History Main / NotUsingTheZWord

19th Feb '17 12:33:39 PM AtticusOmundson
Is there an issue? Send a Message



to:

[[caption-width-right:349:Maybe she would come to her senses if she cooled down with some bottled sky juice.]]
7th Feb '17 7:06:49 PM AthenaBlue
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Ultraviolet}}'' never used the word vampire. Instead, the government called them "Code 5" (that is, V). Also 'leeches' as a slang term.

to:

* ''Series/{{Ultraviolet}}'' In ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', people with superhuman abilities are generally referred to as "Gifted", while words such as "superhero" or "supervillain" rarely come into play. This is a bit of an EnforcedTrope, as the creators have mentioned that legal red tape bars them from using terms like "Mutants" (since Marvel doesn't own film rights to the ''Film/XMen'') to describe characters with powers.
* Cylons in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' are called any number of names, from "Toaster" to "Skin Job", but
never ''robots'', except in "Pegasus", in which some of Pegasus's crew members call a Cylon just that. In the miniseries, Baltar says disparagingly to Number Six "You're a Cylon. A robot."
* Lampshaded in [=S3E3=] of ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}''. "...or they were hiding a zombie." "Oh christ, are we really gonna call her that?' The [[Series/BeingHumanUS USA/Canada]] version also makes this distinction [[spoiler:in season 3 when Sally and two of her ghostly friends are brought back to life. Sally also hates the idea that she is starting to decompose and refuses to call it that, as well]].
* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
** The Initiative insists on calling the various monsters they hunt "Hostile Sub-Terrestrials" or [=HSTs=] in a laughable effort to sound scientific about it, sounding suspiciously like "Aggressive Non-Terrestrials" from the dragonless ''Doctor Who'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]". The Scoobies are not impressed. But then the Initiative are military. If they don't have a multiple-word phrase they can abbreviate, they wither and die.
** This was also played for laughs in an early ep, with someone asking if vampires prefer to be called "Undead Americans" instead.
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'':
** While the show does actually refer to Leo and his kind as guardian angels on occasion, the preferred term is "Whitelighter," and their bosses are "the Elders." How often they use the A-word may vary DependingOnTheWriter.
** The Source is the most powerful demon who rules the Underworld - don't call him "the Devil." To be fair it is a position rather than a single being, but then plenty of other works have
used "the Devil" that way too.
* ''Series/DeadSet'' never uses
the word vampire. Instead, zombie to describe its undead - writer Charlie Brooker wanted to distinguish it from more light-hearted zombie comedies like ''Shaun of the government called them "Code 5" (that is, V). Also 'leeches' as Dead'' where characters use the Z-word frequently. One character does however quote "They're coming to get you Barbara!" from ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so at least they aren't completely {{genre blind|ness}}.
** Plus Patrick directly quotes the famous "choke on 'em" line, in
a slang term.tributary recreation of the scene from ''Film/DayOfTheDead1985''.
** Probably because calling him a zombie would be rather demeaning and would imply he's less than human. He retains his intelligence and reasoning, he's just dead.



** Another story, "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones Smith and Jones]]" has similarly vampiric creatures not named as such. Admittedly, they differ from vampires in some significant ways.



** The television story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw Tooth and Claw]]" has the Doctor explain that the monster is a "lupine wavelength haemovariform", but it's called a werewolf throughout.
** Similarly, the Carrionites in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode The Shakespeare Code]]" are frequently called witches.



** Then you have the "Vampires of Venice" which inverts this trope by constantly saying how similar the MonsterOfTheWeek is to vampires, only for them to turn out to be not vampires but alien fish creatures. Which the Doctor makes reference to in later episodes as "Sexy Fish Vampires".

to:

** "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw Tooth and Claw]]" has the Doctor explain that the monster is a "lupine wavelength haemovariform", but it's called a werewolf throughout.
** Another story, "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones Smith and Jones]]" has similarly vampiric creatures not named as such. Admittedly, they differ from vampires in some significant ways.
** Similarly, the Carrionites in "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode The Shakespeare Code]]" are frequently called witches.
** Then you have the "Vampires [[Recap/DoctorWhoS31E6TheVampiresOfVenice "The Vampires of Venice" Venice"]], which inverts this trope by constantly saying how similar the MonsterOfTheWeek is to vampires, only for them to turn out to be not vampires but alien fish creatures. Which the Doctor makes reference to in later episodes as "Sexy Fish Vampires".



