History Main / OddballInTheSeries

29th Mar '17 1:20:17 AM Korodzik
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* In the choose-your-own-adventure ''[[Literature/TimeMachineSeries Time Machine]]'' series, ''The Rings of Saturn'' is the only book that is set in the future rather than the past, and thus doesn't try to teach the reader anything about history.
18th Mar '17 10:10:17 PM MyFinalEdits
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* ''TheLostYearsOfMerlin'''s fourth book, ''The Mirror of Merlin,'' is a mild example--it's not as StrictlyFormula as the others (dispatching with the [[PropheciesRhymeAllTheTime rhyming prophecy]] and with a subtler RaceAgainstTheClock), and is a bit less InNameOnly in its approach to Arthurian legend (due to Merlin meeting [[spoiler:[[MyFutureSelfAndMe his future self]] and a young Arthur through TimeTravel]]).

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* ''TheLostYearsOfMerlin'''s ''Literature/TheLostYearsOfMerlin'''s fourth book, ''The Mirror of Merlin,'' is a mild example--it's not as StrictlyFormula as the others (dispatching with the [[PropheciesRhymeAllTheTime rhyming prophecy]] and with a subtler RaceAgainstTheClock), and is a bit less InNameOnly in its approach to Arthurian legend (due to Merlin meeting [[spoiler:[[MyFutureSelfAndMe his future self]] and a young Arthur through TimeTravel]]).
18th Mar '17 6:14:24 PM JoeMerl
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** Only two Franchise/DisneyPrincess movies have the protagonist as someone other than the princess: ''Disney/{{Aladdin}},'' where it's the titular "Disney Prince," and ''Disney/SleepingBeauty,'' which is especially interesting for making the good fairies, who would be sidekicks or mentors in any other Disney fairy tale, into the main characters.



* ''TheLostYearsOfMerlin'''s fourth book, ''The Mirror of Merlin,'' is a mild example--it's not as StrictlyFormula as the others (dispatching with the [[PropheciesRhymeAllTheTime rhyming prophecy]] and RaceAgainstTheClock), and is a bit less InNameOnly in its approach to Arthurian legend (due to [[spoiler:Merlin meeting [[MyFutureSelfAndMe his future self]] and a young Arthur through TimeTravel]]).

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* ''TheLostYearsOfMerlin'''s fourth book, ''The Mirror of Merlin,'' is a mild example--it's not as StrictlyFormula as the others (dispatching with the [[PropheciesRhymeAllTheTime rhyming prophecy]] and with a subtler RaceAgainstTheClock), and is a bit less InNameOnly in its approach to Arthurian legend (due to [[spoiler:Merlin Merlin meeting [[MyFutureSelfAndMe [[spoiler:[[MyFutureSelfAndMe his future self]] and a young Arthur through TimeTravel]]).
25th Feb '17 9:31:20 PM JoeMerl
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* ''TheLostYearsOfMerlin'''s fourth book, ''The Mirror of Merlin,'' is a mild example--it's not as StrictlyFormula as the others (dispatching with the [[PropheciesRhymeAllTheTime rhyming prophecy]] and RaceAgainstTheClock), and is a bit less InNameOnly in its approach to Arthurian legend (due to [[spoiler:Merlin meeting [[MyFutureSelfAndMe his future self]] and a young Arthur through TimeTravel]]).
19th Feb '17 3:20:18 PM merotoker
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* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', the second film in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, is a pretty big oddball in that series. First of all, it was distributed by Universal rather than Paramount, meaning Disney (who acquired the distribution for the rest of the MCU from Paramount in 2013) doesn't have the rights to package it with its fellows or make sequels to the movie. Furthermore, the film breaks from the MCU formula by establishing the Hulk's origin story via a montage in the opening credits (allowing to be share BroadStrokes continuity with the [[Film/{{Hulk}} 2003 film). It has a much darker tone than the series is known for, and the S.H.I.E.L.D. presence that linked all the other Phase One films together was reduced to an EasterEgg in this film. Add on the fact that Creator/EdwardNorton was replaced by Creator/MarkRuffalo, and that Ruffalo's Hulk looks and behaves much differently from Norton's, and you might not even think ''TIH'' is an MCU film at all, the only real sign being [[spoiler:the cameo from Tony Stark]], which was the first confirmation that yes, the MCU ''was'' a thing that was happening. To this day, {{Call Back}}s to the events of ''TIH'' are far rarer than callbacks to any other film in the series, to the point that Thunderbolt Ross was featured in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' for the explicit purpose of assuring audiences that ''The Incredible Hulk'' is still {{canon}}.
* ''Film/{{Halloweentown}} High,'' the third film, actually takes place almost entirely in our world, with [[OurMonstersAreDifferent Halloweentown residents]] coming over as foreign exchange students. It's also set over at least several weeks instead of just Halloween night, unlike its predecessors (but like its sequel). In addition, Gwen suddenly drops her [[DoesNotLikeMagic dislike of magic]] and Marnie's LoveInterest for this film [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse is never mentioned again]]. (The sequel also tries to [[{{Handwave}} ignore any consequences]] of this film [[TheUnmasquedWorld breaking the Masquerade]] so that Marnie still can't be happy in the human world.)

