History Main / NoBiochemicalBarriers

3rd Feb '18 2:22:17 PM MCE
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''WesternAnimation/JimmyNeutron'' both follows and subverts this trope in the TV movie. The gang is transported to another planet to star on an intergalactic game show. The losing team gets their planet destroyed. One of the games played involves spinning a wheel and eating whatever it lands on. Carl spins the wheel and lands on a dish described as "gut chunks" by the host. He eats and rather enjoys them. The opposing team lands on a slice of Banana Cream pie. [[YourHeadAsplode Eating it doesn't have good results..]]

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''WesternAnimation/JimmyNeutron'' *''WesternAnimation/JimmyNeutron'' both follows and subverts this trope in the TV movie. The gang is transported to another planet to star on an intergalactic game show. The losing team gets their planet destroyed. One of the games played involves spinning a wheel and eating whatever it lands on. Carl spins the wheel and lands on a dish described as "gut chunks" by the host. He eats and rather enjoys them. The opposing team lands on a slice of Banana Cream pie. [[YourHeadAsplode Eating it doesn't have good results..]]
3rd Feb '18 10:22:03 AM PaladinOne
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* Played straight in ''VideoGame/SpaceEmpires''. Once researched, Plague Bombs and other forms of bio-weaponry will be equally effective against all races.


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* Played straight in ''VideoGame/SinsOfASolarEmpire''. Every planet that can be colonized, can be colonized by any player.
* Averted in ''VideoGame/SpaceEmpires''. Every species has both a planet type (rock/ice/gas giant) and an atmosphere (oxygen/nitrogen/hydrogen/ammonia/none) that they can live on/in. Researching the ability to colonize other planet types is possible, but attempting to colonize a planet with an inappropriate atmosphere results in the creation of a Dome Colony, with severe limits on maximum colony size and population. Furthermore, every planet has several properties that factor into habitability ratings for different species, which affects population happiness and growth and [immi/emi]gration rates.
25th Jan '18 9:03:48 AM Fury1031
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-->'''[[GenreSavvy Guy]]''': What're you doing! We're on an alien planet! Is there AIR? You don't know!

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-->'''[[GenreSavvy Guy]]''': What're you doing! We're on Hey, don't open that! It's an alien planet! Is there AIR? You don't know!
24th Jan '18 2:38:45 PM calumapplepie
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* Both Justified and Downplayed in ''Literature/EncounterWithTiber'', as the aliens ability to eat human food is limited in that while they can gain some nutrition, they get [[spoiler: poisoned by what they cannot digest.]]



* In Robert Zubrin's ''First Landing'', lots of people on Earth start worrying about this after the protagonists announce their discovery of microscopic Martian life. One of the astronauts radios a response back, giving the exact reason why it ''wouldn't'' happen -- not coincidentally, she almost word-for-word quotes Zubrin's earlier nonfiction ''The Case for Mars''. (The novel was mainly meant to promote the ideas in ''[=TCfM=]''.)

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* In ''Literature/EncounterWithTiber'', its averted, with Tiberians being too different for earth organisms to attack them.
* In Robert Zubrin's ''First Landing'', lots of people on Earth start worrying about this after the protagonists announce their discovery of microscopic Martian life. One of the astronauts astronaut's radios a response back, giving the exact reason why it ''wouldn't'' happen -- not coincidentally, she almost word-for-word quotes Zubrin's earlier nonfiction ''The Case for Mars''. (The novel was mainly meant to promote the ideas in ''[=TCfM=]''.)


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* Hand Waved in ''Literature/EncounterWithTiber'' with Earth having a "tiber-like" atmosphere
16th Jan '18 9:30:17 AM Sharlee
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* Extremes of humidity found naturally in some of Earth's biomes can be fatal to species that aren't adapted to them. Wetland or jungle plants in particular can expire from desiccation if exposed to dry air for very long, and arid-climate plants can literally start rotting alive if subjected to excessive water vapor. Animals fare a bit better, but many may become dehydrated by breathing too-dry air, or have difficulty regulating their body temperatures if the atmosphere is too damp.

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* Extremes of humidity found naturally in some of Earth's biomes can be fatal to species that aren't adapted to them. Wetland or jungle plants in particular can expire from desiccation if exposed to dry air for very long, and arid-climate plants can literally start rotting alive if subjected to excessive water vapor. Animals fare a bit better, but many may become dehydrated by breathing too-dry air, or have difficulty regulating their body temperatures and fighting off skin infections if the atmosphere is too damp.
16th Jan '18 9:29:39 AM Sharlee
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* Extremes of humidity found naturally in some of Earth's biomes can be fatal to species that aren't adapted to them. Wetland or jungle plants in particular can expire from desiccation if exposed to dry air for very long, and arid-climate plants can literally start rotting alive if subjected to excessive water vapor.

