediately [[spoiler:unless you read them while standing on a very specific spot in a secret room.]]



** These are in fact adrenaline pills. The "slowing down" is actually BulletTime, and during this you get super strength (just try punching someone and see what happens...)
** ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' allows you to get drunk, impairing your driving ability just like in real life.

to:

** These are in fact adrenaline pills. The "slowing down" is actually BulletTime, and during this you get super strength (just try punching someone and see what happens...)
**
* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoIV'' allows you to get drunk, impairing your driving ability just like in real life.



** Lava Golem and Volcanic Queen as well, both of them have high ATK and are played on your opponents field rather than yours, but inflict 1000 damage to the controller on their standby and end phase, respectively. They did have a plus-side for your opponent, though. Despite the negative effects, they are still 3000 ATK and 2500 ATK monsters respectively.
*** Similarly, there exists a monster called Ameba that causes 2000 points of damage if you use another card such as Creature Swap to give control of it to your opponent. There also is an equip card called Vengeful Servant that gives any monster equipped with it a similar effect. Even better is Number 30: Acid Golem of Destruction, which has 3000 attack and is extremely easy to summon but at the cost of only being able to attack for a few turns making you take 2000 damage per turn after that and making you unable special summon, so a good way to use it is to give control of it to the opponent with another card after the turns it can attack run out, making it play a similar role as Lava golem, but worse. Lava golem's main advantage over this is that you sacrifice your opponent's monsters to summon it instead of your own.
*** Ojama Trio and Nightmare Archfiends both give token monsters to you opponent that damage them when they are destroyed, and they can also block your opponent from summoning monsters by filling up all their monster zones.

to:

** Lava Golem and Volcanic Queen as well, both of them have high ATK and are played on your opponents field rather than yours, but inflict 1000 damage to the controller on their standby and end phase, respectively. They did have a plus-side for your opponent, though. Despite the negative effects, they are still 3000 ATK and 2500 ATK monsters respectively.
*** Similarly, there
respectively. There also exists a monster called Ameba that causes 2000 points of damage if you use another card such as Creature Swap to give control of it to your opponent. There also is an equip card called Vengeful Servant that gives any monster equipped with it a similar effect. Even better is Number 30: Acid Golem of Destruction, which has 3000 attack and is extremely easy to summon but at the cost of only being able to attack for a few turns making you take 2000 damage per turn after that and making you unable special summon, so a good way to use it is to give control of it to the opponent with another card after the turns it can attack run out, making it play a similar role as Lava golem, but worse. Lava golem's main advantage over this is that you sacrifice your opponent's monsters to summon it instead of your own.
*** ** Ojama Trio and Nightmare Archfiends both give token monsters to you opponent that damage them when they are destroyed, and they can also block your opponent from summoning monsters by filling up all their monster zones.



** Another excellent strategy that uses this trope centers around the cards [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Nurse_Reficule_the_Fallen_One Nurse Reficule the Fallen One]] and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Bad_Reaction_to_Simochi Bad Reaction to Simochi.]] When either of these two cards are on your side of the field, any effect that would heal the opponent's life points will damage them instead, so you can pack your deck with cards that heal your opponent and use them to rapidly burn your opponent's life points.

to:

** Another excellent strategy that uses this trope centers around the cards [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Nurse_Reficule_the_Fallen_One Nurse Reficule the Fallen One]] and [[http://yugioh.wikia.com/wiki/Bad_Reaction_to_Simochi Bad Reaction to Simochi.]] When either of these two cards are on your side of the field, any effect that would heal the opponent's life points will damage them instead, so you can pack your deck with cards that heal your opponent and use them to rapidly burn your opponent's life points.



** It was reprinted in recent set, said set having been released outside of Japan.



* In the ''Literature/LoneWolf'' series of gamebooks, the hero can gather quite a few items; some useful, others not so much. And then there are the items that will make Lone Wolf's adventure harder down the line (or outright ''kill'' him) if he was dumb enough to pick them up. These items ''usually'' have very ''evil'' sounding names to warn the player that they're better off leaving them alone.

to:

* In the ''Literature/LoneWolf'' series of gamebooks, the gamebooks:
** The
hero can gather quite a few items; some useful, others not so much. And then there are the items that will make Lone Wolf's adventure harder down the line (or outright ''kill'' him) if he was dumb enough to pick them up. These items ''usually'' have very ''evil'' sounding names to warn the player that they're better off leaving them alone.



* Aluminum in ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy''. Technically one of the sixteen Allomantic metals, but its only power is to erase all your other metal reserves upon burning.
** Also, burning an impure Allomantic metal will make you very sick, and trying to burn something that isn't an Allomantic metal at all will kill you.

to:

* Aluminum in ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy''. Technically one of the sixteen Allomantic metals, but its only power is to erase all your other metal reserves upon burning.
**
burning. Also, burning an impure Allomantic metal will make you very sick, and trying to burn something that isn't an Allomantic metal at all will kill you.



