History Main / NinetiesAntihero

25th Apr '17 4:27:08 PM Kadorhal
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* ComicBook/HolyTerror: As one of the individuals who influenced the Dark Age of Comics, it was the natural evolution of Creator/FrankMiller that he would eventually create a Dark Age Anti-Hero of his own in the form of "The Fixer". He is a BloodKnight so [[AxCrazy psychopathic]] that even the darkest iterations of Batman (of which he is a CaptainErsatz), including even those by Miller himself, would seem saintly by comparison. This is demonstrated with The Fixer's slaughter of the Al-Qaeda cell [[spoiler:in the underground of Empire City]] with a multitude of guns, ranging from pistols to bazookas, as well as a chemical weapon of some sort ([[MoralEventHorizon and yes, you read correctly]]). Granted, while the setting tries to justify his methods in that he is fighting a Terrorist group who is orchestrating an act of war rather than the typical mobsters and other criminals that would be the purview of the Justice system to try and punish,[[note]] (and to what extent should either the military and/or law enforcement be involved in addressing terrorism is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment another matter of debate]]).

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* ComicBook/HolyTerror: As one of the individuals who influenced the Dark Age of Comics, it was the natural evolution of Creator/FrankMiller that he would eventually create a Dark Age Anti-Hero of his own in the form of "The Fixer". He is a BloodKnight so [[AxCrazy psychopathic]] that even the darkest iterations of Batman (of which he is a CaptainErsatz), including even those by Miller himself, would seem saintly by comparison. This is demonstrated with The Fixer's slaughter of the Al-Qaeda cell [[spoiler:in the underground of Empire City]] with a multitude of guns, ranging from pistols to bazookas, as well as a chemical weapon of some sort ([[MoralEventHorizon and yes, you read correctly]]). Granted, while the setting tries to justify his methods in that he is fighting a Terrorist terrorist group who is orchestrating an act of war war, rather than the typical mobsters and other criminals that would be the purview of the Justice justice system to try and punish,[[note]] (and punish[[note]]and to what extent should either the military and/or law enforcement should be involved in addressing terrorism is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment another matter of debate]]).debate]][[/note]].
22nd Apr '17 11:45:11 PM BattleMaster
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* Renegade!Shepard in the ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series: a ruthless and pragmatic person, willing to take the morally grey (or outright black) actions to get the job done. Basically, s/he is out to save the galaxy, but doesn't much care who or what s/he tramples to get there. Some of the Renegade choices available (particularly in [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]]) can paint Ren!Shep as uncaring, incredibly xenophobic and a human supremacist with near sociopathic levels of disregard towards others.

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* Renegade!Shepard in the ''Franchise/MassEffect'' series: a ruthless and pragmatic person, willing to take the morally grey (or outright black) actions to get the job done. Basically, s/he is out to save the galaxy, but doesn't much care who or what s/he tramples to get there. Some of the Renegade choices available (particularly in [[VideoGame/MassEffect1 the first game]]) can paint Ren!Shep as uncaring, incredibly xenophobic and a human supremacist with near sociopathic levels of disregard towards others.others while others can come across as simply being StupidEvil by having obvious repercussions that hurt your ability to fight the Reapers.
14th Apr '17 2:31:01 PM Rubber_Lotus
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Added DiffLines:

* By late '94, the ''ComicBook/WonderWoman'' office had [[FollowTheLeader decided]] they ''also'' wanted in on that action. Enter Artemis of Bana-Mighdall, the [[TokenHeroicOrc kindest and most open-minded member]] of a splinter tribe of Amazons... which meant she was ''still'' a HotBlooded {{Jerkass}} several magnitudes more violent than Diana on her worst day. Artemis' tenure as Diana's AntiHeroSubstitute was a lot shorter, lasting only about six issues (and a handful of cameos in Justice League titles and the like) before she was killed off. A while later, she was resurrected, become a part-time demon slayer, and ultimately mellowed out into a regular member of Diana's supporting cast.
22nd Mar '17 5:17:33 PM Delphi
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[[caption-width-right:350:Everything that was wrong with [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks comics in the '90s]] in one cover.[[labelnote:From the top:]] Title (if you can read it) includes "Blood"; Improbable blade; Torn cape; Wolverine knock-off mask that frames face; [[EyesAlwaysShut Youngblood's]] [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall disease]]; Gritted teeth; Improbable anatomy; Improbable muscles; [[HandCannon Improbably huge and just plain improbable gun]]; Lots of pouches; Huge boots; Artist's signature on rubble.[[/labelnote]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Everything that was wrong with [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks comics in the '90s]] in one cover.[[labelnote:From the top:]] Title (if you can read it) includes "Blood"; Improbable blade; Torn cape; Wolverine knock-off mask that frames face; [[EyesAlwaysShut Youngblood's]] [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall disease]]; Gritted teeth; Improbable anatomy; Improbable muscles; [[HandCannon Improbably huge and just plain improbable gun]]; Lots of pouches; Huge boots; [[ArsonMurderAndJaywalking Artist's signature on rubble.[[/labelnote]]]]
]][[/labelnote]]]]
10th Mar '17 12:16:50 AM rafi
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[[folder:{{Anime}} And {{Manga}}]]
* Guts from ''{{Manga/Berserk}}'', who debuted with the publication of the manga in 1990, has almost all the characteristics of a nineties anti-hero. He has a [[DarkAgeOfSupernames gritty but simple name]], is [[AnArmAndALeg missing an arm and an eye]], [[HeroicBuild has ridiculous muscles]] but [[CombatPragmatist relies on his lethal equipment instead of superpowers]], wears a black costume with lots of [[BadassBandolier bags and bandoliers]], is a badass with a DarkAndTroubledPast and [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]] to boot, and uses a ludicrous {{BFS}} as his main weapon. During the early Black Swordsman Arc he tells Puck that he doesn't care about anything except {{Revenge}}, considering any bystanders who get caught up in his vengeance as [[TheSocialDarwinist weaklings who didn't deserve to live]], and he [[ColdBloodedTorture brutally tortures]] any villains he defeats. In spite of all this he turns out to be something of an UnbuiltTrope example, or at least a more subtle one, as the state we first see him in is when he's at his very worst and using a JerkassFacade to hide from his pain. He goes through several shades of AntiHero through his CharacterDevelopment, but always has some redeeming qualities such as loyalty to his friends and sympathy for those who have suffered like he has.

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[[folder:{{Anime}} And {{Manga}}]]
[[folder: Anime and Manga]]
* Guts from ''{{Manga/Berserk}}'', ''Manga/{{Berserk}}'', who debuted with the publication of the manga in 1990, has almost all the characteristics of a nineties anti-hero. He has a [[DarkAgeOfSupernames gritty but simple name]], is [[AnArmAndALeg missing an arm and an eye]], [[HeroicBuild has ridiculous muscles]] but [[CombatPragmatist relies on his lethal equipment instead of superpowers]], wears a black costume with lots of [[BadassBandolier bags and bandoliers]], is a badass with a DarkAndTroubledPast and [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]] to boot, and uses a ludicrous {{BFS}} as his main weapon. During the early Black Swordsman Arc he tells Puck that he doesn't care about anything except {{Revenge}}, considering any bystanders who get caught up in his vengeance as [[TheSocialDarwinist weaklings who didn't deserve to live]], and he [[ColdBloodedTorture brutally tortures]] any villains he defeats. In spite of all this he turns out to be something of an UnbuiltTrope example, or at least a more subtle one, as the state we first see him in is when he's at his very worst and using a JerkassFacade to hide from his pain. He goes through several shades of AntiHero through his CharacterDevelopment, but always has some redeeming qualities such as loyalty to his friends and sympathy for those who have suffered like he has.



* [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 Fon Spaak]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDCE73Stargazer Sven Cal Bayan]] from Franchise/{{Gundam}} have a very strong Nineties Anti-Hero vibe to them. They are both savage and brutal Gundam pilots with a sadistic streak. They are a contrast to characters like Setsuna F Seiei and Kira Yamato.



* This is a common criticism of [[Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure Jotaro Kujo]], the protagonist of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStardustCrusaders''. He's a [[TheStoic stoic]], aloof badass who delivers one-liners and punches his enemies senseless. However, his edgier traits are toned down in later parts of ''[=JoJo=]'', coming off as more of a BigBrotherMentor in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond is Unbreakable]]'' and being given a DeconReconSwitch as a flawed but well-meaning father in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStoneOcean Stone Ocean]]''.



* Fon Spaak from ''Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 '' and Sven Cal Bayan from ''Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDCE73Stargazer'' have a very strong Nineties Anti-Hero vibe to them. They are both savage and brutal Gundam pilots with a sadistic streak. They are a contrast to characters like Setsuna F Seiei and Kira Yamato.