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* Extremes of humidity found naturally in some of Earth's biomes can be fatal to species that aren't adapted to them. Wetland or jungle plants in particular can expire from desiccation if exposed to dry air for very long, and arid-climate plants can literally start rotting alive if subjected to excessive water vapor. Animals fare a bit better, but many may become dehydrated by breathing too-dry air, or have difficulty regulating their body temperatures if the atmosphere is too damp.
16th Jan '18 9:27:00 AM Sharlee
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* Extremes of humidity found naturally in some of Earth's biomes can be fatal to species that aren't adapted to them. Wetland or jungle plants in particular can expire from desiccation if exposed to dry air for very long, and arid-climate plants can literally start rotting alive if subjected to excessive water vapor.
16th Jan '18 9:21:06 AM Sharlee
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* Fish, squid, etc. can extract oxygen from water just fine, while humans and any other animal with lungs can't and will drown. On the flipside, dry/collapsed gills cannot function. And they dry very fast. There are species of fish that can survive prolonged exposure to air, and just a slight chemical difference in the water can kill an organism with gills. And never transplant a saltwater fish to a freshwater, or vice versa. Unless it's a salmon, and they can't move directly from salt water to fresh water or vice versa; they need time in an area that is a mix of the two. Ditto for eels.
* Humans can tolerate all kinds of pressure and gas differences, as long as whatever we're breathing contains an approximate partial pressure of 3.0 psi oxygen. Heliox (helium-oxygen mix, containing no nitrogen at all) has long been popular with technical divers at extreme depths, as the lack of nitrogen removes one possible avenue for pressure toxicities. On the other hand, oxygen toxicity becomes a real problem at those kinds of depths, so you have to carry multiple mixes, in separate bottles with separate breathing rigs. And God Himself can't save you if you breathe from the green bottle (100% oxygen) at deeper than about 20 feet of salt water.

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* Fish, squid, etc. can extract oxygen from water just fine, while humans and any other animal with dependent upon lungs can't and will drown. On the flipside, dry/collapsed gills cannot function. And they dry very fast. There are species of fish that can survive prolonged exposure to air, and but only by keeping their gills moist and/or using their swim bladders as lungs. Additionally, just a slight chemical difference in the water can kill an organism with gills. And never transplant a saltwater fish to a freshwater, or vice versa. Unless it's a salmon, and they can't move directly from salt water to fresh water or vice versa; they need time in an area that is a mix of the two. Ditto for eels.
* Humans can tolerate all kinds of pressure and gas differences, as long as whatever we're breathing contains an approximate partial pressure of 3.0 psi oxygen.oxygen and is devoid of active toxins. Heliox (helium-oxygen mix, containing no nitrogen at all) has long been popular with technical divers at extreme depths, as the lack of nitrogen removes one possible avenue for pressure toxicities. On the other hand, oxygen toxicity becomes a real problem at those kinds of depths, so you have to carry multiple mixes, in separate bottles with separate breathing rigs. And God Himself can't save you if you breathe from the green bottle (100% oxygen) at deeper than about 20 feet of salt water.



* Approximately 2.6 billion years ago, the oxygen molecule was poisonous to all life on Earth, save a few microorganisms that invented aerobic respiration to use the tiny amounts generated by UV diffraction at the ocean's surface. Then a new way to extract energy from the environment appeared which we now call "photosynthesis" which transforms carbon dioxide and water into sugar and oxygen. Over a period of roughly 200 million years, the cyanobacteria that produced oxygen became more successful, killing off almost everything that could not adapt to its effects. Rightfully so, scientists called this event the Oxygen Catastrophe. Nowadays, lots of Earth life depends on oxygen to survive, but anaerobic microbes are still kicking around in sheltered micro-biomes - such as your gut. There are also some microbes that cannot do anything useful with oxygen but don't get killed by it.

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* Approximately 2.6 billion years ago, the oxygen molecule was poisonous to all life on Earth, save a few microorganisms that invented aerobic respiration to use the tiny amounts generated by UV diffraction at the ocean's surface. Then a new way to extract energy from the environment appeared which we now call "photosynthesis" "photosynthesis", which transforms carbon dioxide and water into sugar and oxygen. Over a period of roughly 200 million years, the cyanobacteria that produced oxygen became more successful, killing off almost everything that could not adapt to its this "toxic waste product"'s effects. Rightfully so, scientists called this event the Oxygen Catastrophe. Nowadays, lots of Earth life depends on oxygen to survive, but anaerobic microbes are still kicking around in sheltered micro-biomes - such as your gut. There are also some microbes that cannot do anything useful with oxygen but don't get killed by it.
16th Jan '18 9:15:11 AM Sharlee
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* For about 60 million years during the Carboniferous, it's believed that there weren't any decomposers on Earth capable of breaking down lignin: a key structural component of plants' supportive tissues. This meant that dead stems and twigs didn't rot on the surface, but became buried over time and gradually converted into coal beds. Only when fungi and bacteria developed the capacity to catabolize lignin did the carbon in tough plant parts start returning to the biosphere as it does today.
15th Jan '18 11:55:06 AM Divra
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** Similarly, one compound found in a gland in ''coll'' fish, which is lethally poisonous to Mardukans, turns out to be a precursor to several vitamins (not quite the same, but similar enough for a milspec nanite package to work with).
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