History Main / NewerThanTheyThink

5th May '16 7:44:37 PM CaptEquinox
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** [[http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/thr-esq/warner-music-pays-14-million-863120 Not any more!!!]]



* So you see the music video of Sting called [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHylQRVN2Qs "Russians"]]. It reminds of those black and white propaganda films of the cold war era and is about the hope that America makes peace with the Soviet Union, which makes it something that should come straight out of the 1950's-1970's. You then see the date of the music video, which reads ''2005''.

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* So you see the music video of Sting called [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHylQRVN2Qs "Russians"]]. It reminds of those black and white propaganda films of the cold war era and is about the hope that America makes peace with the Soviet Union, which makes it something that should come straight out of the 1950's-1970's. You then see the date of the music video, which reads ''2005''.''1985''.


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* "Love Is A Rose" is not a hundred-year-old folk song. It was written by Creator/NeilYoung in the early 1970s. Likewise, the melody to "Slip Away" sounds like an antique ballad, but was written by Young.
27th Apr '16 8:21:58 PM Naram-Sin
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* The Crimean Khanate, the last monarchy whose reigning dynasty claimed direct descent from Genghis Khan, was not dissolved until 1783, the same year Britain recognized the independence of the United States.
24th Apr '16 11:40:19 PM erforce
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* The now-ubiquitous practice of wide releases was pretty much invented by ''{{Jaws}}''. Before 1975, movies were treated more like road shows, released to a few theatres first, and gradually rolled out to the rest of the world for as long as they continued to be successful. This custom led to movies having much, much longer theatrical runs than they do today; a blockbuster like ''Film/TheSoundOfMusic'' or ''TheExorcist'' could easily spend over a year on the big screen, even before re-releases. ''Jaws'' bucked convention by instead releasing to thousands of theatres immediately; this strategy was so successful that the rest of the industry quickly followed suit.

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* The now-ubiquitous practice of wide releases was pretty much invented by ''{{Jaws}}''.''Film/{{Jaws}}''. Before 1975, movies were treated more like road shows, released to a few theatres first, and gradually rolled out to the rest of the world for as long as they continued to be successful. This custom led to movies having much, much longer theatrical runs than they do today; a blockbuster like ''Film/TheSoundOfMusic'' or ''TheExorcist'' could easily spend over a year on the big screen, even before re-releases. ''Jaws'' bucked convention by instead releasing to thousands of theatres immediately; this strategy was so successful that the rest of the industry quickly followed suit.
21st Apr '16 11:20:18 PM Twentington
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* And speaking of common mall stores, Bath & Body Works was founded in 1990.
21st Apr '16 11:19:28 PM Twentington
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* While many clothing chains have been around for a very long time and evolved with the times, a few more are newer than one would expect:
** Old Navy was founded by parent company Gap in 1995. (It was known as "Gap Warehouse" early on.)
** [=H&M=] was founded in Sweden in 1947, but did not enter the United States until 2000.
** Forever 21 was founded in 1984, which already makes it young for a clothing chain, but it did not open stores outside California until the end of TheNineties.
** White House Black Market was founded in 1985.
** Torrid, a plus-size clothing chain owned by Hot Topic, was founded in 2001.
21st Apr '16 11:11:49 PM Twentington
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* The ''[[{{Film/Frankenstein1931}} Frankenstein]]'' movie with Creator/BorisKarloff (and other movies made in 1931 with and without Karloff) is older than the country of UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia.
* Although UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}} was founded in 1962, it was not truly a national chain until 1995, when they opened their first location in Vermont. Even as late as 1990, they barely covered half the country. Likewise, they didn't start building "supercenters" (i.e., stores with complete grocery sections) until 1988, and did not really push to make all their stores supercenters until the 2000s. In fact, the "supercenter" Walmart has become so commonplace that they don't even call it that anymore. On the flipside, the ''overall'' concept of a "supercenter" is OlderThanTheyThink, having been started back in 1962 (the same year that both Walmart and UsefulNotes/{{Kmart}} were founded) by UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} chain Meijer. Even today, Meijer stores outnumber Walmart in Michigan. Walmart didn't expand outside the United States until 1995, when the first Canadian store opened.
** Speaking of Walmart, their sister chain Sam's Club did not come into play until 1983.
* 1983 was also the year that Costco was founded.
* Some motel chains are fairly new. For instance: Baymont Inn (1973 as Budgetel; renamed in 1999), Drury Inn (1973), Hampton Inn (1984), [=AmericInn=] (1984), and Microtel (1989). Newer still are America's Best Value (1999, with sister brand Lexington starting in 2007) and Magnuson (2003), which grew almost entirely by rebranding other properties.

