History Main / PixelHunt

6th Feb '16 7:38:03 PM Thunderchin
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** There's also a fun one at the end of the game, which, while obvious in hindsight, can be counter-intuitive the first time around because it averts one of the usual conventions of gaming, to wit: [[spoiler:You have to target MB rather than trying to dispose of her minions first]]. Made all the more confusing by the fact that said convention was in full force for the previous boss fight, where [[spoiler:you have to kill all the small metroids before you can damage the big one]]. Considering her massive minions are right in your face the whole time (and do take damage, but never seem to die) and she's way in the background), and attack you viciously, it's a particularly mendacious example, as the game uses intentional trickery to misdirect you from thinking it's even a Pixel Hunt at all.
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** Of course, there's also that one where you have to find the one tiny little pixel that activates a light source - [[ThatOneLevel IN PITCH BLACK]]!!! ** There's also a fun [[SarcasmMode fun]] one at the end of the game, which, while obvious in hindsight, can be counter-intuitive the first time around because it averts one of the usual conventions of gaming, to wit: [[spoiler:You have to target MB rather than trying to dispose of her minions first]]. Made all the more confusing by the fact that said convention was in full force for the previous boss fight, where [[spoiler:you have to kill all the small metroids before you can damage the big one]]. Considering her massive minions are right in your face the whole time (and do take damage, but never seem to die) and she's way in the background), and attack you viciously, it's a particularly mendacious example, as the game uses intentional trickery to misdirect you from thinking it's even a Pixel Hunt at all.
2nd Feb '16 8:34:06 AM BeerBaron
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It's the first mission of the main quest, not a FG quest (though it is given by a member of the FG)
** For the most part, significant objects in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' are easy to find. However, one of the early Fighters' Guild quests has you looking for a [[MacGuffin Dwemer Cube]] in a nearby ruin, and you aren't told what it looks like. It's a three-inch cube in muted colors, sitting on a shelf in an easily-overlooked alcove of a very large room. Another sidequest has you searching for a ring at the bottom of a pond. In good light conditions it borders on one of these, but to get the full experience you need to happen upon it at night. Having a character that needs to periodically surface for air is a bonus.
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** For the most part, significant objects in ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind'' are easy to find. However, one of the early Fighters' Guild quests first mission for the main quest has you looking for a [[MacGuffin Dwemer Cube]] in a nearby ruin, and you aren't told what it looks like. It's a three-inch cube in muted colors, sitting on a shelf in an easily-overlooked alcove of a very large room. Another sidequest has you searching for a ring at the bottom of a pond. In good light conditions it borders on one of these, but to get the full experience you need to happen upon it at night. Having a character that needs to periodically surface for air is a bonus.
16th Jan '16 6:23:44 PM MyFinalEdits
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General examples aren't allowed anymore
* This trope is the whole point of {{Hidden Object game}}s, but many still manage to take this to a frustrating, potentially rage-inducing level, because the games themselves are built on the very lazy mistake that these are prevalent in adventure games because people enjoy them. Objects might be hidden in such a way that you can't really identify what it's supposed to be. Or the descriptor for an object is only loosely similar to the actual object used. Some games even penalize you for clicking too much. ** Some games would even specify the color of an object to be found, but until you located the object for the first time it would not actually be shown as that color.
16th Jan '16 5:54:00 PM zaphod77
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** Some games would even specify the color of an object to be found, but until you located the object for the first time it would not actually be shown as that color.
3rd Dec '15 7:23:52 PM nombretomado
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* In the Japanese room escape game ''Doukoku'' for the SegaSaturn: if you want to save a particular female character when her leg gets caught between an iron grille, in between utilizing some quite obvious items on screen, you have to click on her hair, where you find a hairpin to unscrew the grille. Not only is this not hinted at, the hairpin is also completely invisible (you don't even get to see it as an item), and all other similar clicks have actual items drawn on screen for you to see. Not to mention you get the impression that you have to go to other places to find the suitable item, since most room escape games (including this one) require players to do so. Do that, and the girl dies the most horrible death in the game (foreshadowed by the chainsaw next to her, which you can actually use to try to set her free, only to find out that the iron grille is just too strong for the chainsaw without putting her into harm).
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* In the Japanese room escape game ''Doukoku'' for the SegaSaturn: UsefulNotes/SegaSaturn: if you want to save a particular female character when her leg gets caught between an iron grille, in between utilizing some quite obvious items on screen, you have to click on her hair, where you find a hairpin to unscrew the grille. Not only is this not hinted at, the hairpin is also completely invisible (you don't even get to see it as an item), and all other similar clicks have actual items drawn on screen for you to see. Not to mention you get the impression that you have to go to other places to find the suitable item, since most room escape games (including this one) require players to do so. Do that, and the girl dies the most horrible death in the game (foreshadowed by the chainsaw next to her, which you can actually use to try to set her free, only to find out that the iron grille is just too strong for the chainsaw without putting her into harm).
17th Oct '15 8:44:10 PM TheGreenHerring
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* ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' is rife with these. Examples include the locket, the crystal, the piece of cheese, and probably several others that my memory has suppressed. It also includes an actual, well, needle in a haystack (a ''gold'' needle, just to make things worse.) [[spoiler: Luckily, you don't have to hunt the pixel to get it, although some people doubtless tried.]]
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* ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' is rife with these. Examples include the locket, the crystal, crystal and the piece of cheese, and probably several others that my memory has suppressed. cheese. It also includes an actual, well, actual needle in a haystack (a ''gold'' needle, just to make things worse.) [[spoiler: Luckily, you don't have to hunt the pixel to get it, although some people doubtless tried.]]

* The ''VideoGame/TheXFilesGame'' had a required clue in the form of a bullet that was ''2x2 pixels big'' (in a game that ran at 640x480), making it probably the most egregious example of (quite literal) pixel hunting on this list.
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* The ''VideoGame/TheXFilesGame'' had a required clue in the form of a bullet that was ''2x2 pixels big'' (in a game that ran at 640x480), making it probably the most egregious example of (quite literal) pixel hunting on this list.
16th Oct '15 11:51:53 AM TheGreenHerring
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* ''VideoGame/AmazonGuardiansOfEden'' requires the player to find a decoder ring in a recently-trashed room. The ring is ''literally'' a single pixel.
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* ''VideoGame/AmazonGuardiansOfEden'' requires the player to find a decoder ring in a recently-trashed room. The In a literal example of this trope, the ring is ''literally'' a single pixel.''precisely'' one pixel--hard to find even at the game's low screen resolution.
15th Oct '15 7:39:04 PM TheGreenHerring
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* ''VideoGame/AmazonGuardiansOfEden'' requires the player to find a decoder ring in a recently-trashed room. The ring is ''literally'' a single pixel.
15th Oct '15 7:32:47 PM TheGreenHerring
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alphabetize all sections
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%% %% This list of examples has been alphabetized. Please add your example in the proper place. Thanks! %%

* In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'', Subject 16 encoded data which you have to decode with Pixel Hunt puzzles by finding either Pieces of Eden in historical photographs or Renaissance paintings. At least in the paintings you are trying to find something which was already in the painting (a staff, a sword, etc) which can be recognized. In the photos, you are looking for a little sphere the devs added and thus have no frame of reference. Just hunt and peck. * Mr. Little from ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' is exactly what his name implies, at only five pixels tall. What's worse is that he's wearing green, and standing in grass that's about the same shade and height. At least he walks around. If not for his family, located elsewhere in more conspicuous surroundings, you would never know he was around. Fortunately, he is not needed to advance in the game. You need never even realize he exists. * Many puzzles in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' ''[[UpdatedRerelease Master Quest]]'' consist of locating torches and switches embedded in walls, boxes, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick cows]], or that are otherwise very well concealed or [[HiddenInPlainSight hidden in plain sight]].

* In ''VideoGame/AssassinsCreedII'', Subject 16 encoded data which you have to decode with Pixel Hunt puzzles by finding either Pieces of Eden in historical photographs or Renaissance paintings. At least in the paintings you are trying to find something which was already in the painting (a staff, a sword, etc) which can be recognized. In the photos, you are looking for a little sphere the devs added and thus have no frame of reference. Just hunt and peck. * Mr. Little from ''VideoGame/CaveStory'' is exactly what his name implies, at only five pixels tall. What's worse is that he's wearing green, and standing in grass that's about the same shade and height. At least he walks around. If not for his family, located elsewhere in more conspicuous surroundings, you would never know he was around. Fortunately, he is not needed to advance in the game. You need never even realize he exists. * Many puzzles in ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' ''[[UpdatedRerelease Master Quest]]'' consist of locating torches and switches embedded in walls, boxes, [[BreadEggsMilkSquick cows]], or that are otherwise very well concealed or [[HiddenInPlainSight hidden in plain sight]].

* ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' suffers from some incredibly obnoxious moments where the player simply has to "search the area for clues" or some such. Often the player can search the same object three or four times without triggering a necessary cutscene because Aya has to be facing just so and interacting with the exact right pixels. Worse was the fact that you couldn't run and search at the same time, so button-mashing a search ended up with Aya's running animation going on and off like a strobe light. * ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' kinda uses this during the battle with Tigris Cantus. At one point, she deactivates all of Neku's pins, turns invisible on a white screen while she summons illusions of herself, and [[spoiler: equips the player with only the Rhyme pin]]. You need to find a ''tiny'' little yellow glint to attack so that you do damage. Luckily, you can track said glint by examining the direction of the player character's shadow. * ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' has a number of invisible items, usually key items, such as "Dentures", "Beetle", or "Firewood" that require a bit of pixel-hunting. * While not necessary for completion, finding the Daredevil and Black Panther action figures in ''MarvelUltimateAlliance'' (which are required for unlocking the respective characters) can turn into this. Both are fairly dark and can end up being near-invisible in levels like Mephisto's Realm.

* ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' suffers from some incredibly obnoxious moments where The first ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' did not have the player simply has to "search the area for clues" or some such. Often the player can search the same object three or four times without triggering a necessary cutscene because Aya has to be facing just so and interacting with the exact right pixels. Worse was the fact key that you couldn't run and search at highlights all items on the same time, so button-mashing a search ended up with Aya's running animation going on and off like a strobe light. * ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' kinda uses this during the battle with Tigris Cantus. At one point, she deactivates all of Neku's pins, turns invisible on a white screen while she summons illusions of herself, and [[spoiler: equips the player with only the Rhyme pin]]. You need to find a ''tiny'' little yellow glint to attack so that you do damage. Luckily, you can track said glint by examining the direction of the player character's shadow. * ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' has a number of invisible items, usually key items, such as "Dentures", "Beetle", or "Firewood" that require a bit of pixel-hunting. * While not necessary for completion, floor. Good luck finding that tiny ring. This was so frustrating that the Daredevil and Black Panther action figures in ''MarvelUltimateAlliance'' (which are required for unlocking the respective characters) can turn into this. Both are fairly dark and can end up being near-invisible in levels like Mephisto's Realm.third party Hellfire expansion added both a spell ''and'' a character power to illuminate all items.

* The first ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' did not have the key that highlights all items on the floor. Good luck finding that tiny ring. This was so frustrating that the third party Hellfire expansion added both a spell ''and'' a character power to illuminate all items.
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* The first ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'' did While not have the key that highlights all items on the floor. Good luck necessary for completion, finding the Daredevil and Black Panther action figures in ''VideoGame/MarvelUltimateAlliance'' (which are required for unlocking the respective characters) can turn into this. Both are fairly dark and can end up being near-invisible in levels like Mephisto's Realm. * ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'' has a number of invisible items, usually key items, such as "Dentures", "Beetle", or "Firewood" that tiny ring. This require a bit of pixel-hunting. * ''VideoGame/ParasiteEve'' suffers from some incredibly obnoxious moments where the player simply has to "search the area for clues" or some such. Often the player can search the same object three or four times without triggering a necessary cutscene because Aya has to be facing just so and interacting with the exact right pixels. Worse was so frustrating the fact that you couldn't run and search at the third party Hellfire expansion added both same time, so button-mashing a spell ''and'' search ended up with Aya's running animation going on and off like a character power to illuminate strobe light. * ''VideoGame/TheWorldEndsWithYou'' kinda uses this during the battle with Tigris Cantus. At one point, she deactivates all items.of Neku's pins, turns invisible on a white screen while she summons illusions of herself, and [[spoiler: equips the player with only the Rhyme pin]]. You need to find a ''tiny'' little yellow glint to attack so that you do damage. Luckily, you can track said glint by examining the direction of the player character's shadow.

* ''VideoGame/KingsQuestIV'': the bridle on the island, and the gold ball under the bridge. * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' is rife with these. Examples include the locket, the crystal, the piece of cheese, and probably several others that my memory has suppressed. It also includes an actual, well, needle in a haystack (a ''gold'' needle, just to make things worse.) [[spoiler: Luckily, you don't have to hunt the pixel to get it, although some people doubtless tried.]] * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestVI'' contains a one-pixel coin you have to find. This is actually easy because it has an animated sparkle every few seconds. It turns out the harder pixel hunt on the panel was a board that managed to blend perfectly into the scenery; after the coin fiasco, who would look at it? * ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest 6: Roger Wilco in The Spinal Frontier'' lampshades this by having the narrator comment on a certain very small item when you look at it by saying, after identifying the item, "Good eyesight! Now we'll have to do one of those puzzles where you have to find a one-pixel coin or something. But hey, who'd design a mean, unfair puzzle like THAT?"
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* ''VideoGame/KingsQuestIV'': This is commonplace in free online games of the bridle "escape the room" variety. * ''VideoGame/AnotherCode'' had this occur twice. Once you had to examine a specific window in a cabinet to find a glass with the key to the next room, but there were no clues as to which one to pick. Thankfully, once you found the right, you got a big old close-up for the key you were looking for. Later in the game, you had to pick one book out of a huge bookshelf spanning a wall hiding yet another key and if you hadn't solved the puzzle on the island, nearby table, you could be at it for a while. Once again, picking the right area gave you a nice close-up on the book you were looking for. * ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'', a game based on legends of the Knights Templar, [[MarketBasedTitle was released in the United States as]] ''Circle of Blood'', but had so many tiny and the gold ball under the bridge. * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' is rife with these. Examples include the locket, the crystal, the piece of cheese, and probably several others that my memory has suppressed. It also includes an actual, well, needle in a haystack (a ''gold'' needle, just impossible to make find things worse.) [[spoiler: Luckily, in it that it's better known as "Circle of Mouse". You (almost literally) had to move the mouse over every pixel in a picture to find something you had to have to continue. * The ''Bud Tucker in Double Trouble'' adventure game presents this problem twice. First, in the park there's a teabag in the floor, and you can't beat the game without it, but it's just 4x4 pixels, and in the middle of scenery. Later on, you need to look for a nail, that is even smaller, and you don't have know you can't advance without it. The sad thing is that even after you GuideDangIt and know you need a teabag and a nail, and where they are, they're still very hard to hunt click, and you may need to search for different guides that are more specific on exactly where you're meant to click. There's a third instance in the pixel kitchen with the gorilla, but the area to get it, although some people doubtless tried.]] * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestVI'' contains a one-pixel coin click isn't that small, it's just that you don't know where do you have to find. This is actually easy because it has an animated sparkle every few seconds. It turns out click. You know they [[ExaggeratedTrope overdid]] [[FakeDifficulty it]] when a guide isn't enough to help you solve it. * ''VideoGame/ClockTower'' aka ''Clock Tower: The First Fear'' had the harder pixel hunt on the panel cursor change from an arrow to a target box whenever it was a board moved onto anything that could be interacted with. * Averted in ''VideoGame/DeathGate'' -- no item is too small to be noticed, and everything shows a text description when you mouse over it. Still they managed to blend perfectly into the scenery; after the coin fiasco, who would look hide at it? * ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest 6: Roger Wilco in The Spinal Frontier'' lampshades this by having the narrator comment on a certain very small least one item in plain sight by making ''absolutely'' sure that the player sees it, dismisses it as unimportant and forgets about it. When you realize you need these items, you're likely to not even check that room again, and even then you may still overlook it. Finding it was way more satisfying than finding a PixelHunt spot. * The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' games sometimes had this. Yes, the usable items were captioned, but only once you had the mouse on them, and the Josh-Kirby-lite insanely detailed backgrounds didn't help. ''VideoGame/DiscworldNoir'', as in many things, was an improvement ... except when you look at it by saying, after identifying were locked in jail, and had to find the item, "Good eyesight! Now we'll have right brick in a ''pitch-black room'' to do one of those puzzles where escape. * In the Japanese room escape game ''Doukoku'' for the SegaSaturn: if you want to save a particular female character when her leg gets caught between an iron grille, in between utilizing some quite obvious items on screen, you have to click on her hair, where you find a one-pixel coin hairpin to unscrew the grille. Not only is this not hinted at, the hairpin is also completely invisible (you don't even get to see it as an item), and all other similar clicks have actual items drawn on screen for you to see. Not to mention you get the impression that you have to go to other places to find the suitable item, since most room escape games (including this one) require players to do so. Do that, and the girl dies the most horrible death in the game (foreshadowed by the chainsaw next to her, which you can actually use to try to set her free, only to find out that the iron grille is just too strong for the chainsaw without putting her into harm). %%* Pretty much anything in ''Fascination''. * Towards the end of ''VideoGame/FullThrottle'', not only do you need to find a tiny little spot on a gigantic rock wall to kick so you can open a secret passage, you have to kick it at just the right time. So you'll be kicking the wall all over the place and still not knowing if you're kicking the wrong spot or something. But hey, who'd design if you just haven't gotten the timing down. ** The fluff makes the clue particularly unhelpful--Mo mentions that she used this guideline when she was ''six'', so you're trying to kick spots on the wall where the crack matches the eyeline of a mean, unfair puzzle like THAT?"little kid. The crack that's ''supposed'' to point you at the right spot to kick lines up with your own, grown-up, six-foot-tall eyeline.