* The Anarchy Sisters of ''Anime/PantyAndStockingWithGarterbelt'' are crude and [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] {{Fallen Angel}}s who spend most of their time lazing around, indulging in their own vices, or acting as the sex symbols of Daten City. They have simple yet cool names, with their first names representing where their hyper-destructive weapons come from, and their surname pretty much summing up [[DestructiveSavior what they cause]]. They don't care about what lengths they go to in order to achieve their goals, and to top it off, their designs are heavily inspired by nineties cartoons.



* This is a common criticism of [[Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure Jotaro Kujo]], the protagonist of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStardustCrusaders''. He's a [[TheStoic stoic]], aloof badass who delivers one-liners and punches his enemies senseless. However, his edgier traits are toned down in later parts of ''[=JoJo=]'', coming off as more of a BigBrotherMentor in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond is Unbreakable]]'' and being given a DeconReconSwitch as a flawed but well-meaning father in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStoneOcean Stone Ocean]]''.



* The Anarchy Sisters of ''Anime/PantyAndStockingWithGarterbelt'' are crude and [[DeadpanSnarker snarky]] {{Fallen Angel}}s who spend most of their time lazing around, indulging in their own vices, or acting as the sex symbols of Daten City. They have simple yet cool names, with their first names representing where their hyper-destructive weapons come from, and their surname pretty much summing up [[DestructiveSavior what they cause]]. They don't care about what lengths they go to in order to achieve their goals, and to top it off, their designs are heavily inspired by nineties cartoons.
27th Feb '17 6:51:51 AM Vir
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* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainSturdy'', a {{Pilot}} for a proposed series that aired as part of WesternAnimation/WhatACartoon, presents an subversion and parody of this archetype. The eponymous character, an aging Silver Age era superhero, watches as a Nineties anti-hero type character demonstrates how a hero should approach criminals, but then threatens to tear off a hypothetical criminals arms. When the character is told "what if he has no arms?", the hero then does a 180 and [[StrawmanEmotional begins to mope about the hypothetical criminal's]] [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth misfortunates]]. Captain Sturdy already didn't have a high opinion of the Nineties anti-hero character, but after this he especially became disillusioned with how the Union of Super Heroes are [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad more concerned about avoiding offending people than doing what is necessary and pragmatic for the common good]].
* ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' became one of these in an alternate future where Gosalyn disappeared (because she had been sucked through time into that alternate future). He might've been this earlier on, but by the time Gosalyn ran into him he had long ago [[JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope crossed the line]] and was solidly in the KnightTemplar category.

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* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainSturdy'', ''Captain Sturdy'', a {{Pilot}} {{pilot}} for a proposed series that aired as part of WesternAnimation/WhatACartoon, ''WesternAnimation/WhatACartoon'', presents an a subversion and parody of this archetype. The eponymous character, an aging Silver Age era superhero, watches as a Nineties nineties anti-hero type character demonstrates how a hero should approach criminals, but then threatens to tear off a hypothetical criminals criminal's arms. When the character is told "what if he has no arms?", the hero then does a 180 and [[StrawmanEmotional begins to mope about the hypothetical criminal's]] [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth misfortunates]]. Captain Sturdy already didn't have a high opinion of the Nineties nineties anti-hero character, but after this he especially became disillusioned with how the Union of Super Heroes are [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad more concerned about avoiding offending people than doing what is necessary and pragmatic for the common good]].
* ''WesternAnimation/DarkwingDuck'' became one of these in an alternate future where Gosalyn disappeared (because she had been sucked through time into that alternate future). He might've been this earlier on, but by the time Gosalyn ran into him he had long ago [[JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope crossed the line]] and was solidly in the KnightTemplar category.



* The Pack was an [[ShowWithinAShow (in-universe) live action]] example in ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}''. The actors eventually turned into supervillains through a series of literal {{Xanatos Gambit}}s, complete with actual powers and an even more Dark-Age-ish look.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee'' also spoofed it with Boomfist, who battles an idiot MadScientist in a futuristic CrapsackWorld and delivers {{family unfriendly Aesop}}s. Although he does respect Juniper's abilities and [[spoiler: makes a HeroicSacrifice]].
* The eponymous WesternAnimation/MajorLazer certainly has elements of this - bonus points for his BFG being a literal ArmCannon.
* When the ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' briefly decide to split up as separate superheroines, with Blossom taking on a WonderWoman-ish persona and Bubbles dressing up as a cute bunny girl, the sullen and quick-tempered Buttercup reinvents herself as "Mange", a [[ComicBook/{{Spawn}} brooding, shadowy character with glowing green eyes]] who only emerges at night. Unfortunately for Townsville, this means she has to wait until nightfall to stop a monster attack in the middle of the day: she spends the hours beforehand just brooding awkwardly in the living room. Or watching TV, that part was never quite clear.

