History Main / NotUsingTheZWord

27th Aug '16 2:04:55 PM res20stupid
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* Reconstructed in ''VideoGame/{{Bloodborne}}''. To us, the monsters and plague-infested citizens are very obviously werewolves but there's no counterpoint for such creatures in the game's setting so they're given the catch-all term of "Beasts". The same thing for [[OurVampiresAreDifferent vampires]] - it's an entire setting of vampires, or the closest thing, due to how much blood is consumed so the kind of monsters we're scared of is [[ButForMeItWasTuesday just an everyday occurence in Yharnam]].
17th Aug '16 3:10:02 PM StFan
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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Anime and & Manga]]



* ''Manga/HighschoolOfTheDead'' doesn't even bother making up some name for the zombies, everyone just calls them "Them". One character called them zombies, only to be ''corrected'' by another character who made it sound as though zombies are entirely different creatures from the ones the cast faces; ([[CallARabbitASmeerp they're not]]). It's later mentioned by one of the main characters that the word "Them" was a piece of brilliance: It becomes easier to put "Them" down if you don't think of them as anything and thus affirm their existence as former humans.
** In the English dub, Takagi mentions it once while in the mansion, but it's the only time it's spoken. Not sure if it was a mistake on the voice actress' part, or if they accidentally had that word in the script dialogue she was reading.

to:

* ''Manga/HighschoolOfTheDead'' doesn't even bother making up some name for the zombies, everyone just calls them "Them". One character called them zombies, only to be ''corrected'' by another character who made it sound as though zombies are entirely different creatures from the ones the cast faces; ([[CallARabbitASmeerp they're not]]). It's later mentioned by one of the main characters that the word "Them" was a piece of brilliance: It becomes easier to put "Them" down if you don't think of them as anything and thus affirm their existence as former humans.
**
humans. In the English dub, Takagi mentions it once while in the mansion, but it's the only time it's spoken. Not sure if it was a mistake on the voice actress' part, or if they accidentally had that word in the script dialogue she was reading.



--> ComicBook/WerewolfByNight: "You mean they're zo—" [[SoundEffectBleep SKRASH]]

to:

--> ComicBook/WerewolfByNight: "You -->'''ComicBook/WerewolfByNight:''' You mean they're zo—" zo-- [[SoundEffectBleep SKRASH]]



[[folder:Fan Fiction]]

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[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* ''ComicStrip/{{Candorville}}'' justifies this in a humorous fashion regarding its "[[OurVampiresAreDifferent fangs]]": "Copyright issues. Lawyers would get involved."
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Fan Fiction]]Works]]



* ''FanFic/FutariWaPrettyCureDragon'' never refers to {{qipao}}s in-story, even in the narration, using that term; the {{qipao}} is always referred to as a "Chinese dress" or something similar.

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* ''FanFic/FutariWaPrettyCureDragon'' ''Fanfic/FutariWaPrettyCureDragon'' never refers to {{qipao}}s in-story, even in the narration, using that term; the {{qipao}} is always referred to as a "Chinese dress" or something similar.



[[folder:Films -- Animated]]

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[[folder:Films -- Animated]]Animation]]



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells'' never uses the word "bible" -- it's really a Gospel Book -- despite being about making one. The Book of Iona/Kells is just referred to as "the book" or a sacred text. Considering that Bible comes from the Greek for "Book", maybe its just a case of TranslationConvention.
* In ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls'', the word "human" is never used to refer to the inhabitants of the world on the opposite side of the magic mirror from Equestria.
* The only uses of the word LEGO in ''WesternAnimation/TheLEGOMovie'' are in the title and on the studs of the actual pieces the world is built from. Nobody uses terms like "minifig" or "minifigure", either.



* In ''Film/FromDuskTillDawn'', an argument begins over whether the creatures they were fighting are technically vampires. Played with at the end of the movie:
-->'''Carlos:''' What were they, psychos?
-->'''Seth:''' Did they look like "psychos"? Is ''that'' what they looked like? They were ''vampires''! "Psychos" do not ''explode'' when ''sunlight'' hits them, I don't give a fuck how crazy they are!
** The monstrous, rapid transformation is more typical of zombie films than of vampire stories. Creator/QuentinTarantino himself has said that a zombie movie was what he had in mind.

to:

* In ''Film/FromDuskTillDawn'', an argument begins over whether the creatures they were fighting are technically vampires. Played with at the end of the movie:
-->'''Carlos:''' What were they, psychos?
-->'''Seth:''' Did they look like "psychos"? Is ''that'' what they looked like? They were ''vampires''! "Psychos" do not ''explode'' when ''sunlight'' hits them, I don't give a fuck how crazy they are!
**
The monstrous, rapid transformation is more typical of zombie films than of vampire stories. Creator/QuentinTarantino himself has said that a zombie movie was what he had in mind. Played with at the end of the movie:
-->'''Carlos:''' What were they, psychos?\\
'''Seth:''' Did they look like "psychos"? Is ''that'' what they looked like? They were ''vampires''! "Psychos" do not ''explode'' when ''sunlight'' hits them, I don't give a fuck how crazy they are!



** ''Film/SkyLine'' does the same thing, with the characters never using the word "aliens" to describe the invaders.

to:

** * ''Film/SkyLine'' does the same thing, with the characters never using the word "aliens" to describe the invaders.



* The granddaddy of the 'Don't use the "R" word' subtrope: Back in 1977, the world knew mechanical/electronic automata as pretty much just one thing: Robots. To look different, we suppose, ''Franchise/StarWars'' referred to theirs as something (at the time) different, an abbreviation of 'android' -- ''droid''. Of course, nowadays the word is so common that non-''Star Wars''-based shows and movies have used it, even, and it's entirely possible that there are people out there who would recognize the word 'droid' more quickly. Moreover, 'droid' is more immediately recognizable as a term for sci-fi movie robots--few people would think to refer to an automated arm that screws bolts onto cars, a thick frisbee that sucks your carpet clean, or a plastic velociraptor with stupid legs as 'droids'. This also contains irony. Abbreviated from 'androids,' the word 'droid' should thus refer only to things that match the definition of 'android.' 'Android,' of course, means 'artificial person' (and [[GenderBlenderName more precisely]], ''male'' artificial people) -- only of the two most famous ''Star Wars'' droids, 50% aren't humanoid at all.
** [[AllThereInTheManual According to source material]], the word "droid" properly refers only to robots with full artificial intelligence, while less intelligent robots (like the aforementioned one's that folks in real would never think of referring to as "droids") are classified "robots", not "droids", although many characters refer to them colloquially as "droids" anyway. Robots aren't as common as droids, on account of being arguably inferior, which might also help explain the rarity of the term.
** However, the word 'droid' is a (and has been for decades) a registered trademark of Lucasfilm. One only needs to watch a commercial for a Motorola Droid phone to see the 'used with permission' fine print. If the term 'droid' has ever been used in a non-Lucasfilm movie, then the studio likely paid for the privilege.
*** Actually, the Motorola Droid was designed by George Lucas, himself. Hence, why there is a Droid R2-D2.
** At one point in ''Film/ANewHope'', Luke explicitly refers to C-3PO and R2-D2 as robots.

to:

