History Main / NinetiesAntihero

6th Jan '17 8:10:32 AM Basara-kun
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* Inspired by various anti-heroes of the list, Chilean vigilante [[ComicBook/DiabloChile Diablo]] is the TropeCodifier for [[ChileanMedia Chilean comic books]], wearing a BadassLongcoat and a CoolMask with an IrislessEyeMaskOfMystery, having [[GunsAkimbo a plenty of guns]], being accompanied by a HornyDevil who's his devilish tutor and having pages full of {{Gorn}}, especially when he summons TheLegionsOfHell.
1st Jan '17 3:50:08 AM Morgenthaler
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* This is a common criticism of [[Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure Jotaro Kujo]], the protagonist of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStardustCrusaders''. He's a [[TheStoic stoic]], aloof {{badass}} who delivers one-liners and punches his enemies senseless. However, his edgier traits are toned down in later parts of ''[=JoJo=]'', coming off as more of a BigBrotherMentor in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond is Unbreakable]]'' and being given a DeconReconSwitch as a flawed but well-meaning father in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStoneOcean Stone Ocean]]''.

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* This is a common criticism of [[Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure Jotaro Kujo]], the protagonist of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStardustCrusaders''. He's a [[TheStoic stoic]], aloof {{badass}} badass who delivers one-liners and punches his enemies senseless. However, his edgier traits are toned down in later parts of ''[=JoJo=]'', coming off as more of a BigBrotherMentor in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond is Unbreakable]]'' and being given a DeconReconSwitch as a flawed but well-meaning father in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStoneOcean Stone Ocean]]''.
28th Dec '16 12:51:39 PM Morgenthaler
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* In the DarkHorseComics superhero line ''Comics Greatest World'', ComicBook/{{X}} filled this role. He was at least willing to give you one warning, a vertical slash across the face. If the X across your face or an image of your face was completed, however, he killed you. No exceptions. He was willing to do whatever it took to cleanse the city of Arcadia of its crime and corruption.

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* In the DarkHorseComics Creator/DarkHorseComics superhero line ''Comics Greatest World'', ComicBook/{{X}} filled this role. He was at least willing to give you one warning, a vertical slash across the face. If the X across your face or an image of your face was completed, however, he killed you. No exceptions. He was willing to do whatever it took to cleanse the city of Arcadia of its crime and corruption.
27th Dec '16 5:43:18 AM supergod
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* During ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman, Franchise/{{Superman}} had an AntiHeroSubstitute in the form of the Eradicator, one of the four replacement Supermen who appeared after he died.]] He was portrayed as a negative version of the trope, finding himself being lauded by Guy Gardner, which made him question things, and chewed out by Lois Lane and ComicBook/{{Steel}} for using the S-Shield and causing death and destruction in its name.

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* During ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman, Franchise/{{Superman}} had an AntiHeroSubstitute in the form of the Eradicator, one of the four replacement Supermen who appeared appear after he died.dies.]] He was He's portrayed as a negative version of the trope, finding himself being lauded by Guy Gardner, which made makes him question things, and chewed out by Lois Lane and ComicBook/{{Steel}} for using the S-Shield and causing death and destruction in its name.



* Superman himself became this in the ElseWorld story ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd''.

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* Superman himself became this in In the ElseWorld story ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd''.''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', Superman is portrayed as this, being depowered and having to rely on huge guns, being a lot more willing to kill, and drawn to be overtly muscular and with huge pouches.
27th Dec '16 5:36:04 AM supergod
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* During Creator/GrantMorrison's run on ''ComicBook/ActionComics'', in one alternate universe Lois Lane, Clark Kent and Jimmy Olsen created a device that would allow the user to create a super powered Tulpa. They wanted to create TheCape, however the executives thought this trope would have more wide-market appeal, and deliberately attempted to invoke it. It didn't go quite [[GoneHorriblyWrong right]] though.
** Except this is ''exactly'' what the executive who stole the idea from them wanted, to create a ridiculously over-the-top parody of Superman to kill him with, being as he was a demon from the 5th Dimension with a major grudge against the Man of Steel.
* Franchise/{{Superman}} and Franchise/{{Batman}} got [[AntiHeroSubstitute Anti-Hero Substitutes]]. For Superman, it was the Eradicator, [[ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman one of the four replacement Supermen who appeared after he died.]] For Batman, it was [[ComicBook/{{Knightfall}} Jean-Paul Valley, the man formerly (at the time), known as Azrael, who replaced him after Bane broke his back.]] Nightwing chewed Bruce out over it and Bruce himself admits it was one of his worse mistakes.
** Interestingly, both the Eradicator and Comicbook/{{Azrael}} are portrayed as being examples of this trope being ''bad''. The Eradicator found himself being lauded by Guy Gardner, which made him question things, and chewed out by Lois Lane and ComicBook/{{Steel}} for using the S-Shield and causing death and destruction in its name. Azrael, especially his time as Batman, was made as a TakeThat towards those who wanted Batman to act more like ComicBook/ThePunisher. They got it and when he took his first life, everyone agreed that Bruce is the better Batman and Azrael needed to go.
** In Jean-Paul Valley's case, it should be pointed out that while he was an unfavorable deconstruction, but he was also written as a [[JerkassWoobie sympathetic deconstruction]] in that he is shown to suffer from mental illness from his [[DarkAndTroubledPast brutal upbringing]] by the Order of St. Dumas' Program rather than being a TautologicalTemplar {{Jerkass}} like many other examples of this archetype were. From the moment after he meets and befriends psychiatrist Brian Bryan, Valley becomes more of reconstruction of the trope.