*** The Railway cards are even more annoying if someone owns all four. You have to pay double the rate, or $400, which is a large chunk of change.

to:

*** ** The Railway cards are even more annoying if someone owns all four. You have to pay double the rate, or $400, which is a large chunk of change.
8th Nov '17 8:21:22 PM MyFinalEdits
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* The arcade game ''MagicSword'' had plenty of powerups lying around, from stronger weapons, to gaining an infinite projectile attack for some time, to invincibility. And then there is a pair of scissors: pick it up, and your companion is instantly killed.
* Several games in the ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' series had, alongside the usual food items used to restore health, several rotten food items like "Rotten Meat" and "Spoiled Milk". In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow'', equipping a Ghoul soul allowed Soma to eat them safely. After which, against logic, they would heal disproportionately large amounts of heath -- apparently, to a ghoul, spoiled milk is more nutritious than an entire turkey is to a human.

to:

* The arcade game ''MagicSword'' ''VideoGame/MagicSword'' had plenty of powerups lying around, from stronger weapons, to gaining an infinite projectile attack for some time, to invincibility. And then there is a pair of scissors: pick it up, and your companion is instantly killed.
* ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'':
**
Several games in the ''Franchise/{{Castlevania}}'' series had, have, alongside the usual food items used to restore health, several rotten food items like "Rotten Meat" and "Spoiled Milk". In ''VideoGame/CastlevaniaDawnOfSorrow'', equipping a Ghoul soul allowed Soma to eat them safely. After which, against logic, they would heal disproportionately large amounts of heath -- apparently, to a ghoul, spoiled milk is more nutritious than an entire turkey is to a human.



* ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'' features "Rupoors", which would somehow ''reduce'' the number of Rupees Link is currently carrying when found. A minor key version of the series' trademark ItemGet fanfare would play when a Rupoor was found, complete with Link holding the item above his head but looking none too pleased about it. One area in the game consists of a maze with Rupoors for walls, requiring Link to walk carefully to avoid them. And to make it more difficult, Keese are flying around the area -- and half of your projectile weapons pick up Rupoors.
** They also appear in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaFourSwords'' under the name Black Rupees, though rather than directly taking away your Rupees, they make you drop them (allowing other players to steal them). This is actually helpful during Rupee Fever, which doubles the value of all Rupees when all Links are at full health.
** They also appear in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' in the digging minigame. The look on Link's face (seen in the page image) when you pick one up is [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments priceless]].
*** [[AndThatsTerrible And that's a little bit sad.]]
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has Purple Chus, which leave behind Purple Chu Jelly when killed. Other types of Chu Jelly are very useful, either restoring a good amount of health or as a Lantern Oil substitute, so Purple Jelly should have a good effect too, right? Wrong, they have a ''random'' effect: while they can heal a random amount of Hearts, they can also ''hurt you'', even taking you down to one Heart. The Nasty Soup, which can be gotten where you get the Lantern, has the same effect. The main purposes of Purple Chus are to make you fight a Chu without getting anything good out of it, or to have them in the same area as useful Chus, forcing you to kill the useful ones and grab their jelly before the purple ones absorb them and take away their useful qualities.
*** However, since the purple chu jelly cannot outright kill you, it is best used while low on health so if you get the negative effects, nothing will happen.
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'': The Poes have the same effect when consumed.

to:

* ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'':
**
''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaPhantomHourglass'' features "Rupoors", which would somehow ''reduce'' the number of Rupees Link is currently carrying when found. A minor key version of the series' trademark ItemGet fanfare would play when a Rupoor was found, complete with Link holding the item above his head but looking none too pleased about it. One area in the game consists of a maze with Rupoors for walls, requiring Link to walk carefully to avoid them. And to make it more difficult, Keese are flying around the area -- and half of your projectile weapons pick up Rupoors.
** They Rupoors also appear in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaFourSwords'' under the name Black Rupees, though rather than directly taking away your Rupees, they make you drop them (allowing other players to steal them). This is actually helpful during Rupee Fever, which doubles the value of all Rupees when all Links are at full health.
** They Rupoors also appear in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaSkywardSword'' in the digging minigame. The look on Link's face (seen in the page image) when you pick one up is [[SugarWiki/FunnyMoments priceless]].
*** [[AndThatsTerrible And that's a little bit sad.]]
** ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTwilightPrincess'' has Purple Chus, which leave behind Purple Chu Jelly when killed. Other types of Chu Jelly are very useful, either restoring a good amount of health or as a Lantern Oil substitute, so Purple Jelly should have a good effect too, right? Wrong, they have a ''random'' effect: while they can heal a random amount of Hearts, they can also ''hurt you'', even taking you down to one Heart. The Nasty Soup, which can be gotten where you get the Lantern, has the same effect. The main purposes of Purple Chus are to make you fight a Chu without getting anything good out of it, or to have them in the same area as useful Chus, forcing you to kill the useful ones and grab their jelly before the purple ones absorb them and take away their useful qualities.
*** However, since the purple chu jelly cannot outright kill you, it is best used while low on health so if you get the negative effects, nothing will happen.
**
qualities. In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' and ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'': The ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaMajorasMask'', the Poes have the same effect when consumed.



