History Main / OddballInTheSeries

12th Oct '17 3:34:49 PM 4444jdm
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** ''Series/KamenRiderKuuga'' places as much emphasis on the actions of the police force as on the titular hero, has a mysterious ancient enemy whose motives are only fully understood in hindsight or on a second viewing, never has the hero declare his finishing moves, never uses the name "Kamen Rider" outside of the opening song, treats the growing [[DestructiveSaviour destructive power]] of the main character as concerning or even detrimental, [[DeconstructedTrope deconstructs]] the idea of [[spoiler:the main character's powers coming from the same source as the enemy]], and [[spoiler:doesn't even have a traditional FinalBattle where the hero and BigBad show off the full extent of their abilities and powers, instead going for a bloody fist fight in the snow]]. Also, [[DistantFinale the final episode]] is set after everything's over and involves going back and revisiting all the main characters to see how they've moved on afterwards, instead of being the final battle.

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** ''Series/KamenRiderKuuga'' ''Series/KamenRiderAmazon'' was a major departure from the traditional Showa-era Kamen Rider formula, having the main character transformed via mystical spells instead of using "traditional" belts. The Rider cuts the enemies in a gruesome way instead of letting them explode in most cases, and had inexperience at riding motorcycles. At the finale, the Rider [[ButNowIMustGo had to leave]] instead of staying in Japan like other Showa Riders did.
** ''Series/KamenRiderKuuga'', which began the Heisei-era formula,
places as much emphasis on the actions of the police force as on the titular hero, has a mysterious ancient enemy whose motives are only fully understood in hindsight or on a second viewing, never has the hero declare his finishing moves, never uses the name "Kamen Rider" outside of the opening song, treats the growing [[DestructiveSaviour destructive power]] of the main character as concerning or even detrimental, [[DeconstructedTrope deconstructs]] the idea of [[spoiler:the main character's powers coming from the same source as the enemy]], and [[spoiler:doesn't even have a traditional FinalBattle where the hero and BigBad show off the full extent of their abilities and powers, instead going for a bloody fist fight in the snow]]. Also, [[DistantFinale the final episode]] is set after everything's over and involves going back and revisiting all the main characters to see how they've moved on afterwards, instead of being the final battle.
12th Oct '17 5:04:23 AM 4444jdm
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** 2013's ''Series/UltramanGinga'' was the first proper Ultraman series since ''Ultraman Mebius'' in 2006. It took some strange turns with the formula though. First off, there's no defense team, but instead a group of childhood friends hanging out at their former, soon-to-be-demolished elementary school. Second, it used Spark Dolls, toys of monsters and Ultras that could be used by people to transform into the monster or Ultra trapped in the toy form, meaning it was not uncommon to see the monsters used by the good guys fighting the villainous monster of the episode. Third, and least significant but still noteworthy, the franchise had begun relying heavily on their most popular monsters (Zetton, Red King, Eleking, etc.) to regularly antagonize the heroes, but this time, the iconics either never appeared or were DemotedToExtra in favour of more obscure monsters. It wasn't terribly well-received with fans, so perhaps that's why Tsuburaya returned to the normal formula with the SequelSeries ''Ultraman Ginga S'' (albeit still using the Spark Dolls).
** 2016's ''Series/UltramanOrb'' again skews the typical Ultra style in favor of the main hero being a wanderer, Gai Kurenai, helped out by a team of amateur paranormal investigators, against a mysterious demon who can take human form named Jugglus Juggler and his card-summoned Kaiju. All the main cast are played by actors with backgrounds in tokusatsu, something which hadn't been done in the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' in quite a while. Juggler and Gai have several untransformed fight scenes, and their relationship has often been compared to Franchise/KamenRider's tradition of having villains who fight the hero both transformed and untransformed. Also, Gai gets his powers to transform from other Ultra heroes fairly late in the series, and there is a significant CerebusSyndrome that takes hold starting with Episode 12.

