History Main / NotUsingTheZWord

2nd Nov '17 2:55:57 AM Bosco13
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** Happens to several other monsters in the Zelda franchise;
*** [[{{Mummy}} Mummies]] are called Gibdos.
*** Cyclopses are Hinoxes.
2nd Nov '17 2:54:11 AM Bosco13
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** Link is actually referred to as being half-elf in [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Manga/TheLegendOfZelda Yuu Mishouzaki's manga]].

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** Link is actually referred to as being half-elf in [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Manga/TheLegendOfZelda [[Manga/TheLegendOfZelda Yuu Mishouzaki's manga]].
2nd Nov '17 2:53:18 AM Bosco13
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** Link is actually referred to as being half-elf in [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Manga/TheLegendOfZelda Yuu Mishouzaki's manga]].
2nd Nov '17 2:50:04 AM Bosco13
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** Though there are enemies called zombies in ''[[VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaLinksAwakening Link's Awakening]]''.
2nd Nov '17 2:47:59 AM Bosco13
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* ''LightNovel/VampireHunterD'' doesn't refer to half vampires as [[{{Dhampyr}} dhampyrs]] because when that word was transliterated into Japanese for the novels and then back into English for the American release of the movies, we ended up with "dampiel" in the first film and "dunpeal" in Bloodlust. The novels correctly use "dhampir."
2nd Nov '17 2:45:49 AM Bosco13
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** Being an undead wizard who uses a SoulJar to gain immortality, Lord Voldemort is a textbook example of a [[OurLichesAreDifferent lich]], but the word is never uttered in the franchise.
21st Oct '17 1:40:42 PM LordInsane
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*** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', the word "zombie" ''is'' used, but it's for temporarily-risen bodies that crumble to dust after a while and generally look the same as they did when they were alive. Also unlike traditional zombies, they can talk and seem to be self-aware (but [[AndIMustScream incapable of controlling their actions]]). The more traditional rotten shambling corpses are "Draugr", ancient undead Nords who also have elements of [[{{Mummy}} Mummies]]. (The word "draugr" exists in real life languages in northern Europe, and essentially means "undead".)

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*** In ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', the word "zombie" ''is'' used, but it's for temporarily-risen bodies that crumble to dust after a while and generally look the same as they did when they were alive. Also unlike traditional zombies, they can talk and seem to be self-aware (but [[AndIMustScream incapable of controlling their actions]]). The more traditional rotten shambling corpses are "Draugr", ancient undead Nords who also have elements of [[{{Mummy}} Mummies]].Mummies]] and first showed up in the series in Morrowind's ''Bloodmoon'' expansion. (The word "draugr" exists in real life languages in northern Europe, and essentially means "undead".)
20th Sep '17 11:29:49 AM BeerBaron
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** The series also includes many other fictional types of creature under different names, including [[OurDemonsAreDifferent lesser Daedra]] and the [[OurElvesAreBetter Races of Mer]].

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** The series also includes many other fictional types of creature under different names, including [[OurDemonsAreDifferent "demonic"]] lesser Daedra]] Daedra and the [[OurElvesAreBetter Elves]] known as the Races of Mer]].Mer.
20th Sep '17 11:18:59 AM BeerBaron
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* In ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' demons are "Daedra". In ''Arena'' they were called ''Daemons'', but there was only one variety of them, "Fire Daemons." They were renamed as Daedra in ''Daggerfall'' as the backstory settled, then a type of Daedra inherited the name of the abandoned man-made golems, Atronachs, in ''Morrowind''.
** Zombies are still zombies, though. And vampires are still vampires.
*** Zombies are called Bonewalkers in ''Morrowind'', but this is explicitly described as a regional variation, with 'Zombie' being the common western term and 'Bonewalker' being the Dunmeri term (and indeed ''Arena'', ''Daggerfall'' and ''Oblivion'' all call them zombies). There are creatures called Zombies in Vvardenfell, but the Ash Zombies aren't all that zombie-like, or even undead.
*** In ''Skyrim'', the word "zombie" ''is'' used, but it's for temporarily-risen bodies that crumble to dust after a while and generally look the same as they did when they were alive. Also unlike traditional zombies, they can talk and seem to be self-aware (but [[AndIMustScream incapable of controlling their actions]]). The more traditional rotten shambling corpses are "draugr" (who are draugr, not zombies -- that is, they had already shown up in a previous game as a ''separate'' kind of shambling corpse to zombies).
** Official canon still recognizes "demon" as a word used to describe daedra, but is considered inaccurate by scholars. Sort of how the singular of "daedra" is "daedroth," which is also the name of the giant, bipedal lizards that spit fire/poison. It shows a lot of dedication when the writers are willing to include in-universe [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics linguistic errors]].
** Interestingly, the as-yet unseen continent of Akaviri does seem to have "snow demons" called Kamal, that are completely independent from daedra. Whether or not they actually exist or are anything like how they're described in the scarce texts they appear in is up for some discussion.
** "Daedra" in general seems to be retconned into a term meaning a divine creature. Note that divine doesn't necessarily mean good, but in another plane of existence. For instance, there are 16 Daedra "Princes", some of them may have ''agreeable'' values as you, and hence may seem like they're "good", while a good number of them do represent "disagreeable" acts, in particular, Mehrunes Dagon (Prince of Destruction) and Molag Bal (Prince of Corruption).
** "Daedra" basically means "Not our ancestors", referring to the fact that those entities did not self-sacrifice to form or become bound to the Mundus, the plane of existence that the planet Nirn, and thus the continent of Tamriel is in. Since they didn't take part in generating so much creatia, they have a bit of a CreativeSterility problem.
** [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] with the various Mer races. While the terms "Dwarf", "Orc" and "Elf" are all recognized terms in the [[TranslationConvention Imperial Tongue]], they're ''very'' rarely used in the actual games, with most dialogue and gameplay cues exclusively using the terms "Dwemer", "Orsimer", and the various "Mer" variants ("Aldmer", "Bosmer", "Dunmer"[[note]] High Elves, Wood Elves and Dark Elves, respectively[[/note]], etc.), respectively. However, if you manage to acquire any armor or weapons made by those races, the games ''will'' use the adjectives "Dwarven", "Orcish" and "Elvish" to describe them.