** Though this is VERY dependent on the individual game's list of possible effects, getting the skull could be a GOOD thing. In ''Bomberman 64'', the effects were split 50/50 good to bad; for example, one possible outcome was you would instantly get full power bombs (with blue super sized explosions.) Another one set you on fire, making you able to kill anyone by touching them... but you'd have to move quick because you would burn to death eventually. Another made you absolutely tiny, but super fast.
* ''VideoGame/Bomberman64'' and ''VideoGame/Bomberman64TheSecondAttack!'' have "Bomb-Down," "Sandal," and "Fire-Down" items, which lower the amount of bombs you can place, your speed, and the blast radius of your bombs. These also occur throughout the multiplayer modes of most ''Bomberman'' games. ''Bomberman 64'' also featured an "Evil" item, which activated a stage-wide effect potentially affecting all players. Some effects include a tornado, maxing out everyone's bomb count and explosion size, shuffling the positions of all players, and an "evil disco light" that [[InterfaceScrew saturated the screen with bright colours]], making it hard to see the action.
** They became useful in one specific section of ''The Second Attack!'' which required the player to cross the reactor core of a spaceship. Reducing the Blast Radius to zero was the only way to safely cross the otherwise lethal reactor fluid. At zero radius, ice bombs would not blowback on the player if they were careful.

to:

** Though this is VERY dependent on the individual game's list of possible effects, getting the skull could be a GOOD thing. In ''Bomberman 64'', the effects were split 50/50 good to bad; for example, one possible outcome was you would instantly get full power bombs (with blue super sized explosions.) Another one set you on fire, making you able to kill anyone by touching them... but you'd have to move quick because you would burn to death eventually. Another made you absolutely tiny, but super fast.
* ''VideoGame/Bomberman64'' and ''VideoGame/Bomberman64TheSecondAttack!'' have "Bomb-Down," "Sandal," and "Fire-Down" items, which lower the amount of bombs you can place, your speed, and the blast radius of your bombs. These also occur throughout the multiplayer modes of most ''Bomberman'' games. ''Bomberman 64'' also featured an "Evil" item, which activated a stage-wide effect potentially affecting all players. Some effects include a tornado, maxing out everyone's bomb count and explosion size, shuffling the positions of all players, and an "evil disco light" that [[InterfaceScrew saturated the screen with bright colours]], making it hard to see the action.
**
action. They became useful in one specific section of ''The Second Attack!'' which required the player to cross the reactor core of a spaceship. Reducing the Blast Radius to zero was the only way to safely cross the otherwise lethal reactor fluid. At zero radius, ice bombs would not blowback on the player if they were careful.



* Fake Item Boxes in ''[[VideoGame/MarioKart64 Mario Kart 64]]'' [[VideoGame/MarioKart and beyond]] do about the same thing as Poison Mushrooms, whereas the normal item boxes are rainbow-colored or bluish and have a "?" while a fake one will be red and have a "¿". Both blocks look exactly the same from a distance (the fake one changing when you get closer), but most players can avoid them by memorizing where real items boxes should appear. The TropeNamer itself appears in the SNES original. The boxes can also be detected, at least in the DS version, by checking the game map. The fake ones appear different than the regular ones.
** The Wii game had a storm cloud item. It floated over your head, charging up lightning. If you didn't give it away by hitting somebody else in time, it would electrocute and shrink you.
*** One small benefit from the storm cloud is a constant speed boost. While the intention of this is to allow players to catch up to another player to pass it off, the boost also lets you drive off track without slowing down, allowing you to take some nice shortcuts especially in the final lap.

to:

* ''VideoGame/MarioKart'':
**
Fake Item Boxes in ''[[VideoGame/MarioKart64 Mario Kart 64]]'' [[VideoGame/MarioKart ''VideoGame/MarioKart64'' and beyond]] beyond do about the same thing as Poison Mushrooms, whereas the normal item boxes are rainbow-colored or bluish and have a "?" while a fake one will be red and have a "¿". Both blocks look exactly the same from a distance (the fake one changing when you get closer), but most players can avoid them by memorizing where real items boxes should appear. The TropeNamer itself appears in the SNES original. The boxes can also be detected, at least in the DS version, by checking the game map. The fake ones appear different than the regular ones.
** The Wii game had ''VideoGame/MarioKartWii'' has a storm cloud item. It floated floats over your head, charging up lightning. If you didn't don't give it away by hitting somebody else in time, it would will electrocute and shrink you.
*** One small benefit from the storm cloud is a constant speed boost. While the intention of this is to allow players to catch up to another player to pass it off, the boost also lets you drive off track without slowing down, allowing you to take some nice shortcuts especially in the final lap.
you.