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* The ''[[{{Film/Frankenstein1931}} Frankenstein]]'' ''{{Film/Frankenstein|1931}}'' movie with Creator/BorisKarloff (and other movies made in 1931 with and without Karloff) is older than the country of UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia.
* Although UsefulNotes/{{Walmart}} was founded in 1962, it was not truly a national chain until 1995, when they opened their first location in Vermont. Even as late as 1990, they barely covered half the country.country and were still predominantly a Southern chain. Likewise, they didn't start building "supercenters" (i.e., larger stores with complete grocery sections) until 1988, and did not really push to make all their stores supercenters until the 2000s. In fact, Before then, most of their stores were only half to one-quarter the size they are now (although in some rural parts of the South, this is still the case due to GrandfatherClause) due to the lack of groceries, pharmacies, automotive, and other departments codified by the "supercenter" Walmart has become format. Also, any stores that had a restaurant in them likely had a cafeteria called Radio Grill or a scaled down [=McDonald's=] that only sold a handful of lunch items, not the Subway franchises that are nearly omnipresent in Walmarts today (the affiliation started in 2004). While the "supercenter" concept is now so commonplace with Walmart that they don't even call it that anymore. On the flipside, name is no longer used by the chain, the ''overall'' concept of a "supercenter" is OlderThanTheyThink, having been started back in 1962 (the same year that both Walmart and UsefulNotes/{{Kmart}} were founded) by UsefulNotes/{{Michigan}} chain Meijer. Even today, Meijer stores outnumber Meijer, which still outnumbers Walmart in Michigan. that area. Also, Walmart didn't expand outside the United States until 1995, when the first Canadian store stores opened.
** * Speaking of Walmart, their sister chain Sam's Club did and its main rival, Costco, were not come into play founded until 1983.
* 1983 was also the year Considering how long some hotel brands such as Holiday Inn, Hilton, Marriott, Howard Johnson's, etc. have been around, one would think that Costco was founded.
* Some motel
most other hotel chains are fairly new. of similar vintage, but this is not the case. For instance: Baymont Inn (1973 as Budgetel; renamed in 1999), Drury Inn (1973), Super 8 (1974), Hampton Inn (1984), [=AmericInn=] (1984), and Microtel (1989). Newer still are America's Best Value (1999, with sister brand Lexington starting in 2007) and Magnuson (2003), which grew almost entirely by rebranding other properties.
20th Apr '16 4:23:23 AM JulianLapostat
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* The entire concept of going out to dinner is a 19th century invention (sometimes attributed to Del Monico's, New York, though this may only apply in the US). Before this period (by which time urban living was taking off and most people had disposable income they could never have dreamed of a century earlier), there were obviously places that sold food to be eaten outside of the home, but such places were regarded more as a necessity (for people in transit, or single people with no facility to cook) than a luxury (you certainly wouldn't be taking a date to one, not that dates were something the well-off did in this period anyway- going out alone with a man would be unthinkable for a respectable girl!). Any really good cooking was done by cooks employed in private homes. Social spaces like the tavern would be centered around booze (or, in some finer establishments, coffee).
** Some people attribute the idea to the results of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which left a lot of cooks without employers.

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* The entire concept of going out to dinner is a 19th century invention (sometimes attributed to Del Monico's, New York, though this may only apply in the US). Before this period (by which time urban living was taking off and most people had disposable income they could never have dreamed of a century earlier), there were obviously places that sold food to be eaten outside of the home, but such places were regarded more as a necessity (for people in transit, or single people with no facility to cook) than a luxury (you certainly wouldn't be taking a date to one, not that dates were something the well-off did in this period anyway- going out alone with a man would be unthinkable for a respectable girl!). Any really good cooking was done by cooks employed in private homes. Social spaces like the tavern would be centered around booze (or, in some finer establishments, coffee).
**
coffee). Some people attribute the idea to the results of UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution, which left a lot of cooks without employers.employers, and an urban population that provided a big market.



* Despite being widely seen as one of the symbols of the Ancient World, the Taj Mahal actually wasn't completed until 1653--making it just a little bit over 300 years old. For perspective, the Jamestown Colony had already been standing for over 20 years when construction on the Taj Mahal started, and the palace was barely 200 years old when India became a British colony.
* The ''[[{{Film/Frankenstein1931}} Frankenstein]]'' movie with Creator/BorisKarloff is older than the country of UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia.

