History Main / NewerThanTheyThink

27th Jun '17 6:18:35 PM LaptopGuy
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* "Bolero" must have been around since at least the 19th century, right? Wrong, it was composed by Maurice Ravel in 1928.
* "Sabre Dance", composed by Aram Khachaturian in 1941, is widely believed to be a piece of the turn of the 20th century, due to its similarities to the 1900 piece "Flight of the Bumblebee".
27th Jun '17 2:52:13 PM MBG159
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** The iconic look of Gotham City (perpetually dark skies, gargoyles everywhere, crumbling infrastructure, old-school buildings, {{Bizarrechitecture}} in general) is similarly a creation of the film - specifically of production designer Anton Furst. The look was brought into the comics in a largely-forgotten 1992 storyline involving an insane architect; prior to then, Gotham mostly looked like a normal city.


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* The idea that all of Batman's villains are varying degrees of insane is fairly young, as well. Though ComicBook/TheJoker has pretty much always been crazy, Arkham Asylum wasn't introduced until 1974 and wasn't consistently called that until 1979. It wasn't really associated with Batman's rogues then, either; most of them were either regular crimelords or traditional supervillains. As late as 1986's Who's Who, only a handful of villains were listed as Arkham residents (Joker, Two-Face, Mad Hatter, Maxie Zeus, and [[ComicBook/SwampThing Floronic Man]]). The idea seems to have been codified by a mix of the Post-Crisis era giving writers carte blanche to redesign villains into more deranged figures, and the popularity of ''ComicBook/ArkhamAsylumASeriousHouseOnSeriousEarth''.
26th Jun '17 3:20:22 PM JulianLapostat
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-> ''Nothing appears more ancient, and linked to the immemorial past, than the pageantry which surrounds British monarchy in its public ceremonial manifestations. Yet,...in its modern form it is the product of the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. 'Traditions' which appear or claim to be old are often quite recent in origin and sometimes invented.''
-->-- '''Eric Hobsbawm''', ''The Invention of Tradition''
25th Jun '17 9:34:27 AM nombretomado
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* The now-ubiquitous practice of wide releases was pretty much invented by ''Film/{{Jaws}}''. Before 1975, movies were treated more like road shows, released to a few theatres first, and gradually rolled out to the rest of the world for as long as they continued to be successful. This custom led to movies having much, much longer theatrical runs than they do today; a blockbuster like ''Film/TheSoundOfMusic'' or ''TheExorcist'' could easily spend over a year on the big screen, even before re-releases. ''Jaws'' bucked convention by instead releasing to thousands of theatres immediately; this strategy was so successful that the rest of the industry quickly followed suit.

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* The now-ubiquitous practice of wide releases was pretty much invented by ''Film/{{Jaws}}''. Before 1975, movies were treated more like road shows, released to a few theatres first, and gradually rolled out to the rest of the world for as long as they continued to be successful. This custom led to movies having much, much longer theatrical runs than they do today; a blockbuster like ''Film/TheSoundOfMusic'' or ''TheExorcist'' ''Film/TheExorcist'' could easily spend over a year on the big screen, even before re-releases. ''Jaws'' bucked convention by instead releasing to thousands of theatres immediately; this strategy was so successful that the rest of the industry quickly followed suit.
19th Jun '17 10:18:21 PM Twentington
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* Macy's was largely exclusive to the East Coast for most of its history (barring a few scattered stores in the South, plus short-lived entries into Toledo and Kansas City) until TheNineties, when it began acquiring a myriad of other department store chains in its merger with Federated Department Stores. It didn't become truly national until 2006, when it acquired the entire line of department stores from the May Company.

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* Macy's was largely exclusive to the East Coast for most of its history (barring a few scattered stores in the South, South and California, plus short-lived failed entries into Toledo and Kansas City) until TheNineties, when it began acquiring a myriad of other department store chains in its merger with Federated Department Stores. It didn't become truly national until 2006, when it acquired the entire line of department stores from the May Company.



** Forever 21 was founded in 1984, which already makes it young for a clothing chain; it did not open stores outside California until the end of TheNineties.

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** Forever 21 was founded in 1984, which already makes it young for a clothing chain; chain, but it did not open stores outside California until the end of TheNineties.
19th Jun '17 11:45:48 AM Bicorn
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* The eight arrow symbol of Chaos is not an "ancient occult symbol" like some modern occult enthusiasts think; it was designed by the writer Creator/MichaelMoorcock in the sixties.
19th Jun '17 6:37:07 AM system
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19th Jun '17 4:57:54 AM DeathToTVTropes
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** [[LifeImitatesArt Sadly, this is no longer true. After the 2003 occupation of Iraq, a working Iron Maiden was found in the dungeons of Uday Hussein.]]
18th Jun '17 9:59:37 AM nombretomado
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* Princesses are among the most recognizable characters in the Creator/{{Disney}} studios' wheelhouse, but it hasn't always been that way. Of the [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon nineteen animated films]] that WaltDisney made during his lifetime, only three of them were "princess" films: ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' (1937), ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' (1950), and ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'' (1959). Walt felt that he had nothing else to contribute to the genre after ''Snow White'', and wanted to spend his time working with other genres. He only made ''Cinderella'' because ''Snow White'' was popular and his studio really needed the money, and he made ''Sleeping Beauty'' because he felt that he could bring something different to the table (mainly, an adaption that focused more on its villain and side characters than its main characters). The Disney studios would not release another "princess" film until ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' (1989) [[note]] an unconventional example in that the character filling the princess role wore hardly any clothes and in fact was not even human (and barely humanoid, at that) [[/note]], and the Franchise/DisneyPrincess franchise would not actually exist until 2000.

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* Princesses are among the most recognizable characters in the Creator/{{Disney}} studios' wheelhouse, but it hasn't always been that way. Of the [[Franchise/DisneyAnimatedCanon nineteen animated films]] that WaltDisney Creator/WaltDisney made during his lifetime, only three of them were "princess" films: ''Disney/SnowWhiteAndTheSevenDwarfs'' (1937), ''Disney/{{Cinderella}}'' (1950), and ''Disney/SleepingBeauty'' (1959). Walt felt that he had nothing else to contribute to the genre after ''Snow White'', and wanted to spend his time working with other genres. He only made ''Cinderella'' because ''Snow White'' was popular and his studio really needed the money, and he made ''Sleeping Beauty'' because he felt that he could bring something different to the table (mainly, an adaption that focused more on its villain and side characters than its main characters). The Disney studios would not release another "princess" film until ''Disney/TheLittleMermaid'' (1989) [[note]] an unconventional example in that the character filling the princess role wore hardly any clothes and in fact was not even human (and barely humanoid, at that) [[/note]], and the Franchise/DisneyPrincess franchise would not actually exist until 2000.
17th Jun '17 8:51:15 PM Naram-Sin
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** The severity of the Spanish Inquisition was greatly exaggerated by Protestant propaganda--ironically, from the same countries who accused Spain of being "soft" just a century before.

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** The severity of the Spanish Inquisition was greatly exaggerated by Protestant propaganda--ironically, sometimes from the same countries who accused Spain of being "soft" with non-Christians just a century before.before (see below).
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