%%* Pretty much anything in ''Fascination''. * ''TorinsPassage'', a {{Sierra}} adventure game developed by Al Lowe, featured one scene with this trope implemented quite literally; it involved locating a pixel-sized glint that occasionally flashed on the screen, and in the middle of a ''maze'', at that. And the game's hint system was no help; it merely told you to look for the glint on the screen... ** The game also had another example of a pixel hunt; at another point there is a moss-covered slope that is extremely slick (and yes the game does use the associated pun), and if you attempt to climb it you fall off and die. You can enlist the help of the nearby grass to tell you places that are safe to go to, but grass only tells you where a safe spot is while your cursor is on it, and the safe spots are ludicrously small as well as visually indistinguishable from the rest of the slope. Add this to the fact that you had to find six or seven spots to cross the slope, constantly assaulted by the grass's high-pitched cries of "not there" and "no", hoping for the occasional "yes", it made for an extremely frustrating experience. Al Lowe has ''no idea'' how to play Hot and Cold, apparently. A review showed a screenshot of this game captioned, "See that wrench? Neither did we. For ''three hours.''"
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%%* Pretty much anything in ''Fascination''. * ''TorinsPassage'', a {{Sierra}} adventure game developed by Al Lowe, featured one scene with this trope implemented quite literally; it involved locating a pixel-sized glint that occasionally flashed on the screen, and in the middle of a ''maze'', at that. And the game's hint system was no help; it merely told you to look for the glint on the screen... ** The game also had another example of a pixel hunt; at another point there is a moss-covered slope that is extremely slick (and yes the game does use the associated pun), and if you attempt to climb it you fall off and die. You can enlist the help of the nearby grass to tell you places ''VideoGame/InnocentUntilCaught'' has obtainable objects that are safe to go to, but grass literally two (VGA-)pixels small (such as a tiny chewing gum under a table). ''VideoGame/{{DreamWeb}}'', however, ups the ante by not only tells having 3x3 pixel objects, but also cluttering the screen with a zillion pieces of random junk that can all be picked up... Of course, your character Ryan only has so much space in his inventory. Finding the right objects that are actually needed later can be real fun when your apartment looks like a family of bums lived there for a year... Talk about searching the proverbial needle in a haystack. And yes, you can even pick up ''peas from a leftover TV dinner'' lying on the carpet. To be fair, in some cases, Ryan utters something like "I think I left something important here" when you want to exit a room. * The Polish game ''Kajko i Kokosz'' has many occurrences where you need to pick up a safe spot very small item which doesn't at all stand out against the background. For instance, you have to pick up a stone hid among a stack of identical stones. Or you need to pick up a black rock... which is while your cursor is ''1 by 1 pixels big''. And skipping one of those very small items makes it impossible to finish the game, as you cannot get back to the location it was on, leading to GuideDangIt. Even worse - it was on it, the background of almost the same color. * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestIV'': the bridle on the island, and the safe spots are ludicrously small gold ball under the bridge. * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestV'' is rife with these. Examples include the locket, the crystal, the piece of cheese, and probably several others that my memory has suppressed. It also includes an actual, well, needle in a haystack (a ''gold'' needle, just to make things worse.) [[spoiler: Luckily, you don't have to hunt the pixel to get it, although some people doubtless tried.]] * ''VideoGame/KingsQuestVI'' contains a one-pixel coin you have to find. This is actually easy because it has an animated sparkle every few seconds. It turns out the harder pixel hunt on the panel was a board that managed to blend perfectly into the scenery; after the coin fiasco, who would look at it? * Just as well as visually indistinguishable it displays many, many other common design flaws of adventure games, ''LimboOfTheLost'' fails to disappoint in achieving this one too. Have fun looking for flasks and bottles in the shadows, hunting sheets of wool mere footsteps away from normal view, and picking up pieces of wood with one-pixel-tall hot spots! To be fair, if you're making your graphics by taking screenshots of other games, there's a limit to what you can do in the rest way of the slope. Add this to the fact that you had to find six or seven spots to cross the slope, constantly assaulted by the grass's high-pitched cries of "not there" and "no", hoping for the occasional "yes", it made for an extremely frustrating experience. Al Lowe has ''no idea'' how to play Hot and Cold, apparently. A review showed a screenshot of this game captioned, "See that wrench? Neither did we. For ''three hours.''"object placement.

%%* Pretty much anything * True to its name, ''VideoGame/{{McPixel}}'' takes advantage of its [[{{Retreaux}} intentionally low resolution]] yet high color depth to make clickable objects nary a single pixels in ''Fascination''. * ''TorinsPassage'', a {{Sierra}} adventure game developed by Al Lowe, featured one scene with this trope implemented quite literally; it involved locating a pixel-sized glint that occasionally flashed on the screen, and in the middle of a ''maze'', at that. And the game's hint system was no help; it merely told you to look for the glint on the screen... ** The game also had another example of a pixel hunt; at another point there is a moss-covered slope that is extremely slick (and yes the game does use the associated pun), and if you attempt to climb it you fall off and die. You can enlist the help of the nearby grass to tell you places that are safe to go to, but grass only tells you where a safe spot is width and/or height while your cursor is on it, and the safe spots are ludicrously small as well as visually indistinguishable only a single shade different from the rest of the slope. Add this to the fact that you had to find six or seven spots to cross the slope, constantly assaulted by the grass's high-pitched cries of "not there" and "no", hoping for the occasional "yes", it made for an extremely frustrating experience. Al Lowe has ''no idea'' how to play Hot and Cold, apparently. A review showed a screenshot of this game captioned, "See that wrench? Neither did we. For ''three hours.''"its surroundings.

* Towards the end of ''FullThrottle'', not only do you need to find a tiny little spot on a gigantic rock wall to kick so you can open a secret passage, you have to kick it at just the right time. So you'll be kicking the wall all over the place and still not knowing if you're kicking the wrong spot or if you just haven't gotten the timing down. ** The fluff makes the clue particularly unhelpful -- Mo mentions that she used this guideline when she was ''six'', so you're trying to kick spots on the wall where the crack matches the eyeline of a little kid. The crack that's ''supposed'' to point you at the right spot to kick lines up with your own, grown-up, six-foot-tall eyeline. * The ''VideoGame/TheXFilesGame'' had a required clue in the form of a bullet that was ''2x2 pixels big'' (in a game that ran at 640x480), making it probably the most egregious example of (quite literal) pixel hunting on this list. * ''VideoGame/ClockTower'' aka ''Clock Tower: The First Fear'' had the cursor change from an arrow to a target box whenever it was moved onto anything that could be interacted with. * The Polish game ''Kajko i Kokosz'' has many occurrences where you need to pick up a very small item which doesn't at all stand out against the background. For instance, you have to pick up a stone hid among a stack of identical stones. Or you need to pick up a black rock... which is ''1 by 1 pixels big''. And skipping one of those very small items makes it impossible to finish the game, as you cannot get back to the location it was on, leading to GuideDangIt. Even worse - it was on the background of almost the same color.

* ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}'' also had its points of pixel hunting, with switches hidden in tiny decorative buttons on lamp posts looking exactly like ''every other lamp post'' you encountered on your way there. Good luck hovering over the whole screen in the hopes of seeing the cursor change. * ''SherlockHolmes'' adventure games tend to fall into this trope, as they try to recreate Holmes' ability to make deductions from tiny clues. In one example, you can't move on until you click a specific footprint to take a closer look, then hold your magnifying glass over just the right spot on just the right clump of grass near the footprint, to find a nearly invisible fish scale. * ''Circle of Blood'', AKA ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'', a game based on legends of the Knights Templar, had so many tiny and impossible to find things in it that it's better known as 'Circle of Mouse'. You (almost literally) had to move the mouse over every pixel in a picture to find something you had to have to continue.
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* ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}'' ** ''VideoGame/{{Riven}}: The Sequel to Myst'' also had its points of pixel hunting, with switches hidden in tiny decorative buttons on lamp posts looking exactly like ''every other lamp post'' you encountered on your way there. Good luck hovering over the whole screen in the hopes of seeing the cursor change. * ''SherlockHolmes'' adventure games tend to fall into this trope, as they try to recreate Holmes' ability to make deductions from tiny clues. In one example, you can't move on until you click a specific footprint to take a closer look, then hold your magnifying glass over just the right spot on just the right clump of grass near the footprint, to find a nearly invisible fish scale. * ''Circle of Blood'', AKA ''VideoGame/BrokenSword'', a game based on legends of the Knights Templar, had so many tiny and impossible to find things in it that it's better known as 'Circle of Mouse'. You (almost literally) had to move the mouse over every pixel in a picture to find something you had to have to continue.change.

* Just as well as it displays many, many other common design flaws of adventure games, ''LimboOfTheLost'' fails to disappoint in achieving this one too. Have fun looking for flasks and bottles in the shadows, hunting sheets of wool mere footsteps away from normal view, and picking up pieces of wood with one-pixel-tall hot spots! To be fair, if you're making your graphics by taking screenshots of other games, there's a limit to what you can do in the way of object placement. * This trope was avoided in the ''SimonTheSorcerer'' games, in which you could hit F10 at any time and have all the active objects on the screen highlighted for you. The same didn't go for exits from the current location, meaning you could still miss a couple of rooms, but otherwise it completely avoided the need to carefully sweep the screen for tiny items that you would otherwise miss. * This is commonplace in free online games of the "escape the room" variety. * The Lovecraft-inspired PC adventure ''Shadow of the Comet'' had an interface that worked by showing a visible line of sight to any item that could be picked up. Problem is, it only worked if you were facing the item in the right way, and was incredibly frustrating if you didn't know what you were looking for, and you usually didn't. * Averted in ''VideoGame/DeathGate'' -- no item is too small to be noticed, and everything shows a text description when you mouse over it. Still they managed to hide at least one item in plain sight by making ''absolutely'' sure that the player sees it, dismisses it as unimportant and forgets about it. When you realize you need these items, you're likely to not even check that room again, and even then you may still overlook it. Finding it was way more satisfying than finding a PixelHunt spot. * ''Shannara'' has a strange variation: at one point, you end up in a room that is pitch black, and you have to move the mouse pointer around until the text at the bottom of the screen indicates that you're pointing at something that can be used as a light source. (And the room is filled with ''lots'' of completely irrelevant junk.) * Old-timey point'n'click game ''VideoGame/WeenTheProphecy'' had a couple. At one point you [[InvokedTrope lose three grains of sand in a grass field]]. You shrink yourself to get a better view, and the end result isn't ''quite'' as bad as it sounds because you know you have to look for them in the first place, they're shiny, distinctly off-color with the rest of the screen, and are [=3x3=] instead of one pixel, and the game is old enough that individual pixels are still pretty big and noticeable. Later on though, you're thrown in a jail cell and have to PixelHunt a nail lodged in the wall. [[GuideDangIt Unlike the previous example]], you ''don't'' know you have to be looking for it in the first place, it's almost the same color as the rest of the blank wall, it ''is'' exactly one pixel, and the first several times you click on it ''nothing noticeable happens because it's stuck'' and you have to wiggle it out with several clicks. * ''VideoGame/AnotherCode'' had this occur twice. Once you had to examine a specific window in a cabinet to find a glass with the key to the next room, but there were no clues as to which one to pick. Thankfully, once you found the right, you got a big old close-up for the key you were looking for. Later in the game, you had to pick one book out of a huge bookshelf spanning a wall hiding yet another key and if you hadn't solved the puzzle on the nearby table, you could be at it for a while. Once again, picking the right area gave you a nice close-up on the book you were looking for.

* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' games sometimes had this. Yes, the usable items were captioned, but only once you had the mouse on them, and the Josh-Kirby-lite insanely detailed backgrounds didn't help. ''VideoGame/DiscworldNoir'', as in many things, was an improvement ... except when you were locked in jail, and had to find the right brick in a ''pitch-black room'' to escape. * ''VideoGame/InnocentUntilCaught'' has obtainable objects that are literally two (VGA-)pixels small (such as a tiny chewing gum under a table). ''VideoGame/{{DreamWeb}}'', however, ups the ante by not only having 3x3 pixel objects, but also cluttering the screen with a zillion pieces of random junk that can all be picked up... Of course, your character Ryan only has so much space in his inventory. Finding the right objects that are actually needed later can be real fun when your apartment looks like a family of bums lived there for a year... Talk about searching the proverbial needle in a haystack. And yes, you can even pick up ''peas from a leftover TV dinner'' lying on the carpet. To be fair, in some cases, Ryan utters something like "I think I left something important here" when you want to exit a room. * In the Japanese room escape game ''Doukoku'' for the SegaSaturn: if you want to save a particular female character when her leg gets caught between an iron grille, in between utilizing some quite obvious items on screen, you have to click on her hair, where you find a hairpin to unscrew the grille. Not only is this not hinted at, the hairpin is also completely invisible (you don't even get to see it as an item), and all other similar clicks have actual items drawn on screen for you to see. Not to mention you get the impression that you have to go to other places to find the suitable item, since most room escape games (including this one) require players to do so. Do that, and the girl dies the most horrible death in the game (foreshadowed by the chainsaw next to her, which you can actually use to try to set her free, only to find out that the iron grille is just too strong for the chainsaw without putting her into harm). * The ''Bud Tucker in Double Trouble'' adventure game presents this problem twice. First, in the park there's a teabag in the floor, and you can't beat the game without it, but it's just 4x4 pixels, and in the middle of scenery. Later on, you need to look for a nail, that is even smaller, and you don't know you can't advance without it. The sad thing is that even after you GuideDangIt and know you need a teabag and a nail, and where they are, they're still very hard to click, and you may need to search for different guides that are more specific on exactly where you're meant to click. There's a third instance in the kitchen with the gorilla, but the area to click isn't that small, it's just that you don't know where do you have to click. You know they [[ExaggeratedTrope overdid]] [[FakeDifficulty it]] when a guide isn't enough to help you solve it. * ''Teen Agent'' requires you to dive into a lake and grab an anchor from its depths. Except the anchor is tiny and barely visible, there are no in-game hints that would suggest its existence, you only get to see it for a couple of seconds at a time (that's how long the character can dive,) and to pick it up you have to click on it ''right'' after you begin diving--otherwise the character will simply ignore your command. That, and also yet another bookshelf with only one usable book.
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* The ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'' games sometimes [[Creator/HPLovecraft Lovecraft]]-inspired PC adventure ''VideoGame/ShadowOfTheComet'' had this. Yes, the usable items were captioned, but an interface that worked by showing a visible line of sight to any item that could be picked up. Problem is, it only once you had the mouse on them, and the Josh-Kirby-lite insanely detailed backgrounds didn't help. ''VideoGame/DiscworldNoir'', as in many things, was an improvement ... except when worked if you were locked facing the item in jail, and had to find the right brick way, and was incredibly frustrating if you didn't know what you were looking for, and you usually didn't. ** The sequel, ''VideoGame/PrisonerOfIce'', required you to find a single book on a bookshelf labeled "A book" in a ''pitch-black room'' sea of "Books" to escape. * ''VideoGame/InnocentUntilCaught'' has obtainable objects that are literally two (VGA-)pixels small (such as open a tiny chewing gum under a table). ''VideoGame/{{DreamWeb}}'', however, ups the ante by not only having 3x3 pixel objects, but also cluttering the screen with a zillion pieces of random junk that can all be picked up... Of course, your character Ryan only has so much space in his inventory. Finding the right objects that are actually needed later can be real fun when your apartment looks like a family of bums lived there for a year... Talk about searching the proverbial needle in a haystack. And yes, you can even pick up ''peas from a leftover TV dinner'' lying on the carpet. To be fair, in some cases, Ryan utters something like "I think I left something important here" secret door. Thankfully, this time, object labels would appear when you want to exit a room. * In the Japanese room escape game ''Doukoku'' for the SegaSaturn: if you want to save a particular female character when her leg gets caught between an iron grille, in between utilizing some quite obvious items on screen, you have to click on her hair, highlighted them with your cursor regardless of where you find a hairpin to unscrew the grille. Not only is this not hinted at, the hairpin is also completely invisible (you don't even get to see it as an item), and all other similar clicks have actual items drawn on screen for you to see. Not to mention you get the impression that you have to go to other places to find the suitable item, since most room escape games (including this one) require players to do so. Do that, and the girl dies the most horrible death in the game (foreshadowed by the chainsaw next to her, which you can actually use to try to set her free, only to find out that the iron grille is just too strong for the chainsaw without putting her into harm). were facing. * The ''Bud Tucker in Double Trouble'' ''Literature/{{Shannara}}'' adventure game presents this problem twice. First, in the park there's has a teabag in the floor, and strange variation: at one point, you can't beat the game without it, but it's just 4x4 pixels, and end up in the middle of scenery. Later on, you need to look for a nail, room that is even smaller, pitch black, and you don't know you can't advance without it. The sad thing is that even after you GuideDangIt and know you need a teabag and a nail, and where they are, they're still very hard to click, and you may need to search for different guides that are more specific on exactly where you're meant to click. There's a third instance in the kitchen with the gorilla, but the area to click isn't that small, it's just that you don't know where do you have to click. You know move the mouse pointer around until the text at the bottom of the screen indicates that you're pointing at something that can be used as a light source. (And the room is filled with ''lots'' of completely irrelevant junk.) * ''Franchise/SherlockHolmes'' adventure games tend to fall into this trope, as they [[ExaggeratedTrope overdid]] [[FakeDifficulty it]] when a guide isn't enough try to help you solve it. * ''Teen Agent'' requires you recreate Holmes' ability to dive into a lake and grab an anchor make deductions from its depths. Except the anchor is tiny clues. In one example, you can't move on until you click a specific footprint to take a closer look, then hold your magnifying glass over just the right spot on just the right clump of grass near the footprint, to find a nearly invisible fish scale. * This trope was avoided in the ''VideoGame/SimonTheSorcerer'' games, in which you could hit F10 at any time and barely visible, there are no in-game hints that would suggest its existence, have all the active objects on the screen highlighted for you. The same didn't go for exits from the current location, meaning you only get to see it for could still miss a couple of seconds at a time (that's how long rooms, but otherwise it completely avoided the character can dive,) and need to pick carefully sweep the screen for tiny items that you would otherwise miss. * ''VideoGame/SpaceQuest 6: Roger Wilco in The Spinal Frontier'' lampshades this by having the narrator comment on a certain very small item when you look at it up by saying, after identifying the item, "Good eyesight! Now we'll have to do one of those puzzles where you have to click on it ''right'' after you begin diving--otherwise the character will simply ignore your command. That, and also yet another bookshelf with only one usable book. find a one-pixel coin or something. But hey, who'd design a mean, unfair puzzle like THAT?"