* ''Series/TheEvent'' places bizarre importance on using the term "Eebies" (Extra Terrestrial Biological Entities) and not "Aliens". Because "Aliens" makes the series hard to take seriously, whereas [[InherentlyFunnyWords Eebies]] naturally lends a sense of seriousness and significance to the proceedings.



* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
** The Initiative insists on calling the various monsters they hunt "Hostile Sub-Terrestrials" or [=HSTs=] in a laughable effort to sound scientific about it, sounding suspiciously like "Aggressive Non-Terrestrials" from the dragonless ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]". The Scoobies are not impressed. But then the Initiative are military. If they don't have a multiple-word phrase they can abbreviate, they wither and die.
** This was also played for laughs in an early ep, with someone asking if vampires prefer to be called "Undead Americans" instead.
* ''Series/KyleXY'' features a main character and another character who are clones, but [[CloningBlues follow almost no cloning cliches]]; possibly because of this, nobody ever uses the word "clone" in the show. Until the last episode comes and they [[spoiler:are apparently not only not clones, but show no qualms about killing actual clones, even though the description of their origins (and their identical appearances to their parents in younger days) meant "clone"]].

to:

* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
** The Initiative insists on calling the various monsters they hunt "Hostile Sub-Terrestrials" or [=HSTs=] in
In ''Series/{{Helix}}'' a laughable effort CDC rapid response team of pathologists refers to sound scientific about it, sounding suspiciously like "Aggressive Non-Terrestrials" from the dragonless ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]". The Scoobies are not impressed. But then the Initiative are military. If they don't have a multiple-word phrase they can abbreviate, they wither and die.
** This was also played for laughs in an early ep, with someone asking if vampires prefer to be called "Undead Americans" instead.
* ''Series/KyleXY'' features a main character and another character
infectees of TheVirus NARVIK-B, who are clones, but [[CloningBlues follow almost no cloning cliches]]; possibly because [[SuperStrength super-strong]], paranoid, aggressive and compelled to assault victims and vomit BadBlackBarf into their mouths, as "Vectors," repurposing an epidemiologically correct term for use in their research and containment efforts, instead of this, nobody ever uses the word "clone" in the show. Until the last episode comes and they [[spoiler:are apparently not only not clones, but show no qualms about killing actual clones, even though the description of their origins (and their identical appearances to their parents in younger days) meant "clone"]]."Zombie".



** Also of note are the Bacchai who show up in both ''Hercules'' and ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Though in this case, it's more twisting the Bacchai from mythology into vampires than it is avoiding a term.
* Cylons in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' are called any number of names, from "Toaster" to "Skin Job", but never ''robots'', except in "Pegasus", in which some of Pegasus's crew members call a Cylon just that. In the miniseries, Baltar says disparagingly to Number Six "You're a Cylon. A robot."

to:

** Also of note are the Bacchai Bacchae who show up in both ''Hercules'' and ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Though in this case, it's more twisting the Bacchai Bacchae from mythology into vampires than it is avoiding a term.
* Cylons ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is to be commended for being well into its third season with no sign of planning to use the word "mutant". Or for that matter, "superhero" or "supervillain". The FanNickname for people with powers in ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'' ''Heroes'' is "evolved humans", because those are called any number of names, from "Toaster" to "Skin Job", but never ''robots'', except ''nothing'' like "mutants" (of course, granted, [[Franchise/TheDCU "metahuman" is already taken]]...). And no one in "Pegasus", in which some of Pegasus's crew members call a Cylon ''Heroes'' has "powers", going by Heroes Wiki; they have "abilities". And no one has "super strength", they have "enhanced strength", because "super strength"... well that would be just that. In ''silly''. Of course, AscendedFanboy Hiro does refer to himself as a "superhero", and the miniseries, Baltar says disparagingly characters have swapped "abilities" with "special powers" and "powers" occasionally. Especially Sylar. He doesn't have abilities, he has powers. And considering how he can slice the top of your head off like it's a hard-boiled egg, it's best not to Number Six "You're a Cylon. A robot."argue.
* In ''Series/InTheFlesh'' while "zombie" is said the government prefers [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad Partially Deceased Syndrome]] while the HVF uses the derogatory "Rotters".