* The granddaddy of the 'Don't "Don't use the "R" word' 'R' word" subtrope: Back in 1977, the world knew mechanical/electronic automata as pretty much just one thing: Robots. To look different, we suppose, ''Franchise/StarWars'' referred to theirs as something (at the time) different, an abbreviation of 'android' "android" -- ''droid''. Of course, nowadays the word is so common that non-''Star Wars''-based shows and movies have used it, even, and it's entirely possible that there are people out there who would recognize the word 'droid' "droid" more quickly. Moreover, 'droid' "droid" is more immediately recognizable as a term for sci-fi movie robots--few robots -- few people would think to refer to an automated arm that screws bolts onto cars, a thick frisbee that sucks your carpet clean, or a plastic velociraptor with stupid legs as 'droids'."droids". This also contains irony. Abbreviated from 'androids,' "androids", the word 'droid' "droid" should thus refer only to things that match the definition of 'android.' 'Android,' "android". "Android", of course, means 'artificial person' "artificial person" (and [[GenderBlenderName more precisely]], ''male'' artificial people) -- only of the two most famous ''Star Wars'' droids, 50% aren't humanoid at all.
**
all.\\\
[[AllThereInTheManual According to source material]], the word "droid" properly refers only to robots with full artificial intelligence, while less intelligent robots (like the aforementioned one's that folks in real would never think of referring to as "droids") are classified "robots", not "droids", although many characters refer to them colloquially as "droids" anyway. Robots aren't as common as droids, on account of being arguably inferior, which might also help explain the rarity of the term.
**
term. However, the word 'droid' "droid" is a (and has been for decades) a registered trademark of Lucasfilm. One only needs to watch a commercial for a Motorola Droid phone to see the 'used "used with permission' permission" fine print. print (the Motorola Droid was designed by George Lucas, himself; hence, why there is a Droid R2-D2). If the term 'droid' "droid" has ever been used in a non-Lucasfilm movie, then the studio likely paid for the privilege.
*** Actually, the Motorola Droid was designed by George Lucas, himself. Hence, why there is a Droid R2-D2.
**
privilege. At one point in ''Film/ANewHope'', Luke explicitly refers to C-3PO and R2-D2 as robots.



* ''Film/{{Aliens}}'': Bishop prefers to be called an "artificial person."
** Played straight in that the apparently technically-correct term is "synthetic," then subverted with numerous uses of both "robot" and "android."

to:

* ''Film/{{Aliens}}'': Bishop prefers to be called an "artificial person."
**
person". Played straight in that the apparently technically-correct term is "synthetic," then subverted with numerous uses of both "robot" and "android.""android".



-->'''Jack:''' You know what I'm thinking, don't you?
-->'''Ianto:''' No, Jack. It's ridiculous. You ''know'' it's ridiculous.
-->'''Jack:''' On our way here we field a call from Gwen, who says that she and Rhys have been attacked by a walking corpse. And now here we are surrounded by evidence of an attack in which the perpetrators used their ''bare hands'' as murder weapons and then cannibalised their victims. What does that suggest to ''you'', Ianto?
-->'''Ianto:''' It's crazy, Jack. It's horror-movie hokum. You know it is.
-->'''Jack:''' And ''you'' know what we're up against here, don't you?
-->'''Ianto:''' No, I don't. Don't say it, Jack. Don't use the-
-->'''Jack:''' Zombies!
-->'''Ianto:''' -zed word.
** * Midway through series 2 of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', [[spoiler: Owen is killed off]] and then revived through AppliedPhlebotinum. The show makes it quite clear that he's still technically dead: he has no metabolism, can't eat or drink, can't heal injuries, etc. And yet, despite all the references to him being a walking dead man, no one once uses the word "zombie".

to:

-->'''Jack:''' You know what I'm thinking, don't you?
-->'''Ianto:'''
you?\\
'''Ianto:'''
No, Jack. It's ridiculous. You ''know'' it's ridiculous.
-->'''Jack:'''
ridiculous.\\
'''Jack:'''
On our way here we field a call from Gwen, who says that she and Rhys have been attacked by a walking corpse. And now here we are surrounded by evidence of an attack in which the perpetrators used their ''bare hands'' as murder weapons and then cannibalised cannibalized their victims. What does that suggest to ''you'', Ianto?
-->'''Ianto:'''
Ianto?\\
'''Ianto:'''
It's crazy, Jack. It's horror-movie hokum. You know it is.
-->'''Jack:'''
is.\\
'''Jack:'''
And ''you'' know what we're up against here, don't you?
-->'''Ianto:'''
you?\\
'''Ianto:'''
No, I don't. Don't say it, Jack. Don't use the-
-->'''Jack:''' Zombies!
-->'''Ianto:''' -zed word.
** * Midway through series 2 of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', [[spoiler: Owen is killed off]] and then revived through AppliedPhlebotinum. The show makes it quite clear that he's still technically dead: he has no metabolism, can't eat or drink, can't heal injuries, etc. And yet, despite all the references to him being a walking dead man, no one once uses the word "zombie".
the--\\
'''Jack:''' Zombies!\\
'''Ianto:''' --zed word.



* From Creator/BrandonSanderson's works come a couple of examples- the Elantrians from ''Literature/{{Elantris}}'' and the Lifeless from ''Literature/{{Warbreaker}}'' are both pretty clearly zombies (albeit very different variations), but are never called such- indeed, the word "undead" itself is almost never used. Also, the Koloss from ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy'' aren't exactly orcs, but have a number of similarities and [[{{Mooks}} play]] a [[AlwaysChaoticEvil similar]] role in the story.
** WordOfGod has stated that the people in Elantris are not zombies. In fact, he wrote a long blog post explaining why he does not consider them to be zombies. He then concluded by saying "Having said that, I have always wanted to write a zombie story." He also refers to the Elantrians as "essentially zombies" in an [[WordOfGod Annotation]] so [[ShrugOfGod make of that what you will]].

to:

* From Creator/BrandonSanderson's works come a couple of examples- the examples. The Elantrians from ''Literature/{{Elantris}}'' and the Lifeless from ''Literature/{{Warbreaker}}'' are both pretty clearly zombies (albeit very different variations), but are never called such- indeed, such. Indeed, the word "undead" itself is almost never used. Also, the Koloss from ''Literature/MistbornTheOriginalTrilogy'' aren't exactly orcs, but have a number of similarities and [[{{Mooks}} play]] a [[AlwaysChaoticEvil similar]] role in the story.
**
story. WordOfGod has stated that the people in Elantris are not zombies. In fact, he wrote a long blog post explaining why he does not consider them to be zombies. He then concluded by saying "Having said that, I have always wanted to write a zombie story." He also refers to the Elantrians as "essentially zombies" in an [[WordOfGod Annotation]] so [[ShrugOfGod make of that what you will]].



** The story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The Curse of Fenric"]] has undead which drank blood and are repelled by strong faith, but are never called vampires.
** Another story, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones "Smith and Jones"]] has similarly vampiric creatures not named as such. Admittedly, they differ from vampires in some significant ways.
** This was possibly because an earlier story, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay "State of Decay"]], ''did'' have vampires called by name, and the ones in the later stories were clearly [[OurVampiresAreDifferent different]].

to:

** The story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS26E3TheCurseOfFenric The Curse of Fenric"]] Fenric]]" has undead which drank drink blood and are repelled by strong faith, but are never called vampires.
** Another story, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones "Smith "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E1SmithAndJones Smith and Jones"]] Jones]]" has similarly vampiric creatures not named as such. Admittedly, they differ from vampires in some significant ways.
** This was is possibly because an earlier story, [[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay "State "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS18E4StateOfDecay State of Decay"]], ''did'' Decay]]", ''does'' have vampires called by name, and the ones in the later stories were clearly [[OurVampiresAreDifferent different]].



** The television story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw "Tooth and Claw"]] has the Doctor explain that the monster is a "lupine wavelength haemovariform", but it's called a werewolf throughout.
** Similarly, the Carrionites in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The Shakespeare Code"]] are frequently called witches.
** The Gelth from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead "The Unquiet Dead"]] aren't called ghosts in that story, which is fair enough since they aren't actually ghosts, just gas creatures. They can also possess human bodies for a little zombie action.

to:

** The television story [[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw "Tooth "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS28E2ToothAndClaw Tooth and Claw"]] Claw]]" has the Doctor explain that the monster is a "lupine wavelength haemovariform", but it's called a werewolf throughout.
** Similarly, the Carrionites in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS29E2TheShakespeareCode The Shakespeare Code"]] Code]]" are frequently called witches.
** The Gelth from [[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead "The "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS27E3TheUnquietDead The Unquiet Dead"]] Dead]]" aren't called ghosts in that story, which is fair enough since they aren't actually ghosts, just gas creatures. They can also possess human bodies for a little zombie action.