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* The Pack was an [[ShowWithinAShow (in-universe) live action]] live-action]] example in ''WesternAnimation/{{Gargoyles}}''. The actors eventually turned into supervillains through a series of literal {{Xanatos Gambit}}s, complete with actual powers and an even more Dark-Age-ish look.
* ''WesternAnimation/TheLifeAndTimesOfJuniperLee'' also spoofed it with Boomfist, who battles an idiot MadScientist in a futuristic CrapsackWorld and delivers {{family unfriendly Aesop}}s.[[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop Family-Unfriendly Aesops]]. Although he does respect Juniper's abilities and [[spoiler: makes a HeroicSacrifice]].
* The eponymous WesternAnimation/MajorLazer certainly has elements of this - bonus points for his BFG {{BFG}} being a literal ArmCannon.
* When the ''WesternAnimation/ThePowerpuffGirls'' briefly decide to split up as separate superheroines, with Blossom taking on a WonderWoman-ish Franchise/WonderWoman-ish persona and Bubbles dressing up as a cute bunny girl, the sullen and quick-tempered Buttercup reinvents herself as "Mange", a [[ComicBook/{{Spawn}} brooding, shadowy character with glowing green eyes]] who only emerges at night. Unfortunately for Townsville, this means she has to wait until nightfall to stop a monster attack in the middle of the day: she spends the hours beforehand just brooding awkwardly in the living room. Or watching TV, that part was never quite clear.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheTick'': Spoofed with Big Shot, a [[ComicBook/ThePunisher Punisher-esque]] character who shoots up inanimate objects [[BerserkerTears while tears run down his face]]. After running out of bullets, he says [[FreudianExcuse "Why didn't you love me, Mom?"]] and collapses, sobbing, on Arthur. He's someone so obviously messed-up that the Tick tells him to 'seek professional help'-- the ''[[CaptainOblivious Tick]]''! When next seen in "The Tick vs. The Tick," after Big Shot has done so, he's relatively well-adjusted and tries to convince the Tick and Barry to discuss their problems rationally. With emphasis on 'relatively' well adjusted. He starts foaming at the mouth when he mentions how he used to solve all his problems with... ''violence'', and gives a rather, um, ''passionate'' outcry for Barry to "put it in the happy box!". In his final appearance in the show on "The Tick vs. Neil and Dot's Wedding", Big Shot goes on a shooting spree... With a camera, having channelled his enthusiasm for firearms into flash photography.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheTick'': Spoofed with Big Shot, a [[ComicBook/ThePunisher Punisher-esque]] character who shoots up inanimate objects [[BerserkerTears while tears run down his face]]. After running out of bullets, he says [[FreudianExcuse "Why didn't you love me, Mom?"]] and collapses, sobbing, on Arthur. He's someone so obviously messed-up that the Tick tells him to 'seek professional help'-- the ''[[CaptainOblivious Tick]]''! When next seen in "The Tick vs. The Tick," after Big Shot has done so, he's relatively well-adjusted and tries to convince the Tick and Barry to discuss their problems rationally. With emphasis on 'relatively' well adjusted.well-adjusted. He starts foaming at the mouth when he mentions how he used to solve all his problems with... ''violence'', and gives a rather, um, ''passionate'' outcry for Barry to "put it in the happy box!". In his final appearance in the show on "The Tick vs. Neil and Dot's Wedding", Big Shot goes on a shooting spree... With a camera, having channelled his enthusiasm for firearms into flash photography.
27th Feb '17 6:15:26 AM Vir
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* Spoofed in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'', where Timmy called upon the help of several [[EraSpecificPersonality different versions of the Crimson Chin]] to defeat an escaped supervillain, including a bandoleer-wearing, gun-toting "edgy" version of the Chin from the eighties. He was apparently the only version that ever got away with profanity, but was canceled because of it anyway. Interestingly, the ''actual'' nineties Chin subverts is depicted as more of a [[Music/{{Grunge}} Grunge]] [[FadSuper rocker]].

