History Main / PixelHunt

26th Mar '18 9:13:37 PM Gingerkitteh
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** Other enjoyable hunts include spotting brown grubs against a brown backgryou were looking for. Later in the game, you have to pick one book out of a huge bookshelf spanning a wall hiding yet another key and if you hadn't solved the puzzle on the nearby table, you could be at it for a while. Once again, picking the right area gave you a nice close-up on the book you were looking for.

to:

** Other enjoyable hunts include spotting brown grubs against a brown backgryou background you were looking for. Later in the game, you have to pick one book out of a huge bookshelf spanning a wall hiding yet another key and if you hadn't solved the puzzle on the nearby table, you could be at it for a while. Once again, picking the right area gave you a nice close-up on the book you were looking for.
10th Mar '18 6:58:30 AM Generality
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* Mateus Skutnik's adventure games often feature some degree of this, particularly the ''VideoGame/{{Submachine}} and ''VideoGame/DaymareTown'' series. There's a tendency to hide necessary items amidst a collection of similar background items, forcing the player to look for a wrench in a pile of debris and metal fragments, or a single wire in a room full of disassembled machine parts. The hardest, by design, are the Secrets, used to get bonus material. They usually take the form of red circles a few pixels wide, and can be easy or fiendishly difficult to spot depending on the color of the background. There are a few in each game that can only be found by tremendous luck or by exhaustively searching each screen.

to:

* Mateus Skutnik's adventure games often feature some degree of this, particularly the ''VideoGame/{{Submachine}} ''VideoGame/{{Submachine}}'' and ''VideoGame/DaymareTown'' series. There's a tendency to hide necessary items amidst a collection of similar background items, forcing the player to look for a wrench in a pile of debris and metal fragments, or a single wire in a room full of disassembled machine parts. The hardest, by design, are the Secrets, used to get bonus material. They usually take the form of red circles a few pixels wide, and can be easy or fiendishly difficult to spot depending on the color of the background. There are a few in each game that can only be found by tremendous luck or by exhaustively searching each screen.
10th Mar '18 6:57:53 AM Generality
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Added DiffLines:

* Mateus Skutnik's adventure games often feature some degree of this, particularly the ''VideoGame/{{Submachine}} and ''VideoGame/DaymareTown'' series. There's a tendency to hide necessary items amidst a collection of similar background items, forcing the player to look for a wrench in a pile of debris and metal fragments, or a single wire in a room full of disassembled machine parts. The hardest, by design, are the Secrets, used to get bonus material. They usually take the form of red circles a few pixels wide, and can be easy or fiendishly difficult to spot depending on the color of the background. There are a few in each game that can only be found by tremendous luck or by exhaustively searching each screen.
18th Feb '18 9:35:19 AM v-n-n-n-n
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* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'' has this too; surprisingly, on it's map screen for turf wars. One of the turfs is a single sidewalk on the north edge of the map. On the in-game map this becomes a barely visible line, usually yellow against the green of your gang.

to:

* ''VideoGame/GrandTheftAutoSanAndreas'' has this too; surprisingly, on it's its map screen for turf wars. One of the turfs is a single sidewalk on the north edge of the map. On the in-game map this becomes a barely visible line, usually yellow purple against the green of your gang.
8th Feb '18 1:59:21 AM GoblinCipher
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* While ''VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors'' is usually very good about avoiding this, with only important objects reacting to clicks, one room is a big exception to this -- the Library. Nearly every section of the enormous bookshelves is interactable, but only a tiny handful serve any purpose and there are no visual clues at all. Worse, the game's navigation is similar to ''VideoGame/{{Myst}}'', so even with a walkthrough it can be hard to understand what section of the room you're being directed towards. Adding insult to injury is that the room's central puzzle is childishly simple ... once you've pixel hunted up the six pieces to it.
2nd Feb '18 4:47:53 PM morenohijazo
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Added DiffLines:

* ''VideoGame/RandalsMonday'': The clover hunt during the [[spoiler:prison chapter]]. Otherwise [[AvertedTrope averted]].
11th Dec '17 10:08:05 PM bwburke94
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** Other enjoyable hunts include spotting brown grubs against a brown background, spotting one moving leaf among a whole forest of leaves, and spotting a bridge that is ABOUT to be burned down. Of course, there's also that one where you have to find the one tiny little pixel that activates a light source - IN PITCH BLACK!!!
** There's a fun one at the end of the game, which, while obvious in hindsight, can be counter-intuitive the first time around because it averts one of the usual conventions of gaming, to wit: [[spoiler:You have to target MB rather than trying to dispose of her minions first]]. Made all the more confusing by the fact that said convention is in full force for the previous boss fight, where [[spoiler:you have to kill all the small Metroids before you can damage the big one]]. Considering her massive minions are right in your face the whole time (and do take damage, but never seem to die) and she's way in the background while her henchmen attack you viciously, it's a particularly mendacious example, as the game uses intentional trickery to misdirect you from thinking it's even a Pixel Hunt at all.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Action RPG]]
* ''VideoGame/AvalonCode'' is ridiculous in this regard. Every map has a single spot that will give a small description if you press A to examine it. Said spot is invisible, so if you want [[HundredPercentCompletion full points on a map]], you'll have to run around frantically pressing the A button at every suspicious nook, and you also need to do this in areas where there's enemies, which means that pressing A instead causes you to attempt to uppercut a nonexistent enemy every time you press it and aren't close enough to a piece of scenery that you can examine.
* The first ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' does not have the key that highlights all items on the floor. Good luck finding that tiny ring. This is so frustrating that the third party Hellfire expansion adds both a spell ''and'' a character power to illuminate all items.
* A less onerous example comes in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas''. Plot-critical items are rarely difficult to find, but some switches, doors, or bonus items can very easily blend into the RealIsBrown background and assorted junk. This gets extremely annoying when they are laying amongst owned items, and it can take a minute to find the exact angle to avoid stealing someone's toothbrush and being attacked.
* While not necessary for completion, finding the Daredevil and Black Panther action figures in ''VideoGame/MarvelUltimateAlliance'' (which are required for unlocking the respective characters) can turn into this. Both are fairly dark and can end up being near-invisible in levels like Mephisto's Realm.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' has a number of invisible items, usually key items such as "Dentures", "Beetle", or "Firewood", that require a bit of pixel-hunting.
* ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' suffers from some incredibly obnoxious moments where the player simply has to "search the area for clues" or some such. Often the player can search the same object three or four times without triggering a necessary cutscene because Aya has to be facing just so and interacting with the exact right pixels. Worse was the fact that you can't run and search at the same time, so button-mashing a search ends up with Aya's running animation going on and off like a strobe light.
* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' uses this during the battle with Tigris Cantus. At one point, she deactivates all of Neku's pins, turns invisible on a white screen while she summons illusions of herself, and [[spoiler: equips the player with only the Rhyme pin]]. You need to find a ''tiny'' little yellow glint to attack so that you do damage. Luckily, you can track said glint by examining the direction of the player character's shadow.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Adventure Game]]
* This is commonplace in free online games of the "escape the room" variety.
* ''VideoGame/AmazonGuardiansOfEden'' requires the player to find a decoder ring in a recently-trashed room. In a literal example of this trope, the ring is ''precisely'' one pixel--hard to find even at the game's low screen resolution.
* ''VideoGame/AnotherCode'' has this occur twice. Once you have to examine a specific window in a cabinet to find a glass with the key to the next room, but there are no clues as to which one to pick. Thankfully, once you find the right one, you get a big old close-up on the key you were looking for. Later in the game, you have to pick one book out of a huge bookshelf spanning a wall hiding yet another key and if you hadn't solved the puzzle on the nearby table, you could be at it for a while. Once again, picking the right area gave you a nice close-up on the book you were looking for.

to:

** Other enjoyable hunts include spotting brown grubs against a brown background, spotting one moving leaf among a whole forest of leaves, and spotting a bridge that is ABOUT to be burned down. Of course, there's also that one where you have to find the one tiny little pixel that activates a light source - IN PITCH BLACK!!!
** There's a fun one at the end of the game, which, while obvious in hindsight, can be counter-intuitive the first time around because it averts one of the usual conventions of gaming, to wit: [[spoiler:You have to target MB rather than trying to dispose of her minions first]]. Made all the more confusing by the fact that said convention is in full force for the previous boss fight, where [[spoiler:you have to kill all the small Metroids before you can damage the big one]]. Considering her massive minions are right in your face the whole time (and do take damage, but never seem to die) and she's way in the background while her henchmen attack you viciously, it's a particularly mendacious example, as the game uses intentional trickery to misdirect you from thinking it's even a Pixel Hunt at all.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Action RPG]]
* ''VideoGame/AvalonCode'' is ridiculous in this regard. Every map has a single spot that will give a small description if you press A to examine it. Said spot is invisible, so if you want [[HundredPercentCompletion full points on a map]], you'll have to run around frantically pressing the A button at every suspicious nook, and you also need to do this in areas where there's enemies, which means that pressing A instead causes you to attempt to uppercut a nonexistent enemy every time you press it and aren't close enough to a piece of scenery that you can examine.
* The first ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' does not have the key that highlights all items on the floor. Good luck finding that tiny ring. This is so frustrating that the third party Hellfire expansion adds both a spell ''and'' a character power to illuminate all items.
* A less onerous example comes in ''VideoGame/{{Fallout 3}}'' and ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas''. Plot-critical items are rarely difficult to find, but some switches, doors, or bonus items can very easily blend into the RealIsBrown background and assorted junk. This gets extremely annoying when they are laying amongst owned items, and it can take a minute to find the exact angle to avoid stealing someone's toothbrush and being attacked.
* While not necessary for completion, finding the Daredevil and Black Panther action figures in ''VideoGame/MarvelUltimateAlliance'' (which are required for unlocking the respective characters) can turn into this. Both are fairly dark and can end up being near-invisible in levels like Mephisto's Realm.
* ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' has a number of invisible items, usually key items such as "Dentures", "Beetle", or "Firewood", that require a bit of pixel-hunting.
* ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' suffers from some incredibly obnoxious moments where the player simply has to "search the area for clues" or some such. Often the player can search the same object three or four times without triggering a necessary cutscene because Aya has to be facing just so and interacting with the exact right pixels. Worse was the fact that you can't run and search at the same time, so button-mashing a search ends up with Aya's running animation going on and off like a strobe light.
* ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' uses this during the battle with Tigris Cantus. At one point, she deactivates all of Neku's pins, turns invisible on a white screen while she summons illusions of herself, and [[spoiler: equips the player with only the Rhyme pin]]. You need to find a ''tiny'' little yellow glint to attack so that you do damage. Luckily, you can track said glint by examining the direction of the player character's shadow.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Adventure Game]]
* This is commonplace in free online games of the "escape the room" variety.
* ''VideoGame/AmazonGuardiansOfEden'' requires the player to find a decoder ring in a recently-trashed room. In a literal example of this trope, the ring is ''precisely'' one pixel--hard to find even at the game's low screen resolution.
* ''VideoGame/AnotherCode'' has this occur twice. Once you have to examine a specific window in a cabinet to find a glass with the key to the next room, but there are no clues as to which one to pick. Thankfully, once you find the right one, you get a big old close-up on the key you
backgryou were looking for. Later in the game, you have to pick one book out of a huge bookshelf spanning a wall hiding yet another key and if you hadn't solved the puzzle on the nearby table, you could be at it for a while. Once again, picking the right area gave you a nice close-up on the book you were looking for.



[[folder:Interactive Novel]]
* Some of the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games use this trope during the investigation scenes, particularly in the last case of the third game where it's necessary to find [[spoiler: a tiny, tiny note slipped almost completely under an ottoman]] in order to break a psyche-lock and advance the plot. For the most part, clues in the ''Ace Attorney'' series are quite obvious, with only a few hidden. The point of the game isn't to hide the clues, but hide their meanings, after all. ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' [[AntiFrustrationFeatures alleviates this a little]] by having your cursor flash whenever you hover over something of significance, and display a checkmark when hovering over a particular item or area that you've already examined.
* ''VideoGame/StarTrekBorg'' has one annoying sequence where you have to press the button on the bottom of a phaser in order to change its frequency setting; if you fail to do this, a passing Borg will show up and kill both you and your partner. Unfortunately, the hotspot that allows you to push the button is either in the wrong place, approximately two pixels wide or is otherwise programmed to work only 1 out of 256 times. The game's developers did release a patch that fixed one of the game's hotspots... unfortunately, this is the hotspot for punching your partner in the face (a necessary action nonetheless).
* The dark setting of ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'' makes some items in puzzle rooms go unnoticeable or plain invisible, which will drag on the investigation and create much frustration because one of the features of [[VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors its prequel]] yields a yellow outline whenever you click something examinable, and in this installment it's gone. One of the major offenders of this trope in VLR is the binder in GAULEM Bay, which is dark grey in a black area next to a ''blatantly noticeable white'' coat, making it impossible to see if your console screen is obscured by a bright light in whatever place you're playing at. There's also the shelf in the Laboratory, which has ''tons'' of bottles and beakers and only half of them are useful, yet you can't tell which is which until you click in every one of them.
* In ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma'', the bio-lab holds a bookshelf that- if the protagonists take a closer look at it- takes up about two-thirds of the screen. All of its books are dully colored, have no visible titles, and have several nondescript cardboard boxes scattered among them. Clicking on any of those things will not help. You are supposed to click on the one sheaf of paper, lying atop one box, in this giant bookshelf. And may God help you, because the game's actual controls will not.
[[/folder]]


Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Visual Novel]]
* Some of the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games use this trope during the investigation scenes, particularly in the last case of the third game where it's necessary to find [[spoiler: a tiny, tiny note slipped almost completely under an ottoman]] in order to break a psyche-lock and advance the plot. For the most part, clues in the ''Ace Attorney'' series are quite obvious, with only a few hidden. The point of the game isn't to hide the clues, but hide their meanings, after all. ''VisualNovel/PhoenixWrightAceAttorneyDualDestinies'' [[AntiFrustrationFeatures alleviates this a little]] by having your cursor flash whenever you hover over something of significance, and display a checkmark when hovering over a particular item or area that you've already examined.
* ''VideoGame/StarTrekBorg'' has one annoying sequence where you have to press the button on the bottom of a phaser in order to change its frequency setting; if you fail to do this, a passing Borg will show up and kill both you and your partner. Unfortunately, the hotspot that allows you to push the button is either in the wrong place, approximately two pixels wide or is otherwise programmed to work only 1 out of 256 times. The game's developers did release a patch that fixed one of the game's hotspots... unfortunately, this is the hotspot for punching your partner in the face (a necessary action nonetheless).
* The dark setting of ''VisualNovel/VirtuesLastReward'' makes some items in puzzle rooms go unnoticeable or plain invisible, which will drag on the investigation and create much frustration because one of the features of [[VisualNovel/NineHoursNinePersonsNineDoors its prequel]] yields a yellow outline whenever you click something examinable, and in this installment it's gone. One of the major offenders of this trope in VLR is the binder in GAULEM Bay, which is dark grey in a black area next to a ''blatantly noticeable white'' coat, making it impossible to see if your console screen is obscured by a bright light in whatever place you're playing at. There's also the shelf in the Laboratory, which has ''tons'' of bottles and beakers and only half of them are useful, yet you can't tell which is which until you click in every one of them.
* In ''VisualNovel/ZeroTimeDilemma'', the bio-lab holds a bookshelf that- if the protagonists take a closer look at it- takes up about two-thirds of the screen. All of its books are dully colored, have no visible titles, and have several nondescript cardboard boxes scattered among them. Clicking on any of those things will not help. You are supposed to click on the one sheaf of paper, lying atop one box, in this giant bookshelf. And may God help you, because the game's actual controls will not.
[[/folder]]
4th Dec '17 8:22:28 AM Cryoclaste
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* The 2D ''{{Metroid}}'' games after ''Super Metroid'' have pixel hunting to find hidden tunnels and holes in the ceiling (especially with the ones that can't be detected by shooting or releasing bombs at the wall/ceiling).

to:

* The 2D ''{{Metroid}}'' ''Franchise/{{Metroid}}'' games after ''Super Metroid'' have pixel hunting to find hidden tunnels and holes in the ceiling (especially with the ones that can't be detected by shooting or releasing bombs at the wall/ceiling).
16th Oct '17 1:50:55 PM Leefan
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* Mr. Little from ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' is exactly what his name implies, at only five pixels tall. What's worse is that he's wearing green, and standing in grass that's about the same shade and height. At least he walks around. If not for his family, located elsewhere in more conspicuous surroundings, you would never know he was around. Fortunately, he is not needed to advance in the game. You need never even realize he exists.

to:

* Mr. Little from ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' is exactly what his name implies, at only five pixels tall. What's worse is that he's wearing green, and standing in grass that's about the same shade and height. At least he walks around. If not for his family, located elsewhere in more conspicuous surroundings, you would never know he was around. Fortunately, he is not needed to advance in the game. You need may never even realize he exists.
30th Sep '17 3:07:38 PM morenohijazo
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* In ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'', connector puzzles gradually become this as they increase in difficulty. The hardest puzzles require finding a specific spot to place your connector so that it can draw an appropriate line of sight through different elements. In puzzles like "Time Crawls", the margin for error is minimal and putting the connector a few centimetres away won't work.

to:

* In ''VideoGame/TheTalosPrinciple'', connector puzzles gradually become this as they increase in difficulty. The hardest puzzles require finding a specific spot to place your connector so that it can draw an appropriate line of sight through different elements. In puzzles like "Time Crawls", the margin for error is minimal and putting the connector a few centimetres away won't work.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.PixelHunt