* Midway through series 2 of ''Series/{{Torchwood}}'', [[spoiler: Owen is killed off]] and then revived through AppliedPhlebotinum. The show makes it quite clear that he's still technically dead: he has no metabolism, can't eat or drink, can't heal injuries, etc. And yet, despite all the references to him being a walking dead man, no one once uses the word "zombie".



* The Initiative in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' insists on calling the various monsters they hunt "Hostile Sub-Terrestrials" or [=HSTs=] in a laughable effort to sound scientific about it, sounding suspiciously like "Aggressive Non-Terrestrials" from the dragonless ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]". The Scoobies are not impressed. But then the Initiative are military. If they don't have a multiple-word phrase they can abbreviate, they wither and die.

to:

* ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
**
The Initiative in ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'' insists on calling the various monsters they hunt "Hostile Sub-Terrestrials" or [=HSTs=] in a laughable effort to sound scientific about it, sounding suspiciously like "Aggressive Non-Terrestrials" from the dragonless ''Series/DoctorWho'' story "[[Recap/DoctorWhoS24E4Dragonfire Dragonfire]]". The Scoobies are not impressed. But then the Initiative are military. If they don't have a multiple-word phrase they can abbreviate, they wither and die.



* In an episode of ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'', Herc visits his old friend Vlad, who lives in Transylvania, and learns that he's changed a bit since the old days... Apart from a couple of slips, however, the script resolutely uses the term "strigoi" to describe the bloodsucking monsters ("strigoi" being yet another East European term for a vampire, but is similar to the Classic Greek term "striga").
** "Striga" is more likely to be interchangeable with "witch" than "vampire"...not, of course, that old folktales are super-careful about such distinctions.
** Fortunately, they're using the folklore version of Vlad and not drawing from the historical version. A 'couple of slips' for Vlad Dracul would be pretty bad for anyone within a hundred miles that so much as looked at him funny. And certainly not be Family Friendly Violence in the least.
** Also of note are the Bacchai who show up in both ''Hercules'' and ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Though in this case, it's more twisting the Baccai from mythology into vampires than it is avoiding a term.

to:

* ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'':
**
In an episode of ''Series/HerculesTheLegendaryJourneys'', episode, Herc visits his old friend Vlad, who lives in Transylvania, and learns that he's changed a bit since the old days... Apart from a couple of slips, however, the script resolutely uses the term "strigoi" to describe the bloodsucking monsters ("strigoi" being yet another East European term for a vampire, but is similar to the Classic Greek term "striga").
**
"striga"). "Striga" is more likely to be interchangeable with "witch" than "vampire"..."vampire"... not, of course, that old folktales are super-careful about such distinctions.
**
distinctions. Fortunately, they're using the folklore version of Vlad and not drawing from the historical version. A 'couple of slips' for Vlad Dracul would be pretty bad for anyone within a hundred miles that so much as looked at him funny. And certainly not be Family Friendly Family-Friendly Violence in the least.
** Also of note are the Bacchai who show up in both ''Hercules'' and ''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Though in this case, it's more twisting the Baccai Bacchai from mythology into vampires than it is avoiding a term.



[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
* ''ComicStrip/{{Candorville}}'' justifies this in a humorous fashion regarding its "[[OurVampiresAreDifferent fangs]]": "Copyright issues. Lawyers would get involved."

to:

[[folder:Newspaper Comics]]
[[folder:Pinballs]]
* ''ComicStrip/{{Candorville}}'' justifies As with the television series, Creator/SternPinball's ''Pinball/TheWalkingDead'' refers to its undead hordes as "walkers".
* In ''Pinball/{{NBA}},'' the {{Pinball}} word "Jackpot" is never used. Many have speculated that
this in was a humorous fashion regarding its "[[OurVampiresAreDifferent fangs]]": "Copyright issues. Lawyers would get involved."requirement by the NBA to avoid accidentally associating basketball with gambling.



[[folder:Pinball]]
* As with the television series, Creator/SternPinball's ''Pinball/TheWalkingDead'' refers to its undead hordes as "walkers".
* In ''Pinball/{{NBA}},'' the {{Pinball}} word "Jackpot" is never used. Many have speculated that this was a requirement by the NBA to avoid accidentally associating basketball with gambling.
[[/folder]]



* ''WesternAnimation/AladdinTheSeries'' had a character that controlled what were obviously some form of Undead, but the words undead and zombie were never mentioned. Instead, they were always called Mamluks, which rather than being some kind of mythological creature, simply means "slave" in Arabic. While they ''were'' enslaved zombies.
** Historically, the mamluks were the soldiers of slave origin used by Muslim rulers to fight their wars. They became a powerful warrior caste, and some did reach the level of sultan (including one named Ala'a ad-Din (Aladdin)). Therefore, it would be correct to call them mamluks, which has nothing to do with their status of being undead. Strangely enough, one of the original sources of ''Literature/ArabianNights'' was written down in the second half of the 13th century in the Mamluk kingdoms of Syria and Egypt. However, the undead of Persia/Arabia were typically referred to as "ghuls", or "ghouls".
** Iago does refer to them as zombies in the episode "Black Sands": "Big blue zombie at twelve o’clock!"
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells'' never uses the word "bible"--it's really a Gospel Book--despite being about making one. The Book of Iona/Kells is just referred to as "the book" or a sacred text. Considering that Bible comes from the Greek for "Book," maybe its just a case of TranslationConvention.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/AladdinTheSeries'' had a character that controlled what were obviously some form of Undead, but the words undead and zombie were never mentioned. Instead, they were always called Mamluks, which rather than being some kind of mythological creature, simply means "slave" in Arabic. While they ''were'' enslaved zombies.
**
zombies. Historically, the mamluks were the soldiers of slave origin used by Muslim rulers to fight their wars. They became a powerful warrior caste, and some did reach the level of sultan (including one named Ala'a ad-Din (Aladdin)). Therefore, it would be correct to call them mamluks, which has nothing to do with their status of being undead. Strangely enough, one of the original sources of ''Literature/ArabianNights'' was written down in the second half of the 13th century in the Mamluk kingdoms of Syria and Egypt. However, the undead of Persia/Arabia were typically referred to as "ghuls", or "ghouls".
**
"ghouls". Iago does refer to them as zombies in the episode "Black Sands": "Big blue zombie at twelve o’clock!"
* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells'' never uses the word "bible"--it's really a Gospel Book--despite being about making one. The Book of Iona/Kells is just referred to as "the book" or a sacred text. Considering that Bible comes from the Greek for "Book," maybe its just a case of TranslationConvention.
o’clock!"



* In ''WesternAnimation/MyLittlePonyEquestriaGirls'', the word "human" is never used to refer to the inhabitants of the world on the opposite side of the magic mirror from Equestria.
* The only uses of the word LEGO in ''WesternAnimation/TheLEGOMovie'' are in the title and on the studs of the actual pieces the world is built from. Nobody uses terms like "minifig" or "minifigure", either.



* Completely averted in ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland'', which not only uses the word in the title, but is spoken freely by the characters in the film. However, this trope was subtly lampshaded once:
-->'''Lena:''' It was a nightmare! Me and Miss Lenoir went outside to wait for you when we were attacked by these... these...
-->'''Velma:''' Zombies?
** The word is also used freely in the episode ''Which Witch is Which?'' of ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooWhereAreYou'', which portrays a more traditional zombie (in this case, being controlled by a voodoo-practicing witch).

to:

* ''Franchise/ScoobyDoo'':
**
Completely averted in ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooOnZombieIsland'', which not only uses the word in the title, but is spoken freely by the characters in the film. However, this trope was subtly lampshaded once:
-->'''Lena:''' --->'''Lena:''' It was a nightmare! Me and Miss Lenoir went outside to wait for you when we were attacked by these... these...
-->'''Velma:'''
these...\\
'''Velma:'''
Zombies?
** The word is also used freely in the episode ''Which "Which Witch is Which?'' Is Which?" of ''WesternAnimation/ScoobyDooWhereAreYou'', which portrays a more traditional zombie (in this case, being controlled by a voodoo-practicing witch).