* ''Seried/DeadSet'' never uses the word zombie to describe its undead - writer Charlie Brooker wanted to distinguish it from more light-hearted zombie comedies like ''Shaun of the Dead'' where characters use the Z-word frequently. One character does however quote "They're coming to get you Barbara!" from ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so at least they aren't completely {{genre blind|ness}}.
** Plus Patrick directly quotes the famous "choke on 'em" line, in a tributary recreation of the scene from ''Film/DayOfTheDead1985''.
** Probably because calling him a zombie would be rather demeaning and would imply he's less than human. He retains his intelligence and reasoning, he's just dead.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is to be commended for being well into its third season with no sign of planning to use the word "mutant". Or for that matter, "superhero" or "supervillain". The FanNickname for people with powers in ''Heroes'' is "evolved humans", because those are ''nothing'' like "mutants" (of course, granted, [[Franchise/TheDCU "metahuman" is already taken]]...). And no one in ''Heroes'' has "powers", going by Heroes Wiki; they have "abilities". And no one has "super strength", they have "enhanced strength", because "super strength"... well that would be just ''silly''. Of course, AscendedFanboy Hiro does refer to himself as a "superhero", and the characters have swapped "abilities" with "special powers" and "powers" occasionally. Especially Sylar. He doesn't have abilities, he has powers. And considering how he can slice the top of your head off like it's a hard-boiled egg, it's best not to argue.

to:

* ''Seried/DeadSet'' never ''Series/KyleXY'' features a main character and another character who are clones, but [[CloningBlues follow almost no cloning cliches]]; possibly because of this, nobody ever uses the word zombie to describe its undead - writer Charlie Brooker wanted to distinguish it from more light-hearted zombie comedies like ''Shaun of "clone" in the Dead'' where characters use show. Until the Z-word frequently. One character does however quote "They're coming to get you Barbara!" from ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so at least last episode comes and they aren't completely {{genre blind|ness}}.
** Plus Patrick directly quotes
[[spoiler:are apparently not only not clones, but show no qualms about killing actual clones, even though the famous "choke on 'em" line, description of their origins (and their identical appearances to their parents in a tributary recreation of younger days) meant "clone"]].
* In
the scene from ''Film/DayOfTheDead1985''.
** Probably because calling him a zombie would be rather demeaning and would imply he's less than human. He retains his intelligence and reasoning, he's just dead.
* ''Series/{{Heroes}}''
''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'' episode "Abominations", Professor Martin Stein is revealed to be commended for being well into its third season with no sign DEADLY afraid of planning zombies, to use the word "mutant". Or for that matter, "superhero" or "supervillain". The FanNickname for people with powers in ''Heroes'' is "evolved humans", because those are ''nothing'' like "mutants" (of course, granted, [[Franchise/TheDCU "metahuman" is already taken]]...). And no one in ''Heroes'' has "powers", going by Heroes Wiki; they have "abilities". And no one has "super strength", they have "enhanced strength", because "super strength"... well that would be just ''silly''. Of course, AscendedFanboy Hiro does refer point he refuses to himself as a "superhero", so much utter the word, and constantly begs the characters have swapped "abilities" with "special powers" and "powers" occasionally. Especially Sylar. He others not to say it in front of him.
* Henry from ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}''
doesn't have abilities, he has powers. And considering how he can slice the top of your head off like it's a hard-boiled egg, it's best not it when he's referred to argue.as a [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolf]].
-->'''Henry:''' Yeah, we don't use the "W" word around here.\\
'''Will:''' Oh, right, right. It's, uh, HAP.\\
'''Henry:''' It's a hyper-accelerated protean, thank you very much.



* In the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Regeneration", the Borg obviously can't be called the Borg, since it's 200 years before the official first contact in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. But the writers seem to go out of their way to avoid even calling them cyborgs. Instead they're referred to as "cybernetic hybrids".
** Similarly, the episode "Acquisition" featured the ''Enterprise'' being overrun by Ferengi. But the name of their species is never used.
* A more realistic version was Disney's late 60s ''The Swamp Fox'' series. It took place in South Carolina around the time of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution. Most people who know any American History at all know that most (though not all) African-Americans, particularly in southern states, were slaves at the time. And the character-slash-real person of Oscar definitely was. However, Disney never uses the "s" word, always calling them "servants" or "boy" in one or two cases. Most likely {{Disneyfication}} due to the target audience being kids.



