History Main / NoOSHACompliance

17th Oct '17 6:00:16 PM Premonition45
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* Seen in the 1982 film, ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', in the engine room of the USS ''Enterprise''. Apparently, there's some sort of engine chamber containing radioactive materials, and the only way to enter this chamber is through a ''revolving door''. When Spock goes in to make repairs (with no radiation suit!) he cannot be retrieved for medical treatment because the entire compartment would be flooded with radiation. Justified by the massive battle damage that had caused the leak in the first place. WordOfGod is that Starfleet had that design there because they figured any ship that damaged was as good as dead anyway.
* ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'' has this as a plot point. Praxis exploded because the Klingons have No OSHA Compliance. Their mining operations were so extensive and poorly regulated that the whole planet was a powder keg waiting for a spark.
* In the 2009 ''Film/StarTrek'' film:
** Romulan Space Mining Corp apparently picked up ship design plans from the Republic/Imperial Industrial Design Bureau, specifically Volume 3: "Platforms, No Safety Railings, and Bottomless Chasms". Given justification in the prequel comic, saying the Narada was warped by Borg tech. Also justified in that (1): it was a mining vessel, and probably used the chasms for storage and (2) they ''are'' Romulans. With enhanced strength and agility they can quite easily jump from platform to platform, and don't need to worry about falling.
** Alternate-timeline Starfleet, on the other hand, makes this token effort to avert the trope in the transporter room: "Caution: Do not enter transporter while transport is in progress." Most people, when dealing with something as absurdly dangerous and volatile as a [[TeleporterAccident transporter]] (which, in terms of Starfleet accidents, are probably second after [[HolodeckMalfunction the infamous holodeck]]), would have instituted advanced technology like a ''door'', which would have to be shut before the transporter could be operated.
** Though the engineering areas of Federation ships in the movie seem to have plenty of railings and OSHA compliance (they would, since they were filmed in actual factories, like the Budweiser brewery!), there's no clear reason why those super-futuristic warp cores need so much smoke and fire, or why interplanetary shuttlecraft seem to emit so much steam.
* In ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. The green shiny glowy thing channeling Thalaron radiation in Shinzon's ship is all open and exposed, allowing anybody to walk right up to it, hand phaser said glowy thing, and blow the ship all to hell.
** Also, the chamber containing said device is immediately aft of the bridge, that apparently anyone can just walk into.
* Oh, ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''...
** Some of the hull windows were said to be ''force fields'', but this was in an enclosed maintenance-type area seemingly only accessible via Jeffries tubes and was normally covered by a retractable piece of hull anyway. As it is, force fields are used to seal hull breaches in any case in every series other than ''Enterprise''.
** There are some coolant pipes running up from the floor. They are filled with a flesh-melting gas capable of filling quite a good chunk of engineering. The plan involves puncturing one by shooting it. The backup plan has Data... karate-chopping it.
*** "[[WebVideo/RedLetterMedia Excuse me sir, I have some questions.]] So you don't want to [[ATeamFiring fire our weapons in Engineering]], to avoid hitting [[GoingCritical the warp core]]. Okay, that makes sense. But you want us to hit the [[ContainmentField smaller, harder-to-hit part]] that's ''right next to it''?"

to:

* The ''Franchise/StarTrek'' films:
** ''Film/StarTrekTheMotionPicture'': A transporter which is on the fritz and not safe for use will apparently still accept incoming transports from another location, rather than letting the sender do all the work. Given they were working on a console which went haywire due to the transport, this could be chalked up to extraordinarily bad timing, though it still raises the question as to why no one told the sender that transport wasn't safe. Kirk, after all, was beamed into an orbiting station and then flown over. Also, beginning in this movie and in the rest of the TOS movies, [[http://wrathofdhanprops.blogspot.com/2013/01/the-complete-guide-to-starfleet-style_26.html engineers now had radiation suits]].
**
Seen in the 1982 film, ''Film/StarTrekIITheWrathOfKhan'', in the engine room of the USS ''Enterprise''. Apparently, there's some sort of engine chamber containing radioactive materials, and the only way to enter this chamber is through a ''revolving door''. When Spock goes in to make repairs (with no radiation suit!) he cannot be retrieved for medical treatment because the entire compartment would be flooded with radiation. Justified by the massive battle damage that had caused the leak in the first place. WordOfGod is that Starfleet had that design there because they figured any ship that damaged was as good as dead anyway.
* ** ''Film/StarTrekVITheUndiscoveredCountry'' has this as a plot point. Praxis exploded because the Klingons have No OSHA Compliance. Their mining operations were so extensive and poorly regulated that the whole planet was a powder keg waiting for a spark.
* ** Oh, ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''...
*** Some of the hull windows were said to be ''force fields'', but this was in an enclosed maintenance-type area seemingly only accessible via Jeffries tubes and was normally covered by a retractable piece of hull anyway. As it is, force fields are used to seal hull breaches in any case in every series other than ''Enterprise''.
*** There are some coolant pipes running up from the floor. They are filled with a flesh-melting gas capable of filling quite a good chunk of engineering. The plan involves puncturing one by shooting it. The backup plan has Data... karate-chopping it.
**** "[[WebVideo/RedLetterMedia Excuse me sir, I have some questions.]] So you don't want to [[ATeamFiring fire our weapons in Engineering]], to avoid hitting [[GoingCritical the warp core]]. Okay, that makes sense. But you want us to hit the [[ContainmentField smaller, harder-to-hit part]] that's ''right next to it''?"
** In ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. The green shiny glowy thing channeling Thalaron radiation in Shinzon's ship is all open and exposed, allowing anybody to walk right up to it, hand phaser said glowy thing, and blow the ship all to hell.
*** Also, the chamber containing said device is immediately aft of the bridge, that apparently anyone can just walk into.
**
In the 2009 ''Film/StarTrek'' film:
** *** Romulan Space Mining Corp apparently picked up ship design plans from the Republic/Imperial Industrial Design Bureau, specifically Volume 3: "Platforms, No Safety Railings, and Bottomless Chasms". Given justification in the prequel comic, saying the Narada was warped by Borg tech. Also justified in that (1): it was a mining vessel, and probably used the chasms for storage and (2) they ''are'' Romulans. With enhanced strength and agility they can quite easily jump from platform to platform, and don't need to worry about falling.
** *** Alternate-timeline Starfleet, on the other hand, makes this token effort to avert the trope in the transporter room: "Caution: Do not enter transporter while transport is in progress." Most people, when dealing with something as absurdly dangerous and volatile as a [[TeleporterAccident transporter]] (which, in terms of Starfleet accidents, are probably second after [[HolodeckMalfunction the infamous holodeck]]), would have instituted advanced technology like a ''door'', which would have to be shut before the transporter could be operated.
** *** Though the engineering areas of Federation ships in the movie seem to have plenty of railings and OSHA compliance (they would, since they were filmed in actual factories, like the Budweiser brewery!), there's no clear reason why those super-futuristic warp cores need so much smoke and fire, or why interplanetary shuttlecraft seem to emit so much steam.
* In ''Film/StarTrekNemesis''. The green shiny glowy thing channeling Thalaron radiation in Shinzon's ship is all open and exposed, allowing anybody to walk right up to it, hand phaser said glowy thing, and blow the ship all to hell.
** Also, the chamber containing said device is immediately aft of the bridge, that apparently anyone can just walk into.
* Oh, ''Film/StarTrekFirstContact''...
** Some of the hull windows were said to be ''force fields'', but this was in an enclosed maintenance-type area seemingly only accessible via Jeffries tubes and was normally covered by a retractable piece of hull anyway. As it is, force fields are used to seal hull breaches in any case in every series other than ''Enterprise''.
** There are some coolant pipes running up from the floor. They are filled with a flesh-melting gas capable of filling quite a good chunk of engineering. The plan involves puncturing one by shooting it. The backup plan has Data... karate-chopping it.
*** "[[WebVideo/RedLetterMedia Excuse me sir, I have some questions.]] So you don't want to [[ATeamFiring fire our weapons in Engineering]], to avoid hitting [[GoingCritical the warp core]]. Okay, that makes sense. But you want us to hit the [[ContainmentField smaller, harder-to-hit part]] that's ''right next to it''?"
steam.
14th Oct '17 6:44:47 AM TheWarioBros
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Added DiffLines:

** ''VideoGame/DonkeyKongCountryTropicalFreeze'' continues the pattern, with such locations as Sawmill Thrill (a mine cart/canoe ride straight through an active sawmill with blades cutting things like the floor to pieces inches from the Kongs), Reckless Ride (a rocket barrel journey straight through the machinery of a fruit juice production plant) and basically every other factory or building related level in the game.
30th Sep '17 5:04:48 PM timotaka
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* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series, though justifiably unsafe since it's set AfterTheEnd, has the player visit several Pre-War buildings which obviously have issues with OSHA compliance. There are robot workers who "punish" disobedience by starving the offenders to death (or straight-up murder them), turrets that fire on anyone they don't recognize (including employees who have forgotten their ID cards) and security systems that summon dozens of heavily armed sentry bots (missile-equipped, at that) to deal with a single intruder ''indoors''. The first half of the ''Dead Money'' DLC for ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' takes place in a Villa that was constructed with the strength of a sandcastle, according to various logs -- the huge cloud of poisonous gas isn't fallout, ''it's a purpose built weaponised poison from the air conditioning''. The Sierra Madre Casino nearby, in response to the war happening, locked the guests inside and ''shot anyone who tried to leave''. And all of this doesn't include the Sierra Madre vault, which itself was built as a trap.

to:

* The ''VideoGame/{{Fallout}}'' series, though justifiably unsafe since it's set AfterTheEnd, has the player visit several Pre-War buildings which obviously have issues with OSHA compliance. There are robot workers who "punish" disobedience by starving the offenders to death (or straight-up murder them), turrets that fire on anyone they don't recognize (including employees who have forgotten their ID cards) and security systems that summon dozens of heavily armed sentry bots (missile-equipped, at that) to deal with a single intruder ''indoors''. The first half of the ''Dead Money'' DLC for ''VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas'' takes place in a Villa that was constructed with the strength of a sandcastle, according to various logs -- the huge cloud of poisonous gas isn't fallout, ''it's a purpose built weaponised poison from the air conditioning''. The Sierra Madre Casino nearby, in response to the war happening, locked the guests inside and ''shot anyone who tried to leave''. And all of this doesn't include the Sierra Madre vault, which itself was built as a trap. At least the game goes out of its way to provide justifications in the case of ''Dead Money'': Not only was the resort constructed with the help of scientists from ''Old World Blues'' (see below) who used it as a testing ground for dangerous inventions, the logs which mention the shoddy construction also tell you this was because the contractors were skimming off money with cheap, sub-standard construction and pocketing the rest.
30th Sep '17 4:52:37 PM timotaka
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** Near the end of the movie Quaid and [[TheDragon Rictor]] fight on a large cargo elevator which ascends from a wide open room into a shaft with the walls flush right next to the edges of the elevator, with no guard rails or cage on the elevator to prevent something from getting caught in between and crushed.

to:

** Near the end of the movie Quaid and [[TheDragon Rictor]] fight on a large cargo elevator which ascends from a wide open room into a shaft with the walls flush right next to the edges of the elevator, with no guard rails or cage on the elevator to prevent something from getting caught in between and crushed. (Guess how the fight scene ends?)
30th Sep '17 4:37:41 PM timotaka
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** Near the end of the movie Quaid and [[TheDragon Rictor]] fight on a large cargo elevator which ascends from an open room into a shaft with the walls flush right next to the edges elevator, with no guard rails or cage to prevent something from getting caught in between and crushed.

to:

** Near the end of the movie Quaid and [[TheDragon Rictor]] fight on a large cargo elevator which ascends from an a wide open room into a shaft with the walls flush right next to the edges of the elevator, with no guard rails or cage on the elevator to prevent something from getting caught in between and crushed.
30th Sep '17 4:35:01 PM timotaka
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* The Martian spaceport in ''Film/TotalRecall1990'', where the windows protecting the terminal from the near-vacuum outside: a) are not bulletproof, despite the presence of armed guards and agents, b) shatter completely from a handful of bullet holes, making those small holes into one large one, and c) have emergency shutters that must be activated manually, while holding on for dear life as the room [[ExplosiveDecompression rapidly decompresses]]. And the whole bay over the dome is just as fragile, minus the shutter due to it size.

to:

* The ''Film/TotalRecall1990'':
** In the
Martian spaceport in ''Film/TotalRecall1990'', where the windows protecting the terminal from the near-vacuum outside: a) are not bulletproof, despite the presence of armed guards and agents, b) shatter completely from a handful of bullet holes, making those small holes into one large one, and c) have emergency shutters that must be activated manually, while holding on for dear life as the room [[ExplosiveDecompression rapidly decompresses]]. And the whole bay over the dome is just as fragile, minus the shutter due to it size.size.
** Near the end of the movie Quaid and [[TheDragon Rictor]] fight on a large cargo elevator which ascends from an open room into a shaft with the walls flush right next to the edges elevator, with no guard rails or cage to prevent something from getting caught in between and crushed.
30th Sep '17 4:30:07 PM timotaka
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* The ending of ''Film/WhiteHeat'', starring James Cagney, is a fight scene that takes place in a chemical plant in Long Beach, CA.

to:

* The ending of ''Film/WhiteHeat'', starring James Cagney, is a fight scene that takes place in a chemical plant in Long Beach, CA. This one is somewhat justified in that there was a firefight where pipes and tanks were hit, and Cagney's character randomly turned several valves in an attempt to cause distractions.
19th Aug '17 7:28:49 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this, despite what CommonKnowledge might tell you. Safety (along with luxury) was a selling point of the ''Olympic'' class of liners, so the ''Titanic'' was tricked out with every safety measure the builders could think of, and while it's true that she did not have enough lifeboats for all her passengers, she was carrying four more than the law required (maritime regulations called for 16 lifeboats in ships over 10,000 tonnes, and the ''Titanic'' had those plus four collapsibles. Problem was, the ''Titanic'' happened to be over 50,000 tonnes, so it still wasn't enough). The real problem in the ''Titanic'' disaster was the regulations themselves- aside from the well-known problem with the lifeboats, no lifeboat drills were required (and the ''Titanic'' never had any), round-the-clock wireless operation was not required (''Titanic'', being a giant passenger ship, had two operators for round-the-clock duty, but neither the ''Californian'' or the ''Carpathia'' did- the ''Carpathia'' was very lucky to catch the ''Titanic'''s distress signal), wireless operators were employees of Marconi Wireless and instructed to prioritize passenger messages over weather reports (The ''Titanic'' received and basically ignored several iceberg warnings), and iceberg warnings were treated as advisories instead of major hazards. That along with the fact that iceberg-sideswipe damage was not among the foreseen dangers ''Titanic'' could withstand was what really turned the ''Titanic'''s maiden voyage into a tragedy. Frankly, with the state of maritime safety, ''some'' massive disaster was pretty much inevitable, and the ''Titanic'' drew the metaphorical short straw.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this, despite what CommonKnowledge might tell you. Safety (along with luxury) was a selling point of the ''Olympic'' class of liners, so the ''Titanic'' was tricked out with every safety measure the builders could think of, and while it's true that she did not have enough lifeboats for all her passengers, she was carrying four more than the law required (maritime regulations called for 16 lifeboats in ships over 10,000 tonnes, and the ''Titanic'' had those plus four collapsibles. Problem was, the ''Titanic'' happened to be over 50,000 tonnes, so it still wasn't enough). The real problem in the ''Titanic'' disaster was the regulations themselves- aside from the well-known problem with the lifeboats, no lifeboat drills were required (and the ''Titanic'' never had any), round-the-clock wireless operation was not required (''Titanic'', being a giant passenger ship, had two operators for round-the-clock duty, but neither the ''Californian'' or the ''Carpathia'' did- the ''Carpathia'' was very lucky to catch the ''Titanic'''s ''Titanic's'' distress signal), the meaning of fired rockets was not clearly 'immediate and severe distress', wireless operators were employees of Marconi Wireless and instructed to prioritize passenger messages over weather reports (The ''Titanic'' received and basically ignored several iceberg warnings), and iceberg warnings were treated as advisories instead of major hazards. That along with the fact that iceberg-sideswipe damage was not among the foreseen dangers ''Titanic'' could withstand was what really turned the ''Titanic'''s ''Titanic's'' maiden voyage into a tragedy. Frankly, with the state of maritime safety, ''some'' massive disaster was pretty much inevitable, and the ''Titanic'' drew the metaphorical short straw.
19th Aug '17 7:25:24 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this. The ship was in full compliance with the maritime safety regulations of the day. Ships of over 10,000 tons required sixteen liftboats and ''Titanic'' actually carried four more than required. However, the problem was that said regulations had last been updated eighteen years prior, and failed to take into account the size-increase in shipbuilding. Thomas Andrews, the ship's builder, had lobbied the White Star Line to double the number of the ship's lifeboats, but was unsuccessful.