* People fighting to end slavery usually refer to it as "Human Trafficking", because most people don't take the concept of modern-day slavery seriously.
** Part of the reason for that is that the word slavery tends to imply that it's legally sanctioned. Human trafficking emphasizes the fact that it's done by criminals, like drug trafficking. This is the cornerstone to the issue, though there are other points.
** At the start of the American civil war, slaves that fled over to the union side were refered to in official reports and newspapers as "contraband".
*** Because prior to the 13th Amendment, slavery was still legal under the US Constitution. However, criminals resisting Federal authority (such raising an army against it!) [[BotheringByTheBook could have their "property" confiscated as "contraband".]]
** Also, there are slaves who are not trafficked, and some forms of human trafficking which are thoroughly evil are not exactly slavery. One of the leading researchers in the field, Siddarth Kara, relates the story of meeting trafficked and sexually exploited women who - though technically freed - still worked the sex trade they had been trafficked into. Likewise, debt-bonded villagers in South Asia are slaves to the owners of their debts, but they are usually not trafficked into the area. Their young children, especially girls, may be trafficked out of the area. Whatever you imagine comes next, the reality is worse. Trafficking and slavery are highly related but not identical.

to:

* People fighting to end slavery usually refer to it as "Human Trafficking", because most people don't take the concept of modern-day slavery seriously.
**
seriously. Part of the reason for that is that the word slavery tends to imply that it's legally sanctioned. Human trafficking emphasizes the fact that it's done by criminals, like drug trafficking. This is the cornerstone to the issue, though there are other points.
**
points. At the start of the American civil war, slaves that fled over to the union side were refered referred to in official reports and newspapers as "contraband".
***
"contraband". Because prior to the 13th Amendment, slavery was still legal under the US Constitution. However, criminals resisting Federal authority (such raising an army against it!) [[BotheringByTheBook could have their "property" confiscated as "contraband".]]
**
]]\\\
Also, there are slaves who are not trafficked, and some forms of human trafficking which are thoroughly evil are not exactly slavery. One of the leading researchers in the field, Siddarth Kara, relates the story of meeting trafficked and sexually exploited women who - -- though technically freed - -- still worked the sex trade they had been trafficked into. Likewise, debt-bonded villagers in South Asia are slaves to the owners of their debts, but they are usually not trafficked into the area. Their young children, especially girls, may be trafficked out of the area. Whatever you imagine comes next, the reality is worse. Trafficking and slavery are highly related but not identical.



14th Aug '16 12:41:30 AM Theokal3
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** In the fan-made ''TabletopGame/PrincessTheHopeful'' the {{Magical Girl}}s are never referred as such, instead being called "Princesses", "Nobles" or "the Hopeful".

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** In While the fan-made ''TabletopGame/PrincessTheHopeful'' the is explicitly designed as to be about {{Magical Girl}}s Girl}}s, the characters are never referred as such, instead being called such in-universe. They refer to themselves as "Princesses", "Nobles" "Nobles", or "the Hopeful".
11th Aug '16 1:16:53 AM Kakai
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/TheDinosaurLords'', they're called hordelings, likely because the people of Paradise have never heard the word "zombie".
4th Aug '16 9:56:10 PM PaulA
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* The vampiric narrator of StevenBrust's ''Agyar'' never once uses the word "vampire," nor does he ever explicitly describe himself feeding on blood, though he does so many times. Agyar tells the story simply to put his thoughts on paper, and therefore does not explain anything that would be second nature to himself.

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* The vampiric narrator of StevenBrust's ''Agyar'' Creator/StevenBrust's ''Literature/{{Agyar}}'' never once uses the word "vampire," "vampire", nor does he ever explicitly describe himself feeding on blood, though he does so many times. Agyar tells the story simply to put his thoughts on paper, and therefore does not explain anything that would be second nature to himself.
30th Jul '16 8:34:43 PM merotoker
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Compare to DifferentlyPoweredIndividual (for superheroes), ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames (for superheroic ''individuals'') AMechByAnyOtherName (for HumongousMecha), MagicByAnyOtherName and SpeakOfTheDevil. See also CallARabbitASmeerp, FantasticSlur, TheScottishTrope, and [[TWordEuphemism T-Word Euphemism]]. When used for non-fantastic things and attributes, it may be an attempt to [[ShowDontTell show and not tell]].

to:

Compare to DifferentlyPoweredIndividual (for superheroes), ComicBookMoviesDontUseCodenames (for superheroic ''individuals'') AMechByAnyOtherName (for HumongousMecha), MagicByAnyOtherName and SpeakOfTheDevil. See also CallARabbitASmeerp, FantasticSlur, FantasticSlurs, TheScottishTrope, and [[TWordEuphemism T-Word Euphemism]]. When used for non-fantastic things and attributes, it may be an attempt to [[ShowDontTell show and not tell]].



* ''BlackButler'' introduces CameBackWrong zombies in the Campania arc, which have a very traditional appearance (stitches, falling-apart bodies, gaping mouths, shambling gait) but are referred to as Bizarre Dolls. This is most likely because the series is set in Victorian England, long before the word "zombie" entered common usage.
* The Mariage introduced in ''AudioPlay/StrikersSoundStageX'' of the ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' franchise are [[IAmAHumanitarian flesh-eating]] undead armies that are raised by a {{Necromancer}}. However, they are never called zombies or ghouls, and are instead referred to as Corpse Weapons.

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* ''BlackButler'' ''Manga/BlackButler'' introduces CameBackWrong zombies in the Campania arc, which have a very traditional appearance (stitches, falling-apart bodies, gaping mouths, shambling gait) but are referred to as Bizarre Dolls. This is most likely because the series is set in Victorian England, long before the word "zombie" entered common usage.
* The Mariage introduced in ''AudioPlay/StrikersSoundStageX'' of the ''Franchise/LyricalNanoha'' franchise are [[IAmAHumanitarian [[ImAHumanitarian flesh-eating]] undead armies that are raised by a {{Necromancer}}. However, they are never called zombies or ghouls, and are instead referred to as Corpse Weapons.



* Pre-Code horror comics, particular those from EC, are probably the root of zombie ubiquity in pop culture horror, but you'll find the word used only a handful of times in any of them. Like Romero later, these writers associated "zombie" with Caribbean folk magic, and employed it only in stories where voodoo raises the dead. There was no single word for other types of walking corpses at all.

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* Pre-Code horror comics, particular those from EC, Creator/{{EC|Comics}}, are probably the root of zombie ubiquity in pop culture horror, but you'll find the word used only a handful of times in any of them. Like Romero later, these writers associated "zombie" with Caribbean folk magic, and employed it only in stories where voodoo raises the dead. There was no single word for other types of walking corpses at all.



* {{Downplayed}} in ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead''. The survivors call the zombies by a variety of names, includes "lurkers" and "roamers" (depending on the zombies' behavior) or simply "biters." They use the word "zombies" as well, but less frequently, because it's hard to take seriously.

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* {{Downplayed}} {{Downplayed|Trope}} in ''ComicBook/TheWalkingDead''. The survivors call the zombies by a variety of names, includes "lurkers" and "roamers" (depending on the zombies' behavior) or simply "biters." They use the word "zombies" as well, but less frequently, because it's hard to take seriously.