* ''VideoGame/{{Carmageddon}}'' had Pinball Mode, which caused you to bounce off objects at increased speed, causing thousands of damage in the first game and probably wrecking you instantly in the sequel. The best thing you could do was sit motionlessly and hoping nobody would hit you. There was also Bouncy Bouncy (your car jumps every few seconds), Jelly Suspension (your car wobbles and tips over), Jupiter Gravity (good luck getting uphill), and the second game has a ball and chain that attaches to your car and Ethereal Pedestrians (can't run over them, so you can't get extra time on your clock for 30 seconds - oops). Not to mention the Drugs, Miniature Pedestrians, Turbo Opponents, basic exploding powerups, Hot Rod (speed boost combined with 'wheelie' suspension, great for blasting into a wall at 600 kph), Greased Tires and the various powerups that crumple up your car or make it break in two.
** Several of these "bad" powerups can be used for good. The ball-and-chain thing isn't practical to use, but powersliding into a group of pedestrians with it is a guaranteed ticket to LudicrousGibs land, and you can detach it at will anyway. Hot Rod is a useful on-demand turbo if used in small doses; also, combined with the tires-stick-to-everything powerup, it's a great way to climb walls (it lifts the nose of the car). And Pinball isn't evil just to you - everything in the game starts bouncing around. Send a ped into a group of others and they'll pinball themselves into pulps, or hit an opponent so that you pinball away to safety while they pinball into an obstacle-filled area, and watch them get wrecked in a second or two.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Carmageddon}}'' had ''VideoGame/{{Carmageddon}}'';
**
Pinball Mode, which caused Mode causes you to bounce off objects at increased speed, causing thousands of damage in the first game and probably wrecking you instantly in the sequel. The best thing you could can do was is sit motionlessly and hoping nobody would hit you. There was is also Bouncy Bouncy (your car jumps every few seconds), Jelly Suspension (your car wobbles and tips over), Jupiter Gravity (good luck getting uphill), and the second game has a ball and chain that attaches to your car and Ethereal Pedestrians (can't run over them, so you can't get extra time on your clock for 30 seconds - oops). Not to mention the The Drugs, Miniature Pedestrians, Turbo Opponents, basic exploding powerups, Hot Rod (speed boost combined with 'wheelie' suspension, great for blasting into a wall at 600 kph), Greased Tires and the various powerups that crumple up your car or make it break in two.
** Several of these "bad" powerups can be used for good. The ball-and-chain thing isn't practical to use, but powersliding into a group of pedestrians with it is a guaranteed ticket to LudicrousGibs land, and you can detach it at will anyway. Hot Rod is a useful on-demand turbo if used in small doses; also, combined with the tires-stick-to-everything powerup, it's a great way to climb walls (it lifts the nose of the car). And Pinball isn't evil just to you - everything in the game starts bouncing around. Send a ped into a group of others and they'll pinball themselves into pulps, or hit an opponent so that you pinball away to safety while they pinball into an obstacle-filled area, and watch them get wrecked in a second or
two.



* In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' and ''Brawl'', Super Mushrooms made your character grow, while Poison Mushrooms made you shrink. The latter could be identified from the former by a slightly darker color and a slightly meaner expression, with the outer corners of the Poison Mushroom's eyes turned [[TsurimeEyes upward]] rather than [[TaremeEyes downward]]. However, this difference may not be obvious when the camera is zoomed out enough.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' and ''Brawl'', ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros'':
**
Super Mushrooms made make your character grow, while Poison Mushrooms made make you shrink. The latter could can be identified from the former by a slightly darker color and a slightly meaner expression, with the outer corners of the Poison Mushroom's eyes turned [[TsurimeEyes upward]] rather than [[TaremeEyes downward]]. However, this difference may not be obvious when the camera is zoomed out enough.



** The Metal Box is somewhat of a double-edged sword rather than a complete Poison Mushroom. Getting knocked off the platform while in "Metal" mode will result in you struggling to return to the area as it makes you heavy and... just that.



* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' lets you smoke and drink booze. Smoking whittles away at your health, while the booze blurs your screen and sways your view for a time. While nothing forces the player to try either booze or cigarettes, the assumption that these droppable items must have some actual ''use'' may draw naive souls in...
** Alcoholic drinks are healing items, though. If you're hurt, you can find a safe spot, down beer, wine and/or liquor, and recover some health (it works like any other food item), and just wait for the effects of blurred vision and swaying screen to go away (which is only a matter of seconds; [[AllThereInTheManual it's explained that]] [[HyperactiveMetabolism your nano-machines make you go through the effects of drunkenness much faster than a normal human]]).
*** The Cigarettes can actually ''kill'' JC if he chain-smokes a truely heroic quantity of them; on the order of chain-smoking ten whole packs at once (because each time you smoke, you consume an entire pack, and each pack deals you 10 health damage to the torso.)
*** Both of the above (minus the cigarettes) are carried over into the prequel, ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution''.

to:

* ''VideoGame/DeusEx'' lets you smoke and drink booze. Smoking whittles away at your health, while the booze blurs your screen and sways your view for a time. time (though it can also heal you). While nothing forces the player to try either booze or cigarettes, the assumption that these droppable items must have some actual ''use'' may draw naive souls in...
** Alcoholic drinks are healing items, though. If you're hurt, you can find a safe spot, down beer, wine and/or liquor, and recover some health (it works like any other food item), and just wait for the effects of blurred vision and swaying screen to go away (which is only a matter of seconds; [[AllThereInTheManual it's explained that]] [[HyperactiveMetabolism your nano-machines make you go through the effects of drunkenness much faster than a normal human]]).
***
in. The Cigarettes can actually ''kill'' JC if he chain-smokes a truely heroic quantity of them; on the order of chain-smoking ten whole packs at once (because each time you smoke, you consume an entire pack, and each pack deals you 10 health damage to the torso.)
*** Both of the above
torso). These items (minus the cigarettes) are carried over into the prequel, ''VideoGame/DeusExHumanRevolution''.



** ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'' has rotten food, which uses the same icon as its respective healing item and damages you if you eat it. Best check for mold before you eat things out of a trashcan.
* ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTriad'' has the Shrooms Mode powerdown and the annoying (and depending on where it's located, potentially deadly) Elasto Mode powerup. Shrooms Mode makes shooting straight virtually impossible (and will probably make you feel a bit sick). Elasto Mode makes you bounce off solid objects and drastically reduces your friction with the ground. Given all the hazards in the game, you don't want to wind up picking up an Elasto Mode powerup in a large number of the areas in the game.

to:

** * ''VideoGame/BioShockInfinite'' has rotten food, which uses the same icon as its respective healing item and damages you if you eat it. Best check for mold before you eat things out of a trashcan.
* ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTriad'' ''VideoGame/RiseOfTheTriad'':
** The game
has the Shrooms Mode powerdown and the annoying (and depending on where it's located, potentially deadly) Elasto Mode powerup. Shrooms Mode makes shooting straight virtually impossible (and will probably make you feel a bit sick). Elasto Mode makes you bounce off solid objects and drastically reduces your friction with the ground. Given all the hazards in the game, you don't want to wind up picking up an Elasto Mode powerup in a large number of the areas in the game.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' series (and many subsequent generations of turn-based strategy game) feature the so-called "Goody Huts" -- old dwellings unaffiliated with any faction that, when explored, may turn out to contain scrolls of ancient knowledge, secret treasures, nomads or tribespeople who are sick of living in the ruins... or a barbarian hideout that is none too thrilled with your intrusion. (''Civ V'' replaces these with ancient ruins, which don't carry the risk of barbarian attack; instead, one possible bonus from exploring them is revealing the locations of several nearby barbarian camps.)

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'':
**
The ''VideoGame/{{Civilization}}'' series (and many subsequent generations of turn-based strategy game) feature the so-called "Goody Huts" -- old dwellings unaffiliated with any faction that, when explored, may turn out to contain scrolls of ancient knowledge, secret treasures, nomads or tribespeople who are sick of living in the ruins... or a barbarian hideout that is none too thrilled with your intrusion. (''Civ V'' replaces these with ancient ruins, which don't carry the risk of barbarian attack; instead, one possible bonus from exploring them is revealing the locations of several nearby barbarian camps.)



* The various ''{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}}'' games have poison and Death hiding in treasure chests identical to food and potion chests. It's impossible to tell which is which without opening them. ''Gauntlet II'' had poisoned cider and poisoned blue potions. Shooting either of them would cause enemies to slow down. There was also "IT", which chased down a player and bonded to him or her, causing enemies to follow them. The IT effect persisted throughout the level and can only be mitigated by tagging another player ("Tag, you're IT!"), which simply passed the effect to that player.

to:

* ''{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}}'':
**
The various ''{{VideoGame/Gauntlet}}'' games have poison and Death hiding in treasure chests identical to food and potion chests. It's impossible to tell which is which without opening them. ''Gauntlet II'' had poisoned cider and poisoned blue potions. Shooting either of them would cause enemies to slow down. There was also "IT", which chased down a player and bonded to him or her, causing enemies to follow them. The IT effect persisted throughout the level and can only be mitigated by tagging another player ("Tag, you're IT!"), which simply passed the effect to that player.



* ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' has a [[http://kol.coldfront.net/thekolwiki/index.php/Dungeons_of_Doom_potion series of potions]] that are a clear reference to these sorts of items. Their effects are mapped to specific potions differently for each person and each ascension, so they're risky until you've got them mapped out - especially if you hit the one that increases drunkenness while you're one point away from your limit (which makes you unable to continue adventuring) and have more than the rollover cap worth of adventures left.
** It also has "goofballs". It enhances your skills for a 10 turns, after which it penalizes your character by weakening him for the next 30 turns ("goofball withdrawal"). How do you cut the penalty short? Take more goofballs. And the price of the goofballs? First one's free. Subsequent ones ramp up in price by 1000 meat each time. And subsequent consumption also causes lost of stat to boot. The moral? DrugsAreBad.

to:

* ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'' ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'':
** The game
has a [[http://kol.coldfront.net/thekolwiki/index.php/Dungeons_of_Doom_potion series of potions]] that are a clear reference to these sorts of items. Their effects are mapped to specific potions differently for each person and each ascension, so they're risky until you've got them mapped out - especially if you hit the one that increases drunkenness while you're one point away from your limit (which makes you unable to continue adventuring) and have more than the rollover cap worth of adventures left.
** It also has "goofballs"."Goofballs". It enhances your skills for a 10 turns, after which it penalizes your character by weakening him for the next 30 turns ("goofball withdrawal"). How do you cut the penalty short? Take more goofballs. And the price of the goofballs? First one's free. Subsequent ones ramp up in price by 1000 meat each time. And subsequent consumption also causes lost of stat to boot. The moral? DrugsAreBad.



* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' has the [[http://www.wowhead.com/?quest=5253 Crystal of Zin-Malor]] that some players have actually found a use for (despite the fact it constantly damages you if you have it equipped) as opposed to turning it in for a quest.

to:

* ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'':
** The game
has the [[http://www.wowhead.com/?quest=5253 Crystal of Zin-Malor]] that some players have actually found a use for (despite the fact it constantly damages you if you have it equipped) as opposed to turning it in for a quest.