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* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', the second film in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, is a pretty big oddball in that series. First of all, it was distributed by Universal rather than Paramount, meaning Disney (who acquired the distribution for the rest of the MCU from Paramount in 2013) doesn't have the rights to package it with its fellows or make sequels to the movie. Furthermore, the film breaks from the MCU formula by establishing the Hulk's origin story via a montage in the opening credits (allowing it to be share BroadStrokes continuity with the [[Film/{{Hulk}} 2003 film).film]]). It has a much darker tone than the series is known for, and the S.H.I.E.L.D. presence that linked all the other Phase One films together was reduced to an EasterEgg in this film. Add on the fact that Creator/EdwardNorton was replaced by Creator/MarkRuffalo, and that Ruffalo's Hulk looks and behaves much differently from Norton's, and you might not even think ''TIH'' is an MCU film at all, the only real sign being [[spoiler:the cameo from Tony Stark]], which was the first confirmation that yes, the MCU ''was'' a thing that was happening. To this day, {{Call Back}}s to the events of ''TIH'' are far rarer than callbacks to any other film in the series, to the point that Thunderbolt Ross was featured in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' for the explicit purpose of assuring audiences that ''The Incredible Hulk'' is still {{canon}}.
* ''Film/{{Halloweentown}} High,'' the third film, actually takes place almost entirely in our world, with [[OurMonstersAreDifferent Halloweentown residents]] coming over as foreign exchange students. It's also set over at least several weeks instead of just Halloween night, unlike its predecessors (but like its sequel). In addition, Gwen suddenly drops her [[DoesNotLikeMagic dislike of magic]] and Marnie's LoveInterest {{Love Interest|s}} for this film [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse is never mentioned again]]. (The sequel also tries to [[{{Handwave}} ignore any consequences]] of this film [[TheUnmasquedWorld breaking the Masquerade]] so that Marnie still can't be happy in the human world.)



* ''Ring for Jeeves'' in the Literature/JeevesAndWooster series by Creator/PGWodehouse - the novel features only Jeeves as a character (Bertie Wooster is absent) and the story is set in the post-WWII Britain instead of usual vague GenteelInterbellumSetting, with quite unpleasant implications for the upper class protagonists, who have to actually [[RealityEnsues start to work for living]]. [[ActuallyPrettyFunny It's quite funny]], just [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks different from the classical Wodehouse]], into whose signature StrictlyFormula novels reality intrudes quite disturbingly.[[note]]Wodehouse freely admitted he was writting basically "musical comedies without music", and some of his fans even in the 1930S acknowledged that many elements of his humour and settings were more like taken from [[TheEdwardianEra early 1910s]].[[/note]]

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* ''Ring for Jeeves'' in the Literature/JeevesAndWooster series by Creator/PGWodehouse - the novel features only Jeeves as a character (Bertie Wooster is absent) and the story is set in the post-WWII Britain instead of usual vague GenteelInterbellumSetting, with quite unpleasant implications for the upper class protagonists, who have to actually [[RealityEnsues start to work for living]]. [[ActuallyPrettyFunny It's quite funny]], just [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks different from the classical Wodehouse]], into whose signature StrictlyFormula novels reality intrudes quite disturbingly.[[note]]Wodehouse freely admitted he was writting writing basically "musical comedies without music", and some of his fans even in the 1930S acknowledged that many elements of his humour and settings were more like taken from [[TheEdwardianEra early 1910s]].[[/note]]



** 1980's ''Series/UltramanEighty'' had its first half as an oddball, being just as focused on Takeshi's life as a teacher and his relationships with staff and students as on his battles with kaiju. However, ratings dipped in the mid-tens, causing the rest of the series to be retooled into a far more standard Ultra show. Producer Noboru Tsuburaya [[DoingItForTheArt specifically meant]] to use the first half as an attempt at a school dorama as well as a tokusatsu, and he later said the second half of the series was an OldShame for him due to not living up to his original vision, and the first half of the show only got a resolution in UltramanMebius some 26 years later.