* Creator/GrantMorrison's ''ComicBook/NewXMen'' run did this with superheroes. Though "mutant" is used frequently, the word "superhero" is only mentioned once, when Cyclops remarks "I was never sure why Professor Xavier had us dress like ''superheroes''," when reviewing the team's new black leather uniforms. As part of Morrison's run, the other superheroes in the MarvelUniverse are never mentioned or acknowledged, and the X-Men fervently insist that they're not (nor have they ever been) superheroes themselves...despite the costumes, codenames, secret identities, use of mutations to fight crime...

to:

* Creator/GrantMorrison's ''ComicBook/NewXMen'' run did this with superheroes. Though "mutant" is used frequently, the word "superhero" is only mentioned once, when Cyclops remarks "I was never sure why Professor Xavier had us dress like ''superheroes''," when reviewing the team's new black leather uniforms. As part of Morrison's run, the other superheroes in the MarvelUniverse Franchise/MarvelUniverse are never mentioned or acknowledged, and the X-Men fervently insist that they're not (nor have they ever been) superheroes themselves...despite the costumes, codenames, secret identities, use of mutations to fight crime...



* In ''TheMagicSchoolBus'' fanfic, ''FanFic/UnderCoverOfDarkness'', only once is the word "zombie" used, and it's in a joking manner pre-apocalypse. Post-apocalypse, everyone calls them "maulers."

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* In ''TheMagicSchoolBus'' ''Literature/TheMagicSchoolBus'' fanfic, ''FanFic/UnderCoverOfDarkness'', only once is the word "zombie" used, and it's in a joking manner pre-apocalypse. Post-apocalypse, everyone calls them "maulers."



* The movie ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'', directed by Brad Bird. The word "superhero" is hardly used, but instead they're called "supers". Possibly because Marvel and DC claim a joint trademark (not copyright) on the former.

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* The movie ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'', directed by Brad Bird.Creator/BradBird. The word "superhero" is hardly used, but instead they're called "supers". Possibly because Marvel and DC claim a joint trademark (not copyright) on the former.



* No one in ''Film/{{Cloverfield}}'' mentions the words "Franchise/{{Godzilla}}", "Film/KingKong", or even "Monster", which would be the logical words anyone would utter upon seeing the creature. [[{{HSQ}} Not immediately, though]].

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* No one in ''Film/{{Cloverfield}}'' mentions the words "Franchise/{{Godzilla}}", "Film/KingKong", or even "Monster", which would be the logical words anyone would utter upon seeing the creature. [[{{HSQ}} [[HolyShitQuotient Not immediately, though]].



** ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' never calls its undead "zombies". It does call them "ghouls" in a newscast. According to TheOtherWiki, George Romero never thought of them as zombies, despite the movie becoming the TropeMaker for the modern ZombieApocalypse. It was made at a time when 'zombie' still referred to someone under the spell of a voodoo priest. Although there may have been some passing references to reanimated corpses as zombies in earlier films, it wasn't a general term for them yet.

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** ''Film/NightOfTheLivingDead1968'' never calls its undead "zombies". It does call them "ghouls" in a newscast. According to TheOtherWiki, [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]], George Romero never thought of them as zombies, despite the movie becoming the TropeMaker {{Trope Maker|s}} for the modern ZombieApocalypse. It was made at a time when 'zombie' still referred to someone under the spell of a voodoo priest. Although there may have been some passing references to reanimated corpses as zombies in earlier films, it wasn't a general term for them yet.



Film adaptations of the novel ''never'' use the word, preferring vague euphemisms. This may be because they're more often treated as zombies due to the more modern concept of a ZombieApocalypse instead of a Vampire Apocalypse, and the fact that the movie version are less like vampires. The one with WillSmith goes so far as to [[NeverTrustATrailer totally omit the existence of any monsters in the movie from most of its trailers]]. Additionally, the writers felt "vampire" was too corny, but somehow felt fine about the nickname "darkseekers".

to:

Film adaptations of the novel ''never'' use the word, preferring vague euphemisms. This may be because they're more often treated as zombies due to the more modern concept of a ZombieApocalypse instead of a Vampire Apocalypse, and the fact that the movie version are less like vampires. The one with WillSmith Creator/WillSmith [[Film/IAmLegend version]] goes so far as to [[NeverTrustATrailer totally omit the existence of any monsters in the movie from most of its trailers]]. Additionally, the writers felt "vampire" was too corny, but somehow felt fine about the nickname "darkseekers".



* The movie ''Film/{{Ultraviolet}}'' directed by Kurt Wimmer, which is unrelated to [[Series/{{Ultraviolet}} the series]] but also features vampires, zig-zags the trope. Government agents refer to them as "hemophages". Civilian newspapers use the word "vampire" because [[LampshadeHanging it made for better headlines]]. Violet herself will use either one depending on the context.

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* The movie ''Film/{{Ultraviolet}}'' directed by Kurt Wimmer, which is unrelated to [[Series/{{Ultraviolet}} the series]] but also features vampires, zig-zags the trope. Government agents refer to them as "hemophages". Civilian newspapers use the word "vampire" because [[LampshadeHanging it made for better headlines]]. Violet herself will use either one depending on the context.



* The protagonists of ''Film/KickAss'' talk about superheroes all the time, but the Mafia-esque villains refuse to at first. The mob bosses don't believe an underling when he claims he didn't betray them, he was framed by some guy dressed like Batman. Since at this point there are no known superheroes in the world, we can't really blame the boss for his incredulity.
** It then becomes something of a running gag for the mob to refer to Big Daddy as Batman. To try to make it seem less ridiculous, the guy telling the story attempts to save face by saying he's [[CaptainObvious not the actual Batman]] but someone who looks like him.

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* The protagonists of ''Film/KickAss'' talk about superheroes all the time, but the Mafia-esque villains refuse to at first. The mob bosses don't believe an underling when he claims he didn't betray them, he was framed by some guy dressed like Batman. Since at this point there are no known superheroes in the world, we can't really blame the boss for his incredulity.
**
incredulity. It then becomes something of a running gag for the mob to refer to Big Daddy as Batman. To try to make it seem less ridiculous, the guy telling the story attempts to save face by saying he's [[CaptainObvious not the actual Batman]] but someone who looks like him.



* The word "Transformer" is only used ''twice'' in the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' series, once in each film and the first film is referring to the piece of electrical equipment. Granted, the terms "Autobot," "Decepticon", and "Cybertronian" are thrown around constantly, though this might have something to do with the trademark.
** This is ''probably'' because in most ''Transformers'' continuities, the title isn't a term Cybertronians use to describe themselves.

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* The word "Transformer" is only used ''twice'' in the ''Film/{{Transformers}}'' ''Franchise/{{Transformers|FilmSeries}}'' series, once in each film and the first film is referring to the piece of electrical equipment. Granted, the terms "Autobot," "Decepticon", and "Cybertronian" are thrown around constantly, though this might have something to do with the trademark.
**
trademark. This is ''probably'' because in most ''Transformers'' continuities, the title isn't a term Cybertronians use to describe themselves.



* In the 1994 film ''Film/{{Wolf}}'' the characters never use the word "werewolf," even though that is obviously what JackNicholson's character is turning into.

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* In the 1994 film ''Film/{{Wolf}}'' the characters never use the word "werewolf," even though that is obviously what JackNicholson's Creator/JackNicholson's character is turning into.



* All mechs in ''Film/{{Elysium}}'' are called [[StarWars droids]], not robots.

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* All mechs in ''Film/{{Elysium}}'' are called [[StarWars [[Franchise/StarWars droids]], not robots.



* Subverted in ''Literature/WorldWarZ'': they had all sorts of codewords starting with Z ("Zack" was common in the U.S., a callback to "Charlie" from TheVietnamWar), and when they actually did use the word "zombie" it was self-conscious, because until the ZombieApocalypse, zombies had just been scary things from horror movies. They're also referred to as "ghouls" or "Gs". Incidentally, the British called them "Zeds" (the European convention for the letter "Z"), the Japanese named them after a type of ant, and in China zombies are called "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The Eternal Walking Nightmare]]."