** The bad effects need to actually "hit" the player, while the good ones always hit, so increasing your Defense by any means before destroying a lab will allow you to get only positive effects, unless you are really unlucky. Also, the good effects last longer than the negative ones.
* In the early days of ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}'' there was the classic scam of taking a Karambwan octopus (the ONLY fish in the game you can cook half-way), and having you cook it. You might think that it is completely cooked, but it ''isn't'' (it's cooked ''half-way'', remember?). Eating it would damage you for 30-50 HitPoints, maximum 99, ''and'' poison you to the tune of ''13 HitPoints every ten seconds''. Needless to say, you would be screwed if you ate it, especially if you were in the middle of nowhere and didn't have an antipoison. Fortunately, the damage was dramatically reduced after an update, and it no longer poisons you, ''and'' you get a warning when you try to eat it.
** This also ends up as a subversion, when you realize you can grind the poorly cooked octopus into a paste that you can use to make your attacks poisonous for a brief period of time.
** The recently introduced Invention skill revolves around augmenting weaponry and armour and giving it special, randomly determined perks. While many are beneficial, some of them are harmful, with effects such as dramatically lowered damage against certain creatures or the inability to use protection prayers, among others.

to:

* ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}'':
** The bad effects need to actually "hit" the player, while the good ones always hit, so increasing your Defense by any means before destroying a lab will allow you to get only positive effects, unless you are really unlucky. Also, the good effects last longer than the negative ones.
*
In the early days of ''VideoGame/{{Runescape}}'' days, there was the classic scam of taking a Karambwan octopus (the ONLY fish in the game you can cook half-way), and having you cook it. You might think that it is completely cooked, but it ''isn't'' (it's cooked ''half-way'', remember?). Eating it would damage you for 30-50 HitPoints, maximum 99, ''and'' poison you to the tune of ''13 HitPoints every ten seconds''. Needless to say, you would be screwed if you ate it, especially if you were in the middle of nowhere and didn't have an antipoison. Fortunately, the damage was dramatically reduced after an update, and it no longer poisons you, ''and'' you get a warning when you try to eat it.
** This also ends up as a subversion, when you realize you can grind the poorly cooked octopus into a paste that you can use to make your attacks poisonous for a brief period of time.
** The recently introduced Invention skill revolves around augmenting weaponry and armour and giving it special, randomly determined perks. While many are beneficial, some of them are harmful, with effects such as dramatically lowered damage against certain creatures or the inability to use protection prayers, among others.



* The TropeNamer here is the Poison Mushroom from the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' series, a subtle PaletteSwap of the iconic Super Mushroom. They first appeared in the Japanese ''Super Mario Bros. 2'' (known in the United States and Europe as ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels The Lost Levels]]''), where picking one up was the same as touching an enemy.
** The SNES release of ''The Lost Levels'' made the Poison Mushrooms a completely and totally unmistakable solid purple with a skull on the cap of the mushroom and gave them angry eyes. If you still picked one of these up, [[TooDumbToLive you deserved it]].
** Subsequent remake on the UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor, ''Super Mario Bros. Deluxe'', retained the skull cap.
** ''The Lost Levels'' also has backwards {{warp zone}}s.

to:

* ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'':
**
The TropeNamer here is the Poison Mushroom from the ''Franchise/SuperMarioBros'' series, Mushroom, a subtle PaletteSwap of the iconic Super Mushroom. They first appeared in the Japanese ''Super Mario Bros. 2'' (known in the United States and Europe as ''[[VideoGame/SuperMarioBrosTheLostLevels The Lost Levels]]''), where picking one up was the same as touching an enemy.
**
enemy. The SNES release of ''The Lost Levels'' made the Poison Mushrooms a completely and totally unmistakable solid purple with a skull on the cap of the mushroom and gave them angry eyes. If you still picked one of these up, [[TooDumbToLive you deserved it]].
**
it]]. Subsequent remake on the UsefulNotes/GameBoyColor, ''Super Mario Bros. Deluxe'', retained the skull cap.
** ''The Lost Levels'' also has backwards {{warp zone}}s. Not only does it take back Mario or Luigi to a previous world, but it also neglects permanently the access to World 9 (since ''no'' warp zones are allowed for use at all if that world is to be unlocked).
** In the international ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'', some grass patches contain Bob-Ombs with a short fuse. These items are completely useless and serve no other purpose than to be a booby trap, damaging the character if they don't throw them away on time.



** In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'', some grass patches contain Bob-Ombs with a short fuse. These items are completely useless and serve no other purpose than to be a booby trap, damaging the character if they don't throw them away on time.
* Some of the earlier ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games had the "Eggman Monitor" (Robotnik) item, which acted like taking an attack from an enemy if its monitor was opened.
** Their first appearance was in the 2-Player mode in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''. Particularly evil given that the monitors in 2-Player mode don't display an icon representing what's in them until you open them[[hottip:*:merely showing static or question marks]], and that the number of items collected is included in each player's score. The only ways to know you're safe from them is to memorize where and what every item is, or turn on the "Teleport Only" option (so all monitors [[FreakyFridayFlip make Sonic and Tails switch places]]).
*** In Casino Night Zone, if you get three Eggmen/Robotnik on a slot machine, you lose [[strike:all your]] 100 rings.
** ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' had the these first appear in Act 2 of the Hydrocity Zone, but they are easily missed. Later they appear in the [[SlippySlideyIceWorld Ice Cap]] zone, where they used the "obstacle" approach (and are frozen in a layer of breakable ice, building in a slight margin for safety).

to:

** In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioBros2'', some grass patches contain Bob-Ombs with a short fuse. These items are completely useless and serve no other purpose than to be a booby trap, damaging the character if they don't throw them away on time.
* Some of the earlier ''Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog'' games had have the "Eggman Monitor" (Robotnik) item, which acted acts like taking an attack from an enemy if its monitor was is opened.
** Their first appearance was in the 2-Player mode in ''VideoGame/SonicTheHedgehog2''. Particularly evil given that the monitors in 2-Player mode don't display an icon representing what's in them until you open them[[hottip:*:merely them[[note]]merely showing static or question marks]], marks[[/note]], and that the number of items collected is included in each player's score. The only ways to know you're safe from them is to memorize where and what every item is, or turn on the "Teleport Only" option (so all monitors [[FreakyFridayFlip make Sonic and Tails switch places]]).
*** In
places]]). Also, in Casino Night Zone, if you get three Eggmen/Robotnik on a slot machine, you lose [[strike:all your]] 100 rings.
** ''VideoGame/Sonic3AndKnuckles'' had has the these first appear in Act 2 of the Hydrocity Zone, but they are easily missed. Later they appear in the [[SlippySlideyIceWorld Ice Cap]] zone, where they used the "obstacle" approach (and are frozen in a layer of breakable ice, building in a slight margin for safety).