* True to its name, ''VideoGame/{{McPixel}}'' takes advantage of its [[{{Retreaux}} intentionally low resolution]] yet high color depth to make clickable objects nary a single pixels in width and/or height while only a single shade different from its surroundings. * ''VideoGame/PrisonerOfIce'' requires you to find a single book on a bookshelf labeled "A book" in a sea of "Books" to open a secret door. Thankfully, like any object, its label appears when you move your cursor over it.
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* True to its name, ''VideoGame/{{McPixel}}'' takes advantage of its [[{{Retreaux}} intentionally low resolution]] yet high color depth to make clickable objects nary a single pixels in width and/or height while only a single shade different from its surroundings. * ''VideoGame/PrisonerOfIce'' ''VideoGame/TeenAgent'' requires you to find dive into a single book lake and grab an anchor from its depths. Except the anchor is tiny and barely visible, there are no in-game hints that would suggest its existence, you only get to see it for a couple of seconds at a time (that's how long the character can dive,) and to pick it up you have to click on a it ''right'' after you begin diving--otherwise the character will simply ignore your command. That, and also yet another bookshelf labeled "A book" with only one usable book. * ''TorinsPassage'', a {{Sierra}} adventure game developed by Al Lowe, featured one scene with this trope implemented quite literally; it involved locating a pixel-sized glint that occasionally flashed on the screen, and in a sea the middle of "Books" to open a secret door. Thankfully, like any object, its label appears when ''maze'', at that. And the game's hint system was no help; it merely told you move to look for the glint on the screen... ** The game also had another example of a pixel hunt; at another point there is a moss-covered slope that is extremely slick (and yes the game does use the associated pun), and if you attempt to climb it you fall off and die. You can enlist the help of the nearby grass to tell you places that are safe to go to, but grass only tells you where a safe spot is while your cursor over it.is on it, and the safe spots are ludicrously small as well as visually indistinguishable from the rest of the slope. Add this to the fact that you had to find six or seven spots to cross the slope, constantly assaulted by the grass's high-pitched cries of "not there" and "no", hoping for the occasional "yes", it made for an extremely frustrating experience. Al Lowe has ''no idea'' how to play Hot and Cold, apparently. A review showed a screenshot of this game captioned, "See that wrench? Neither did we. For ''three hours.''" * Old-timey point'n'click game ''VideoGame/WeenTheProphecy'' had a couple. At one point you [[InvokedTrope lose three grains of sand in a grass field]]. You shrink yourself to get a better view, and the end result isn't ''quite'' as bad as it sounds because you know you have to look for them in the first place, they're shiny, distinctly off-color with the rest of the screen, and are [=3x3=] instead of one pixel, and the game is old enough that individual pixels are still pretty big and noticeable. Later on though, you're thrown in a jail cell and have to PixelHunt a nail lodged in the wall. [[GuideDangIt Unlike the previous example]], you ''don't'' know you have to be looking for it in the first place, it's almost the same color as the rest of the blank wall, it ''is'' exactly one pixel, and the first several times you click on it ''nothing noticeable happens because it's stuck'' and you have to wiggle it out with several clicks. * The ''VideoGame/TheXFilesGame'' had a required clue in the form of a bullet that was ''2x2 pixels big'' (in a game that ran at 640x480), making it probably the most egregious example of (quite literal) pixel hunting on this list.

* Koudelka (first game in the ''ShadowHearts'' series) is built around a number of what some would call obtuse puzzles. Objects that can be picked up usually give some kind of visual cue such as being shiny or a different color, but other times, they're completely nondescript and look exactly like the pre-rendered background they're placed on. This devolves into the player mashing X constantly to find things that can be picked up to solve the current puzzle, sometimes rooms away with no indication of where to look. GuideDangIt!

* In ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', [[spoiler: [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming they are reunited in the]] [[NostalgiaLevel Hall of Memories]]]].
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* ** In ''VideoGame/{{Mother 3}}'', [[spoiler: [[CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming they are reunited in the]] [[NostalgiaLevel Hall of Memories]]]].Memories]]]]. * While not necessary for game completion, there is ''a lot'' of PixelHunt action in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII''. Some of the notice on the boards which you may otherwise just take as background actually contains messages, and in the case of the Turtle's Paradise newsletter, nab you some pretty sweet items. One of the most hidden examples was the back of a signboard in Sector Seven containing a message about Avalanche. If the Ultimania Omega guide is any indication, there is probably a lot more.

* While not necessary for game completion, there is ''a lot'' of PixelHunt action in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII''. Some of the notice on the boards which you may otherwise just take as background actually contains messages, and in the case of the Turtle's Paradise newsletter, nab you some pretty sweet items. One of the most hidden examples was the back of a signboard in Sector Seven containing a message about Avalanche. If the Ultimania Omega guide is any indication, there is probably a lot more. * In the game ''VideoGame/LegendOfLegaia'' there is a very well hidden item called the "Platinum Card" which can only be found after reviving the second Genesis tree and then returning to Drake Castle and checking a specific section of a wall. Another example is the "Mettle Goblet", which grants a character infinite AP. * In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'', there are 39 chests distributed all over the world. They are completely invisible. You don't have to find them to beat the game, but it's still a huge GuideDangIt quest.

* ''VideoGame/ShiningTheHolyArk'' has 50 (thankfully optional) Pixies to be found. They're hidden throughout the world and all you have to do is inspect the section of wall they're hiding in. However there is no indication what so ever that a pixie may be hiding in a solid brick wall/pond/pot/statue meaning the only way to find them is to search every single section of wall in the game. Unless you have a guide of course.
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* ''VideoGame/ShiningTheHolyArk'' has 50 (thankfully optional) Pixies to be found. They're hidden throughout ''Koudelka'' (first game in the world and all you have to do ''VideoGame/ShadowHearts'' series) is inspect the section built around a number of wall what some would call obtuse puzzles. Objects that can be picked up usually give some kind of visual cue such as being shiny or a different color, but other times, they're hiding in. However there is completely nondescript and look exactly like the pre-rendered background they're placed on. This devolves into the player mashing X constantly to find things that can be picked up to solve the current puzzle, sometimes rooms away with no indication what so ever that a pixie may be hiding in a solid brick wall/pond/pot/statue meaning the only way of where to find them is to search every single section of wall in the game. Unless you have a guide of course.look. GuideDangIt!

