History Main / NoBudget

6th Jul '16 12:27:27 PM Quanyails
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* Indy Mogul, a web show on Youtube, explains how to do Hollywood-style special effects on a low budget.

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* Indy Mogul, a web show on Youtube, [=YouTube=], explains how to do Hollywood-style special effects on a low budget.
6th Jul '16 8:53:42 AM Quanyails
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* ''Series/PJKatiesFarm'' is defined by its utter lack of budget. Everything is done by the eponymous PJ Katie — the characters were literally made by her out Crayola Model Magic, there are no writers (the scripts are all ad-libbed by PJ Katie), there is [[ManOfAThousandVoices only one voice actor]] and she is the same person as the puppeteer. The only other person on set was the cameraman. At one point a Danish, which was obviously PJ Katie's lunch, was used as a prop to represent a flying saucer and you can see her eating it during the credits.

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* ''Series/PJKatiesFarm'' is defined by its utter lack of budget. Everything is done by the eponymous PJ Katie — the characters were literally made by her out Crayola Model Magic, there are no writers (the scripts are all ad-libbed by PJ Katie), there is [[ManOfAThousandVoices only one voice actor]] and she is the same person as the puppeteer. The only other person on set was the cameraman. At one point a Danish, danish, which was obviously PJ Katie's lunch, was used as a prop to represent a flying saucer and you can see her eating it during the credits.
6th Jul '16 8:49:46 AM Quanyails
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* In general, this applied to many shows on Creator/TheBBC in the 1960s-80s. As the [[YMMV/DoctorWho "Doctor Who" YMMV]] page puts it: "Creator/TheBBC was somewhat notorious for giving the set and costume designers of ''Series/DoctorWho'' a shoestring budget; that is, a bundle of shoe strings that they were expected to make fifteen monsters out of." Creator/TomBaker, who played the Fourth Doctor, claimed that ''nobody'' liked the bad effects the show had during this period and you just bore with them. Anyone who says otherwise is looking through the [[NostalgiaFilter nostalgia-glasses]].

to:

* In general, this applied to many shows on Creator/TheBBC in the 1960s-80s. As the ''YMMV/DoctorWho'' [[YMMV/DoctorWho "Doctor Who" YMMV]] page YMMV page]] puts it: "Creator/TheBBC was somewhat notorious for giving the set and costume designers of ''Series/DoctorWho'' a shoestring budget; that is, a bundle of shoe strings that they were expected to make fifteen monsters out of." Creator/TomBaker, who played the Fourth Doctor, claimed that ''nobody'' liked the bad effects the show had during this period and you just bore with them. Anyone who says otherwise is looking through the [[NostalgiaFilter nostalgia-glasses]].
6th Jul '16 8:46:46 AM Quanyails
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* ''Series/{{Inquizition}}'', airing from 1998-2001, was by design stripped clean of anything that might imply any sort of a budget. The contestants stood behind podiums that performed the bare minimum of functions- locking in an answer and showing a score- and looked it. They competed in an empty sound stage green-screened to look like an abandoned airplane hangar that gave its own implications of cheapness. The prize for winning was a whopping $250, though later on they got '''really''' crazy and upped the prize to $500.

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* ''Series/{{Inquizition}}'', airing from 1998-2001, was by design stripped clean of anything that might imply any sort of a budget. The contestants stood behind podiums that performed the bare minimum of functions- locking functions--locking in an answer and showing a score- and score--and looked it. They competed in an empty sound stage green-screened to look like an abandoned airplane hangar that gave its own implications of cheapness. The prize for winning was a whopping $250, though later on they got '''really''' crazy and upped the prize to $500.
6th Jul '16 8:40:38 AM Quanyails
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* Film/CryWolf is an interesting example. The producers had made a short film as a contest for Chrysler, and the prize was a million dollars. They used the money to make the film, along with quite a bit of conspicuous Chrysler ProductPlacement.

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* Film/CryWolf ''Film/CryWolf'' is an interesting example. The producers had made a short film as a contest for Chrysler, and the prize was a million dollars. They used the money to make the film, along with quite a bit of conspicuous Chrysler ProductPlacement.
6th Jul '16 8:40:07 AM Quanyails
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** His first film, Film/GoingOverboard [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this trope in the opening shot.

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** His first film, Film/GoingOverboard ''Film/GoingOverboard'', [[LampshadeHanging lampshades]] this trope in the opening shot.
6th Jul '16 8:37:55 AM Quanyails
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** Shots of Ben and Arthur taking an airline were apparently made by going to an airport and filming the first plane to pass close overhead. The two planes used are a FedEx cargo plane and an Alaska Airlines plane (flying from California to Vermont).