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* Subverted in ''Literature/WorldWarZ'': they had all sorts of codewords starting with Z ("Zack" was common in the U.S., a callback to "Charlie" from TheVietnamWar), UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar), and when they actually did use the word "zombie" it was self-conscious, because until the ZombieApocalypse, zombies had just been scary things from horror movies. They're also referred to as "ghouls" or "Gs". Incidentally, the British called them "Zeds" (the European convention for the letter "Z"), the Japanese named them after a type of ant, and in China zombies are called "[[NamesToRunAwayFromReallyFast The Eternal Walking Nightmare]]."



* ''Literature/SaturnsChildren'' by Charles Stross justifies this in regard to its robots--the actual term robot is considered a FantasticSlur.

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* ''Literature/SaturnsChildren'' by Charles Stross justifies this in regard to its robots--the actual term robot is considered a FantasticSlur.{{Fantastic Slur|s}}.



* In Charles Stross' ''TheLaundrySeries'', the zombies used by the Laundry for jobs such as night guardians are called "Residual Human Resources"; there's also a bit of lampshade hanging about not calling them "zombies".

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* In Charles Stross' ''TheLaundrySeries'', ''Literature/TheLaundrySeries'', the zombies used by the Laundry for jobs such as night guardians are called "Residual Human Resources"; there's also a bit of lampshade hanging about not calling them "zombies".



* ''Literature/TheGospelOfLoki'' doesn't use the Norse names for the various realms and people of Myth/NorseMythology (except Asgard) and doesn't use the traditional English translations either: the Frost Giants are Ice Folk, the dwarfs are the Tunnel Folk (or [[FantasticSlur Maggots]]) and so on.

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* ''Literature/TheGospelOfLoki'' doesn't use the Norse names for the various realms and people of Myth/NorseMythology (except Asgard) and doesn't use the traditional English translations either: the Frost Giants are Ice Folk, the dwarfs are the Tunnel Folk (or [[FantasticSlur [[FantasticSlurs Maggots]]) and so on.



* ''Series/KyleXY'' features a main character and another character who are clones, but [[CloningBlues follow almost no cloning cliches]]; possibly because of this, nobody ever uses the word "clone" in the show. Until the last episode comes and they [[spoiler:are apparently not only not clones, but show no qualms about killing actual clones, even though the description of their origins (and their identical appearances to their parents in younger days) meant "clone".]]

to:

* ''Series/KyleXY'' features a main character and another character who are clones, but [[CloningBlues follow almost no cloning cliches]]; possibly because of this, nobody ever uses the word "clone" in the show. Until the last episode comes and they [[spoiler:are apparently not only not clones, but show no qualms about killing actual clones, even though the description of their origins (and their identical appearances to their parents in younger days) meant "clone".]]"clone"]].



** Also of note are the Bacchai who show up in both Hercules and XenaWarriorPrincess. Though in this case, it's more twisting the Baccai from mythology into vampires than it is avoiding a term.

to:

** Also of note are the Bacchai who show up in both Hercules ''Hercules'' and XenaWarriorPrincess.''Series/XenaWarriorPrincess''. Though in this case, it's more twisting the Baccai from mythology into vampires than it is avoiding a term.



* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is to be commended for being well into its third season with no sign of planning to use the word "mutant". Or for that matter, "superhero" or "supervillain". The FanNickname for people with powers in ''Heroes'' is "evolved humans", because those are ''nothing'' like "mutants" (of course, granted, [[TheDCU "metahuman" is already taken]]...). And no one in ''Heroes'' has "powers", going by Heroes Wiki; they have "abilities". And no one has "super strength", they have "enhanced strength", because "super strength"... well that would be just ''silly''.

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* ''Series/{{Heroes}}'' is to be commended for being well into its third season with no sign of planning to use the word "mutant". Or for that matter, "superhero" or "supervillain". The FanNickname for people with powers in ''Heroes'' is "evolved humans", because those are ''nothing'' like "mutants" (of course, granted, [[TheDCU [[Franchise/TheDCU "metahuman" is already taken]]...). And no one in ''Heroes'' has "powers", going by Heroes Wiki; they have "abilities". And no one has "super strength", they have "enhanced strength", because "super strength"... well that would be just ''silly''.



* In ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' no one in the quiz show broadcast uses the word zombie to describe Them. This may be because they've forgotten what it means.
** It helps that They are capable of speech, and are definitely intelligent, what with figuring out [[spoiler:how to get inside]], and apparently knowing more about the Event than anyone else.

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* In ''Series/ThatMitchellAndWebbLook'' no one in the quiz show broadcast uses the word zombie to describe Them. This may be because they've forgotten what it means.
**
means. It helps that They are capable of speech, and are definitely intelligent, what with figuring out [[spoiler:how to get inside]], and apparently knowing more about the Event than anyone else.



** The [[BeingHumanUS USA/Canada]] version also makes this distinction [[spoiler:in season 3 when Sally and two of her ghostly friends are brought back to life. Sally also hates the idea that she is starting to decompose and refuses to call it that, as well.]]

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** The [[BeingHumanUS [[Series/BeingHumanUS USA/Canada]] version also makes this distinction [[spoiler:in season 3 when Sally and two of her ghostly friends are brought back to life. Sally also hates the idea that she is starting to decompose and refuses to call it that, as well.]]well]].



* In ''Series/InTheFlesh''while "zombie" is said the government prefers [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad Partially Deceased Syndrome]] while the HVF uses the derogatory "Rotters".

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* In ''Series/InTheFlesh''while ''Series/InTheFlesh'' while "zombie" is said the government prefers [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad Partially Deceased Syndrome]] while the HVF uses the derogatory "Rotters".



* While ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' does actually refer to Leo and his kind as guardian angels on occasion, the preferred term is "Whitelighter," and their bosses are "the Elders." How often they use the A-word may vary DependingOnTheWriter.

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* ''Series/{{Charmed}}''
**
While ''Series/{{Charmed}}'' the show does actually refer to Leo and his kind as guardian angels on occasion, the preferred term is "Whitelighter," and their bosses are "the Elders." How often they use the A-word may vary DependingOnTheWriter.



* ''ComicStrip/{{Candorville}}'' justifies this in a humorous fashion regarding its "[[{{Vampire}} fangs]]": "Copyright issues. Lawyers would get involved."

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* ''ComicStrip/{{Candorville}}'' justifies this in a humorous fashion regarding its "[[{{Vampire}} "[[OurVampiresAreDifferent fangs]]": "Copyright issues. Lawyers would get involved."



** Totally averted in all the rest of the pre-[=REmake=] games: ''Everyone'' calls them zombies without hesitation or qualification. Except for [[MauveShirt Marvin]], who refers to them as [[ShapedLikeItself "zombie-like creatures"]]. Most games that feature zombies made after REmake will have common folks refer to them as "monsters", while those with more knowledge will call them B.O.W.'s (Bio-Organic Weapons). This name is perhaps the only example sillier than the term zombie itself, seeing as biological and organic are synonyms, and saying BOW takes longer. Then again, it may be justified in that BOW encompasses more than just the humans--it includes the crocodile-like creatures, bats, snakes, etc.

to:

** Totally averted in all the rest of the pre-[=REmake=] games: ''Everyone'' calls them zombies without hesitation or qualification. Except for [[MauveShirt Marvin]], {{Ma|uveShirt}}rvin, who refers to them as [[ShapedLikeItself "zombie-like creatures"]]. Most games that feature zombies made after REmake will have common folks refer to them as "monsters", while those with more knowledge will call them B.O.W.'s (Bio-Organic Weapons). This name is perhaps the only example sillier than the term zombie itself, seeing as biological and organic are synonyms, and saying BOW takes longer. Then again, it may be justified in that BOW encompasses more than just the humans--it includes the crocodile-like creatures, bats, snakes, etc.