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* During Creator/GrantMorrison's run on ''ComicBook/ActionComics'', in one alternate universe Lois Lane, Clark Kent and Jimmy Olsen created a device that would allow the user to create a super powered Tulpa. They wanted to create TheCape, however the executives thought this trope would have more wide-market appeal, and deliberately attempted to invoke it. It didn't go quite [[GoneHorriblyWrong right]] though.it.
* During ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman, Franchise/{{Superman}} had an AntiHeroSubstitute in the form of the Eradicator, one of the four replacement Supermen who appeared after he died.]] He was portrayed as a negative version of the trope, finding himself being lauded by Guy Gardner, which made him question things, and chewed out by Lois Lane and ComicBook/{{Steel}} for using the S-Shield and causing death and destruction in its name.

** Except this * After having his back broken in ComicBook/{{Knightfall}}, Batman is ''exactly'' what the executive who stole the idea from them wanted, to create a ridiculously over-the-top parody of Superman to kill him with, being as he was a demon from the 5th Dimension with a major grudge against the Man of Steel.
* Franchise/{{Superman}} and Franchise/{{Batman}} got
[[AntiHeroSubstitute Anti-Hero Substitutes]]. For Superman, it was the Eradicator, [[ComicBook/TheDeathOfSuperman one of the four replacement Supermen who appeared after he died.]] For Batman, it was [[ComicBook/{{Knightfall}} replaced by]] Jean-Paul Valley, the man formerly (at the time), known as Azrael, Valley a.k.a. Comicbook/{{Azrael}}, a character with no compunctions about killing. Azrael is chosen by Bruce, who replaced him after Bane broke his back.]] is then chewed out by Nightwing chewed Bruce out over it it, and Bruce himself admits it was one of his worse mistakes.
** Interestingly, both the Eradicator and Comicbook/{{Azrael}} are portrayed as being examples of this trope being ''bad''. The Eradicator found himself being lauded by Guy Gardner, which made him question things, and chewed out by Lois Lane and ComicBook/{{Steel}} for using the S-Shield and causing death and destruction in its name.
worst mistakes. Azrael, especially his time as Batman, was made written as a TakeThat towards those who wanted Batman to act more like ComicBook/ThePunisher. They got it and when he took his first life, everyone agreed that Bruce is the better Batman and Azrael needed to go.
** In Jean-Paul Valley's case, it should be pointed out that while
ComicBook/ThePunisher, though he was an unfavorable still written as a sympathetic deconstruction, but he was also written as a [[JerkassWoobie sympathetic deconstruction]] in that he is shown to suffer from mental illness from his [[DarkAndTroubledPast brutal upbringing]] by the Order of St. Dumas' Program rather than being a TautologicalTemplar {{Jerkass}} like many other examples of this archetype were. From the moment after he meets and befriends psychiatrist Brian Bryan, Valley becomes more of reconstruction of the trope.



** ComicBook/{{Spawn}}, quite possibly the most popular Nineties Anti-Hero. [[DarkAgeOfSupernames Edgy one-word name]], grim-n-gritty {{backstory}} (an assassinated mercenary damned to Hell and sent back as a soldier of Satan), killing bad guys who were slightly worse than him, and written and drawn by Todd [=McFarlane=].
*** Spawn is a very interesting example, as a lot of effort is put into humanizing him and he comes off as a far better character than the average Nineties Anti-Hero. But then, [[LongRunners being around for a while]] tends to do that.
*** The first issue of Spawn also had a little parody of the tropes common appearance. Entertainment TV TalkingHeads commenting that while the spikes and chains are "totally gauche", trying to bring back capes is a bad idea.

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** ComicBook/{{Spawn}}, quite possibly the most popular Nineties Anti-Hero. [[DarkAgeOfSupernames Edgy one-word name]], grim-n-gritty {{backstory}} (an assassinated mercenary damned to Hell and sent back as a soldier of Satan), killing bad guys who were slightly worse than him, and written and drawn by Todd [=McFarlane=].
*** Spawn is a very interesting example, as a lot of effort is put into humanizing him and he comes off as a far better
[=McFarlane=]. [[CharacterizationMarchesOn The character than became less]] of a typical example of this trope as the average Nineties Anti-Hero. But then, [[LongRunners being around for a while]] tends to do that.
***
series went on, however. The first issue of Spawn also had a little parody of the tropes trope's common appearance. Entertainment TV TalkingHeads commenting that while the spikes and chains are "totally gauche", trying to bring back capes is a bad idea.



* During the early '90s, ''Bloodlines'', one of the most loathed CrisisCrossover to hit Franchise/TheDCU, produced a glut of Nineties Anti Heroes, few of whom lasted more than a couple years, including Gunfire, Mongrel, Razorsharp, Edge, Shadowstryke, etc., etc. Probably the only one to be remembered fondly is ''Comicbook/{{Hitman}}'', a, well, super-powered ''hitman'', who alternated between being a paragon of the trope and a clever send-up.
** ''Hitman'' also blatantly parodies this trope when Tommy encounters Nightfist, a ''Batman'' ripoff who takes out drug dealers with a pair of giant metal fists (which he wears over his normal fists) and then steals their drugs.
** Ironically, the Bloodline character now most remembered as a Nineties Anti Hero, Gunfire, was actually a subversion. He had the name, the appearance (tacky armor, green goggles, and a ponytail mullet), and the powers (the ridiculous ability to turn any object into a gun), the actual character turned out to be an old-school ReluctantHero who rescues bystanders and fanboys over the Justice League. Naturally enough, ''Hitman'' still parodied him with a future version who accidentally shoots himself with a med pack and then turns his own ass into a hand grenade.
** It should also be pointed out that aside from design and the occassional kewl name very few of the New Bloods actually had a characterization similar to the typical 90's anti-hero. Most after all were just everyday citizens who happened to be attacked, put into a near death state and came "back" with powers. In fact they're 90's anti-hero's in only the barest of design ways as msot are outright heroes.
** Even Shadowstryke who VISUALLY looked liked a VERY 90's looking anti-hero type you'd expect to be mean had his biggest show of attitude when he went off the handle when being insulted by Guy Gardner. Why? Sure Shadowstryke survived but his family wasn't as lucky.



