History Main / NewerThanTheyThink

23rd Mar '17 1:37:39 PM apLundell
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* Tarot cards were not used for telling fortunes until the 18th century. While they indeed date back to medieval times, they were purely used for playing card games.

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* Tarot cards for divination, that are distinct from playing cards, were not used for telling fortunes produced until the 18th century. While they indeed date back to medieval times, they Before then, Tarot cards were purely used for simply a style of playing cards and were not considered any better or worse for divination than any other style of playing card.
**Not only that, the deck that many people think of as "classic" or "original" tarot cards is the Rider-Waite Deck, introduced specifically for divination in the 1910s. Much of modern Tarot's symbolism, and even some of the
card games.identities, were invented for this deck.
23rd Mar '17 11:56:55 AM JulianLapostat
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* Some sociologists claim that the theory of evolution was used to justify the slave trade; in reality, Darwin published ''On the Origin of Species'' in 1859, ''after'' most of the western world had already abandoned slavery. (The concept of biological evolution actually dates back to the 18th century, but it wasn't until ''On the Origin of Species'' was published that a scientifically plausible model of evolution was presented.) This argument is made even sillier by the fact that Darwin himself was strongly abolitionist, as noted in his autobiography, having many aggressive arguments with the captain of the ''Beagle'' over his support of slavery.
** The Captain of the ''Beagle'', ironically, was a Fundamentalist-type Christian who later attacked Darwin over his theory and became a champion of anti-Darwinian Christians.
** They're probably thinking of the Polygenesis theory. (Which Darwin ''also'' opposed)
** Similarly, people have attempted to blame "Darwinism" for Communism, despite the fact that ''The Communist Manifesto'' was published in 1848, eleven years before Darwin went public.
** Darwin has also been blamed for eugenics (including the Nazis') despite notions of "pure/tainted/inferior" or "royal/aristocratic/common" bloodlines and the associated "selective breeding" for humans being nearly as old as animal husbandry, which is thousands of years old, not to mention that Darwin himself declared the whole idea of eugenics to be "evil" and damaging to "the noblest part of our nature" in his book ''The Descent of Man''.
*** That being said, Darwin had a number of [[PoisonousFriend Poisonous Friends]] who helped to associate his name with the practice, resulting in the name of Social Darwinism, a concept the man himself abhorred.
* The [[RainbowMotif "seven colours of the rainbow"]] as we know them derive from Isaac Newton's experiments in optics in the 1670s, where he first observed the spectrum of sunlight split by a prism. Finding that his numerological theories worked better with a seven colour spectrum, he convinced himself that the area between blue and purple was an entirely separate colour, which he named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo "indigo"]] after the blue dye.
** Actually, because indigo is so indistinguishable from blue and purple, it is possible that Newton's "blue" referred to cyan and his "indigo" referred to our blue, which would make more sense (other languages use a TranslationCorrection often enough). This can clearly be seen in the coin-op VideoGame/RainbowIslands, in which the "blue" gems are cyan and the "indigo" gems are blue. It would also make indigo not being perceived as a real color NewerThanTheyThink.
** Because of the urban myth that "the" primary colours (actually the ''subtractive'' primaries) are "yellow, red and blue", magenta and cyan are sometimes referred to in the printing trade as "process red" and "process blue" respectively. This is borne out by a colour-mixing chart on TheOtherWiki, which shows "red" and "blue" which are clearly what we now call magenta and cyan.
* And even Newton only managed to find seven colors in light separated by a prism (that is, under controlled lab condition). In an actual rainbow, you'll be lucky to see ''four'' colors.

