History Main / PlayingThePlayer

27th May '16 11:02:45 AM Digsu
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* ''KingdomHeartsChainOfMemories'' introduces the Nobodies to the series, and it's quickly established that one of their defining features is their lack of hearts and inability to truly feel anything. Additionally, the ultimate purpose of Organization XIII, the group in charge of all the Nobodies, is stated to be the completion of Kingdom Hearts, which would allow them to get new hearts. Then, five games later, along comes ''KingdomHearts3DDreamDropDistance'' and it's revealed that [[spoiler: Nobodies actually grow new hearts naturally over time, and that the true purpose of the Organization wasn't giving them new hearts at all - instead, it was turning them all into [[GrandTheftMe new vessels]] for the BigBad's soul.]]
25th Apr '16 1:35:57 AM Medinoc
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** At the same time though, [[spoiler:the Nightmares are slowly corrupting the island, making it theirs, and creating more monsters. Waking up the Windfish will ensure that it will go to sleep again, but Link's permanent destruction would make the nightmare eternal...]]
26th Mar '16 3:19:09 PM Gamermaster
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** Even that contains a bit of this: the BigBad actually hints you towards the True Ending because he ''knows'' that you'll want to go for it as a completionist, and through this [[spoiler: uses you to get everyone you befriended into one place so he can absorb their souls.]] The game also plays with your notions of OneHundredPercentCompletion: the game itself ''begs'' you not to reset after achieving a happy ending, because you'd be taking that away from all the characters. If you reset a Pacifist file and go for an evil playthrough out of curiosity, multiple NPCs will be aware of this and will [[YouBastard call you out on it.]] And getting the worst ending even ''once'' permenantly taints any future happy ending you achieve. In other words, exploring every route the game has to offer is a ''very'' bad thing, some paths are better off never being taken.

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** Even that contains a bit of this: the BigBad actually hints you towards the True Ending because he ''knows'' that you'll want to go for it as a completionist, and through this [[spoiler: uses you to get everyone you befriended into one place so he can absorb their souls.]] The game also plays with your notions of OneHundredPercentCompletion: the game itself ''begs'' you not to reset after achieving a happy ending, because you'd be taking that away from all the characters. If you reset a Pacifist file and go for an evil playthrough out of curiosity, multiple NPCs [=NPCs=] will be aware of this and will [[YouBastard call you out on it.]] And getting the worst ending even ''once'' permenantly taints any future happy ending you achieve. In other words, exploring every route the game has to offer is a ''very'' bad thing, some paths are better off never being taken.
26th Mar '16 3:17:46 PM Gamermaster
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* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' builds its entire premise on this, to the point where it acts as a {{Deconstruction}} of RPGs in general.

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* ''VideoGame/{{Undertale}}'' builds its entire premise on this, to the point where it acts as a {{Deconstruction}} of RPGs [=RPGs=] in general.
9th Mar '16 3:28:50 PM MagwitchOo
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This trope is frequently seen in {{deconstruction}}s but in and of itself, it is not necessarily a deconstruction. Additionally, this is not the same as having NoFourthWall. Also, this trope deals often deals with plot details, so spoilers ahead. Not to be confused with TheGamePlaysYou. Compare PlayerPunch, YouBastard and VideoGamesAndFate.

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This trope is frequently seen in {{deconstruction}}s but in and of itself, it is not necessarily a deconstruction. Additionally, this is not the same as having NoFourthWall. Also, this trope deals often deals with plot details, so spoilers ahead. Not to be confused with TheGamePlaysYou. Compare PlayerPunch, YouBastard and VideoGamesAndFate.
29th Feb '16 6:24:01 AM MegaMarioMan
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* The CentralTheme of ''VisualNovel/FleuretBlanc'' is materialism and obsession -- two things that video games, by their nature, tend to encourage. This makes for a very interesting choice of medium, and the dissonance is played up for all it's worth. The mechanics encourage you to reduce your co-workers to RelationshipValues and hoard their prized possessions -- which don't even have any meaning to you! -- all while characters wax philosophical about the meaning of objects in our lives and if we can really gain happiness just through having enough possessions. One of the characters is an avid gamer obsessed with [[AchievementUnlocked virtual achievements]] and the like. Gaining an item results in a cheerful ItemGet jingle, while losing one results in a sad trombone noise, even when it's part of a scripted sequence. This makes many players have a kneejerk negative reaction to losing items, even when it makes perfect sense and is the smarter option. The [[spoiler:gold placard]] is a particular {{Troll}} in this regard; it's ''only ever added to the inventory in cutscenes'', because Florentine always discards it again by the end of the scene. You never keep it permanently, even though it looks like a legitimate item. The game also dramatically tallies up ScoringPoints at the end of every day over a background that says "[[LampshadeHanging Everything is collectible]]"; these points do absolutely nothing. While there is never any explicit betrayal of the player on the level of some other examples here, the game is carefully crafted to make the player uncomfortable and reevaluate their behavior.