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** Shots of Ben and Arthur taking an airline were apparently made by going to an airport and filming the first plane to pass close overhead. The two planes used are a FedEx [=FedEx=] cargo plane and an Alaska Airlines plane (flying from California to Vermont).



** A Sony VX2000 camcorder with a tripod was seemingly the only camera setup used, making the film resemble a home movie. Two of the actors in the film were also credited as "cinematographers", suggesting that they hung around when not being shot to help manipulate the camera. The lack of a proper stabilizing rig makes any shots in motion very shaky and nauseating. All lighting is apparently whatever natural light was available, with one scene of Ben in a dark bedroom waking up being almost pitch black because of it.

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** A Sony VX2000 [=VX2000=] camcorder with a tripod was seemingly the only camera setup used, making the film resemble a home movie. Two of the actors in the film were also credited as "cinematographers", suggesting that they hung around when not being shot to help manipulate the camera. The lack of a proper stabilizing rig makes any shots in motion very shaky and nauseating. All lighting is apparently whatever natural light was available, with one scene of Ben in a dark bedroom waking up being almost pitch black because of it.
30th Jun '16 3:09:22 PM WarioBarker
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* ''Series/BlanketyBlank'', the British version of ''Series/MatchGame'', had nearly '''all''' {{Undesirable Prize}}s because they could never afford prizes someone would actually want. This was frequently {{lampshade|Hanging}}d via SelfDeprecation; one RunningGag was for host Les Dawson to claim their prizes were fire-salvaged.
-->'''Les Dawson''': And for the benefit of anyone who hasn't got an Argos Catalogue, here's some of the rubbish you might be saddled with tonight.

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* ''Series/BlanketyBlank'', the British version of ''Series/MatchGame'', had nearly '''all''' {{Undesirable Prize}}s because they could never afford prizes someone would actually want. This was frequently {{lampshade|Hanging}}d via SelfDeprecation; one RunningGag was for second host Les Dawson to claim their prizes were fire-salvaged.
-->'''Les Dawson''': Dawson:''' And for the benefit of anyone who hasn't got an Argos Catalogue, here's some of the rubbish you might be saddled with tonight.



* ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'': Seasons 37 onward have been accused of this, not with the prizes offered but prizes being offered only as "show" and the pricing games themselves set so hard that, short of a lucky or exceptionally skilled contestant, nobody will win it.
** While this was a common practice prior to Roger Dobkowitz's departure from the show, it was less criticized because while the games were still set to be more difficult than usual, they could still be won by good contestants because Roger believed in not "cheating" the person who was playing — he refused to put the right choice of That's Too Much in the 1st-2nd or 9th-10th slots, or the money of Half Off in [[ThirteenIsUnlucky Box 13]]. The subsequent regime ignored both.
*** A common example is Stack The Deck, in which the object is to select five out of seven available numbers and use them to form the correct price of the car. The contestant is only allowed up to three free digits by correctly pricing all three grocery products in play. The trope applies if any of the products are set up to be incorrectly priced.

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* ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'': Seasons 37 onward have been 37-39 were accused of this, not entirely with the prizes offered but prizes being offered pretty much only as "show" and the pricing games themselves set so hard that, short of a lucky or exceptionally skilled contestant, nobody will win it.
** Per [[http://tpirsummaries.8m.com/Other/PGStats.html this page]], from at least Seasons 29-36 (2000-08) the pricing game win rate was between 46%-50%, with 36 posting the lowest amount of that group. Seasons 37-39 (2008-11) saw the win rate drop noticeably, with 39 in particular putting up just ''34.9%'' thanks in part to new game Pay The Rent.
** While this was a common practice prior to Roger Dobkowitz's departure from the show, it was less criticized because while the games were still set to be more difficult than usual, they could still be won by good contestants because Roger believed in not "cheating" the person who was playing — he refused to put the right choice of That's Too Much in the 1st-2nd or 9th-10th slots, or the money of Half Off in [[ThirteenIsUnlucky Box 13]]. The subsequent regime ignored both.
both, leading to the FanNickname "That's Two Ninth!" in Season 37.
*** A common example is Stack The Deck, in which the object is to select five out of seven available numbers and use them to form the correct price of the car. The contestant is only allowed can get up to three free digits by correctly pricing all three grocery products in play. The trope applies if any of the products are set up to be incorrectly priced.