to:

* In ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' demons are "Daedra". In ''Arena'' they were called ''Daemons'', but there was only one variety of them, "Fire Daemons." They were renamed as Daedra in ''Daggerfall'' as the backstory settled, then a type of Daedra inherited the name of the abandoned man-made golems, Atronachs, in ''Morrowind''.
''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** Zombies are still The series has classic zombies, though. And vampires are still vampires.
*** Zombies are
but depending on the region the specific game in question takes place, they may not be called Bonewalkers in ''Morrowind'', but "zombies". Details beyond their names can be found on OurZombiesAreDifferent.
*** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind Morrowind]]'' has "Bonewalkers", though
this is explicitly described as a regional variation, with 'Zombie' being the common western term and 'Bonewalker' being the Dunmeri term (and indeed ''Arena'', ''Daggerfall'' and ''Oblivion'' all call them zombies). There are creatures called Zombies in Vvardenfell, but the variation. Ash Zombies aren't all that zombie-like, or are another form, but they are much more [[EldritchAbomination eldritch]] and [[TechnicallyLivingZombie technically]] [[PlagueZombie not even undead.
undead]].
*** In ''Skyrim'', ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim Skyrim]]'', the word "zombie" ''is'' used, but it's for temporarily-risen bodies that crumble to dust after a while and generally look the same as they did when they were alive. Also unlike traditional zombies, they can talk and seem to be self-aware (but [[AndIMustScream incapable of controlling their actions]]). The more traditional rotten shambling corpses are "Draugr", ancient undead Nords who also have elements of [[{{Mummy}} Mummies]]. (The word "draugr" (who are draugr, not zombies -- that is, they had already shown up exists in a previous game as a ''separate'' kind of shambling corpse to zombies).
** Official canon still recognizes "demon" as a word used to describe daedra, but is considered inaccurate by scholars. Sort of how the singular of "daedra" is "daedroth," which is also the name of the giant, bipedal lizards that spit fire/poison. It shows a lot of dedication when the writers are willing to include in-universe [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics linguistic errors]].
** Interestingly, the as-yet unseen continent of Akaviri does seem to have "snow demons" called Kamal, that are completely independent from daedra. Whether or not they actually exist or are anything like how they're described
real life languages in the scarce texts they appear in is up for some discussion.
** "Daedra" in general seems to be retconned into a term meaning a divine creature. Note that divine doesn't necessarily mean good, but in another plane of existence. For instance, there are 16 Daedra "Princes", some of them may have ''agreeable'' values as you,
northern Europe, and hence may seem like they're "good", while a good number of them do represent "disagreeable" acts, in particular, Mehrunes Dagon (Prince of Destruction) and Molag Bal (Prince of Corruption).
** "Daedra" basically
essentially means "Not our ancestors", referring to the fact that those entities did not self-sacrifice to form or become bound to the Mundus, the plane "undead".)
** The series also includes many other fictional types
of existence that the planet Nirn, and thus the continent of Tamriel is in. Since they didn't take part in generating so much creatia, they have a bit of a CreativeSterility problem.
** [[ZigZaggedTrope Zig-zagged]] with the various Mer races. While the terms "Dwarf", "Orc" and "Elf" are all recognized terms in the [[TranslationConvention Imperial Tongue]], they're ''very'' rarely used in the actual games, with most dialogue and gameplay cues exclusively using the terms "Dwemer", "Orsimer",
creature under different names, including [[OurDemonsAreDifferent lesser Daedra]] and the various "Mer" variants ("Aldmer", "Bosmer", "Dunmer"[[note]] High Elves, Wood Elves and Dark Elves, respectively[[/note]], etc.), respectively. However, if you manage to acquire any armor or weapons made by those races, the games ''will'' use the adjectives "Dwarven", "Orcish" and "Elvish" to describe them. [[OurElvesAreBetter Races of Mer]].
13th Sep '17 11:19:02 PM foxley
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* The shambling undead created by the DeadlyGas in the ''Literature/ClockworkCentury'' novels are called Rotters (JustifiedTrope due to time period).
** ''Ganymede'', set in New Orleans and including appearances by [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marie_Laveau Marie Laveau]], does refer to them as ''zombis''.
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