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* While UsefulNotes/{{India}} is seen as an ancient civilization, a great part of its landscape, country and history is more recent than you would believe:
**
Despite being widely seen as one of the symbols Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, the Taj Mahal actually wasn't completed until 1653--making it just a little bit over 300 years old. For perspective, the Jamestown Colony had already been standing for over 20 years when construction on the Taj Mahal started, and the palace was barely 200 years old when India became a British colony.
colony. That makes it a contemporary of the Palais de Versailles of UsefulNotes/LouisXIV.
** UsefulNotes/{{Buddhism}} and Jainism is a product of [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Axial_Age the Axial Age]] and as Creator/GoreVidal noted in his novel Literature/{{Creation}} were rough contemporaries of UsefulNotes/{{Confucius}} and {{Socrates}}. The first major Indian Empire, the Mauryas followed the invasion of Alexander. India's oldest active city, Delhi is a "mere" 1000 years old (far younger than Rome, Istanbul, Damascus, Cairo, Athens, London and Paris). The three other major cities (UsefulNotes/{{Bombay}}, Kolkatta, Chennai) are colonial settlements raised to cities, and are essentially the same age as New World cities.
** For most of its history, UsefulNotes/{{Hinduism}} was not called that by its theologians and adherents. They would simple call it dharma (i.e. beliefs or religious duty). Indeed the conception of Hinduism as a separate religion only emerged upon contact with Arab and British conquerors. The word Hinduism in its contemporary usage comes from the late 18th-early 19th Century. Similarly a major number of Indian festivals practised across India come from the 19th Century as part of nationalism, derived in part from previous such events but now dated on the Gregorian Calendar and more specifically organized to unite a broad part of the community.
** India's two oldest epics, Literature/TheMahabharata and Literature/TheRamayana was first written down in the 4th Century CE during the Gupta Empire. The oral tradition and its influence on sculpture and temples dates it even further back in time, but its shelf-life as a written epic is far younger than that of Creator/{{Homer}}'s epics (which existed in written form in the 5th and 4th Century BCE).
* The ''[[{{Film/Frankenstein1931}} Frankenstein]]'' movie with Creator/BorisKarloff (and other movies made in 1931 with and without Karloff) is older than the country of UsefulNotes/SaudiArabia.



* Although Poland has existed as an independent country at various times throughout European history, the Poland of 1939 had only enjoyed about twenty years of independence before it was invaded by the Nazis. When Hitler and Stalin divided up Poland between their respective countries, they were restoring a pre-World War I ''status quo'' which had stood for over a century. Furthermore, the Finland invaded by Stalin in 1939 had never been independent of Russia prior to 1917, about twenty-two years earlier. Incidentally, this helps to explain why Hitler and Stalin felt that they were entitled to these countries -- they saw them as illegitimate breakaway provinces.

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* Although Poland UsefulNotes/{{Poland}} has existed as an independent country at various times throughout European history, the Poland of 1939 had only enjoyed about twenty years of independence before it was invaded by the Nazis. Nazis.
**
When Hitler and Stalin divided up Poland between their respective countries, they were restoring a pre-World War I ''status quo'' which had stood for over a century. Furthermore, the Finland invaded by Stalin in 1939 had never been independent of Russia prior to 1917, about twenty-two years earlier. Incidentally, this helps to explain why Hitler and Stalin felt that they were entitled to territories from these countries nations -- they saw them as illegitimate breakaway provinces.boundaries.
** Polish territory itself greatly evolved throughout the centuries and the territories comprising the Kresy (the area of land the Soviets took over, and today comprising modern day Belarus and Ukraine) was historically land that had been ruled by a minority of Polish nobility (as per the UsefulNotes/PolishLithuanianCommonwealth where only nobles comprised a nation). The Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth is confusing for which parts of its makeup includes Poland, and which includes Lithuania, Ukraine, Latvia, and other neighbouring lands.
** Modern day Poland's borders were drawn by the Soviet Union, its eastern territories were annexed away but "to compensate" Poland and also to neuter UsefulNotes/{{Germany}} from another invasion of the East, the Soviets bestowed to the new nation territory from Germany's Eastern Provinces of Silesia and Pomerania. The native German population was expelled (as well as population from Czechoslovakia and other nations which were given parts of Old German territory).
16th Apr '16 4:45:15 PM Alceister
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** It was UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution which first advanced universal ''male'' suffrage[[note]]That is all men, regardless of wealth and property, regardless of race and religion: which meant French blacks, French Jews, French Protestants, which they put into effect in 1792[[note]](and enshrined by law in the 1793 Constitution which was never implemented on account of the Emergency situation of the ReignOfTerror)[[/note]] after the Storming of the Tuilleries, when France was in the middle of Civil War and instability, which meant that only a small part of the population voted anyway (Mostly the Paris Basin area). The Second French Revolution of 1848, which brought back universal ''male'' suffrage after the Directory and Napoleonic reversal, had greater voter turnout but since the Forty-Eighters had no support base across France[[note]]They were a mix of Centrists, Nostalgic Neo-Jacobins and Socialists, and the centrists (such as Alexis de Tocqueville) wanted nothing to do with the others and backed efforts to suppress the other parties, which prevented any broad republican consensus on the Left[[/note]] and lacked a proper candidate, the man who got voted in was Napoleon III, cue comedian Creator/KarlMarx: "First time as tragedy, second time as farce."