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* Some sociologists claim that the theory of evolution was used to justify the slave trade; in reality, Darwin published ''On the Origin of Species'' in 1859, ''after'' most of the western world had already abandoned slavery. (The concept of biological evolution actually dates back to the 18th century, but it wasn't until ''On the Origin of Species'' was published that a scientifically plausible model of evolution was presented.) This argument is made even sillier by the fact that Darwin himself was strongly abolitionist, as noted in his autobiography, having many aggressive arguments with the captain of the ''Beagle'' over his support of slavery.
** The Captain of the ''Beagle'', ironically, was a Fundamentalist-type Christian who later attacked Darwin over his theory and became a champion of anti-Darwinian Christians.
** They're probably thinking of the Polygenesis theory. (Which Darwin ''also'' opposed)
** Similarly, people have attempted to blame "Darwinism" for Communism, despite the fact that ''The Communist Manifesto'' was published in 1848, eleven years before Darwin went public.
** Darwin has also been blamed for eugenics (including the Nazis') despite notions of "pure/tainted/inferior" or "royal/aristocratic/common" bloodlines and the associated "selective breeding" for humans being nearly as old as animal husbandry, which is thousands of years old, not to mention that Darwin himself declared the whole idea of eugenics to be "evil" and damaging to "the noblest part of our nature" in his book ''The Descent of Man''.
*** That being said, Darwin had a number of [[PoisonousFriend Poisonous Friends]] who helped to associate his name with the practice, resulting in the name of Social Darwinism, a concept the man himself abhorred.
* The [[RainbowMotif "seven colours of the rainbow"]] as we know them derive from Isaac Newton's experiments in optics in the 1670s, where he first observed the spectrum of sunlight split by a prism. Finding that his numerological theories worked better with a seven colour spectrum, he convinced himself that the area between blue and purple was an entirely separate colour, which he named [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indigo "indigo"]] after the blue dye.
** Actually, because
dye. Since indigo is so indistinguishable from blue and purple, it is possible that Newton's "blue" referred to cyan and his "indigo" referred to our blue, which would make more sense (other languages use a TranslationCorrection often enough). This can clearly be seen in the coin-op VideoGame/RainbowIslands, in which the "blue" gems are cyan and the "indigo" gems are blue. It would also make indigo not being perceived as a real color NewerThanTheyThink.
** Because of Thanks to the urban myth that "the" primary colours (actually the ''subtractive'' primaries) are "yellow, red and blue", magenta and cyan are sometimes referred to in the printing trade as "process red" and "process blue" respectively. This is borne out by a colour-mixing chart on TheOtherWiki, which shows "red" and "blue" which are clearly what we now call magenta and cyan.
* And even ** Even Newton only managed to find seven colors in light separated by a prism (that is, under controlled lab condition). In an actual rainbow, you'll be lucky to see ''four'' colors.



* The Catholic Church first recognized heliocentrism in 1822.
** However, they simultaneously rejected and embraced (depending on who you talked to) Kepler's heliocentrism in the early 17th Century, decades before they hired Galileo. Needless to say, Church history is annoyingly complicated.
** Note, Galileo's problems with the Church leadership had less to do with challenging established orthodoxy (which was actually science) and more to do with his being an InsufferableGenius who would mostly back up his theories with "Because I'm smarter than you" rather than explain how he arrived at his conclusions. Since the Pope was financing his research, you can imagine how well that went over.

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* The Catholic Church first recognized heliocentrism in 1822.
**
1822. However, they simultaneously rejected and embraced (depending on who you talked to) Kepler's heliocentrism in the early 17th Century, decades before they hired Galileo. Needless to say, Church history is annoyingly complicated.
**
complicated Note, Galileo's problems with the Church leadership had less to do with challenging established orthodoxy (which was actually science) and more to do with his being an InsufferableGenius who would mostly back up his theories with "Because I'm smarter than you" rather than explain how he arrived at his conclusions. Since the Pope was financing his research, you can imagine how well that went over.
22nd Mar '17 10:11:51 AM nightkiller
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** The Super Bowl itself. Not only was it not called that until 1970. It was also ''not sold out'' in its first edition and considered something of an anti-climax as nobody took the AFL entrant seriously. Until the New York Jets showed the AFL had GrownTheBeard in Super Bowl III where the NFL Baltimore Colts never got a foot on the ground. Oh and the Vince Lombardi trophy? Not called that in the first four Super Bowls, either - they were named after the Green Bay coach who won the first two