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** 2013's ''Series/UltramanGinga'' was the first proper Ultraman series since ''Ultraman Mebius'' in 2006. It took some strange turns with the formula though. First off, there's no defense team, but instead a group of childhood friends hanging out at their former, soon-to-be-demolished elementary school.school (think ''Anime/DigimonFrontier''). Second, it used Spark Dolls, toys of monsters and Ultras that could be used by people to transform into the monster or Ultra trapped in the toy form, meaning it was not uncommon to see the monsters used by the good guys fighting the villainous monster of the episode. Third, and least significant but still noteworthy, the franchise had begun relying heavily on their most popular monsters (Zetton, Red King, Eleking, etc.) to regularly antagonize the heroes, but this time, the iconics either never appeared or were DemotedToExtra in favour of more obscure monsters. It wasn't terribly well-received with fans, so perhaps that's why Tsuburaya returned to the normal formula with the SequelSeries ''Ultraman Ginga S'' (albeit still using the Spark Dolls).
** 2016's ''Series/UltramanOrb'' again skews the typical Ultra style in favor of the main hero being a wanderer, Gai Kurenai, helped out by a team of amateur paranormal investigators, against a mysterious demon who can take human form named Jugglus Juggler and his card-summoned Kaiju. All the main cast are played by actors with backgrounds in tokusatsu, something which hadn't been done in the ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' in quite a while. Juggler and Gai have several untransformed fight scenes, and their relationship has often been compared to Franchise/KamenRider's tradition of having villains who fight the hero both transformed and untransformed. Also, Gai gets his powers to transform from other Ultra heroes fairly late in the series, and there is a significant significant, ''Anime/DigimonTamers''-esque CerebusSyndrome that takes hold starting with Episode 12.
28th Sep '17 12:19:51 PM Twiddler
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[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/metroid_prime_pinball_350px.jpg]]

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[[quoteright:350:http://static.[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/MetroidPrimePinball http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/metroid_prime_pinball_350px.jpg]]jpg]]]]
13th Sep '17 11:27:45 AM JoeMerl
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* The tenth James Bond novel, ''Literature/TheSpyWhoLovedMe'', is told from the FirstPerson perspective of the Bond girl, rather than the usual third-person perspective focusing on Bond. Fleming didn't like the result--the movie with that title is InNameOnly, on his request--though fans of the books generally think that it was an interesting experiment.
13th Sep '17 11:08:39 AM JoeMerl
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* ''Comicbook/UltimateAdventures'' is the only series in Creator/MarvelComics' Comicbook/UltimateUniverse not based on one of their existing franchises, instead focusing on Hawk-Owl and Woody, a DeconstructiveParody of [[Franchise/{{Batman}} a certain superhero]] and [[Comicbook/{{Robin}} sidekick]] belonging to [[Creator/DCComics their competitor]].

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* ''Comicbook/UltimateAdventures'' is the only series in Creator/MarvelComics' Comicbook/UltimateUniverse not based on one of their existing franchises, instead focusing on Hawk-Owl and Woody, a DeconstructiveParody an AffectionateParody of [[Franchise/{{Batman}} a certain superhero]] and [[Comicbook/{{Robin}} sidekick]] belonging to [[Creator/DCComics their competitor]].competitor]]. Genuinely seen as SoOkayItsAverage, it apparently wasn't popular enough for them to try repeating this with other characters.
13th Sep '17 11:04:46 AM JoeMerl
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[[folder:Comicbooks]]
* ''Comicbook/UltimateAdventures'' is the only series in Creator/MarvelComics' Comicbook/UltimateUniverse not based on one of their existing franchises, instead focusing on Hawk-Owl and Woody, a DeconstructiveParody of [[Franchise/{{Batman}} a certain superhero]] and [[Comicbook/{{Robin}} sidekick]] belonging to [[Creator/DCComics their competitor]].
[[/folder]]
13th Sep '17 10:40:35 AM JoeMerl
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* ''Series/{{Roseanne}},'' upon being told that they only had one more season, decided "whatever, let's have some fun" and {{Re Tool}}ed things by having the lower middle-class family win the lottery. A string of {{Bizarro Episode}}s ensue, including one where Roseanne fight terrorists on the roof of a train while wearing a sports bra. Even when it wasn't being weird, it made some controversial decisions, such as revealing that Dan had been having an emotional affair with another woman. This all leads up to its finale, which infamously [[spoiler:reveals that Dan died of his heart attack and most, if not all, of the series was actually a novel Roseanne wrote based loosely on her life]]. However, the show has since been UnCancelled, and the last episode, at least, [[CanonDiscontinuity will apparently be ignored]].