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* Spoofed in an episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheFairlyOddParents'', where Timmy called upon the help of several [[EraSpecificPersonality different versions of the Crimson Chin]] to defeat an escaped supervillain, including a bandoleer-wearing, gun-toting "edgy" version of the Chin from the eighties. He was apparently the only version that ever got away with profanity, but was canceled because of it anyway. Interestingly, the ''actual'' nineties Chin subverts is depicted as more of a [[Music/{{Grunge}} Grunge]] {{grunge}} [[FadSuper rocker]].
19th Feb '17 4:23:04 PM 64SuperNintendo
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** An especial mention should be should be made for Impmon from ''Anime/DigimonTamers'' while he is roaming across the Digital World as his Mega-digivolved form Beelzemon. As Beelzemon, he is a psychotic, shotgun wielding, demonic looking BadassBiker who seeks nothing less than to gain as much power as possible by way of [[TheSocialDarwinist destroying and absorbing the data of other Digimon he has killed]], even one of whom, [[spoiler: Leomon]], is a friend of his associates and then gloat about this act of murder to their faces. Though he is also a deconstruction in that Impmon [[DealWithTheDevil chose to become this]] after having been a [[FreudianExcuse powerless loner his whole life who badly wanted to fulfill his desire for self worth]] especially [[DespairEventHorizon after almost being killed in one fight]]. [[spoiler: He also gets to subvert this trope when after Gallantmon, who, by the logic Beelzemon was going by at the time, had a right to kill him for being beaten, spares him at the request of Jeri, whose partner, Leomon, he had killed prior and goes on a HeelRealization. Impmon returns to the Human world, meets his Tamers Ai and Mako, and eventually manages to gain "this thing called a conscious". Impmon [[LoveRedeems by way of the love of his tamers]] thus learns that [[RousseauWasRight all humans aren't the monstrous beings he first believed]]. He gets to even earn a RedemptionPromotion when he achieves Beelzemon Blast Mode. This subversion of the Nineties Anti Hero trope even gets lampshaded in the dub when he states "Havin' someone to fight for feels pretty good; who knew?"]]

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** An especial mention should be should be made for Impmon from ''Anime/DigimonTamers'' while he is roaming across the Digital World as his Mega-digivolved form Beelzemon. As Beelzemon, he is a psychotic, shotgun wielding, demonic looking BadassBiker who seeks nothing less than to gain as much power as possible by way of [[TheSocialDarwinist destroying and absorbing the data of other Digimon he has killed]], even one of whom, [[spoiler: Leomon]], is a friend of his associates and then gloat about this act of murder to their faces. Though he is also a deconstruction in that Impmon [[DealWithTheDevil chose to become this]] after having been a [[FreudianExcuse powerless loner his whole life who badly wanted to fulfill his desire for self worth]] especially [[DespairEventHorizon after almost being killed in one fight]]. [[spoiler: He also gets to subvert this trope when after Gallantmon, who, by the logic Beelzemon was going by at the time, had a right to kill him for being beaten, spares him at the request of Jeri, whose partner, Leomon, he had killed prior and goes on a HeelRealization. Impmon returns to the Human world, meets his Tamers Ai and Mako, and eventually manages to gain "this thing called a conscious". Impmon [[LoveRedeems by way of the love of his tamers]] thus learns that [[RousseauWasRight all humans aren't the monstrous beings he first believed]]. He gets to even earn a RedemptionPromotion when he achieves Beelzemon Blast Mode. This subversion of the Nineties Anti Hero Anti-Hero trope even gets lampshaded in the dub when he states "Havin' someone to fight for feels pretty good; who knew?"]]



* [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 Fon Spaak]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDCE73Stargazer Sven Cal Bayan]] from Franchise/{{Gundam}} have a very strong Nineties Anti Hero vibe to them. They are both savage and brutal Gundam pilots with a sadistic streak. They are a contrast to characters like Setsuna F Seiei and Kira Yamato.

to:

* [[Anime/MobileSuitGundam00 Fon Spaak]] and [[Anime/MobileSuitGundamSEEDCE73Stargazer Sven Cal Bayan]] from Franchise/{{Gundam}} have a very strong Nineties Anti Hero Anti-Hero vibe to them. They are both savage and brutal Gundam pilots with a sadistic streak. They are a contrast to characters like Setsuna F Seiei and Kira Yamato.