* A strange example is Deathlok the Demolisher, who was created well over two decades before the heyday of the trope. Each of the various version of Deathlok have very 90's Anti-Hero traits to them: he is always a dead man resurrected as a cyborg (cyborgs being common in 90's comics), and turned into an unliving cybernetic weapon that uses huge guns as it's primary method of offense. Usually however the plot often involves Deathlok's ''unwillingness'' to succumb to his programming and kill wantonly, instead struggling to non-lethally dispatch his foes.

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* A strange example is Deathlok the Demolisher, who was created well over two decades before the heyday of the trope. Each of the various version versions of Deathlok have very 90's Anti-Hero traits to them: he is always a dead man resurrected as a cyborg (cyborgs being common in 90's comics), and turned into an unliving cybernetic weapon that uses huge guns as it's primary method of offense. Usually however the plot often involves Deathlok's ''unwillingness'' to succumb to his programming and kill wantonly, instead struggling to non-lethally dispatch his foes.



* ComicBook/HolyTerror: As one of the individuals who influenced the Dark Age of Comics, it was the natural evolution of Creator/FrankMiller that he would eventually create a Dark Age Anti-Hero of his own in the form of "The Fixer". He is a BloodKnight so [[AxCrazy psychopathic]] that even the darkest iterations of Batman (of which he is a CaptainErsatz), including even those by Miller himself, would seem saintly by comparison. This is demonstrated with The Fixer's slaughter of the Al-Qaeda cell [[spoiler:in the underground of Empire City]] with a multitude of guns, ranging from pistols to bazookas, as well as a chemical weapon of some sort ([[MoralEventHorizon and yes, you read correctly]]). Granted, while the setting tries to justify his methods in that he is fighting a Terrorist group who is orchestrating an act of war rather than the typical mobsters and other criminals that would be the purview of the Justice system to try and punish,[[note]] (and to what extent should either the military and/or law enforcement be involved in addressing terrorism is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment another matter of debate]]).[[/note]] but this comic's portrayal of Al-Qaeda, and [[UnfortunateImplications Islam in general]] [[http://www.wired.com/2011/09/holy-terror-frank-miller/ for that matter]], is so cartoonishly over the top that it resembles something out of a ''ComicBook/ChickTracts'', thus ultimately [[{{Narm}} detracting]] from the serious message that is supposed to be expressed, thus unintentionally reminding audiences why this archetype [[DiscreditedTrope fell out of favor in the first place]] and could possibly [[CreatorKiller end Miller's own career]].

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* ComicBook/HolyTerror: As one of the individuals who influenced the Dark Age of Comics, it was the natural evolution of Creator/FrankMiller that he would eventually create a Dark Age Anti-Hero of his own in the form of "The Fixer". He is a BloodKnight so [[AxCrazy psychopathic]] that even the darkest iterations of Batman (of which he is a CaptainErsatz), including even those by Miller himself, would seem saintly by comparison. This is demonstrated with The Fixer's slaughter of the Al-Qaeda cell [[spoiler:in the underground of Empire City]] with a multitude of guns, ranging from pistols to bazookas, as well as a chemical weapon of some sort ([[MoralEventHorizon and yes, you read correctly]]). Granted, while the setting tries to justify his methods in that he is fighting a Terrorist group who is orchestrating an act of war rather than the typical mobsters and other criminals that would be the purview of the Justice system to try and punish,[[note]] (and to what extent should either the military and/or law enforcement be involved in addressing terrorism is [[RuleOfCautiousEditingJudgment another matter of debate]]).[[/note]] but this comic's portrayal of Al-Qaeda, and [[UnfortunateImplications Islam in general]] [[http://www.wired.com/2011/09/holy-terror-frank-miller/ for that matter]], is so cartoonishly over the top that it resembles something out of a ''ComicBook/ChickTracts'', thus ultimately [[{{Narm}} detracting]] from the serious message that is supposed to be expressed, thus unintentionally reminding audiences why this archetype [[DiscreditedTrope fell out of favor in the first place]] and could possibly [[CreatorKiller end Miller's own career]].
26th Dec '16 3:56:25 PM TheBigBopper
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[[caption-width-right:350:Everything that was wrong with [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks comics in the '90s]] in one cover.[[labelnote:From the top:]] Title (if you can read it) includes "Blood"; Improbable blade; Torn cape; Wolverine knock-off mask that frames face; [[EyesAlwaysShut Youngblood's]] [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall disease]]; Gritted teeth; Improbable anatomy; Improbable muscles; [[{{BFG}} Improbably huge and just plain improbable gun]]; Lots of pouches; Huge boots; Artist's signature on rubble.[[/labelnote]]]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Everything that was wrong with [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks comics in the '90s]] in one cover.[[labelnote:From the top:]] Title (if you can read it) includes "Blood"; Improbable blade; Torn cape; Wolverine knock-off mask that frames face; [[EyesAlwaysShut Youngblood's]] [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall disease]]; Gritted teeth; Improbable anatomy; Improbable muscles; [[{{BFG}} [[HandCannon Improbably huge and just plain improbable gun]]; Lots of pouches; Huge boots; Artist's signature on rubble.[[/labelnote]]]]
26th Dec '16 3:54:34 PM TheBigBopper
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[[caption-width-right:350:Everything that was wrong with [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks comics in the '90s]] in one cover. From the top: Title (if you can read it) includes "Blood"; Improbable blade; Torn cape; Wolverine knock-off mask that frames face; [[EyesAlwaysShut Youngblood's]] [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall disease]]; Gritted teeth; Improbable anatomy; Improbable muscles; [[{{BFG}} Improbably huge and just plain improbable gun]]; Lots of pouches; Huge boots; Artist's signature on rubble.]]