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* ''Series/{{Roseanne}},'' upon being told that they only had one more season, decided "whatever, let's have some fun" and {{Re Tool}}ed things by having the lower middle-class family win the lottery. A string of {{Bizarro Episode}}s ensue, including one where Roseanne fight terrorists on the roof of a train while wearing a sports bra. Even when it wasn't being weird, it made some controversial decisions, such as revealing that Dan had been having an emotional affair with another woman. This all leads up to its finale, which infamously [[spoiler:reveals [[spoiler:[[AllJustADream reveals that Dan died of his heart attack and most, if not all, of the series was actually a novel Roseanne wrote wrote, based loosely on her life]].life]]]]. However, the show has since been UnCancelled, and the last episode, at least, [[CanonDiscontinuity will apparently be ignored]].
13th Sep '17 10:39:41 AM JoeMerl
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/{{Roseanne}},'' upon being told that they only had one more season, decided "whatever, let's have some fun" and {{Re Tool}}ed things by having the lower middle-class family win the lottery. A string of {{Bizarro Episode}}s ensue, including one where Roseanne fight terrorists on the roof of a train while wearing a sports bra. Even when it wasn't being weird, it made some controversial decisions, such as revealing that Dan had been having an emotional affair with another woman. This all leads up to its finale, which infamously [[spoiler:reveals that Dan died of his heart attack and most, if not all, of the series was actually a novel Roseanne wrote based loosely on her life]]. However, the show has since been UnCancelled, and the last episode, at least, [[CanonDiscontinuity will apparently be ignored]].
13th Sep '17 10:31:28 AM JoeMerl
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** ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' was also treated as such back when it first came out, being more of a straight-up action movie rather than something for children. Unlike ''Chicken Little'', however, it has since been VindicatedByHistory.

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** ''Disney/AtlantisTheLostEmpire'' was also treated as such back when it first came out, being more of a straight-up action movie or sci-fi epic rather than something for children. Unlike ''Chicken Little'', however, it has since been VindicatedByHistory.
13th Sep '17 10:28:05 AM JoeMerl
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* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' is very different from the other Franchise/StarTrek series, due to being the only one set on a station instead of a starship ("Fort Apache In Space" as opposed to "Wagon Train to the Stars"), and relying heavily on the use of the StoryArc. Instead of a weekly PlanetOfHats, most of the focus is on the Federation's interaction with one planet, Bajor, and said planet's internal politics. It also acts as a {{deconstruction}} of the utopian Federation Gene Roddenberry envisioned.

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* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' is very different from the other Franchise/StarTrek ''Franchise/StarTrek'' series, due to being the only one set on a station instead of a starship ("Fort Apache In Space" as opposed to "Wagon Train to the Stars"), and relying heavily on the use of the StoryArc. Instead of a weekly PlanetOfHats, most of the focus is on the Federation's interaction with one planet, Bajor, and said planet's internal politics. It also acts as a {{deconstruction}} of the utopian Federation Gene Roddenberry envisioned. As such, it's pretty LoveItOrHateIt among ''Trek'' fans, but also has a following among people who don't necessarily like the other series.
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