* ''VideoGame/ShiningTheHolyArk'' has 50 (thankfully optional) Pixies to be found. They're In the game ''VideoGame/LegendOfLegaia'' there is a very well hidden throughout item called the world "Platinum Card" which can only be found after reviving the second Genesis tree and all you have then returning to do is inspect the Drake Castle and checking a specific section of wall they're hiding in. However there a wall. Another example is no indication what so ever that a pixie may be hiding in a solid brick wall/pond/pot/statue meaning the only way to find them is to search every single section of wall in the game. Unless you have "Mettle Goblet", which grants a guide of course.character infinite AP.

* ''VideoGame/ShiningTheHolyArk'' has 50 (thankfully optional) Pixies to be found. They're hidden throughout the world and all you have to do is inspect the section of wall they're hiding in. However there is no indication what so ever that a pixie may be hiding in a solid brick wall/pond/pot/statue meaning the only way to find them is to search every single section of wall in the game. Unless you have a guide of course.course. * In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioRPG'', there are 39 chests distributed all over the world. They are completely invisible. You don't have to find them to beat the game, but it's still a huge GuideDangIt quest.

* ''VideoGame/ShiningTheHolyArk'' has 50 (thankfully optional) Pixies to be found. They're hidden throughout Some of the world and all you have to do is inspect ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games use this trope during the section of wall they're hiding in. However there is no indication what so ever that a pixie may be hiding investigation scenes. Particularly in a solid brick wall/pond/pot/statue meaning the only way last case of the third game where it's necessary to find them is [[spoiler: a tiny, tiny note slipped almost completely under a chair/cushion/basket thing]] in order to search every single section of wall break a psyche-lock and advance the plot. For the most part, clues in the game. Unless you have ''Ace Attorney'' series are quite obvious, with only a guide few hidden. The point of course.the game isn't to hide the clues, but hide their meanings, after all.

* Some of the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games use this trope during the investigation scenes. Particularly in the last case of the third game where it's necessary to find [[spoiler: a tiny, tiny note slipped almost completely under a chair/cushion/basket thing]] in order to break a psyche-lock and advance the plot. For the most part, clues in the ''Ace Attorney'' series are quite obvious, with only a few hidden. The point of the game isn't to hide the clues, but hide their meanings, after all.

* Some In ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'', there used to be one (and only one) form of choice adventure that required you to click the graphics instead of the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' games use this buttons. Sure, it's a trope during ([[spoiler:BookcasePassage]]), but unless you use the investigation scenes. Particularly tab key to select buttons in the last case of the third game your browser, you're probably not going to figure it out without spoilers. Also, lampshaded with a literal PixelHunt, where it's necessary you collect pixels from slain Nintendo monsters to find [[spoiler: a tiny, tiny note slipped almost completely under a chair/cushion/basket thing]] in order to break a psyche-lock and advance the plot. For the most part, clues in the ''Ace Attorney'' series are quite obvious, with only a few hidden. The point of the game isn't to hide the clues, but hide their meanings, after all.make quest items.

* In ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'', there used to be one (and only one) form of choice adventure that required you to click the graphics instead of the buttons. Sure, it's a trope ([[spoiler:BookcasePassage]]), but unless you use the tab key to select buttons in your browser, you're probably not going to figure it out without spoilers. Also, lampshaded with a literal PixelHunt, where you collect pixels from slain Nintendo monsters to make quest items.

* In ''VideoGame/KingdomOfLoathing'', there used The [[NukeEm M.O.A.B.]] in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty: VideoGame/ModernWarfare 3'' actually can be shot down with a rocket launcher like the Javelin. It is [[FakeDifficulty extremely difficult to be one (and do so]], however, partly because the plane is only one) form of choice adventure that required you to click a tiny little dot, which appears at the graphics instead opposite edge of the buttons. Sure, it's a trope ([[spoiler:BookcasePassage]]), but unless map of who ever activated it, and partly because you use only have a few seconds to shoot it down (if you don't have at least four second on the tab key to select buttons in your browser, you're probably not going to figure it out without spoilers. Also, lampshaded with a literal PixelHunt, where clock by the time you collect pixels from slain Nintendo monsters to make quest items.fire, it still detonates before the rocket can reach it).

* The [[NukeEm M.O.A.B.]] in ''VideoGame/CallOfDuty: VideoGame/ModernWarfare 3'' actually can be shot down with a rocket launcher like the Javelin. It is [[FakeDifficulty extremely difficult to do so]], however, partly because the plane is only a tiny little dot, which appears at the opposite edge of the map of who ever activated it, and partly because you only have a few seconds to shoot it down (if you don't have at least four second on the clock by the time you fire, it still detonates before the rocket can reach it). * Hidden object games can occasionally fall victim to this where objects might be hidden in such a way that you can't really identify what it's suppose to be. Or the descriptor for an object is only loosely similar to the actual object used. Some games even penalize you for clicking too much.

* This is the '''entire premise''' of ''"Cate West: The Vanishing Files."'' You fish around with your DS pointer (or Wiimote) looking for items hidden among a background picture. To add insult to injury, there's quite a lot of foreign objects that you ''aren't'' looking for also hidden in the picture and you get penalized for clicking around wildly. There's also a background plot about how the titular protagonist is somehow using her ability to notice details to help police, but the stuff you're hunting for never has anything to do with the case in question.
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* This is the '''entire premise''' of ''"Cate ''Cate West: The Vanishing Files."'' Files''. You fish around with your DS pointer (or Wiimote) looking for items hidden among a background picture. To add insult to injury, there's quite a lot of foreign objects that you ''aren't'' looking for also hidden in the picture and you get penalized for clicking around wildly. There's also a background plot about how the titular protagonist is somehow using her ability to notice details to help police, but the stuff you're hunting for never has anything to do with the case in question.

* The 2D ''{{Metroid}}'' games after ''Super Metroid'' have pixel hunting to find hidden tunnels and holes in the ceiling (especially with the ones that can't be detected by shooting or releasing bombs at the wall/ceiling).

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'' has the infamous Blue Coins causing you to have to spray ''very'' precise areas in order to obtain 100% completion. Hitting the "Z" button would allow you to see how many blue coins you'd collected in every area. Of course, you would still have to know that [[spoiler:there are 30 apiece in the normal courses, 20 in Delfino Square, and 10 in Corona Mountain.]] And even that doesn't help you figure out which of the area's episodes you should be looking in. * Most [[ThatOneLevel Green Stars]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' are hidden in the most obscure and hard-to-reach places, such as under vanishing platforms, behind towers, and [[CameraScrew far out of camera viewing range]]. Fortunately, the stars emit rays of light and a sparkling sound, making finding them somewhat easier. Getting to them, [[TrialAndErrorGameplay not so much]].

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'' has the infamous Blue Coins causing you to The 2D ''{{Metroid}}'' games after ''Super Metroid'' have pixel hunting to spray ''very'' precise areas in order to obtain 100% completion. Hitting the "Z" button would allow you to see how many blue coins you'd collected in every area. Of course, you would still have to know that [[spoiler:there are 30 apiece find hidden tunnels and holes in the normal courses, 20 in Delfino Square, and 10 in Corona Mountain.]] And even ceiling (especially with the ones that doesn't help you figure out which of can't be detected by shooting or releasing bombs at the area's episodes you should be looking in. * Most [[ThatOneLevel Green Stars]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' are hidden in the most obscure and hard-to-reach places, such as under vanishing platforms, behind towers, and [[CameraScrew far out of camera viewing range]]. Fortunately, the stars emit rays of light and a sparkling sound, making finding them somewhat easier. Getting to them, [[TrialAndErrorGameplay not so much]].wall/ceiling).

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'' has the infamous Blue Coins causing you to have to spray ''very'' precise areas in order to obtain 100% completion. Hitting the "Z" button would allow you to see how many blue coins you'd collected in every area. Of course, you would still have to know that [[spoiler:there are 30 apiece in the normal courses, 20 in Delfino Square, and 10 in Corona Mountain.]] And even that doesn't help you figure out which of the area's episodes you should be looking in. * Most [[ThatOneLevel Green Stars]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' are hidden in the most obscure and hard-to-reach places, such as under vanishing platforms, behind towers, and [[CameraScrew far out of camera viewing range]]. Fortunately, the stars emit rays of light and a sparkling sound, making finding them somewhat easier. Getting to them, [[TrialAndErrorGameplay not so much]].

* ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'' has This trope is the infamous Blue Coins causing you to have to spray ''very'' precise areas in order to obtain 100% completion. Hitting the "Z" button would allow you to see how whole point of {{Hidden Object game}}s, but many blue coins you'd collected in every area. Of course, you would still have manage to know take this to a frustrating, potentially rage-inducing level, because the games themselves are built on the very lazy mistake that [[spoiler:there these are 30 apiece prevalent in the normal courses, 20 in Delfino Square, and 10 in Corona Mountain.]] And even that doesn't help you figure out which of the area's episodes you should adventure games because people enjoy them. Objects might be looking in. * Most [[ThatOneLevel Green Stars]] in ''VideoGame/SuperMarioGalaxy2'' are hidden in the most obscure and hard-to-reach places, such as under vanishing platforms, behind towers, and [[CameraScrew far out of camera viewing range]]. Fortunately, a way that you can't really identify what it's supposed to be. Or the stars emit rays of light and a sparkling sound, making finding them somewhat easier. Getting descriptor for an object is only loosely similar to them, [[TrialAndErrorGameplay not so much]].the actual object used. Some games even penalize you for clicking too much.

* This trope is the whole point of {{Hidden Object game}}s, but many still manage to take this to a frustrating, potentially rage-inducing level, because the games themselves are built on the very lazy mistake that these are prevalent in adventure games because people enjoy them.

* In ''VideoGame/LostInBlue'', you have a glossary that has info about various tools/materials/plants/animals/recipes/items as you come across them. The last slot in the plant section of the glossary is a dandelion located in a corner of a certain area of the island that is inaccessible until you get really far along in the game. You have to go hunting for a little weed that is almost indistinguishable from the background. And even though a little box pops up whenever you walk over an item, it's still agonizingly hard to find.

* One of the activities available in ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' is finding seeds, which spawn randomly on the ground around the town. The seeds can be pretty hard to spot unless you're deliberately scanning for them or have a close zoom, and of course they're hard to click on. And don't think you can get away with ignoring them - there are a fair number of in-game challenges that require plants grown from special found seeds, so you're going to have to start picking them up sooner or later. The saving grace is the Collection Helper lifetime reward. Makes the collectable seeds, bugs, fish and rocks show up on the map and give off a highly visible glow. Plus, its usable by everyone in that household once you've gotten it.

* The VirtualVillagers series of casual games is very prone to this trope. The player has to pick up a sprite and drop it on a hotspot to get a particular reaction, such as starting a villager working on a task. This is even harder than clicking on the hotspot since when clicking the cursor gives a more accurate indication of screen position. The hotspots in the ports to IOSGames and AndroidGames are possibly even more difficult to find than in games played on desktop or laptop computers because of the smaller touch screens.
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* In ''VideoGame/LostInBlue'', you have a glossary that has info about various tools/materials/plants/animals/recipes/items as you come across them. The last slot in the plant section of the glossary is a dandelion located in a corner of a certain area of the island that is inaccessible until you get really far along in the game. You have to go hunting for a little weed that is almost indistinguishable from the background. And even though a little box pops up whenever you walk over an item, it's still agonizingly hard to find. * One of the activities available in ''VideoGame/TheSims3'' is finding seeds, which spawn randomly on the ground around the town. The seeds can be pretty hard to spot unless you're deliberately scanning for them or have a close zoom, and of course they're hard to click on. And don't think you can get away with ignoring them - there are a fair number of in-game challenges that require plants grown from special found seeds, so you're going to have to start picking them up sooner or later. The saving grace is the Collection Helper lifetime reward. Makes the collectible seeds, bugs, fish and rocks show up on the map and give off a highly visible glow. Plus, its usable by everyone in that household once you've gotten it. * The VirtualVillagers ''VideoGame/VirtualVillagers'' series of casual games is very prone to this trope. The player has to pick up a sprite and drop it on a hotspot to get a particular reaction, such as starting a villager working on a task. This is even harder than clicking on the hotspot since when clicking the cursor gives a more accurate indication of screen position. The hotspots in the ports to IOSGames and AndroidGames are possibly even more difficult to find than in games played on desktop or laptop computers because of the smaller touch screens.

* ''{{Theresia}}'' demonstrates how to make this trope ''even worse''. It's a rather low-budget game, and gameplay outside of cutscenes is represented as a series of 2-D sketches. Usually there isn't a "before and after" for picking up an item--the item simply doesn't appear on-screen, and you have to use the "look" command on every single object to tell whether, say, there's a key stuck in the middle of those chain links. To make matters worse, there's no visual distinction between items that can be "looked" at and background items that give a generic "there's nothing here" message.

* ''{{Theresia}}'' demonstrates how to make this trope ''even worse''. It's a rather low-budget game, and gameplay outside of cutscenes is represented as a series of 2-D sketches. Usually there isn't a "before and after" for picking up an item--the item simply doesn't appear on-screen, and you have to use the "look" command on every single object to tell whether, say, there's a key stuck in the middle of those chain links. To make matters worse, there's no visual distinction between items that can be "looked" at and background items that give a generic "there's nothing here" message.

* The first 2 Fallout games were terrible with this. Combine dated graphics with a zoomed out topdown view and you can be standing right next to a pickup and have no idea. Taken UpToEleven when your view is obscured by a wall. * In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'', every outdoors map had some form of treasure hidden somewhere in it within an area only a few pixels across. There was never any indication that they were there, you had to find them by chance. None of the items were ever plot relevant though, only valuable bits of loot.
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* The first 2 Fallout games were terrible with this. Combine dated graphics with a zoomed out topdown view developers of ''Age of Pirates 2: City of Abandoned Ships'' had the bright idea to make this this an actual ''quest'' where you go into the jungle and you can be standing right next to look for a pickup and have no idea. Taken UpToEleven when your view is obscured by marble-sized gem in the grass. Or a wall. tiny brown key somewhere on the brown decks of a dozen ships. * In ''VideoGame/BaldursGate'', every outdoors map had some form of treasure hidden somewhere in it within an area only a few pixels across. There was never any indication that they were there, you had to find them by chance. None of the items were ever plot relevant though, only valuable bits of loot.

** ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'', which also used the same engine, did this, too, but outlined clickable objects if your mouse strayed over them. * The early ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' video game ''Shadow of the Horned Rat'' featured magic items lying around some of the battle maps that you could pick up and use. The problem? These items were represented by a single pixel that occasionally turned white. Pretty much the only way to discover them was by chance (and some of them were hidden well out of the way), and once a unit had picked one up, it was stuck with it, thus usually rendering the item useless anyway. Frustrating? Oh my yes. * The released-without-being-finished add-on to ''UltimaVIIPartII: Serpent's Isle,'' ''The Silver Seed,'' had the most powerful item in the game -- a ring that made spell components unnecessary -- hidden on a dead monster that can barely be seen under an avalanche in a section of the dungeon that seemed to go nowhere. Even knowing the area to look in, it's hard to find find it until you look at a screenshot. * ''UltimaVII'' has a very well hidden switch in a dungeon and the key to the shack holding the Hoe of Destruction. It's inside a [[spoiler: dead fish]] in an area ''covered'' with identical-looking [[spoiler: dead fishes]]. And the right one is hidden under some debris that you need to move out of the way first.
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** ''VideoGame/PlanescapeTorment'', which also used the same engine, did this, too, but outlined clickable objects if your mouse strayed over them. * The early ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' video game ''Shadow them. Still, its absolute best item is found in a warehouse before you fight [[spoiler: Trias]], in a pixel on the top left of the Horned Rat'' featured magic items lying room. It's literally finding a needle in a haystack. * In ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', you could hear the sound of a ring drop from a monster, and spend the next 10 minutes carefully searching the ground around some of you. Thankfully, in the battle maps that sequel you can hold Alt-key to show all items on the ground. ''Hellfire'' added the Search skill/spell. Also, since you could pick up and use. The problem? These items were represented by a single pixel that occasionally turned white. Pretty much something as soon as the only way to discover them cursor was by chance (and some of them were hidden well out of the way), and once a unit had picked one up, it was stuck with it, thus usually rendering the item useless anyway. Frustrating? Oh my yes. * The released-without-being-finished add-on to ''UltimaVIIPartII: Serpent's Isle,'' ''The Silver Seed,'' had the most powerful item in the game -- a ring that made spell components unnecessary -- hidden on a dead monster that can barely be seen under an avalanche in a section of the dungeon that seemed to go nowhere. Even knowing the area to look in, it's hard to find find it until same square, you look had to search much less than you'd think at a screenshot. * ''UltimaVII'' has a very well hidden switch in a dungeon and the key to the shack holding the Hoe of Destruction. It's inside a [[spoiler: dead fish]] in an area ''covered'' with identical-looking [[spoiler: dead fishes]]. And the right one is hidden under some debris that you need to move out of the way first.