* In ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' no one in the quiz show broadcast uses the word zombie to describe Them. This may be because they've forgotten what it means. It helps that They are capable of speech, and are definitely intelligent, what with figuring out [[spoiler:how to get inside]], and apparently knowing more about the Event than anyone else.
* ''Series/{{Ultraviolet}}'' never used the word vampire. Instead, the government called them "Code 5" (that is, V). Also 'leeches' as a slang term.
* In ''Series/TheWalkingDead'', the main characters refer to zombies as "walkers" or "geeks." WordOfGod on the accompanying talk show ''Talking Dead'' states that this is because ''The Walking Dead'' exists in a universe where "zombies" never became a pop-cultural phenomenon due to the lack of Romero's ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so people would not generally know the term (unless they had a trivial knowledge of voodoo). Because there's no easily recognizable equivalent in their universe, each group of survivors tends to call them different things. We've got "walkers," "geeks," "roamers," "lame-brains," "biters," "rotters," It seems every new group has a new name for the things.



* In ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' no one in the quiz show broadcast uses the word zombie to describe Them. This may be because they've forgotten what it means. It helps that They are capable of speech, and are definitely intelligent, what with figuring out [[spoiler:how to get inside]], and apparently knowing more about the Event than anyone else.
* In ''Series/TheWalkingDead'', the main characters refer to zombies as "walkers" or "geeks." WordOfGod on the accompanying talk show ''Talking Dead'' states that this is because ''The Walking Dead'' exists in a universe where "zombies" never became a pop-cultural phenomenon due to the lack of Romero's ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'', so people would not generally know the term (unless they had a trivial knowledge of voodoo). Because there's no easily recognizable equivalent in their universe, each group of survivors tends to call them different things. We've got "walkers," "geeks," "roamers," "lame-brains," "biters," "rotters," It seems every new group has a new name for the things.
* ''Series/TheEvent'' places bizarre importance on using the term "Eebies" (Extra Terrestrial Biological Entities) and not "Aliens". Because "Aliens" makes the series hard to take seriously, whereas [[InherentlyFunnyWords Eebies]] naturally lends a sense of seriousness and significance to the proceedings.
* Lampshaded in [=S3E3=] of ''Series/{{Being Human|UK}}''. "...or they were hiding a zombie." "Oh christ, are we really gonna call her that?' The [[Series/BeingHumanUS USA/Canada]] version also makes this distinction [[spoiler:in season 3 when Sally and two of her ghostly friends are brought back to life. Sally also hates the idea that she is starting to decompose and refuses to call it that, as well]].
* Henry from ''Series/{{Sanctuary}}'' doesn't like it when he's referred to as a [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolf]].
-->'''Henry:''' Yeah, we don't use the "W" word around here.\\
'''Will:''' Oh, right, right. It's, uh, HAP.\\
'''Henry:''' It's a hyper-accelerated protean, thank you very much.
* In the ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'' episode "Regeneration", the Borg obviously can't be called the Borg, since it's 200 years before the official first contact in ''Series/StarTrekTheNextGeneration''. But the writers seem to go out of their way to avoid even calling them cyborgs. Instead they're referred to as "cybernetic hybrids".
** Similarly, the episode "Acquisition" featured the ''Enterprise'' being overrun by Ferengi. But the name of their species is never used.