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[[caption-width-right:350:Everything that was wrong with [[UsefulNotes/TheDarkAgeOfComicBooks comics in the '90s]] in one cover. From [[labelnote:From the top: top:]] Title (if you can read it) includes "Blood"; Improbable blade; Torn cape; Wolverine knock-off mask that frames face; [[EyesAlwaysShut Youngblood's]] [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall disease]]; Gritted teeth; Improbable anatomy; Improbable muscles; [[{{BFG}} Improbably huge and just plain improbable gun]]; Lots of pouches; Huge boots; Artist's signature on rubble.]]
[[/labelnote]]]]
9th Dec '16 10:24:44 AM bowserbros
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** ''Dragon Ball'' as a whole is a very Iron-Age-ish anime - except it doesn't itself very serious in that spot.

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** ''Dragon Ball'' as a whole is a very Iron-Age-ish anime - Iron Age-ish anime, except it still doesn't take itself very serious seriously in that spot.


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* This is a common criticism of [[Franchise/JoJosBizarreAdventure Jotaro Kujo]], the protagonist of ''Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStardustCrusaders''. He's a [[TheStoic stoic]], aloof {{badass}} who delivers one-liners and punches his enemies senseless. However, his edgier traits are toned down in later parts of ''[=JoJo=]'', coming off as more of a BigBrotherMentor in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureDiamondIsUnbreakable Diamond is Unbreakable]]'' and being given a DeconReconSwitch as a flawed but well-meaning father in ''[[Manga/JoJosBizarreAdventureStoneOcean Stone Ocean]]''.
7th Dec '16 7:38:28 PM DustSnitch
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In terms of characterization, they have - at most! - only four emotions: [[{{Angst}} brooding]], [[DeadpanSnarker sarcastic]], {{Badass}}, or just plain [[AxCrazy psychotic]]. How much of any one side they show over the others is the main thing that sets them apart from each other.

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In terms of characterization, they have - at most! - only four emotions: [[{{Angst}} brooding]], [[DeadpanSnarker sarcastic]], {{Badass}}, badass, or just plain [[AxCrazy psychotic]]. How much of any one side they show over the others is the main thing that sets them apart from each other.



* Guts from ''{{Manga/Berserk}}'', who debuted with the publication of the manga in 1990, has almost all the characteristics of a nineties anti-hero. He has a [[DarkAgeOfSupernames gritty but simple name]], is [[AnArmAndALeg missing an arm and an eye]], [[HeroicBuild has ridiculous muscles]] but [[CombatPragmatist relies on his lethal equipment instead of superpowers]], wears a black costume with lots of [[BadassBandolier bags and bandoliers]], is a {{Badass}} with a DarkAndTroubledPast and [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]] to boot, and uses a ludicrous {{BFS}} as his main weapon. During the early Black Swordsman Arc he tells Puck that he doesn't care about anything except {{Revenge}}, considering any bystanders who get caught up in his vengeance as [[TheSocialDarwinist weaklings who didn't deserve to live]], and he [[ColdBloodedTorture brutally tortures]] any villains he defeats. In spite of all this he turns out to be something of an UnbuiltTrope example, or at least a more subtle one, as the state we first see him in is when he's at his very worst and using a JerkassFacade to hide from his pain. He goes through several shades of AntiHero through his CharacterDevelopment, but always has some redeeming qualities such as loyalty to his friends and sympathy for those who have suffered like he has.

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* Guts from ''{{Manga/Berserk}}'', who debuted with the publication of the manga in 1990, has almost all the characteristics of a nineties anti-hero. He has a [[DarkAgeOfSupernames gritty but simple name]], is [[AnArmAndALeg missing an arm and an eye]], [[HeroicBuild has ridiculous muscles]] but [[CombatPragmatist relies on his lethal equipment instead of superpowers]], wears a black costume with lots of [[BadassBandolier bags and bandoliers]], is a {{Badass}} badass with a DarkAndTroubledPast and [[DeadpanSnarker sarcasm]] to boot, and uses a ludicrous {{BFS}} as his main weapon. During the early Black Swordsman Arc he tells Puck that he doesn't care about anything except {{Revenge}}, considering any bystanders who get caught up in his vengeance as [[TheSocialDarwinist weaklings who didn't deserve to live]], and he [[ColdBloodedTorture brutally tortures]] any villains he defeats. In spite of all this he turns out to be something of an UnbuiltTrope example, or at least a more subtle one, as the state we first see him in is when he's at his very worst and using a JerkassFacade to hide from his pain. He goes through several shades of AntiHero through his CharacterDevelopment, but always has some redeeming qualities such as loyalty to his friends and sympathy for those who have suffered like he has.



* ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'' is full of ''non-human'' examples (though many look humanoid), especially the early generations created during the nineties, reaching from [[{{Badass}} Badass Furries]] to HollywoodCyborg dinosaurs. However, the characterization seen in ''Manga/CMonDigimon'' and ''Manga/DigimonVTamer01'', the earliest works in the series, didn't reflect this trope and the ''designs'' of Digimon as originally shown in "C-mon" didn't even reflect it, though [[ArtShift this was quickly corrected]] and [[MythologyGag referenced]] in "V-tamer".