* The ''VideoGame/{{Boktai}}'' series is a rather strange example, where while ninety percent of the time its antagonists are referred to as "Immortals", the game still manages to slip in the occasional "Vampire". The DivorcedInstallment (for export only) ''[[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Lunar Knights]]'', makes the terms completely different, however. Vampires are vampires. Immortals are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Boktai}}'' series is a rather strange example, where while ninety percent of the time its antagonists are referred to as "Immortals", the game still manages to slip in the occasional "Vampire". The DivorcedInstallment (for export only) ''[[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Lunar Knights]]'', makes the terms completely different, however. Vampires are vampires. Immortals are SufficientlyAdvancedAliens.{{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s.



* In ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots Metal Gear Solid 4]]'', [[spoiler:when the French mercenaries in South America have their nanomachines repressed, causing emotion, guilt, and reason to flood back into their brain, they are heavily brain damaged, to the point where they feel no pain and shamble about and attack like Romero zombies.]] Despite being a nerd, Otacon says "things" instead of "zombies".
** In ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty Metal Gear Solid 2]]'', Vamp is a pale-skinned immortal who can perform superhuman physical feats and loves drinking human blood. He's insultingly called a 'vampire' a couple of times by Raiden, but Snake just calls him a 'freak', and his name is actually a reference to his [[LesbianVampire sexuality]].

to:

* ''Franchise/MetalGear''
**
In ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid4GunsOfThePatriots Metal ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4]]'', [[spoiler:when the French mercenaries in South America have their nanomachines repressed, causing emotion, guilt, and reason to flood back into their brain, they are heavily brain damaged, to the point where they feel no pain and shamble about and attack like Romero zombies.]] Despite being a nerd, Otacon says "things" instead of "zombies".
** In ''[[VideoGame/MetalGearSolid2SonsOfLiberty Metal Gear Solid 2]]'',
2|SonsOfLiberty}}'', Vamp is a pale-skinned immortal who can perform superhuman physical feats and loves drinking human blood. He's insultingly called a 'vampire' a couple of times by Raiden, but Snake just calls him a 'freak', and his name is actually a reference to his [[LesbianVampire sexuality]].sexuality]].
** In ''VideoGame/{{Metal Gear Solid 4|GunsOfThePatriots}}'', [[spoiler:when the French mercenaries in South America have their nanomachines repressed, causing emotion, guilt, and reason to flood back into their brain, they are heavily brain damaged, to the point where they feel no pain and shamble about and attack like Romero zombies]]. Despite being a nerd, Otacon says "things" instead of "zombies".



** Official canon still recognizes "demon" as a word used to describe daedra, but is considered inaccurate by scholars. Sort of how the singular of "daedra" is "daedroth," which is also the name of the giant, bipedal lizards that spit fire/poison. It shows a lot of dedication when the writers are willing to include in-universe [[YouFailLinguisticsForever linguistic errors]].

to:

** Official canon still recognizes "demon" as a word used to describe daedra, but is considered inaccurate by scholars. Sort of how the singular of "daedra" is "daedroth," which is also the name of the giant, bipedal lizards that spit fire/poison. It shows a lot of dedication when the writers are willing to include in-universe [[YouFailLinguisticsForever [[ArtisticLicenseLinguistics linguistic errors]].



* ''KingdomHearts'' calls clones "replicas". This is justified in that the Replicas are not made with genetics, but by implanting "memories" and "data" into a featureless puppet, creating something akin to a Nobody. Otherwise, they are, for all intents and purposes, intended to be clones of a person.

to:

* ''KingdomHearts'' ''Franchise/KingdomHearts'' calls clones "replicas". This is justified in that the Replicas are not made with genetics, but by implanting "memories" and "data" into a featureless puppet, creating something akin to a Nobody. Otherwise, they are, for all intents and purposes, intended to be clones of a person.



* Link in ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' games is a Hylian by race or Hyrulian by nationality. The term "elf" is never used. Like ''Film/TwentyEightDaysLater'', this has resulted in some fan debate about whether he is actually an elf. Also used literally, as there is a race of living dead present through many of the games who have the appearance of corpses, no intelligence, and walk in a slow shuffle, yet they are only ever referred to as "[=ReDeads=]". ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' even involves [[spoiler:a minor ZombieApocalypse, in which the entire of Hyrule town is infested by zombies, and we only see a small portion of its population evacuating to Kakariko. Nevertheless, all we hear is something along the lines of "Under Ganon, Hyrule became a land of monsters".]]
** The status of Link and Hylians in general as elves or another species altogether has been {{retconned}} in the later Zelda games, where they are just referred a different kind of human.
** The [=ReDead=] trophy in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros. Melee'' clarifies that [=ReDeads=] are magical constructs made to behave and look like the walking dead as an exercise in psychological warfare.

to:

* Link in ''Franchise/TheLegendOfZelda'' games is a Hylian by race or Hyrulian by nationality. The term "elf" is never used. Like ''Film/TwentyEightDaysLater'', this has resulted in some fan debate about whether he is actually an elf. Also used literally, as there is a race of living dead present through many of the games who have the appearance of corpses, no intelligence, and walk in a slow shuffle, yet they are only ever referred to as "[=ReDeads=]". ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaOcarinaOfTime'' even involves [[spoiler:a minor ZombieApocalypse, in which the entire of Hyrule town is infested by zombies, and we only see a small portion of its population evacuating to Kakariko. Nevertheless, all we hear is something along the lines of "Under Ganon, Hyrule became a land of monsters".]]
monsters"]].
** The status of Link and Hylians in general as elves or another species altogether has been {{retconned}} {{retcon}}ned in the later Zelda games, where they are just referred a different kind of human.
** The [=ReDead=] trophy in ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros. ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Melee'' clarifies that [=ReDeads=] are magical constructs made to behave and look like the walking dead as an exercise in psychological warfare.



** Also SegaSuperstars crossover games avoid the words "Death" and "Zombie" all the time, so they refer to the series as "Curien Mansion" or abbreviate them as "HOTD". The zombies are called "Monsters" and "Experiments" by the race commentator and the profile of the two playable characters, Zobio and Zobiko, classify their species as "Ex-Humans".

to:

** Also SegaSuperstars ''VideoGame/SegaSuperstars'' crossover games avoid the words "Death" and "Zombie" all the time, so they refer to the series as "Curien Mansion" or abbreviate them as "HOTD". The zombies are called "Monsters" and "Experiments" by the race commentator and the profile of the two playable characters, Zobio and Zobiko, classify their species as "Ex-Humans".



* A truly bizarre variant of this crops up in the ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' series, where King Dedede is to all appearances a penguin, but is ''never'' referred to as one in any canonical capacity. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in both ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros. Brawl'' and the AnimeOfTheGame, ''Anime/KirbyOfTheStars''.

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* A truly bizarre variant of this crops up in the ''Franchise/{{Kirby}}'' series, where King Dedede is to all appearances a penguin, but is ''never'' referred to as one in any canonical capacity. This is {{lampshade|Hanging}}d in both ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros. ''VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Brawl'' and the AnimeOfTheGame, ''Anime/KirbyOfTheStars''.''Anime/KirbyRightBackAtYa''.



* Website/TheEditingRoom's script for ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'' (or as Website.{{Cracked}} put it: "[[http://www.cracked.com/article_20012_if-dark-knight-rises-was-10-times-shorter-more-honest.html If The Dark Knight Rises]] [[AccentuateTheNegative Was 10 Times Shorter]] [[FridgeLogic and More Honest]]" to lampshade how the movie [[BrotherChuck never mentions]] [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker the villain]] from [[Film/TheDarkKnight the film's predecessor]].