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** 1980's ''Series/UltramanEighty'' had its first half as an oddball, being just as focused on Takeshi's life as a teacher and his relationships with staff and students as on his battles with kaiju. However, ratings dipped in the mid-tens, causing the rest of the series to be retooled into a far more standard Ultra show. Producer Noboru Tsuburaya [[DoingItForTheArt specifically meant]] to use the first half as an attempt at a school dorama as well as a tokusatsu, and he later said the second half of the series was an OldShame for him due to not living up to his original vision, and the first half of the show only got a resolution in UltramanMebius ''Series/UltramanMebius'' some 26 years later.



** 2016's ''Series/UltramanOrb'' again skews the typical Ultra style in favor of the main hero being a wanderer, Gai Kurenai, helped out by a team of amateur paranormal investigators, against a mysterious demon who can take human form named Jugglus Juggler and his card-summoned Kaiju. All the main cast are played by actors with backgrounds in tokusatsu, something which hadn't been done in the UltraSeries in quite a while. Juggler and Gai have several untransformed fight scenes, and their relationship has often been compared to KamenRider's tradition of having villains who fight the hero both transformed and untransformed. Also, Gai gets his powers to transform from other Ultra heroes until fairly late in the series, and there is a significant CerebusSyndrome that takes hold starting with Episode 12.

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** 2016's ''Series/UltramanOrb'' again skews the typical Ultra style in favor of the main hero being a wanderer, Gai Kurenai, helped out by a team of amateur paranormal investigators, against a mysterious demon who can take human form named Jugglus Juggler and his card-summoned Kaiju. All the main cast are played by actors with backgrounds in tokusatsu, something which hadn't been done in the UltraSeries ''Franchise/UltraSeries'' in quite a while. Juggler and Gai have several untransformed fight scenes, and their relationship has often been compared to KamenRider's Franchise/KamenRider's tradition of having villains who fight the hero both transformed and untransformed. Also, Gai gets his powers to transform from other Ultra heroes until fairly late in the series, and there is a significant CerebusSyndrome that takes hold starting with Episode 12.
14th Feb '17 10:28:35 PM JoeMerl
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* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', the second film in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, is a pretty big oddball in that series. First of all, it was distributed by Universal rather than Paramount, meaning Disney (who acquired the distribution for the rest of the MCU from Paramount in 2013) doesn't have the rights to package it with its fellows or make sequels to the movie. Furthermore, the film breaks from the MCU formula of exposing the SuperheroOrigin of the title character ''within'' the body of the film by establishing the Hulk's origin story via a montage in the opening credits. It has a much darker tone than the series is known for, and the S.H.I.E.L.D. presence that linked all the other Phase One films together was reduced to an EasterEgg in this film. Add on the fact that Creator/EdwardNorton was replaced by Creator/MarkRuffalo, and that Ruffalo's Hulk looks and behaves much differently from Norton's, and you might not even think ''TIH'' is an MCU film at all, the only real sign being [[spoiler:the cameo from Tony Stark]], which was the first confirmation that yes, the MCU ''was'' a thing that was happening. To this day, {{Call Back}}s to the events of ''TIH'' are far rarer than callbacks to any other film in the series, to the point that Thunderbolt Ross was featured in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' for the explicit purpose of assuring audiences that ''The Incredible Hulk'' is still {{canon}}.

to:

* ''Film/TheIncredibleHulk'', the second film in the Franchise/MarvelCinematicUniverse, is a pretty big oddball in that series. First of all, it was distributed by Universal rather than Paramount, meaning Disney (who acquired the distribution for the rest of the MCU from Paramount in 2013) doesn't have the rights to package it with its fellows or make sequels to the movie. Furthermore, the film breaks from the MCU formula of exposing the SuperheroOrigin of the title character ''within'' the body of the film by establishing the Hulk's origin story via a montage in the opening credits.credits (allowing to be share BroadStrokes continuity with the [[Film/{{Hulk}} 2003 film). It has a much darker tone than the series is known for, and the S.H.I.E.L.D. presence that linked all the other Phase One films together was reduced to an EasterEgg in this film. Add on the fact that Creator/EdwardNorton was replaced by Creator/MarkRuffalo, and that Ruffalo's Hulk looks and behaves much differently from Norton's, and you might not even think ''TIH'' is an MCU film at all, the only real sign being [[spoiler:the cameo from Tony Stark]], which was the first confirmation that yes, the MCU ''was'' a thing that was happening. To this day, {{Call Back}}s to the events of ''TIH'' are far rarer than callbacks to any other film in the series, to the point that Thunderbolt Ross was featured in ''Film/CaptainAmericaCivilWar'' for the explicit purpose of assuring audiences that ''The Incredible Hulk'' is still {{canon}}.{{canon}}.
* ''Film/{{Halloweentown}} High,'' the third film, actually takes place almost entirely in our world, with [[OurMonstersAreDifferent Halloweentown residents]] coming over as foreign exchange students. It's also set over at least several weeks instead of just Halloween night, unlike its predecessors (but like its sequel). In addition, Gwen suddenly drops her [[DoesNotLikeMagic dislike of magic]] and Marnie's LoveInterest for this film [[WhatHappenedToTheMouse is never mentioned again]]. (The sequel also tries to [[{{Handwave}} ignore any consequences]] of this film [[TheUnmasquedWorld breaking the Masquerade]] so that Marnie still can't be happy in the human world.)



* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' is very different from the other Franchise/StarTrek series, due to being the only one set on a station instead of a starship ("Fort Apache In Space" as opposed to "Wagon Train to the Stars"), and relying heavily on the use of the StoryArc. It also acts as a {{deconstruction}} of the utopian Federation Gene Roddenberry envisioned.

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* ''Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine'' is very different from the other Franchise/StarTrek series, due to being the only one set on a station instead of a starship ("Fort Apache In Space" as opposed to "Wagon Train to the Stars"), and relying heavily on the use of the StoryArc. Instead of a weekly PlanetOfHats, most of the focus is on the Federation's interaction with one planet, Bajor, and said planet's internal politics. It also acts as a {{deconstruction}} of the utopian Federation Gene Roddenberry envisioned.
13th Jan '17 9:33:07 AM spiritsunami
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[[folder:Web Original]]
* ''LetsPlay/TwitchPlaysTouhoumonAndMoemon'', in addition to being the only time that ''LetsPlay/TwitchPlaysPokemon'' used romhacks that replaced the Pokémon with {{Cute Monster Girl}}s, was a dual run in which all inputs controlled both games. Furthermore, because of the difficulty inherent in this, democracy was made easier than ever to obtain. The expectation was that there would be battles between people trying to progress each game, but instead there was mostly just "work on one, then the other", and the idea of a dual run has never been revisited.
[[/folder]]
7th Jan '17 4:43:52 PM justanid
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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/MetroidPrimePinball http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/metroid_prime_pinball.jpg]]]]

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[[quoteright:350:[[VideoGame/MetroidPrimePinball http://static.[[quoteright:350:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/metroid_prime_pinball.jpg]]]]org/pmwiki/pub/images/metroid_prime_pinball_350px.jpg]]
26th Dec '16 6:10:18 PM MyFinalEdits
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* Of the four film adaptations of Creator/DrSeuss books, ''WesternAnimation/HortonHearsAWho'' sticks out from [[Film/HowTheGrinchStoleChristmas the]] [[Film/TheCatInTheHat other]] [[WesternAnimation/TheLorax films]]. For one thing, while the other three were produced by Creator/{{Universal}}, ''Horton'' was produced by Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox. It also got reasonably positive reviews when it was first released, while the others got reviews ranging from mediocre to terrible. This reception seems to have died down, to a point where people ironically forget about this one. ''Grinch'' and ''Lorax'' tend to be remembered for [[BrokenAesop how they handled their messages]], while ''Cat'' is notorious for [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar its surprisingly dirty sense of humor]], which technically led to ''Horton'''s creation in the first place. What is ''Horton'' remembered for? Maybe the [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Anime homage]], and the fact that it ''is'' the first animated film based on Seuss' work. Other than that, ''Horton'' isn't really brought up much.
25th Dec '16 6:34:05 PM akaun6899
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* Of the four film adaptations of Creator/DrSeuss books, ''WesternAnimation/HortonHearsAWho'' sticks out from [[Film/HowTheGrinchStoleChristmas the]] [[Film/TheCatInTheHat other]] [[WesternAnimation/TheLorax films]]. For one thing, while the other three were produced by Creator/{{Universal}}, ''Horton'' was produced by Creator/TwentiethCenturyFox. It also got reasonably positive reviews when it was first released, while the others got reviews ranging from mediocre to terrible. This reception seems to have died down, to a point where people ironically forget about this one. ''Grinch'' and ''Lorax'' tend to be remembered for [[BrokenAesop how they handled their messages]], while ''Cat'' is notorious for [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar its surprisingly dirty sense of humor]], which technically led to ''Horton'''s creation in the first place. What is ''Horton'' remembered for? Maybe the [[BigLippedAlligatorMoment Anime homage]], and the fact that it ''is'' the first animated film based on Seuss' work. Other than that, ''Horton'' isn't really brought up much.
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