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* ''Franchise/{{Digimon}}'' is full of ''non-human'' examples (though many look humanoid), especially the early generations created during the nineties, reaching from [[{{Badass}} Badass Furries]] Furries to HollywoodCyborg dinosaurs. However, the characterization seen in ''Manga/CMonDigimon'' and ''Manga/DigimonVTamer01'', the earliest works in the series, didn't reflect this trope and the ''designs'' of Digimon as originally shown in "C-mon" didn't even reflect it, though [[ArtShift this was quickly corrected]] and [[MythologyGag referenced]] in "V-tamer".



* The ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comic introduced a full-blown Nineties Anti Hero to the ''Doctor Who'' universe in the shape of Abslom Daak, Dalek Killer. He's a "[[ChainsawGood chainsword]]"-loving professional criminal and multiple murderer who was exiled by a future Earth society to a Dalek-occupied world to kill as many Daleks as possible before his inevitable death (although he turned out to be {{Badass}} enough to survive). Of course, he first appeared in 1980 and in some ways was a deconstruction, so could be considered an UnbuiltTrope.

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* The ''Magazine/DoctorWhoMagazine'' comic introduced a full-blown Nineties Anti Hero to the ''Doctor Who'' universe in the shape of Abslom Daak, Dalek Killer. He's a "[[ChainsawGood chainsword]]"-loving professional criminal and multiple murderer who was exiled by a future Earth society to a Dalek-occupied world to kill as many Daleks as possible before his inevitable death (although he turned out to be {{Badass}} badass enough to survive). Of course, he first appeared in 1980 and in some ways was a deconstruction, so could be considered an UnbuiltTrope.



** ComicBook/{{Cable}}, of the New Mutants, X-Force, and the Comicbook/{{X-Men}} was a major TropeCodifier. Tragic and mysterious past? Check. {{BFG}}s coming out the ass? Check. A "{{Badass}}" look that used to be reserved for villains? Check. His first appearance was even in 1990. Over time, though, he's been developed into a more heroic[=/=]complex character, somewhere between MessianicArchetype and AGodAmI.

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** ComicBook/{{Cable}}, of the New Mutants, X-Force, and the Comicbook/{{X-Men}} was a major TropeCodifier. Tragic and mysterious past? Check. {{BFG}}s coming out the ass? Check. A "{{Badass}}" "badass" look that used to be reserved for villains? Check. His first appearance was even in 1990. Over time, though, he's been developed into a more heroic[=/=]complex character, somewhere between MessianicArchetype and AGodAmI.
17th Nov '16 10:36:02 AM X2X
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* ImageComics specialized in these for as long as the fad lasted:

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* ImageComics Creator/ImageComics specialized in these for as long as the fad lasted:



** ''VideoGame/{{Blazblue}}'' has this in Ragna the Bloodedge. Not only does his name sound like something right out of the DarkAgeOfSupernames, he's also ill-tempered, has TooManyBelts, a {{BFS}} that unfolds into a [[SinisterScythe scythe]] (fittingly called "Blood-Scythe") is motivated by {{Revenge}}, and has no problems with harming anyone who gets in his way. To top it all off, his powers consist of draining the life out of others by using the power of [[CastingAShadow darkness]] in the form of summoning parts of an EldritchAbomination.
*** The hilarious {{Irony}} in Ragna is he's {{Adorkable}} and a bit of a loser, with most of the cast snarking and looking down at him. He has a crippling fear of ghosts, and ScreamsLikeALittleGirl, and indeed a lot of the game's humour [[ButtMonkey takes place at his expense]]. He's also quite a nice, compassionate guy beneath his gruff exterior, [[RealMenWearPink and he's a great chef]]. Essentially, while he has the badass appearance and power-set of a textbook Nineties Anti Hero, his abrasive and headstrong personality get him into trouble more often than not. [[spoiler: In fact, much of his CharacterDevelopment revolves around him realizing that his "destroy my enemies" mindset typical of a Nineties Anti Hero hasn't gotten him anywhere and instead vows to use his power to protect his loved ones.]]

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** ''VideoGame/{{Blazblue}}'' ''VideoGame/BlazBlue'' has this in Ragna the Bloodedge. Not only does his name sound like something right out of the DarkAgeOfSupernames, he's also ill-tempered, has TooManyBelts, a {{BFS}} that unfolds into a [[SinisterScythe scythe]] (fittingly called "Blood-Scythe") is motivated by {{Revenge}}, {{revenge}}, and has no problems with harming anyone who gets in his way. To top it all off, his powers consist of draining the life out of others by using the power of [[CastingAShadow darkness]] in the form of summoning parts of an EldritchAbomination.
*** The hilarious {{Irony}} {{irony}} in Ragna is he's {{Adorkable}} and [[LoserProtagonist a bit of a loser, loser]], with most of the cast snarking and looking down at him. He has a crippling fear of ghosts, ghosts (likely owing to the fact that [[spoiler:the person responsible for burning down his home, lopping off his right arm, and kidnapping his kid sister is a ghost]]), and ScreamsLikeALittleGirl, and indeed a lot of the game's humour [[ButtMonkey takes place at his expense]]. He's also quite a nice, compassionate guy beneath his gruff exterior, [[RealMenWearPink [[RealMenCook and he's a great chef]]. Essentially, while he has the badass appearance and power-set of a textbook Nineties Anti Hero, Anti-Hero, his abrasive and headstrong personality get him into trouble more often than not. [[spoiler: In [[spoiler:In fact, much of his CharacterDevelopment revolves around him realizing that his "destroy my enemies" mindset typical of a Nineties Anti Hero the trope hasn't gotten him anywhere and instead vows to use his power to protect his loved ones.]]