** Car games offering compact or subcompact cars often worth less than $20,000 have steadily been on the rise despite inflation. It has gotten to a point where in Season 44, they seem to take pride in offering a Nissan Versa worth ''$12,815'' in fee games such as Spelling Bee or Let 'em Roll. Keep in mind, the average price of a new car these days is nearly three times that.
* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': The 1980s NBC version originally began with a shopping BonusRound, where contestants could buy sometimes-opulent prizes such as a $25,000 precious commodities package or a $20,000 Oriental rug. The show switched to the Winner's Board in late 1984 and the Winner's Big Money Game in 1987, dropping the super-expensive prizes in favor of more standard game-show fare in the $1,500-$5,000 range, and moving its car prizes from full-sized Cadillacs and top-end Porsches to mainstream cars such as the Ford Taurus, entry-level luxury cars such as the Mercedes-Benz 190 or BMW 528i, or compact convertibles including the Chevrolet Cavalier (although the occasional Chevrolet Corvette and Cadillac [=DeVille=] was offered). Some say this was a cost-cutting move, but contestants could still win more than $70,000 cash ($50,000 as the top prize, plus other cash bonuses along the way) for a successful stay. Still, the big-ticket items, such as [[http://www.veoh.com/watch/v1059457FEX3JAX9 $13,000 European tours and $21,000 cabin cruisers]], were gone.
** When it was revived as ''[[Series/{{Temptation2007}} Temptation: The New Sale Of The Century]]'', the budget shrank even further. Prizes were in the $500-$1000 range, less than 1/4th the typical value of the prizes in the 1980's version if you adjust for inflation. The grand prize was just a mid-range car, worth less than 1/8th the 1980's jackpot (again, adjusted for inflation). If the shoestring budget had been any tighter, the prizes would've had to be literal shoe strings.
* ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': Averted until Season 31. Until then, the show allowed players who finished tied to keep their winnings and play again on the following game. However, the producers circumvented this after four occurrences in Fall 2014. Now, all ties are decided with a tiebreaker question. The winner comes back tomorrow with their winnings and the loser goes home with $2,000.
* ''Series/WheelOfFortune'', when the daytime version moved from Creator/{{NBC}} to Creator/{{CBS}} in Summer 1989. The show adopted a play-for-cash format (as its [[LongRunners still-running]] syndicated companion did in October 1987), but the Wheel's dollar values were slashed, sometimes by more than half, with $50 and $75 dotting the Rounds 1-2 layout and the top value in Rounds 4+ being a very modest $1,250. (Conversely, nighttime used a $1,000/$2,500/$3,500/$5,000 layout {formerly $1,000/$1,000/$5,000} rather than the daytime $500/$500/$1,000/$1,250 {formerly $750/$1,000/$2,000}.) Also, the CBS-era Bonus Round prizes included $5,000 cash and subcompact/mini-compact cars, as opposed to the $25,000 cash and super-expensive luxury/hand-built/exotic sportscars common in nighttime. Even worse, the price of a vowel dropped from $250 to $200, then further to $100. While the budget improved slightly over the last two years ($50 and $75 were ousted between late August and mid-September 1989, and the removal of the Free Spin wedge on October 16 resulted in a $400 boost), it was still cheap. While the front-game and Bonus Round prizes increased in value as the series went on, the Wheel became static when Free Spin became a token.

