History Main / NeverNeedsSharpening

9th Jun '17 9:58:22 PM The_Pyro_Jawsome
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** A similar can of worms was opened with [[VideoGame/NoMansSky No Man's Sky]] touting the exact same thing.... and did the exact same thing. It went over worse since literally everyone was [[HypeBacklash hyped for the infinite universe the game promised]]. Chances are you know how it went.
9th Jun '17 9:50:17 PM The_Pyro_Jawsome
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** Speaking of Fallout, [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]] goes into exactly what makes currency valuable. In that instance, genuine caps are valuable because of how they were machined, colored, etc, while paper money printed by the New California Republic is not as valuable as the amount of caps it's supposed to represent, since not too many people in the Mojave use it, defaulting to caps until NCR dollars become backed by the cap enough to be of equal value. Pre-war money and caps trade at a one-to-one exchange because the markings are what make them valuable to post-apocalypse America; the numbers don't mean shit now that the American gold standard is no more. This is also the whole point of the gold standard, X amount of Country A's currency is worth this amount in gold, thus giving it it's value. Counterfeit money is not backed by the standard, thus making it worthless.
6th Jun '17 8:05:49 AM Xemylixa
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** Murder mystery reality show ''Series/{{Whodunnit}}'' did something similar, proclaiming in its finale that it had generated a lot of internet buzz. But that buzz centered around viewers that thought the the show was actually killing contestants instead of just fake-killing them, and the show was unremarkable otherwise.

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** Murder mystery reality show ''Series/{{Whodunnit}}'' did something similar, proclaiming in its finale that it had generated a lot of internet buzz. But that buzz centered around viewers that thought the the show was actually killing contestants instead of just fake-killing them, and the show was unremarkable otherwise.



* In most diamond mines, alongside the select few that are the most desirable colors (clear, yellow, pink, green and blue) there tends to be a large number of undesirable diamonds that are only able to be sold as industrial diamonds (such as for diamond-tipped power tools) because they have a dirty brown color to them. Industrial diamonds are far cheaper than diamonds for jewelry, so to try to push them into the more lucrative jewelry market, there's been a push to marketing them as "chocolate diamonds." This had been done once before, in the 70s, they were marketed as "cognac diamonds" and pushed as the more masculine alternative to white diamonds and better suited for men's jewelry. They're trying again, but now with different sexist undertones (women will buy anything as long as we call it chocolate). The irony is that brown diamonds can be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_diamonds#/media/File:National_Museum_of_Natural_History_Gold_Colored_Diamonds.JPG quite lovely]] even without the marketing spin.
* A big fuss was made about VideoGame/{{Spore}} before its release regarding it "always having something new" so you can "play it forever" because of its procedurally generated worlds and player-made content. In the released version, the procedural generation does not have any tangible effect on gameplay, so "playing forever" really just entails doing the same things over and over again as you would in any other game, but with different models and a lot less depth than others like it so as not to risk doing anything with those models that the spline system couldn't handle well. Yes, you could play it forever and always see new things... but they never promised that doing so would be ''fun''.

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* In most diamond mines, alongside the select few that are the most desirable colors (clear, yellow, pink, green and blue) there tends to be a large number of undesirable diamonds that are only able to be sold as industrial diamonds (such as for diamond-tipped power tools) because they have a dirty brown color to them. Industrial diamonds are far cheaper than diamonds for jewelry, so to try to push them into the more lucrative jewelry market, there's been a push to marketing them as "chocolate diamonds." This had been done once before, in the 70s, they were marketed as "cognac diamonds" and pushed as the more masculine alternative to white diamonds and better suited for men's jewelry. They're trying again, but now with different sexist undertones (women will buy Now the target audience is women, and anything as long as we call it chocolate). called chocolate supposedly feels more feminine. The irony is that is, brown diamonds can be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_diamonds#/media/File:National_Museum_of_Natural_History_Gold_Colored_Diamonds.JPG quite lovely]] even without the marketing spin.
* A big fuss was made about VideoGame/{{Spore}} ''VideoGame/{{Spore}}'' before its release regarding it "always having something new" so you can "play it forever" because of its procedurally generated worlds and player-made content. In the released version, the procedural generation does not have any tangible effect on gameplay, so "playing forever" really just entails doing the same things over and over again as you would in any other game, but with different models and a lot less depth than others like it so as not to risk doing anything with those models that the spline system couldn't handle well. Yes, you could play it forever and always see new things... but they never promised that doing so would be ''fun''.
27th May '17 12:45:12 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item by paying the retail price. Can't afford the MSRP? Well, then you're ''boned''.

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* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item by applying the money you spent on bids toward retail price and paying the retail price. difference. Can't afford the full MSRP? Well, then you're ''boned''.
27th May '17 12:28:40 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item by paying MSRP. Can't afford MSRP? You're ''boned''.

to:

* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item by paying MSRP. the retail price. Can't afford the MSRP? You're Well, then you're ''boned''.
27th May '17 12:20:17 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item... by paying MSRP.

to:

* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item... item by paying MSRP.MSRP. Can't afford MSRP? You're ''boned''.
27th May '17 12:10:25 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item... by paying MSRP.
22nd May '17 3:23:35 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* The International Star Registry runs a similar scam, offering to name a star for your loved one and record the name in the Library of Congress for posterity. They really will do that for you, because the Library of Congress couldn't care less either way; so long as you pay the requisite fee, you could rename every star in the galaxy "Soiled Underpants" and register it with them if you wanted, but it would have no bearing on what the International Astronomical Union officially designates as a star's name.

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* The International Star Registry runs a similar scam, offering to name a star for your loved one and record the name in the Library of Congress for posterity. They really will do that for you, because the Library of Congress couldn't care less either way; so long as you pay the requisite fee, you could rename every star in the galaxy "Soiled Underpants" and register it with them if you wanted, but it would have no bearing on what the International Astronomical Union officially designates as a star's name. To their credit, the Star Registry website ''does'' admit as much if you poke around in their FAQ.
22nd May '17 3:19:40 PM Miracle@StOlaf
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* The International Star Registry runs a similar scam, offering to name a star for your loved one and record the name in the Library of Congress for posterity. They really will do that for you, because the Library of Congress couldn't care less either way; so long as you pay the requisite fee, you could rename every star in the galaxy "Soiled Underpants" and register it with them if you wanted, but it would have no bearing on what the International Astronomical Union officially designates as a star's name.
4th Apr '17 1:04:26 PM Trueman001
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* The credits of the {{Creator/Pixar}} movie {{WesternAnimation/Ratatouille}} included the claim "No stop-motion! Only genuine animation used!" -- probably as a TakeThat at WesternAnimation/ThePolarExpress.

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* The credits of the {{Creator/Pixar}} movie {{WesternAnimation/Ratatouille}} included the claim "No stop-motion! motion capture! Only genuine animation used!" -- probably as a TakeThat at WesternAnimation/ThePolarExpress.
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