* It's hard to tell who's supposed to be a hero in ''VideoGame/BloodStorm'' and who's a villain. They all have menacing one-word names, are all capable of ultra-violence, all look positively Liefeldian and almost all of them are dicks with selfish motives and no care for others (Tremor manages to at least buck this trait by being the only unambiguously good character in the game.)
* ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'' has many player characters fitting this trope, and also a few amongst its [=NPC=] cast:

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* It's hard to tell who's supposed to be a hero in ''VideoGame/BloodStorm'' and who's a villain. They all have menacing one-word names, are all capable of ultra-violence, all look positively Liefeldian and almost all of them are dicks with selfish motives and no care for others (Tremor others. Tremor manages to at least buck this trait by being the only unambiguously good character in the game.)
game.
* ''VideoGame/ChampionsOnline'' has many player characters fitting this trope, and also a few amongst its [=NPC=] NPC cast:



** Infernal could also count, being a demon-binding, [[DarkIsNotEvil evil-looking good guy]], but his {{backstory}} of coming from a HeroicFantasy inspired alternate dimension may be a jab at the overused MedievalEuropeanFantasy {{MMORPG}} setting.
* One of the criticisms levelled at ''VideoGame/{{DmC Devil May Cry}}'' is that it tries to take a light-hearted series and give it the full Nineties treatment, leaving it overwrought with attempted edginess and shallow satire. This is exemplified by the reimagining of Dante, who is a few pouches and a bucket of steroids away from leaping off a Liefeld cover. What's really weird is that the game does still go full {{camp}} every now and then, leaving the game with characters who can't decide if they want to crack wise or tell each other to fuck off.

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** Infernal could also count, being a demon-binding, [[DarkIsNotEvil evil-looking good guy]], but his {{backstory}} of coming from a HeroicFantasy inspired alternate dimension may be a jab at the overused MedievalEuropeanFantasy {{MMORPG}} [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMORPG]] setting.
* One of the criticisms levelled leveled at ''VideoGame/{{DmC ''[[VideoGame/DmCDevilMayCry DmC: Devil May Cry}}'' Cry]]'' is that it tries to take [[Franchise/DevilMayCry a light-hearted series series]] and give it the full Nineties treatment, leaving it overwrought with attempted edginess and shallow satire. This is exemplified by the reimagining of Dante, who is a few pouches and a bucket of steroids away from leaping off a Liefeld cover. What's really weird is that the game does still go full {{camp}} every now and then, leaving the game with characters who can't decide if they want to crack wise or tell each other to fuck off.



** And then once those bad guys are all defeated, he goes straight back to [[RogueProtagonist gleefully slaughtering EVERYBODY in the sequel.]]
* VideoGame/DukeNukem. A sex obsessed, mirrorshade wearing ActionHero wannabe who hangs out in sleazy biker bars and strip clubs, with a LanternJawOfJustice and blond flattop haircut. He's armed to the teeth with {{BFG}}s (as it's a {{FPS}} and all), addicted to steroids (or whatever those pills are) and loves to spew {{one liner}}s like "''I've got balls of steel''", "''Some mutated son of a bitch is gonna pay!''" and of course the immortal "''[[Film/TheyLive It's time to kick ass and chew bubble gum. And I'm all out of gum.]]''" And his games were big in the early [[TheNineties 90s]]. Duke is generally accepted as being a full parody of the 80s/90s action hero rather than actually being one. He's no exception to the fact that most parodies and extreme cases of this are deeply entrenched in PoesLaw though.

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** And then once those bad guys are all defeated, he goes straight back to [[RogueProtagonist gleefully slaughtering EVERYBODY in the sequel.]]
sequel]].
* VideoGame/DukeNukem. A sex obsessed, mirrorshade wearing ActionHero wannabe who hangs out in sleazy biker bars and strip clubs, with a LanternJawOfJustice and blond flattop haircut. He's armed to the teeth with {{BFG}}s (as it's a {{FPS}} [[FirstPersonShooter FPS]] and all), addicted to steroids (or whatever those pills are) and loves to spew {{one liner}}s like "''I've got balls of steel''", "''Some mutated son of a bitch is gonna pay!''" and of course the immortal "''[[Film/TheyLive It's time to kick ass and chew bubble gum. And I'm all out of gum.]]''" And his games were big in the early [[TheNineties 90s]]. Duke is generally accepted as being a full parody of the 80s/90s action hero rather than actually being one. He's no exception to the fact that most parodies and extreme cases of this are deeply entrenched in PoesLaw PoesLaw, though.



-->'''Alchemiss''': ''[sarcastically]'' So how did ''you'' spend your sabbatical, Tombstone? Performing in musical theater? Raising puppies?
-->'''Tombstone''': [[AC:animals wither in my presence.]]
* ''VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries'': If Kratos' muscle-bound and grizzled appearance combined with his multitude of oversized weapons and [[DarkAndTroubledPast dark backstory]] don't convince you, then his lethal and very brutal methods and [[NoIndoorVoice HIS MONOLOGUES IN WHICH HE DECLARES THAT]] [[RageAgainstTheHeavens HE WILL ASCEND OLYMPUS TO KILL THE GODS!!!]] may show otherwise.
* Varik, the protagonist of ''VideoGame/TheHalloweenHack'', is made to look like this, what with being a brooding, alcoholic bounty hunter with a Dark and Mysterious Past. We quickly find out this is not played straight at all - his stats suck, and he's honestly scared of the undead monsters.

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-->'''Alchemiss''': -->'''Alchemiss:''' ''[sarcastically]'' So how did ''you'' spend your sabbatical, Tombstone? Performing in musical theater? Raising puppies?
-->'''Tombstone''': -->'''Tombstone:''' [[AC:animals wither in my presence.]]
* ''VideoGame/GodOfWarSeries'': ''VideoGame/{{God of War|Series}}'': If Kratos' muscle-bound and grizzled appearance combined with his multitude of oversized weapons and [[DarkAndTroubledPast dark backstory]] don't convince you, then his lethal and very brutal methods and [[NoIndoorVoice HIS MONOLOGUES IN WHICH HE DECLARES THAT]] [[RageAgainstTheHeavens HE WILL ASCEND OLYMPUS TO KILL THE GODS!!!]] may show otherwise.
* Varik, the protagonist of ''VideoGame/TheHalloweenHack'', is made to look like this, what with being a brooding, alcoholic bounty hunter with a Dark and Mysterious Past. We quickly find out this is not played straight at all - -- his stats suck, and he's honestly scared of the undead monsters.