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** Car games offering compact or subcompact cars often worth less than $20,000 have steadily been on the rise despite inflation. It has It's gotten to a point where in Season 44, they seem the show seemed to take pride in offering a Nissan Versa worth ''$12,815'' in fee games such as Spelling Bee or Let 'em Roll. Keep in mind, the average price of a new car these days is nearly three times that.
* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': The 1980s NBC version originally began with a shopping BonusRound, where contestants could buy sometimes-opulent prizes such as a $25,000 precious commodities package or a $20,000 Oriental rug. The show switched to the Winner's Board in late November 1984 and the Winner's Big Money Game in December 1987, dropping the super-expensive prizes in favor of more standard game-show fare in the $1,500-$5,000 range, and moving its car prizes from full-sized Cadillacs and top-end Porsches to mainstream cars such as the Ford Taurus, entry-level luxury cars such as the Mercedes-Benz 190 or BMW 528i, or compact convertibles including the Chevrolet Cavalier (although the occasional Chevrolet Corvette and Cadillac [=DeVille=] was offered). Some say this was a cost-cutting move, but contestants could still win more than $70,000 cash ($50,000 as the top prize, plus other cash bonuses along the way) for a successful stay. Still, the big-ticket items, such as [[http://www.veoh.com/watch/v1059457FEX3JAX9 $13,000 European tours and $21,000 cabin cruisers]], were gone.
** The Winner's Big Money Game made the $50,000 ''ridiculously'' hard to get: the champ had to win the WBMG on their seventh day (to get the car), had to risk it and any preceding WBMG winnings to come back for an eighth day, win that game, then clear the subsequent WBMG to actually get the $50,000. By all indication, only one player won the $50,000 in this format, whereas quite a few won the Lot in the Shopping and Winner's Board eras.
** The 1980s syndicated version began with the Shopping format, but in November 1985 changed to the Winner's Board as well, played exactly the same way as on NBC. The change was rather noticeable since it was never so much as hinted at until the last segment of the last Shopping episode, when Jim announced it. The fact the Cash Jackpot continued to grow during the final Shopping week, even when it became obvious that nobody would get the $750 needed to win it, didn't help matters.
** When it was revived as ''[[Series/{{Temptation2007}} Temptation: The New Sale Of The Century]]'', the budget shrank even further. Prizes were in the $500-$1000 $500-$1,000 range, less than 1/4th the typical value of the prizes in the 1980's 1980s version if you adjust for inflation. The grand prize was just a mid-range car, worth less than 1/8th the 1980's 1980s jackpot (again, adjusted for inflation).inflation). Also, Instant Cash started at $500 and grew by $500 per show (with a $5,000 cap) and champs were limited to a maximum of five days. If the shoestring budget had been any tighter, the prizes would've had to be literal shoe strings.
* ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'': Averted until Season 31. Until then, the show allowed players who finished tied to keep their winnings and play again on the following game. However, the producers circumvented this after four occurrences in Fall 2014. Now, 2014: now, all ties are decided with a tiebreaker question. clue. The winner comes back tomorrow on the next show with their winnings and winnings, while the loser goes home with $2,000.
* ''Series/WheelOfFortune'', when the daytime version moved from Creator/{{NBC}} to Creator/{{CBS}} in Summer 1989. The show adopted a play-for-cash format (as its [[LongRunners still-running]] syndicated companion did in October 1987), but the Wheel's dollar values were slashed, sometimes by more than half, with $50 and $75 dotting the Rounds 1-2 layout and the top value in Rounds 4+ being a very modest $1,250. (Conversely, nighttime used a $1,000/$2,500/$3,500/$5,000 layout {formerly $1,000/$1,000/$5,000} rather than the daytime $500/$500/$1,000/$1,250 {formerly $750/$1,000/$2,000}.) Also, the CBS-era Bonus Round prizes included $5,000 cash and subcompact/mini-compact cars, as opposed to the $25,000 cash and super-expensive luxury/hand-built/exotic sportscars common in nighttime. Even worse, the price of a vowel dropped from $250 to $200, then further to $100. While the budget improved slightly over the last two years ($50 and $75 were ousted between late August mid-August and mid-September 1989, and the removal of the Free Spin wedge on October 16 16, 1989 resulted in a $400 boost), it was still cheap. While the front-game and Bonus Round prizes increased in value as the series went on, the Wheel became static when Free Spin became a token.



** Subverted in Season 26: The $10,000 Wedge was replaced by the current Million-Dollar Wedge, which only awards the chance of taking it to the Bonus Round, and the contestant must avoid Bankrupt before the game ends. The only envelope that is replaced in the Bonus Round is the $100,000 envelope, with the other 23 left unchanged. Of course, [[Awesome/WheelOfFortune if the contestant can pull it off…]]
** However, with each time the $1,000,000 has been won, the budget has been [[DoubleSubvertedTrope noticeably tighter]].

to:

** Subverted in Season 26: The $10,000 Wedge was replaced by the current Million-Dollar Wedge, which only awards the chance of taking it to the Bonus Round, and the contestant must avoid Bankrupt before the game ends. The only envelope that is replaced in the Bonus Round is the $100,000 envelope, with the other 23 left unchanged. Of course, [[Awesome/WheelOfFortune if the contestant can pull it off…]]
off...]]
** However, with each time the $1,000,000 has been won, the budget has been [[DoubleSubvertedTrope noticeably tighter]].tighter]]...despite the fact that said prize has always been insured.