* A more realistic version was Disney's late 60s ''The Swamp Fox'' series. It took place in South Carolina around the time of UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution. Most people who know any American History at all know that most (though not all) African-Americans, particularly in southern states, were slaves at the time. And the character-slash-real person of Oscar definitely was. However, Disney never uses the "s" word, always calling them "servants" or "boy" in one or two cases. Most likely {{Disneyfication}} due to the target audience being kids.
* In ''Series/InTheFlesh'' while "zombie" is said the government prefers [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad Partially Deceased Syndrome]] while the HVF uses the derogatory "Rotters".
* In ''Series/AgentsOfSHIELD'', people with superhuman abilities are generally referred to as "Gifted", while words such as "superhero" or "supervillain" rarely come into play. This is a bit of an EnforcedTrope, as the creators have mentioned that legal red tape bars them from using terms like "Mutants" (since Marvel doesn't own film rights to the ''Film/XMen'') to describe characters with powers.
* In ''Series/{{Helix}}'' a CDC rapid response team of pathologists refers to infectees of TheVirus NARVIK-B, who are [[SuperStrength super-strong]], paranoid, aggressive and compelled to assault victims and vomit BadBlackBarf into their mouths, as "Vectors," repurposing an epidemiologically correct term for use in their research and containment efforts, instead of the word "Zombie".
* ''Series/{{Charmed}}'':
** While the show does actually refer to Leo and his kind as guardian angels on occasion, the preferred term is "Whitelighter," and their bosses are "the Elders." How often they use the A-word may vary DependingOnTheWriter.
** The Source is the most powerful demon who rules the Underworld - don't call him "the Devil." To be fair it is a position rather than a single being, but then plenty of other works have used "the Devil" that way too.
* In the ''Series/LegendsOfTomorrow'' episode "Abominations", Professor Martin Stein is revealed to be DEADLY afraid of zombies, to the point he refuses to so much utter the word, and constantly begs the others not to say it in front of him.
7th Feb '17 2:13:55 PM amysteriousravioli
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Charlotte of ''Literature/AlongTheWindingRoad'' really prefers "infecteds," though her love interest doesn't mind throwing the z-word around.
29th Jan '17 3:30:14 PM FF32
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* The villains from ''Film/TheForgotten'' are never called aliens, aside from the implications of the missing children being referred to as "[[AlienAbduction abducted]]" and not kidnapped.
29th Dec '16 10:54:07 PM Xtifr
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Charles Stross's ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'':

to:

* Charles Stross's ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'':''Literature/TheLaundryFiles'':
29th Dec '16 8:57:50 AM Pilomotor
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* Played with in ''Literature/ThisBookIsFullOfSpiders''. The outbreak is caused by a sort of PuppeteerParasite that can mutate humans in unpredictable ways, but isn't anywhere near contagious enough to cause a ZombieApocalypse, and many of the infected retain their senses. In other words, not zombies. However, the government designates these infected individuals "Zulus" to ''encourage'' people to associate them with zombies, since that sort of black-and-white thinking will make it easier for the government to [[GuiltFreeExterminationWar bomb the quarantined city once the rest of the country sees them as a lost cause]].
27th Dec '16 8:42:19 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Due to a [[MoralGuardians religious flap]] about the presence of demons and devils in the game, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' was forced to refer to the inhabitants of the Abyss and the Inferno as "Baatezu" and "Tanar'ri" for many long years. And then they tried to return and ended up with a mix of both. As one of narrators in "[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=5248 Hellbound:The Blood War]]" put it:
-->Most berks think that the Blood War's nothing more than the battle between dem-- no, wait. That ain't the right word. For one thing, it's a sure road to woe. Calling the fiends by the d-words is no better than insulting any other group of folks because of the way they look or act. Not only does it infuriate them, it marks the speaker as a crass boor, someone to be shunned (or killed). Might as well call a bariaur a randy goat, or a slaad a slimy toad. It's a mark of ignorance, plain and simple, and it'll paint a body to be as Clueless as they come.\\

to:

* Due ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'':
** The 2nd Edition of ''AD&D'' removed all references
to a [[MoralGuardians religious flap]] about demons (ChaoticEvil fiends from the presence Abyss), daemons (NeutralEvil fiends from Gehenna and Hades), and devils (LawfulEvil fiends from the Nine Hells), changing their respective names to "tanar'ri," "yugoloths," and "baatezu" to appease MoralGuardians. Later editions restored the terms "demon" and "devil" but kept "tanar'ri" and "baatezu" to refer to the dominant races of the Abyss and Nine Hells (although other types of demons and devils in exist). "Yugoloth" stuck, probably since the game, ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' old name "daemon" was forced too hard to refer to the inhabitants of the Abyss and the Inferno as "Baatezu" and "Tanar'ri" for many long years. And then they tried to return and ended up with a mix of both. distinguish from "demon." As one of narrators in "[[http://index.rpg.net/display-entry.phtml?mainid=5248 Hellbound:The Hellbound: The Blood War]]" put it:
-->Most berks think that the Blood War's nothing more than the battle between dem-- dem -- no, wait. That ain't the right word. For one thing, it's a sure road to woe. Calling the fiends by the d-words is no better than insulting any other group of folks because of the way they look or act. Not only does it infuriate them, it marks the speaker as a crass boor, someone to be shunned (or killed). Might as well call a bariaur a randy goat, or a slaad a slimy toad. It's a mark of ignorance, plain and simple, and it'll paint a body to be as Clueless as they come.\\