* The poison potions in ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' and ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2'' looked almost exactly like the regular potions (they had blue bubbles instead of red -- a detail that could be difficult to make out in the console versions if you had a small TV, and easy to miss in general) but hurt you instead of restoring or increasing health.
** Both of the original games also had a green potion that flipped the screen and reversed your controls. To reverse the effect, you had to find the other potion of the same kind.
** The Super Nintendo version of the first game, in one of the all-new levels, had a room with two large potions: the typical [[HeartContainer life-upgrade potion]], and a potion that instantly killed you.

to:

* ''Franchise/PrinceOfPersia'':
**
The poison potions in ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia1'' and ''VideoGame/PrinceOfPersia2'' looked look almost exactly like the regular potions (they had have blue bubbles instead of red -- a detail that could can be difficult to make out in the console versions if you had have a small TV, and easy to miss in general) but hurt you instead of restoring or increasing health.
** Both of the original games also had have a green potion that flipped flip the screen and reversed reverse your controls. To reverse the effect, you had have to find the other potion of the same kind.
** The Super Nintendo version of the first game, in one of the all-new levels, had has a room with two large potions: the typical [[HeartContainer life-upgrade potion]], and a potion that instantly killed kills you.



* ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim 2'' had a weapon known as the BubbleGun, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: It shoots out ''soap bubbles''. Obviously, it's not even remotely useful in trying to defeat enemies. What raises this above a mere PowerupLetdown is that (at least in the Genesis version) there was no way to switch weapons, so you were stuck with the last weapon you picked up until it ran out of ammo. This was a minor annoyance in the first level, where you could just stop and use it up, but a death sentence in the last level, a foot race against Psy-Crow, where you needed a useful weapon to clear away obstacles so you could beat him to the checkpoints, and using up the ammo wasted valuable time you didn't have. Failing to do so resulted in him [[StalkedByTheBell closing the gate behind him]] and triggering an inescapable DeathTrap (If you were ''lucky'' - if you weren't, a glitch would prevent the DeathTrap from firing, leaving you to [[{{Unwinnable}} sit in the now-sealed room until you gave up and reset the system]]). And even in the versions where you ''could'' switch weapons, you usually got the bubble gun at the worst possible moment.
* ''Rastan'' also had poisoned potions, which were red fluid in triangular bottles, as opposed to the safe blue potions in round bottles. While it reduced your vitality by as much as 15%, a red potion also was worth 10,000 points.

to:

* ''VideoGame/EarthwormJim 2'' had has a weapon known as the BubbleGun, which is ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin: It shoots out ''soap bubbles''. Obviously, it's not even remotely useful in trying to defeat enemies. What raises this above a mere PowerupLetdown is that (at least in the Genesis version) there was no way to switch weapons, so you were stuck with the last weapon you picked up until it ran out of ammo. This was a minor annoyance in the first level, where you could just stop and use it up, but a death sentence in the last level, a foot race against Psy-Crow, where you needed a useful weapon to clear away obstacles so you could beat him to the checkpoints, and using up the ammo wasted valuable time you didn't have. Failing to do so resulted in him [[StalkedByTheBell closing the gate behind him]] and triggering an inescapable DeathTrap (If you were ''lucky'' - if you weren't, a glitch would prevent the DeathTrap from firing, leaving you to [[{{Unwinnable}} sit in the now-sealed room until you gave up and reset the system]]). And even in the versions where you ''could'' switch weapons, you usually got the bubble gun at the worst possible moment.
* ''Rastan'' also had has poisoned potions, which were are red fluid in triangular bottles, as opposed to the safe blue potions in round bottles. While it reduced reduces your vitality by as much as 15%, a red potion also was is worth 10,000 points.



* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic 2'' had the Tax Lien (Makes you lose gold every day), the Hideous Mask (Monsters will never join you), and the Fizbin of Misfortune (Ruins your morale). You can see them on the map and avoid them, but sometimes you'd find them in treasure chests with no warning.
** The Fizbin is at least as old as ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic 3'' (not the "Heroes of" strategy series, but the apparently-lesser-known [=RPGs=]), where it doubled shop prices. It also eradicated you in the Slithercult Saloon if you had it in your inventory and tried one of the slot machines. However, with it you can take a treasure hoard you couldn't otherwise.
** Getting rid of a bad artifact in [=HOMM2=] was easy though. Just recruit a new hero, give him the artifacts and then dismiss him. (Removing him from the game). Did not work in HOMM I, though, giving you a message saying "this item can not be traded".

to:

* ''VideoGame/HeroesOfMightAndMagic 2'' had has the Tax Lien (Makes you lose gold every day), the Hideous Mask (Monsters will never join you), and the Fizbin of Misfortune (Ruins your morale). You can see them on the map and avoid them, but sometimes you'd find them in treasure chests with no warning.
**
warning. The Fizbin is at least as old as ''VideoGame/MightAndMagic 3'' (not the "Heroes of" strategy series, but the apparently-lesser-known [=RPGs=]), where it doubled shop prices. It also eradicated eradicates you in the Slithercult Saloon if you had have it in your inventory and tried try one of the slot machines. However, with it you can take a treasure hoard you couldn't otherwise.
** Getting rid of a bad artifact in [=HOMM2=] was easy though. Just recruit a new hero, give him the artifacts and then dismiss him. (Removing him from the game). Did not work in HOMM I, though, giving you a message saying "this item can not be traded".
otherwise.