* The second-tier Marvel superheroes ''ComicBook/DarkHawk'' and ''ComicBook/{{Sleepwalker}}'', both of whom had their heyday in the early 1990s, are downplayed examples of this trope. While they have strange and bizarre appearances, neither one was especially dark in their tone, at least compared to titles like ''Spawn'', or the other characters that exemplify the Nineties Anti Hero.\\

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* The second-tier Marvel superheroes ''ComicBook/DarkHawk'' and ''ComicBook/{{Sleepwalker}}'', both of whom had their heyday in the early 1990s, are downplayed examples of this trope. While they have strange and bizarre appearances, neither one was especially dark in their tone, at least compared to titles like ''Spawn'', or the other characters that exemplify the Nineties Anti Hero.Anti-Hero.\\



* ValiantComics had a number of Nineties Anti Heroes.

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* ValiantComics had a number of Nineties Anti Heroes.Anti-Heroes.



* The ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comic introduced a full-blown Nineties Anti Hero to the ''Doctor Who'' universe in the shape of Abslom Daak, Dalek Killer. He's a "[[ChainsawGood chainsword]]"-loving professional criminal and multiple murderer who was exiled by a future Earth society to a Dalek-occupied world to kill as many Daleks as possible before his inevitable death (although he turned out to be badass enough to survive). Of course, he first appeared in 1980 and in some ways was a deconstruction, so could be considered an UnbuiltTrope.

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* The ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comic introduced a full-blown Nineties Anti Hero Anti-Hero to the ''Doctor Who'' universe in the shape of Abslom Daak, Dalek Killer. He's a "[[ChainsawGood chainsword]]"-loving professional criminal and multiple murderer who was exiled by a future Earth society to a Dalek-occupied world to kill as many Daleks as possible before his inevitable death (although he turned out to be badass enough to survive). Of course, he first appeared in 1980 and in some ways was a deconstruction, so could be considered an UnbuiltTrope.



* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'', by Mark Waid and Alex Ross, was in part a savage denouncement of Nineties Anti Heroes, and was one of the things that caused the changeover from UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}} to the ModernAge. One of the themes of the comic was the classic generation of superheroes fighting the violent "modern" heroes. Of course, the "classic" heroes shared some of the blame as well; many became just-as-violent {{Knight Templar}}s attempting to deal with it. The "face" of the anti-heroes, Magog, is practically every [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age]] stereotype rolled into one cybernetic, sacrilegious package (though Waid and Ross admitted a certain fondness for him due to how over-the-top he was). [[spoiler:In a brilliant twist of idealism, Magog realizes how screwed up he is, turns himself in, renounces violence, and is one of the people left alive at the end; in the prose novelization of the story, he becomes the Dean of Students at Paradise Island!]]

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* ''ComicBook/KingdomCome'', by Mark Waid and Alex Ross, was in part a savage denouncement of Nineties Anti Heroes, Anti-Heroes, and was one of the things that caused the changeover from UsefulNotes/{{the Dark Age|of Comic Books}} to the ModernAge. One of the themes of the comic was the classic generation of superheroes fighting the violent "modern" heroes. Of course, the "classic" heroes shared some of the blame as well; many became just-as-violent {{Knight Templar}}s attempting to deal with it. The "face" of the anti-heroes, Magog, is practically every [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks Dark Age]] stereotype rolled into one cybernetic, sacrilegious package (though Waid and Ross admitted a certain fondness for him due to how over-the-top he was). [[spoiler:In a brilliant twist of idealism, Magog realizes how screwed up he is, turns himself in, renounces violence, and is one of the people left alive at the end; in the prose novelization of the story, he becomes the Dean of Students at Paradise Island!]]



* Likewise, in Franchise/TheDCU, Jason Todd (Batman's second Robin) has been a Nineties Anti Hero type ever since he came BackFromTheDead. Amusingly, he was absent for the entire decade.

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* Likewise, in Franchise/TheDCU, Jason Todd (Batman's second Robin) has been a Nineties Anti Hero Anti-Hero type ever since he came BackFromTheDead. Amusingly, he was absent for the entire decade.



* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainSturdy'', a {{Pilot}} for a proposed series that aired as part of WesternAnimation/WhatACartoon, presents an subversion and parody of this archetype. The eponymous character, an aging Silver Age era superhero, watches as a Nineties anti hero type character demonstrates how a hero should approach criminals, but then threatens to tear off a hypothetical criminals arms. When the character is told "what if he has no arms?", the hero then does a 180 and [[StrawmanEmotional begins to mope about the hypothetical criminal's]] [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth misfortunates]]. Captain Sturdy already didn't have a high opinion of the Nineties anti hero character, but after this he especially became disillusioned with how the Union of Super Heroes are [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad more concerned about avoiding offending people than doing what is necessary and pragmatic for the common good]].

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainSturdy'', a {{Pilot}} for a proposed series that aired as part of WesternAnimation/WhatACartoon, presents an subversion and parody of this archetype. The eponymous character, an aging Silver Age era superhero, watches as a Nineties anti hero anti-hero type character demonstrates how a hero should approach criminals, but then threatens to tear off a hypothetical criminals arms. When the character is told "what if he has no arms?", the hero then does a 180 and [[StrawmanEmotional begins to mope about the hypothetical criminal's]] [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth misfortunates]]. Captain Sturdy already didn't have a high opinion of the Nineties anti hero anti-hero character, but after this he especially became disillusioned with how the Union of Super Heroes are [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad more concerned about avoiding offending people than doing what is necessary and pragmatic for the common good]].
8th Feb '17 8:42:07 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainSturdy'', a {{Pilot}} for a proposed series that aired as part of WhatACartoon, presents an subversion and parody of this archetype. The eponymous character, an aging Silver Age era superhero, watches as a Nineties anti hero type character demonstrates how a hero should approach criminals, but then threatens to tear off a hypothetical criminals arms. When the character is told "what if he has no arms?", the hero then does a 180 and [[StrawmanEmotional begins to mope about the hypothetical criminal's]] [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth misfortunates]]. Captain Sturdy already didn't have a high opinion of the Nineties anti hero character, but after this he especially became disillusioned with how the Union of Super Heroes are [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad more concerned about avoiding offending people than doing what is necessary and pragmatic for the common good]].

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/CaptainSturdy'', a {{Pilot}} for a proposed series that aired as part of WhatACartoon, WesternAnimation/WhatACartoon, presents an subversion and parody of this archetype. The eponymous character, an aging Silver Age era superhero, watches as a Nineties anti hero type character demonstrates how a hero should approach criminals, but then threatens to tear off a hypothetical criminals arms. When the character is told "what if he has no arms?", the hero then does a 180 and [[StrawmanEmotional begins to mope about the hypothetical criminal's]] [[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth misfortunates]]. Captain Sturdy already didn't have a high opinion of the Nineties anti hero character, but after this he especially became disillusioned with how the Union of Super Heroes are [[PoliticalCorrectnessGoneMad more concerned about avoiding offending people than doing what is necessary and pragmatic for the common good]].
3rd Feb '17 2:04:39 AM LondonKdS
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Female Nineties Anti-Heroes, like [[MostCommonSuperpower most]] female superheroes, have large breasts and small waists, but ''unlike'' most female superheroes, this is often taken to disfiguring extremes. They don't tend to [[{{Stripperiffic}} wear very much clothing]] (or if they do, it'll be typical superheroic [[PaintedOnPants barely-there "spandex"]] which showcases their exaggerated/inaccurate anatomy). But [[SuperheroesWearTights they still usually wear tights]] in some form. The ultimate extreme of the female version was the "bad girl" subgenre, featuring ludicrously buxom, near-naked {{Dark Action Girl}}s, generally with some kind of supernatural nature or origin, hacking and pouting their way through plots designed solely to offer as much {{Gorn}} and FanService as possible.

to:

Female Nineties Anti-Heroes, like [[MostCommonSuperpower most]] female superheroes, have large breasts and small waists, but ''unlike'' most female superheroes, this is often taken to disfiguring extremes. They don't tend to [[{{Stripperiffic}} wear very much clothing]] (or if they do, it'll be typical superheroic [[PaintedOnPants barely-there "spandex"]] which showcases their exaggerated/inaccurate anatomy). But [[SuperheroesWearTights they still usually wear tights]] in some form. The ultimate extreme of the female version was the "bad girl" "BadGirlComic" subgenre, featuring ludicrously buxom, near-naked {{Dark Action Girl}}s, generally with some kind of supernatural nature or origin, hacking and pouting their way through plots designed solely to offer as much {{Gorn}} and FanService as possible.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NinetiesAntihero