* Absolutely every single object in ''{{Summoner}}'' that can be picked up is in the form of a generic brown sack about the size of a football, and is always on traversable ground. Now, imagine that you have to stumble on some objects in order to get critical quest items, often in generic-looking random encounters, in some of the biggest maps in an RPG. That, and you have to be practically on top of the bag before its graphics work. It doesn't matter how eagle-eyed you are, you can't see what it won't show you. * The developers of ''Age of Pirates 2: City of Abandoned Ships'' had the bright idea to make this this an actual ''quest'' where you go into the jungle and look for a marble-sized gem in the grass. Or a tiny brown key somewhere on the brown decks of a dozen ships. * The absolute best item in ''PlanescapeTorment'' is found in a warehouse before you fight [[spoiler: Trias]], in a pixel on the top left of the room. It's literally finding a needle in a haystack. * In ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', you could hear the sound of a ring drop from a monster, and spend the next 10 minutes carefully searching the ground around you. Thankfully, in the sequel you can hold Alt-key to show all items on the ground. ''Hellfire'' added the Search skill/spell. Also, since you could pick up something as soon as the cursor was in the same square, you had to search much less than you'd think at first. * ''VideoGame/NetHack'', sort of. Instead of Pixel Hunt, there's Vibrating Square Hunt. In order to get to the final dungeon below [[FireAndBrimstoneHell Gehennom]], you need to find and stand on a certain square on the bottom level. This wouldn't be so annoying as it is, however, the level (and around the twenty previous levels before that) is a randomly-generated maze. * ''[=UnNetHack=]'' made this a bit easier by informing the player when they were a few spaces away, rather than having to step directly on it. * The SNES version of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' had a limited palette, small sprites, and muted colors to boot. On the bright side, your cursor would "stick" to items when you moved over them. On the incredibly frustrating side, you controlled the cursor with the gamepad, which meant a slow, fixed scrolling speed in the rare case where you had to perform searching-by-frantic-cursor-hunting.
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* Absolutely every single object in ''{{Summoner}}'' that can be picked up is in the form of a generic brown sack about the size of a football, and is always on traversable ground. Now, imagine that you have to stumble on some objects in order to get critical quest items, often in generic-looking random encounters, in some of the biggest maps in an RPG. That, and you have to be practically on top of the bag before its The first two ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' games were terrible with this. Combine dated graphics work. It doesn't matter how eagle-eyed you are, you can't see what it won't show you. * The developers of ''Age of Pirates 2: City of Abandoned Ships'' had the bright idea to make this this an actual ''quest'' where you go into the jungle with a zoomed out topdown view and look for a marble-sized gem in the grass. Or a tiny brown key somewhere on the brown decks of a dozen ships. * The absolute best item in ''PlanescapeTorment'' is found in a warehouse before you fight [[spoiler: Trias]], in a pixel on the top left of the room. It's literally finding a needle in a haystack. * In ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', you could hear the sound of a ring drop from a monster, and spend the next 10 minutes carefully searching the ground around you. Thankfully, in the sequel you can hold Alt-key be standing right next to show all items on the ground. ''Hellfire'' added the Search skill/spell. Also, since you could pick up something as soon as the cursor was in the same square, you had to search much less than you'd think at first. * ''VideoGame/NetHack'', sort of. Instead of Pixel Hunt, there's Vibrating Square Hunt. In order to get to the final dungeon below [[FireAndBrimstoneHell Gehennom]], you need to find a pickup and stand on a certain square on the bottom level. This wouldn't be so annoying as it is, however, the level (and around the twenty previous levels before that) is a randomly-generated maze. * ''[=UnNetHack=]'' made this a bit easier by informing the player have no idea. Taken UpToEleven when they were a few spaces away, rather than having to step directly on it. * The SNES version of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' had a limited palette, small sprites, and muted colors to boot. On the bright side, your cursor would "stick" to items when you moved over them. On the incredibly frustrating side, you controlled the cursor with the gamepad, which meant view is obscured by a slow, fixed scrolling speed in the rare case where you had to perform searching-by-frantic-cursor-hunting.wall.

Added DiffLines:
* Absolutely every single object in ''{{Summoner}}'' that can be picked up is in the form of a generic brown sack about the size of a football, and is always on traversable ground. Now, imagine that you have to stumble on some objects in order to get critical quest items, often in generic-looking random encounters, in some of the biggest maps in an RPG. That, and you have to be practically on top of the bag before its graphics work. It doesn't matter how eagle-eyed you are, you can't see what it won't show you. * The developers of ''Age of Pirates 2: City of Abandoned Ships'' had the bright idea to make this this an actual ''quest'' where you go into the jungle and look for a marble-sized gem in the grass. Or a tiny brown key somewhere on the brown decks of a dozen ships. * The absolute best item in ''PlanescapeTorment'' is found in a warehouse before you fight [[spoiler: Trias]], in a pixel on the top left of the room. It's literally finding a needle in a haystack. * In ''VideoGame/{{Diablo}}'', you could hear the sound of a ring drop from a monster, and spend the next 10 minutes carefully searching the ground around you. Thankfully, in the sequel you can hold Alt-key to show all items on the ground. ''Hellfire'' added the Search skill/spell. Also, since you could pick up something as soon as the cursor was in the same square, you had to search much less than you'd think at first. * ''VideoGame/NetHack'', sort of. Instead of Pixel Hunt, there's Vibrating Square Hunt. In order to get to the final dungeon below [[FireAndBrimstoneHell Gehennom]], you need to find and stand on a certain square on the bottom level. This wouldn't be so annoying as it is, however, the level (and around the twenty previous levels before that) is a randomly-generated maze. * ** ''[=UnNetHack=]'' made this a bit easier by informing the player when they were a few spaces away, rather than having to step directly on it. * The early ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer}}'' video game ''Shadow of the Horned Rat'' featured magic items lying around some of the battle maps that you could pick up and use. The problem? These items were represented by a single pixel that occasionally turned white. Pretty much the only way to discover them was by chance (and some of them were hidden well out of the way), and once a unit had picked one up, it was stuck with it, thus usually rendering the item useless anyway. Frustrating? Oh my yes. * The SNES version of ''TabletopGame/{{Shadowrun}}'' had a limited palette, small sprites, and muted colors to boot. On the bright side, your cursor would "stick" to items when you moved over them. On the incredibly frustrating side, you controlled the cursor with the gamepad, which meant a slow, fixed scrolling speed in the rare case where you had to perform searching-by-frantic-cursor-hunting.searching-by-frantic-cursor-hunting. * Absolutely every single object in ''VideoGame/{{Summoner}}'' that can be picked up is in the form of a generic brown sack about the size of a football, and is always on traversable ground. Now, imagine that you have to stumble on some objects in order to get critical quest items, often in generic-looking random encounters, in some of the biggest maps in an RPG. That, and you have to be practically on top of the bag before its graphics work. It doesn't matter how eagle-eyed you are, you can't see what it won't show you. * ''UltimaVII'' has a very well hidden switch in a dungeon and the key to the shack holding the Hoe of Destruction. It's inside a [[spoiler: dead fish]] in an area ''covered'' with identical-looking [[spoiler: dead fishes]]. And the right one is hidden under some debris that you need to move out of the way first. * The released-without-being-finished add-on to ''UltimaVIIPartII: Serpent's Isle,'' ''The Silver Seed,'' had the most powerful item in the game--a ring that made spell components unnecessary -- hidden on a dead monster that can barely be seen under an avalanche in a section of the dungeon that seemed to go nowhere. Even knowing the area to look in, it's hard to find find it until you look at a screenshot.
11th Oct '15 8:24:36 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Borrowing from ''Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade'' above, ''VideoGame/PrisonerOfIce'' requires you to find a single book on a bookshelf labeled "A book" in a sea of "Books" to open a secret door. Thankfully, like any object, its label appears when you move your cursor over it.
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* Borrowing from ''Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade'' above, ''VideoGame/PrisonerOfIce'' requires you to find a single book on a bookshelf labeled "A book" in a sea of "Books" to open a secret door. Thankfully, like any object, its label appears when you move your cursor over it.
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