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** It was UsefulNotes/TheFrenchRevolution which first advanced universal ''male'' suffrage[[note]]That is all men, regardless of wealth and property, regardless of race and religion: which meant French blacks, French Jews, French Protestants, which they put into effect in 1792[[note]](and 1792 (and enshrined by law in the 1793 Constitution Constitution, which was never implemented on account of the Emergency situation of the ReignOfTerror)[[/note]] after the Storming of the Tuilleries, when France was in the middle of Civil War and instability, which meant that only a small part of the population voted anyway (Mostly the Paris Basin area). The Second French Revolution of 1848, which brought back universal ''male'' suffrage after the Directory and Napoleonic reversal, had greater voter turnout but since the Forty-Eighters had no support base across France[[note]]They were a mix of Centrists, Nostalgic Neo-Jacobins and Socialists, and the centrists (such as Alexis de Tocqueville) wanted nothing to do with the others and backed efforts to suppress the other parties, which prevented any broad republican consensus on the Left[[/note]] and lacked a proper candidate, the man who got voted in was Napoleon III, cue comedian Creator/KarlMarx: "First time as tragedy, second time as farce."
12th Apr '16 6:15:54 AM Tropetastic1995
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** Contrary to what many fans believe, [[SpiderMan the Venom Symbiote]] was actually rather passive and nonaggressive when Spidey first donned it in ''ComicBook/SecretWars'', and Peter only got rid of it once he realized it was a living organism that had a habit of taking his body crimefighting while he was asleep. It wasn't until the 1994 cartoon series that the Venom Symbiote gained the "slowly turn Peter into an aggressive asshole" status it's now famous for. This aspect of it became RetCanon, though - explained as ''Eddie Brock's influence'' turning the ''symbiote'' bad.

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** Contrary to what many fans believe, [[SpiderMan the Venom Symbiote]] was actually rather passive and nonaggressive when Spidey first donned it in ''ComicBook/SecretWars'', and Peter only got rid of it once he realized it was a living organism that had a habit of taking his body crimefighting while he was asleep. It wasn't until the 1994 cartoon series that the Venom Symbiote gained the "slowly turn Peter into an aggressive asshole" status it's now famous for. This aspect of it became RetCanon, though - explained as ''Eddie Brock's influence'' turning the ''symbiote'' bad. Later on it was retconned that the Symbiote had briefly bonded to Deadpool before bonding to Spider-Man as it's proper host, and that having come into contact with Deadpool's mind is what caused it to have a negative influence on Peter, sending it on a downward spiral after bonding with Brock.
4th Apr '16 6:23:47 PM Random888
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* Seasonal allergies weren't identified as a condition until 1819. They were named "hay fever", after the mistaken belief that they were caused by exposure to recently cut hay (by coincidence, allergy season coincided with haying season). A link between hay fever and pollen was demonstrated in 1859, but the condition was still not really understood. It wasn't until 1902 that allergies were discovered. The term "allergy" itself was coined in 1906 and it didn't come into wide currency until the 1920s. All in all, an awareness that some people are allergic to certain things is only about one century old. One reason for this may be that allergies appear to have been rare in pre-industrial times, just as they continue to be rare in developing countries. Even when hay fever was first documented in the 19th century, it was considered to be a rare condition associated with the upper classes.

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* Seasonal allergies weren't identified as a condition until 1819. They were named "hay fever", after the mistaken belief that they were caused by exposure to recently cut hay (by coincidence, allergy season coincided with haying season). A link between hay fever and pollen was demonstrated in 1859, but the condition was still not really understood. It wasn't until 1902 that allergies were discovered. The term "allergy" itself was coined in 1906 and it didn't come into wide currency until the 1920s. All in all, an awareness that some people are allergic to certain things is only about one century old. One reason for this may be that allergies appear to have been rare in pre-industrial times, just as they continue to be rare in developing countries. Even when hay fever was first documented in the 19th century, it was considered to be a rare condition associated with the upper classes. A common theory is that allergies are an unintended side effect of improved sanitation, the result of immune systems attempting to compensate for the sudden lack of real disease.
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