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** The Super Bowl itself. Not only was it not called that officially until 1970. It was also ''not sold out'' in its first edition and considered something of an anti-climax as nobody took the AFL entrant seriously. Until the New York Jets showed the AFL had GrownTheBeard in Super Bowl III where the NFL Baltimore Colts never got a foot on the ground. Oh and the Vince Lombardi trophy? Not called that in the first four Super Bowls, either - they were named after the Green Bay coach who won the first two
22nd Mar '17 9:57:17 AM nightkiller
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**** Time Magazine used it in September 1939. Patton employed it in his June 5, 1944 speech to his troops.
11th Mar '17 9:32:09 PM bt8257
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Congratulations: You've learned that some things are Newer Than They Think -- a relatively recent invention that people tend to assume has much deeper roots in history and popular culture than it actually does -- or the roots are considerably further from the end result than you realize. It usually arises from the myth being presented as part of an older myth and tied into it; or the assumption that because the mythology is ''old'', it hasn't been ''changed''. Sometimes the trope really ''is'' as old as they think, but it's only become popular within recent historical memory.

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Congratulations: You've learned that some things are Newer Than They Think -- a relatively recent invention that people tend to assume has much deeper roots in history and popular culture than it actually does -- or the roots are considerably further from the end result than you realize. It usually arises from the myth being presented as part of an older myth and tied into it; an older myth; or the assumption that because the mythology is ''old'', it hasn't been ''changed''. Sometimes the trope really ''is'' as old as they think, but it's only become popular within recent historical memory.
11th Mar '17 12:15:44 PM JulianLapostat
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* The song "New York, New York" popularized by Music/FrankSinatra (the one that starts "Start spreadin' the news ...") was written for the 1977 Creator/MartinScorsese musical ''New York, New York''; since the film was based in the Tin Pan Alley era, the song [[{{Retraux}} sounded like a tune from that era]]. Sinatra recorded his version in 1979 and it became the final hit single in his long musical career.

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* The song "New York, New York" popularized by Music/FrankSinatra (the one that starts "Start spreadin' the news ...") was written for the 1977 Creator/MartinScorsese musical ''New York, New York''; ''Film/NewYorkNewYork''; since the film was based in the Tin Pan Alley era, the song [[{{Retraux}} sounded like a tune from that era]]. Sinatra recorded his version in 1979 and it became the final hit single in his long musical career.
11th Mar '17 12:01:43 PM thelivingtoad
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* The song "New York, New York" popularized by Music/FrankSinatra (the one that starts "Start spreadin' the news ...") was written for the 1977 Creator/MartinScorsese musical ''New York, New York''; since the film was based in the Tin Pan Alley era, the song [[{{Retraux}} sounded like a tune from that era]]. Sinatra recorded his version in 1979.

to:

* The song "New York, New York" popularized by Music/FrankSinatra (the one that starts "Start spreadin' the news ...") was written for the 1977 Creator/MartinScorsese musical ''New York, New York''; since the film was based in the Tin Pan Alley era, the song [[{{Retraux}} sounded like a tune from that era]]. Sinatra recorded his version in 1979.1979 and it became the final hit single in his long musical career.
10th Mar '17 1:02:10 PM UltimateLazer
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Added DiffLines:

* Ask a non-comic book reader to name members of the ComicBook/SuicideSquad, and they'll likely name Deadshot, Captain Boomerang, and... Harley Quinn? Actually, while the former two are regulars of the squad, Harley Quinn was never a member until the ComicBook/New52 relaunch in ''2011''. Thanks to [[Film/SuicideSquad the movie]], she's now quite possibly the most well-known member of the squad.
27th Feb '17 7:29:42 PM CptnLhurgoyf
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* Tarot cards were not used for telling fortunes until the 18th century. While they indeed date back to medieval times, they were purely used for playing card games.
25th Feb '17 7:41:10 PM nombretomado
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* The song "New York, New York" popularized by FrankSinatra (the one that starts "Start spreadin' the news ...") was written for the 1977 Creator/MartinScorsese musical ''New York, New York''; since the film was based in the Tin Pan Alley era, the song [[{{Retraux}} sounded like a tune from that era]]. Sinatra recorded his version in 1979.

to:

* The song "New York, New York" popularized by FrankSinatra Music/FrankSinatra (the one that starts "Start spreadin' the news ...") was written for the 1977 Creator/MartinScorsese musical ''New York, New York''; since the film was based in the Tin Pan Alley era, the song [[{{Retraux}} sounded like a tune from that era]]. Sinatra recorded his version in 1979.
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