* K' from ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters''. Given life at the end of the decade but still fits in with the trope. Abrupt and harsh name ("Kay-Dash"), cold-hearted SOB who only cooperates when it suits his end (his victory pose has him saying he's good enough to fight your whole team), and has a laser-like focus on his objective (stamping out the NESTS organization and anyone associated with it). However, he ''does'' move away from this a bit as time goes on.
* The ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain'' series gives us two interesting examples. While Kain is more or less a straight example character wise, Raziel is a much more heroic/noble character, ''however'', his character design positivly drips of it. The reason for this is because the game Dev team outsourced the concept art to Top Cow (a comic studio that broke off from {{Image}}, responsible for such works as ''ComicBook/TheDarkness'' and ''Comicbook/{{Witchblade}}''). The reason for this is because of complex corporate politics behind the creation of ''[[VideoGame/LegacyOfKain Soul Reaver]]'', which was being made at the same time as Eidos was having Top Cow publish the ''Franchise/TombRaider'' comic.
** Kain himself is an odd example: while certain an incredibly anti-heroic person, is remarkably sophisticated whereas most examples of this trope are noticeably (and unfortunately) somwhat more crude, and though arrogant and callous in the extreme his ultimate goals are fairly noble, even if his motivations are selfish. Meanwhile Raziel is far more outright heroic, often trying to do the "right" thing in any given situation, except his attempts at nobility often leads to even worse things then he attempted to prevent. It might be said that Kain is an outright ''VillainProtagonist'' while Raziel is a true Anti-Hero as Raziel ATTEMPTS to be good but his imperfections cause him to fail, whereas Kain doesn't bother to try at all and ends up helping the world anyway as a side effect.
* Jack Cayman of ''VideoGame/{{MadWorld}}'' and ''VideoGame/AnarchyReigns''. Well muscled? Check. ChainedByFashion? Check. "Edgy" weapon in the form of a [[ChainsawGood chainsaw]]? Check. No compunctions about killing people? ''Check''.

to:

* K' from ''VideoGame/TheKingOfFighters''. Given life at the end of the decade but still fits in with the trope. Abrupt and harsh name ("Kay-Dash"), cold-hearted SOB who only cooperates when it suits his end (his victory pose has him saying he's good enough to fight your whole team), and has a laser-like focus on his objective (stamping out the NESTS organization and anyone associated with it). However, he ''does'' [[DefrostingIceQueen move away from this a bit as time goes on.
on]]. K' also, [[HiddenDepths surprisingly enough]], has a strong moral compass and sense of justice (perhaps even more so than previous ''KOF'' lead Kyo Kusanagi) in spite of his general disdain toward being dragged into the eponymous tournament year after year, with more recent entries establishing that beneath [[JerkassFacade the stoic, unfriendly surface]] lies a rather decent guy who prefers solitude [[QuestForIdentity as he tries to piece together his missing past]] and [[ClonesArePeopleToo establish himself as something more than a mere]] [[CloneByConversion "Kyo clone."]]
* The ''VideoGame/LegacyOfKain'' series gives us two interesting examples. While Kain is more or less a straight example character wise, character-wise, Raziel is a much more heroic/noble character, ''however'', his character. His character design positivly design, however, positively drips of it. The reason for this This is because the game Dev game's dev team outsourced the concept art to Top Cow (a comic studio that broke off from {{Image}}, Creator/{{Image|Comics}}, responsible for such works as ''ComicBook/TheDarkness'' and ''Comicbook/{{Witchblade}}''). The reason for this is because of ''ComicBook/{{Witchblade}}''); due to complex corporate politics behind the creation of ''[[VideoGame/LegacyOfKain Soul Reaver]]'', which was being made at the same time as Eidos was having Top Cow publish the ''Franchise/TombRaider'' comic.
** Kain himself is an odd example: while certain certainly an incredibly anti-heroic person, he is remarkably sophisticated whereas most examples of this trope are noticeably (and unfortunately) somwhat somewhat more crude, and though arrogant and callous in the extreme extreme, [[WellIntentionedExtremist his ultimate goals are fairly noble, noble]], even if his motivations are selfish. Meanwhile Meanwhile, Raziel is far more outright heroic, often trying to do the "right" thing in any given situation, except his attempts at nobility often leads lead to even worse things then than he attempted to prevent. It might be said that Kain is an outright ''VillainProtagonist'' while Raziel is a true Anti-Hero as Raziel ATTEMPTS to be good but his imperfections cause him to fail, whereas Kain doesn't bother to try at all and ends up helping the world anyway as a side effect.
* Jack Cayman of ''VideoGame/{{MadWorld}}'' and ''VideoGame/AnarchyReigns''. Well muscled? Well-muscled? Check. ChainedByFashion? Check. "Edgy" weapon in the form of a [[ChainsawGood chainsaw]]? Check. No compunctions about killing people? ''Check''.



* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'': As a series that started in 1992, Mortal Kombat in many ways embodies many elements of the Iron age/Dark age of Comic books particularly in the form of its [[BloodierAndGorier overt violence and gory]] [[FinishingMove Fatalities]], but also avoided being completely serious replications of those kinds of comics by including some tongue and cheek humor. These are two characters who exemplify this archetype:
** Scorpion is an undead, [[PlayingWithFire fire wielding]] {{Ninja}} who is a WildCard [[HeelFaceRevolvingDoor who will assist]] which ever side is most convenient to his own agenda (Of seeking vengeance against the murderer of his clan and resurrecting his fallen loved ones to the living) and tends to be one of the most brutal fighters in the series, with the exception of [[EvilOverlord Shao]] [[DropTheHammer Kahn]], to boot due to being fueled by his unquenchable rage. Though ''Videogame/MortalKombatX'' presents him as being a [[DoubleSubvertedTrope double subversion]] of this trope due to being more reasonable after being [[spoiler: freed of Quan Chi's service as one of his revenants]] but, also seeks to kill the sorcerer responsible for murdering his family and turning him into a revenant [[UnwittingPawn to perpetuate Quan Chi's schemes]] and [[AvertedTrope prevent]] [[KarmaHoudini the necromancer from continuing to commit any other atrocities]] even if it means [[spoiler: voiding any opportunity to free any other revenants from his curse]].
** Another Kombatant who falls into this category on occasion is Raiden in his [[FanNickname Dark Raiden]] persona. In this corrupted form, which debuted in [[Videogame/MortalKombatDeception Deception]] ([[spoiler: and reappeared in Mortal Kombat X's last scene]]), the Thunder god ceases to be the benevolent mentor he is known for and turns into a far more ruthless tactician who takes more aggressive measures to protect Earthrealm from foreign invaders including the destruction of all the other realms, even those that were harmless to the Earth itself.

to:

* ''Franchise/MortalKombat'': As a series that started in 1992, Mortal Kombat ''Mortal Kombat'' in many ways embodies many elements of the Iron age/Dark age Age/Dark Age of Comic books particularly in the form of its [[BloodierAndGorier overt violence and gory]] [[FinishingMove Fatalities]], but also avoided being completely serious replications of those kinds of comics by including some tongue and cheek humor. These are two characters who exemplify this archetype:
** Scorpion is an undead, [[PlayingWithFire fire wielding]] {{Ninja}} who is a WildCard [[HeelFaceRevolvingDoor who will assist]] which ever whichever side is most convenient to his own agenda (Of seeking vengeance against the murderer of his clan and resurrecting his fallen loved ones to the living) and tends to be one of the most brutal fighters in the series, with the exception of [[EvilOverlord Shao]] [[DropTheHammer Kahn]], to boot due to being fueled by his unquenchable rage. Though ''Videogame/MortalKombatX'' ''VideoGame/MortalKombatX'' presents him as being a [[DoubleSubvertedTrope double subversion]] {{double subversion}} of this trope due to being more reasonable after being [[spoiler: freed [[spoiler:freed of Quan Chi's service as one of his revenants]] but, but also seeks seeking to kill the sorcerer responsible for murdering his family and turning him into a revenant [[UnwittingPawn to perpetuate Quan Chi's schemes]] and [[AvertedTrope prevent]] [[KarmaHoudini the necromancer from continuing to commit any other atrocities]] even if it means [[spoiler: voiding [[spoiler:voiding any opportunity to free any other revenants from his curse]].
** Another Kombatant who falls into this category on occasion is Raiden in his [[FanNickname Dark Raiden]] persona. In this corrupted form, which debuted in [[Videogame/MortalKombatDeception Deception]] ([[spoiler: and ''[[VideoGame/MortalKombatDeception Deception]]'' ([[spoiler:and reappeared in Mortal Kombat X's [[TheStinger the last scene]]), scene]] of ''MKX'' due to being exposed to the Thunder Jinsei that was tainted by Shinnok]]), the thunder god ceases to be the benevolent mentor he is known for and turns into a far more ruthless tactician who takes more aggressive measures to protect Earthrealm from foreign invaders including the destruction of all the other realms, even those that were harmless to the Earth earth itself.



* VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog is not usually an example, but he was heavily marketed as one for his spinoff game where he swore, used guns, and rode motorcycles to fight an alien invasion.
** To note: In ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', he was a villain who did a HeelFaceTurn at the end and [[NeverFoundTheBody seemed to die at the end]]. ''Sonic Heroes'' is [[LighterAndSofter lighter]] overall than ''Adventure 2'' but here he is a regular AntiHero and spends most of the game following Rouge around anyway.

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* VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog [[Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog Shadow the Hedgehog]] is not usually an example, but he was heavily marketed as one for [[VideoGame/ShadowTheHedgehog his spinoff game spin-off game]] where he swore, used guns, and rode motorcycles to fight an alien invasion.
** To note: In ''VideoGame/SonicAdventure2'', he was a villain who did a HeelFaceTurn at the end and [[NeverFoundTheBody seemed to die at the end]]. ''Sonic Heroes'' ''VideoGame/SonicHeroes'' is [[LighterAndSofter lighter]] overall than ''Adventure 2'' but here he is a regular AntiHero and spends most of the game following Rouge around anyway.



* [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} Doomguy]] was originally something of a FeaturelessProtagonist, but {{fanon}} rapidly turned him into one of these (aided and abetted by the infamous comic described above). ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'' picked this interpretation up and ran screaming at a horde of demons to beat them to death with it, and then ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' [[AscendedFanon made it official]]. '''Rip and tear!'''

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* [[VideoGame/{{Doom}} Doomguy]] was originally something of a FeaturelessProtagonist, but {{fanon}} {{Fanon}} rapidly turned him into one of these (aided and abetted by the infamous comic described above). ''VideoGame/BrutalDoom'' picked this interpretation up and ran screaming at a horde of demons to beat them to death with it, and then ''VideoGame/Doom2016'' [[AscendedFanon made it official]]. '''Rip and tear!'''
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NinetiesAntihero