*** Season 32 saw the show making steps to get back on its feet despite the new $32,000-bonus round minimum being offered on almost three out of every four shows. The minimum dollar value on the wheel increased to $500 and the cash bonus for winning a car in the Bonus Round also increased back to $5,000. However, all that went out the window with the $1,000,000 being won again just three shows into that season. For Season 33, ''Wheel'' chose not to tape any road shows, citing high production costs though the Sony email leaks may have also factored in their decision to do so. Also, two of the Wheel's values decreased with a third being lowered in every round except for one. Furthermore, the show stopped giving cash with cars in the Bonus Round and the 1/2 Car tags were removed for Round 1. Again, it didn't help that the 1/2 Car was won frequently in Season 32.
** Some would argue that nighttime version has shown this even before the Million-Dollar Wedge was introduced to the show. The main-game and BonusRound prizes since about 2002 have almost always been trips, cash bonuses or sponsored shopping sprees. And even then, the trips are usually within the US or the Caribbean islands.

to:

*** Season 32 saw the show making steps to get back on its feet despite the new $32,000-bonus round $32,000 Bonus Round minimum being offered on almost three out of every four shows. The shows: the minimum dollar value on the wheel Wheel increased to $500 (but vowels still cost $250), and the cash bonus for winning a car in the Bonus Round also increased back to $5,000. However, all that went out the window with the $1,000,000 being won again just three shows into that season. the season.
**
For Season 33, ''Wheel'' chose not to tape any road shows, citing high production costs though (though the Sony email leaks may have also factored in their decision to do so.so). Also, two of the Wheel's values decreased with a third being lowered in every round except for one. Furthermore, the show stopped giving cash with cars in the Bonus Round and the 1/2 Car tags were removed for Round 1. Again, it didn't help that the 1/2 Car was won frequently in Season 32.
** Some would argue that nighttime version has shown this even before the Million-Dollar Wedge was introduced to the show. The main-game and BonusRound prizes since about 2002 have almost always been trips, cash bonuses bonuses, or sponsored shopping sprees. And sprees (and even then, the trips are usually within the US or the Caribbean islands.islands). BonusRound prizes, on the other hand, are limited to cars and cash.



** Until 1992, families played for cash. With the introduction of the Bullseye Round, families played for points instead. Plus, the Fast Money prizes of $5,000 or $10,000 depending on the version (which were already cheap by early 90s standards) were replaced with base amounts of $2,500 or $5,000. The 1994 Bankroll version had this even worse with the most families could play for being either $7,000 or $14,000.
** It's more blatant on the current syndicated version which also has families playing for points instead of cash. Its ratings have quadrupled since Steve Harvey became host but the Fast Money prize of $20,000 remains unchanged. Fast Money losses are ''still'' $5 a point which has been the same since 1976.
* Parodied on ''Series/TheCheapShow'', a pseudo-game show created by Chris Bearde. The prizes were intentionally cheap (except in the bonus game), the set had a three-person panel but only two ever showed up, and host Dick Martin was referred as "the only man we can find who'll work this cheap".

to:

** Until 1992, families played for cash. With the introduction of the Bullseye Round, families played for points instead. Plus, the Fast Money prizes of $5,000 or $10,000 depending on the version (which were already cheap by early 90s standards) were replaced with base amounts of $2,500 or $5,000. The 1994 Bankroll version had this even worse worse, with the most families could play for being either $7,000 or $14,000.
** It's more blatant on the current syndicated version version, which also has families playing for points instead of cash. Its ratings have quadrupled since Steve Harvey became host host, but the Fast Money prize of $20,000 remains unchanged. unchanged since 2001. Fast Money losses are ''still'' $5 a point point, which has been the same since 1976.
1976. [[note]](The Ray Combs-hosted pilots from 1987 offered $10 a point, the only change outside of celebrity shows.)[[/note]]
* Parodied on ''Series/TheCheapShow'', a pseudo-game show created by Chris Bearde. The prizes were intentionally cheap (except in the bonus game), the set had a three-person celebrity panel but only two ever showed up, and host Dick Martin was referred introduced as "the only man we can find who'll work this cheap".



* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksilver_(Irish_TV_show) Quicksilver]]'' was an Irish quiz show that ran from TheSixties to TheEighties. Players competed for laughably small cash prizes, ranging from 2 pence to the [[SarcasmMode dizzying heights]] of ten pounds.

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* ''[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quicksilver_(Irish_TV_show) Quicksilver]]'' was an Irish quiz show that ran from TheSixties to TheEighties. Players competed for laughably small cash prizes, ranging from 2 pence to the [[SarcasmMode dizzying heights]] of ten pounds.£10.