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* The CentralTheme of ''VisualNovel/FleuretBlanc'' is materialism and obsession -- two things that video games, by their nature, tend to encourage. This makes for a very interesting choice of medium, and the dissonance is played up for all it's worth. The mechanics encourage you to reduce your co-workers to RelationshipValues and hoard their prized possessions -- which don't even have any meaning to you! -- all while characters wax philosophical about the meaning of objects in our lives and if we can really gain happiness just through having enough possessions. One of the characters is an avid gamer obsessed with [[AchievementUnlocked virtual achievements]] achievements and the like. Gaining an item results in a cheerful ItemGet jingle, while losing one results in a sad trombone noise, even when it's part of a scripted sequence. This makes many players have a kneejerk negative reaction to losing items, even when it makes perfect sense and is the smarter option. The [[spoiler:gold placard]] is a particular {{Troll}} in this regard; it's ''only ever added to the inventory in cutscenes'', because Florentine always discards it again by the end of the scene. You never keep it permanently, even though it looks like a legitimate item. The game also dramatically tallies up ScoringPoints at the end of every day over a background that says "[[LampshadeHanging Everything is collectible]]"; these points do absolutely nothing. While there is never any explicit betrayal of the player on the level of some other examples here, the game is carefully crafted to make the player uncomfortable and reevaluate their behavior.
21st Feb '16 1:42:27 PM Dravencour
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* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' starts off by doing its best to convince the player that it is a standard military shooter; everything from the trailer, the demo, the cover art to even the first 40 or so minutes of gameplay is engineered to make the game appear as nothing more than a typical {{America Saves the Day}}, kill-all-the-bad-guys shooter. However as the story unfolds, it slowly reveals itself to be a GenreDeconstruction of military shooter games, criticizes the genre for providing players an unrealistic and immoral escapist fantasy through the glorification of violence. The game straight up calls out the player for using the game to act out a [[IJustWantToBeBadass power fantasy]], calling into question the morality of playing games which simulate killing people for fun. The game's protagonist, Capt. Martin Walker, transforms from a strait-laced, no-nonsense soldier into a vicious, bloodthirsty maniac as a result of his experiences and the increasingly barbaric actions he is "forced" to carry out. [[spoiler:At the end of the game, it is revealed that he had been hallucinating large parts of the game, including the existence of Col. John Konrad, the alleged "villain".]]

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* ''VideoGame/SpecOpsTheLine'' starts off by doing its level best to convince the player that it is a standard military shooter; everything from the trailer, the demo, the cover art to even the first 40 or so minutes of gameplay is engineered to make the game appear as nothing more than a typical {{America Saves the Day}}, kill-all-the-bad-guys shooter. However as the story unfolds, it slowly reveals itself to be a GenreDeconstruction of military shooter games, and criticizes the genre for providing players an unrealistic and immoral escapist fantasy through the glorification of violence. The game straight up calls out the player for using the game to act out a [[IJustWantToBeBadass power fantasy]], calling into question the morality of playing games which simulate killing people for fun. The game's protagonist, Capt. Martin Walker, transforms from a strait-laced, no-nonsense soldier into a vicious, bloodthirsty maniac as a result of his experiences and the increasingly barbaric actions he is "forced" to carry out. [[spoiler:At the end of the game, it is revealed that he had been hallucinating large parts of the game, including the existence of Col. John Konrad, the alleged "villain".]]
31st Jan '16 9:18:33 AM nombretomado
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* ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' is ''infamous'' for doing this. The game begins with you waking up from cryo-sleep with [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]] stuffed into your head and throws you into a spaceship overrun with aliens. Sounds relatively standard so far. Until you [[TheReveal discover]] that [[spoiler:MissionControl is really the BigBad of the first game and lied to you by assuming the identity of someone else. Oh, and said villain [[LaserGuidedAmnesia tampered with your memory restoration]]. Said villain remains as MissionControl, declaring that your only chance to survive is to destroy the alien infestation with her help. So you go along with the plan, as she [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything creepily dotes on you]] and declares you to be her "avatar" (or more correctly, pawn).]]
** ''SystemShock 1'' did it brilliantly too, when you need to make a rather difficult leap from one platform to another in a place where you '''think''' you're safely hidden from SHODAN's view, only to suddenly hear three words. "[[PunctuatedForEmphasis Nice]]. [[OhCrap Jump]]. [[ParanoiaFuel Human]]." Just one of numerous ways that SHODAN made such a memorable villain was by ''toying'' with you, like a cat toying with a mouse.

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* ''VideoGame/SystemShock 2'' ''VideoGame/SystemShock2'' is ''infamous'' for doing this. The game begins with you waking up from cryo-sleep with [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]] stuffed into your head and throws you into a spaceship overrun with aliens. Sounds relatively standard so far. Until you [[TheReveal discover]] that [[spoiler:MissionControl is really the BigBad of the first game and lied to you by assuming the identity of someone else. Oh, and said villain [[LaserGuidedAmnesia tampered with your memory restoration]]. Said villain remains as MissionControl, declaring that your only chance to survive is to destroy the alien infestation with her help. So you go along with the plan, as she [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything creepily dotes on you]] and declares you to be her "avatar" (or more correctly, pawn).]]
** ''SystemShock ''VideoGame/SystemShock 1'' did it brilliantly too, when you need to make a rather difficult leap from one platform to another in a place where you '''think''' you're safely hidden from SHODAN's view, only to suddenly hear three words. "[[PunctuatedForEmphasis Nice]]. [[OhCrap Jump]]. [[ParanoiaFuel Human]]." Just one of numerous ways that SHODAN made such a memorable villain was by ''toying'' with you, like a cat toying with a mouse.
21st Dec '15 5:59:48 PM eroock
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/SilentHillShatteredMemories http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/PlayingThePlayer_3830.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/SilentHillShatteredMemories http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/PlayingThePlayer_3830.org/pmwiki/pub/images/playing_the_player.jpg]]]]
21st Dec '15 5:47:45 PM eroock
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->''Games tend to be very trustworthy--good guys are good, bad guys are bad. What you see and perceive is real. Sometimes characters are betrayed, but the player never is. ''

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->''Games ->''"Games tend to be very trustworthy--good guys are good, bad guys are bad. What you see and perceive is real. Sometimes characters are betrayed, but the player never is. ''"''
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