** Though, in 3rd Edition and beyond, they're back to being demons (tanar'ri) and devils (baatezu). Though both terms are used in places and almost interchangeably, as the majority of demons belong to the Tanar'ri race, and most devils belong to the Baatezu race.
** Technically, it's not the same: "demons" and "devils" are collective nouns the Clueless (Prime mortals) use for "ChaoticEvil fiends" and "LawfulEvil fiends", while "Tanar'ri" and "Baatezu" are names of races, dominant on their respective planes. There are ''other'' chaotic and lawful fiends: a Quasit and Bebilith are ChaoticEvil fiends from Abyss, but not Tanar'ri. On the other hand, a ChaoticNeutral or TrueNeutral (20%) [[HalfHumanHybrid Alu-fiend]] who was born on Prime and never left it -- definitely a Lesser Tanar'ri, but calling her "demon" would stretch the term a lot.

to:

** Though, in 3rd Edition Treants, balors, and beyond, halflings got their names as a way of WritingAroundTrademarks; they're back to being demons (tanar'ri) respectively based on the [[PlantPerson Ents]], [[OurDemonsAreDifferent Balrogs]], and devils (baatezu). Though both terms are used in places and almost interchangeably, as the majority {{hobbits}} of demons belong to the Tanar'ri race, and most devils belong to the Baatezu race.
** Technically, it's not the same: "demons" and "devils" are collective nouns the Clueless (Prime mortals) use for "ChaoticEvil fiends" and "LawfulEvil fiends", while "Tanar'ri" and "Baatezu" are names of races, dominant on their respective planes. There are ''other'' chaotic and lawful fiends: a Quasit and Bebilith are ChaoticEvil fiends from Abyss, but not Tanar'ri. On the other hand, a ChaoticNeutral or TrueNeutral (20%) [[HalfHumanHybrid Alu-fiend]] who was born on Prime and never left it -- definitely a Lesser Tanar'ri, but calling her "demon" would stretch the term a lot.
Franchise/TolkiensLegendarium.
26th Dec '16 8:07:49 PM PaulA
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* The 2007 ''Series/FlashGordon'' series avoids referring to any of the Mongo peoples as the human-animal mashups or mythological constructs that they're based on, and by which they are known in most other adaptations. Thus, Hawkmen are "[[MeaningfulName Dactyls]]", Lionmen are "Tuuren", Amazons are "Omadrians", and so forth. Being that it's an installment of '''[[{{Camp}} Flash]] [[SoBadItsGood Gordon]]''', it doesn't work. At all.

to:

* The 2007 ''Series/FlashGordon'' ''Series/{{Flash Gordon|2007}}'' series avoids referring to any of the Mongo peoples as the human-animal mashups or mythological constructs that they're based on, and by which they are known in most other adaptations. Thus, Hawkmen are "[[MeaningfulName Dactyls]]", Lionmen are "Tuuren", Amazons are "Omadrians", and so forth. Being that it's an installment of '''[[{{Camp}} Flash]] [[SoBadItsGood Gordon]]''', it doesn't work. At all.
24th Dec '16 7:43:07 AM contrafanxxx
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* In the True Mastermind Edition of ''[[VideoGame/TimeCrisis Time Crisis 5]]'', [[spoiler: there is a drug that was created to [[FeelNoPain suppress pain and fear]]. However, with the lifeless way the move and attack, they're zombies in all but name. [[BigBad Robert Baxter]] plans on using the drug to turn the entire world into a ZombieApocalypse, with New York as his first target.]]
13th Dec '16 9:39:50 AM PixelKnight
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[quoteright:320:[[VideoGame/TheLastOfUs http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/zombie_bite.png]]]]
[[caption-width-right:320:The very first rule of zombie apocalypse survival: Don't get bitten.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 614. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NotUsingTheZWord