to:

* The [[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic RMS]] ''[[UsefulNotes/RMSTitanic Titanic]]'' was actually a subversion of this. The ship was in full compliance this, despite what CommonKnowledge might tell you. Safety (along with the maritime safety regulations luxury) was a selling point of the day. Ships ''Olympic'' class of over 10,000 tons required sixteen liftboats and liners, so the ''Titanic'' actually carried was tricked out with every safety measure the builders could think of, and while it's true that she did not have enough lifeboats for all her passengers, she was carrying four more than required. However, the problem was that said law required (maritime regulations called for 16 lifeboats in ships over 10,000 tonnes, and the ''Titanic'' had last been updated eighteen years prior, and failed to take into account those plus four collapsibles. Problem was, the size-increase ''Titanic'' happened to be over 50,000 tonnes, so it still wasn't enough). The real problem in shipbuilding. Thomas Andrews, the ship's builder, had lobbied ''Titanic'' disaster was the White Star Line to double regulations themselves- aside from the number of well-known problem with the ship's lifeboats, no lifeboat drills were required (and the ''Titanic'' never had any), round-the-clock wireless operation was not required (''Titanic'', being a giant passenger ship, had two operators for round-the-clock duty, but neither the ''Californian'' or the ''Carpathia'' did- the ''Carpathia'' was unsuccessful.very lucky to catch the ''Titanic'''s distress signal), wireless operators were employees of Marconi Wireless and instructed to prioritize passenger messages over weather reports (The ''Titanic'' received and basically ignored several iceberg warnings), and iceberg warnings were treated as advisories instead of major hazards. That along with the fact that iceberg-sideswipe damage was not among the foreseen dangers ''Titanic'' could withstand was what really turned the ''Titanic'''s maiden voyage into a tragedy. Frankly, with the state of maritime safety, ''some'' massive disaster was pretty much inevitable, and the ''Titanic'' drew the metaphorical short straw.
16th Aug '17 4:38:26 PM DarkHunter
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** ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' averts this, as the smelting factory here has plenty of guardrails, with the only spot without them intended for lowering objects into a vat.

to:

** ''Film/Terminator2JudgmentDay'' averts this, as the smelting factory here has plenty of guardrails, with the only spot without them intended for lowering objects into a vat. The factory is also evacuated when a helium tanker crashes into it, with one worker hitting the alarm and everyone immediately running for it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NoOSHACompliance