* The Devil Axe in ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' tends to be this. Great stats, equippable by anyone with an Axe rank, good for training said Axe rank, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and also has a random chance of damaging the]] ''[[BreadEggsMilkSquick wielder]]'' [[BreadEggsMilkSquick instead of the enemy]] (especially when the user was about to score a critical.) And since this is a series where FinalDeath is in play, most players wisely decide to treat the axe as VendorTrash instead of using it in combat.
** Note that it's not ''completely'' random; the Devil Axe's chance to backfire is based on the wielder's LuckStat, so you can reduce the odds of this happening by raising their Luck. That said, considering ''Fire Emblem'' is notorious for its SpitefulAI, most players will still avoid even giving it to high-luck units.

to:

* The Devil Axe in ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' tends to be this. Great stats, equippable by anyone with an Axe rank, good for training said Axe rank, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and also has a random chance of damaging the]] ''[[BreadEggsMilkSquick wielder]]'' [[BreadEggsMilkSquick instead of the enemy]] (especially when the user was about to score a critical.) critical). And since this is a series where FinalDeath is in play, most players wisely decide to treat the axe as VendorTrash instead of using it in combat.
** Note that it's not ''completely'' random; the Devil Axe's chance to backfire is based on the wielder's LuckStat, so you can reduce the odds of this happening by raising their Luck. That said, considering ''Fire Emblem'' is notorious for its SpitefulAI, most players will still avoid even giving it to high-luck units.
combat.
29th Oct '17 11:51:43 PM OrangenChan
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* The Devil's Axe in ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' tends to be this. Great stats, equippable by anyone with an Axe rank, good for training said Axe rank, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and also has a random chance of damaging the]] ''[[BreadEggsMilkSquick wielder]]'' [[BreadEggsMilkSquick instead of the enemy]] (especially when the user was about to score a critical.) And since this is a series where FinalDeath is in play, most players wisely decide to treat the axe as VendorTrash instead of using it in combat.

to:

* The Devil's Devil Axe in ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' tends to be this. Great stats, equippable by anyone with an Axe rank, good for training said Axe rank, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick and also has a random chance of damaging the]] ''[[BreadEggsMilkSquick wielder]]'' [[BreadEggsMilkSquick instead of the enemy]] (especially when the user was about to score a critical.) And since this is a series where FinalDeath is in play, most players wisely decide to treat the axe as VendorTrash instead of using it in combat.combat.
** Note that it's not ''completely'' random; the Devil Axe's chance to backfire is based on the wielder's LuckStat, so you can reduce the odds of this happening by raising their Luck. That said, considering ''Fire Emblem'' is notorious for its SpitefulAI, most players will still avoid even giving it to high-luck units.
15th Oct '17 2:11:17 PM nombretomado
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* The fairly unimportant '96 {{Breakout}} clone named ''Twinblok'' had a powerup that temporarily transformed all balls on the field into tennis balls. They turned completely harmless to blocks and the sudden change in their behavior was often lethal, since you were still obligated to keep at least one in play.
** Another Breakout clone called ''[=MacBrickout=]'' has blocks randomly drop capsules. The majority of the capsules do useful things, such as increase the size of the paddle, allow the ball to stick to the paddle, or giving the player extra balls to juggle. A few, however, would have negative effects, such as shrinking the paddle; the worst was the red "X" capsule which made the paddle useless. And getting too many "paddle expand" capsules would actually cause ''half of the paddle to break off'', so if you're close to the breaking point, even they prove to be Poison Mushrooms.
** This is common in Breakout-style games that use powerups. One variation, ''Alpha Bounce'', includes the "P" items that do something different depending on which paddle you're using.

to:

* The fairly unimportant '96 {{Breakout}} ''VideoGame/{{Breakout}}'' clone named ''Twinblok'' had a powerup that temporarily transformed all balls on the field into tennis balls. They turned completely harmless to blocks and the sudden change in their behavior was often lethal, since you were still obligated to keep at least one in play.
** Another Breakout ''Breakout'' clone called ''[=MacBrickout=]'' has blocks randomly drop capsules. The majority of the capsules do useful things, such as increase the size of the paddle, allow the ball to stick to the paddle, or giving the player extra balls to juggle. A few, however, would have negative effects, such as shrinking the paddle; the worst was the red "X" capsule which made the paddle useless. And getting too many "paddle expand" capsules would actually cause ''half of the paddle to break off'', so if you're close to the breaking point, even they prove to be Poison Mushrooms.
** This is common in Breakout-style ''Breakout''-style games that use powerups. One variation, ''Alpha Bounce'', includes the "P" items that do something different depending on which paddle you're using.
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