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* Website/TheEditingRoom's script for ''Film/TheDarkKnightRises'' (or as Website.{{Cracked}} put it: "[[http://www.cracked.com/article_20012_if-dark-knight-rises-was-10-times-shorter-more-honest.html If The Dark Knight Rises]] [[AccentuateTheNegative Was 10 Times Shorter]] [[FridgeLogic and More Honest]]" to lampshade how the movie [[BrotherChuck [[ChuckCunninghamSyndrome never mentions]] [[SelfDemonstrating/TheJoker [[ComicBook/TheJoker the villain]] from [[Film/TheDarkKnight the film's predecessor]].



* A example from this website: The page for ChurchOfHappyology never explicitly states the name of the religion that is being lampooned by other creators. As you might guess from the name, it's Scientology.
* Justified and used for WorldBuilding in ''WebOriginal/OrionsArm'', where robots are referred to as "vecs" (named for an in-universe roboticist named Hans Moravec). This is because in the OA universe, the term robot has come to be considered a FantasticSlur since it's definition implies that the machines in question are non-sentient, when they clearly are. Because of this, people who use the term robot within stories are treated as bigots.

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* A An example from this website: The page for ChurchOfHappyology never explicitly states the name of the religion that is being lampooned by other creators. As you might guess from the name, it's Scientology.
* Justified and used for WorldBuilding in ''WebOriginal/OrionsArm'', where robots are referred to as "vecs" (named for an in-universe roboticist named Hans Moravec). This is because in the OA universe, the term robot has come to be considered a FantasticSlur {{Fantastic Slur|s}} since it's definition implies that the machines in question are non-sentient, when they clearly are. Because of this, people who use the term robot within stories are treated as bigots.



* In the direct-to-home-video animated adaptation of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', the characters seem to go out of their way to never, ever say the name "{{Superman}}". He's referred to as Clark a few times, but the word "Superman" isn't uttered a single time in the entirety of the movie. This despite the main focus of the second half being a fight between Superman and [[Characters/{{Batman}} the title character]].

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* In the direct-to-home-video animated adaptation of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'', the characters seem to go out of their way to never, ever say the name "{{Superman}}"."Franchise/{{Superman}}". He's referred to as Clark a few times, but the word "Superman" isn't uttered a single time in the entirety of the movie. This despite the main focus of the second half being a fight between Superman and [[Characters/{{Batman}} the title character]].



--->'''GreenLantern:''' Funny thing is, he's supposed to be dead.

to:

--->'''GreenLantern:''' --->'''Franchise/GreenLantern:''' Funny thing is, he's supposed to be dead.



--->'''GreenLantern:''' Uh...

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--->'''GreenLantern:''' --->'''Green Lantern:''' Uh...



** Previously done in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans''. Neither, Deathstroke nor The Terminator were ever used. He was always just Slade. Also, with a few rare exceptions, the Titans were only referred to by their code names.

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** Previously done in ''WesternAnimation/TeenTitans''. Neither, Deathstroke nor The Terminator were ever used. [[note]]Although this particular example overlaps with NeverSayDie. [[/note]] He was always just Slade. Also, with a few rare exceptions, the Titans were only referred to by their code names.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells'' never uses the word "bible"--it's really a Gospel Book--despite being about making one. The Book of Iona/Kells is just referred to as "the book" or a sacred text.
** Considering that Bible comes from the Greek for "Book," maybe its just a case of TranslationConvention.
* ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' never calls any of the characters (most of whom are FunnyAnimals) by their species, it just treats them as human. Taken to humorous levels when Rigby is referred to as a 'man' by human characters.
** Subverted in "Jinx" when Rigby tries to use charades to communicate with Pops and he points at himself, Pops immediately says "raccoon".
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' "Treehouse of Horror XX" there is a 'muncher' outbreak started by eating infected hamburgers. Notably, the segment is mostly an extended parody of ''28 Days Later'', listed above.
** The Brazilian-Portuguese dub of that episode [[AvertedTrope averted the trope]] and used the term 'zumbi' (zombie).

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/TheSecretOfKells'' never uses the word "bible"--it's really a Gospel Book--despite being about making one. The Book of Iona/Kells is just referred to as "the book" or a sacred text.
**
text. Considering that Bible comes from the Greek for "Book," maybe its just a case of TranslationConvention.
* ''WesternAnimation/RegularShow'' never calls any of the characters (most of whom are FunnyAnimals) by their species, it just treats them as human. Taken to humorous levels when Rigby is referred to as a 'man' by human characters.
**
characters. Subverted in "Jinx" when Rigby tries to use charades to communicate with Pops and he points at himself, Pops immediately says "raccoon".
* In ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' "Treehouse of Horror XX" there is a 'muncher' outbreak started by eating infected hamburgers. Notably, the segment is mostly an extended parody of ''28 Days Later'', listed above.
**
above. The Brazilian-Portuguese dub of that episode [[AvertedTrope averted the trope]] and used the term 'zumbi' (zombie).
6th Jun '16 3:58:29 PM Doug86
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A subtrope of the SciFiGhetto. Can be used to highlight how [[OurMonstersAreDifferent their monsters are different]]. Suppose your monsters are rotting shambling undead that want to drink your blood. Call them zombies and every casual reader's going to assume they're after "braaaaaiiinnss," while calling them vampires brings up images of [[UniversalHorror old black-&-white horror movies]], Creator/AnneRice and [[Literature/{{Twilight}} sparkles]]. When it's used to force a sense of [[ThisIsReality "realism"]] (we don't call them "zombies" because zombies ''[[NotAZombie aren't real]]''), it smacks painfully of GenreBlindness. If ''you'' were confronted by what appears to be a member of the walking dead, how much effort would you spend coming up with an alternative name?

to:

A subtrope of the SciFiGhetto. Can be used to highlight how [[OurMonstersAreDifferent their monsters are different]]. Suppose your monsters are rotting shambling undead that want to drink your blood. Call them zombies and every casual reader's going to assume they're after "braaaaaiiinnss," while calling them vampires brings up images of [[UniversalHorror [[Franchise/UniversalHorror old black-&-white horror movies]], Creator/AnneRice and [[Literature/{{Twilight}} sparkles]]. When it's used to force a sense of [[ThisIsReality "realism"]] (we don't call them "zombies" because zombies ''[[NotAZombie aren't real]]''), it smacks painfully of GenreBlindness. If ''you'' were confronted by what appears to be a member of the walking dead, how much effort would you spend coming up with an alternative name?
5th Jun '16 3:22:55 PM nombretomado
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* The word "vampire" is never uttered in ''Film/RiseBloodHunter'' to describe the cult of undead blood drinkers. That's why most people who saw the trailer thought it was about some sort of ''PushingDaisies''-esque zombie or something.

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* The word "vampire" is never uttered in ''Film/RiseBloodHunter'' to describe the cult of undead blood drinkers. That's why most people who saw the trailer thought it was about some sort of ''PushingDaisies''-esque ''Series/PushingDaisies''-esque zombie or something.
9th May '16 10:56:40 PM erforce
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* ''Series/TheSarahConnorChronicles'' made a point of never ever saying the [[{{Terminator}} T-word]] out loud, despite it being the very title of the show. Then, at the climax of (possibly) the last episode, Sarah screamed it into her adversary's face. Good times. Although this was an issue over royalties; as in they didn't want to pay any more than necessary so the T-word use was extremely limited.

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* ''Series/TheSarahConnorChronicles'' ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'' made a point of never ever saying the [[{{Terminator}} [[Franchise/{{Terminator}} T-word]] out loud, despite it being the very title of the show. Then, at the climax of (possibly) the last episode, Sarah screamed it into her adversary's face. Good times. Although this was an issue over royalties; as in they didn't want to pay any more than necessary so the T-word use was extremely limited.
1st May '16 6:20:57 AM cricri3007
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Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' where, when you fight a zombie for the first time, Dr.Vahlen says that "as improbable as it sounds, this is a zombie''".
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