* Letters and Numbers, the Australian version of ''Series/{{Countdown}}'', doesn't feature any celebrity guests and the prize for everyone is a Macquarie dictionary whether they lose the first round or win eight in a row.

to:

* Letters ''Letters and Numbers, Numbers'', the Australian version of ''Series/{{Countdown}}'', doesn't feature any celebrity guests and the prize for everyone is a Macquarie dictionary whether they lose the first round or win eight in a row.



* ''Series/{{Cops}}'', which is "filmed on-location with the men and women of law enforcement," as it says at the beginning of every show. The show is completely unscripted, mostly following around real police officers making routine arrests and talking to people. What little budget there is goes into the cameras and the editing.

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* ''Series/{{Cops}}'', which is "filmed on-location with the men and women of law enforcement," as it says at the beginning of every show. The show is completely unscripted, mostly following around because it follows real police officers making routine arrests and talking to people. What little budget there is goes into the cameras and the editing.



* In general, this applied to many shows on Creator/TheBBC in the 1960s-80s. As the ''[[YMMV/DoctorWho Doctor Who YMMV]]'' page puts it: "Creator/TheBBC was somewhat notorious for giving the set and costume designers of Series/DoctorWho a shoestring budget; that is, a bundle of shoe strings that they were expected to make fifteen monsters out of." Creator/TomBaker, who played the Fourth Doctor on ''Series/DoctorWho'', claimed that ''nobody'' liked the bad effects ''Doctor Who'' had during this period and you just bore with them. Anyone who says otherwise is looking through the [[NostalgiaFilter nostalgia-glasses]].

to:

* In general, this applied to many shows on Creator/TheBBC in the 1960s-80s. As the ''[[YMMV/DoctorWho Doctor Who YMMV]]'' [[YMMV/DoctorWho "Doctor Who" YMMV]] page puts it: "Creator/TheBBC was somewhat notorious for giving the set and costume designers of Series/DoctorWho ''Series/DoctorWho'' a shoestring budget; that is, a bundle of shoe strings that they were expected to make fifteen monsters out of." Creator/TomBaker, who played the Fourth Doctor on ''Series/DoctorWho'', Doctor, claimed that ''nobody'' liked the bad effects ''Doctor Who'' the show had during this period and you just bore with them. Anyone who says otherwise is looking through the [[NostalgiaFilter nostalgia-glasses]].



** Fans of many BBC shows have a common saying that goes similar to: BBC: 15 ACTORS, 8 PROPS, 3 SHOOTING AREAS, AND ONE STORYLINE

to:

** Fans of many BBC shows have a common saying that goes similar to: BBC: to "BBC: 15 ACTORS, 8 PROPS, 3 SHOOTING AREAS, AND ONE STORYLINESTORYLINE".



* ''Series/BlakesSeven'' was allocated the same budget by the BBC as the much cheaper show it was replacing. The per episode effects budget, for example, was £50. Expect to see plenty of sets, costumes, and props nicked from ''Series/DoctorWho'', or perhaps some baking tins stuck on the walls. The special effects designer spent his budget for the ''entire series'' on the first episode to be filmed, "Space Fall", because ''Franchise/StarWars'' was debuting at around the same time. The actual first episode, "The Way Back", went so far over budget it affected the rest of the season — and became one of the best stories in the series.

to:

* ''Series/BlakesSeven'' was allocated the same budget by the BBC as the much cheaper show it was replacing. The per episode per-episode effects budget, for example, was £50. Expect to see plenty of sets, costumes, and props nicked from ''Series/DoctorWho'', or perhaps some baking tins stuck on the walls. The special effects designer spent his budget for the ''entire series'' on the first episode to be filmed, "Space Fall", because ''Franchise/StarWars'' was debuting at around the same time. The actual first episode, "The Way Back", went so far over budget it affected the rest of the season — and became one of the best stories in the series.
26th Jun '16 6:10:24 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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Added DiffLines:

* The long-extinct [[Creator/DuMont DuMont]] network's programs were produced on low budgets due to their constant troubles as the perennial fourth place network. This resulted in shows with wobbly sets, improvised props (such as the "communicator" in ''Series/CaptainVideo'' made out of a regular telephone handset) and a soundtrack provided by just an electric organ. To be fair, they often made up for these deficiencies with good writing and excellent actors.
22nd Jun '16 4:03:05 PM TimBuckII
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** Mind you, the "homemade" look was entirely intentional, to pay homage to the low-budget films they riff on.
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