History Main / NeverNeedsSharpening

9th Feb '16 6:02:00 AM DaibhidC
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* The Highland Titles website assures potential buyers of a "souvenir plot" in the Scottish Highlands that their purchase does not need to be registered. It doesn't say that this is because the Scottish Land Registry does not consider this to be a genuine sale of land, and that legally, the plot remains with Highland Titles.
30th Jan '16 10:20:40 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Open-world games that advertise how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to take away is something like "we had so many ideas to put in the game that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this". What actually happens is that the size of the map was seemingly set in stone in the first meeting, simply to one-up whatever game from last year had the previously-largest playable area, ''before'' actually thinking up anything to fill it with - ending up with an impressively-massive game world that's a chore to navigate and, outside of the city you begin in, is almost entirely boring and lifeless.
to:
** [[WideOpenSandbox Open-world games games]] that advertise make a big deal in advertising about how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to take away is something like "we had so many ideas to put in the game that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this". What actually happens more often seems to be the case is that the size of the map was seemingly set in stone in the first meeting, simply to one-up whatever game from last year had the previously-largest playable area, ''before'' actually thinking up anything to fill it with - ending up with an impressively-massive game world that's a chore to navigate and, outside of the city you begin in, is almost entirely boring and lifeless.

* When first issued to troops in Vietnam, the M16 was described as a 'self-cleaning' weapon (this only applied to the gas system) which led to its notorious unreliability, until the military issued cleaning kits and trained the soldiers in GunStripping like they should have done in the first place, made modifications to the powder used in the cartridges and the rifle itself.
to:
* When first issued to troops in Vietnam, the M16 was described as a 'self-cleaning' weapon (this only applied to the gas system) which led to its notorious unreliability, until the military issued cleaning kits and kits, trained the soldiers in GunStripping how to maintain the weapon like they should have done in the first place, and made modifications to the powder used in the cartridges (to help prevent undue fouling) and the rifle itself.itself (to actually facilitate cleaning and maintenance; the earliest version could only fix issues via near-complete disassembly).
20th Jan '16 1:22:15 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Open-world games that advertise how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to take away is something like "we had so many ideas that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this", but it often comes across more as them having set the size of the map in stone simply to be larger than the previously-largest game world, ''before'' thinking up anything to fill it with, and ending up with a massive game world that's a chore to navigate and is mostly boring and empty. * Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!"[[note]] Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]]. "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]] One of a kind! [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals.
to:
** Open-world games that advertise how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to take away is something like "we had so many ideas to put in the game that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this", but it often comes across more as them having set this". What actually happens is that the size of the map was seemingly set in stone in the first meeting, simply to be larger than one-up whatever game from last year had the previously-largest game world, playable area, ''before'' actually thinking up anything to fill it with, and with - ending up with a massive an impressively-massive game world that's a chore to navigate and and, outside of the city you begin in, is mostly almost entirely boring and empty. lifeless. * Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!"[[note]] Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]]. it[[/note]], "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]] One [[/note]], and "One of a kind! kind!" [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals.
15th Jan '16 1:46:20 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** Murder mystery reality show ''Series/{{Whodunnit}}'' did something similar, proclaiming in its finale that it had generated a lot of internet buzz. But that buzz centered around viewers that [[ViewersAreMorons thought the the show was actually killing contestants instead of just fake-killing them]], and the show was unremarkable otherwise.
to:
** Murder mystery reality show ''Series/{{Whodunnit}}'' did something similar, proclaiming in its finale that it had generated a lot of internet buzz. But that buzz centered around viewers that [[ViewersAreMorons thought the the show was actually killing contestants instead of just fake-killing them]], them, and the show was unremarkable otherwise.
14th Jan '16 9:41:26 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In most diamond mines, alongside the select few that are the most desirable colors (clear, yellow, pink, green and blue) there tends to be a large number of undesirable diamonds that are only able to be sold as industrial diamonds (such as for diamond-tipped power tools) because they have a dirty brown color to them. Industrial diamonds are far cheaper than diamonds for jewelry, so to try to push them into the more lucrative jewelry market, there's been a push to marketing them as "chocolate diamonds." This had been done once before, in the 70s, they were marketed as "cognac diamonds" and pushed as the more masculine alternative to white diamonds and better suited for men's jewelry. They're trying again, but now with different sexist undertones (women will buy anything as long as we call it chocolate). The irony is that brown diamonds can be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_diamonds#/media/File:National_Museum_of_Natural_History_Gold_Colored_Diamonds.JPG quite lovely without the marketing spin]].
to:
* In most diamond mines, alongside the select few that are the most desirable colors (clear, yellow, pink, green and blue) there tends to be a large number of undesirable diamonds that are only able to be sold as industrial diamonds (such as for diamond-tipped power tools) because they have a dirty brown color to them. Industrial diamonds are far cheaper than diamonds for jewelry, so to try to push them into the more lucrative jewelry market, there's been a push to marketing them as "chocolate diamonds." This had been done once before, in the 70s, they were marketed as "cognac diamonds" and pushed as the more masculine alternative to white diamonds and better suited for men's jewelry. They're trying again, but now with different sexist undertones (women will buy anything as long as we call it chocolate). The irony is that brown diamonds can be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_diamonds#/media/File:National_Museum_of_Natural_History_Gold_Colored_Diamonds.JPG quite lovely lovely]] even without the marketing spin]].spin.
14th Jan '16 9:40:53 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Miracle Blade uses the same phrase for the same reason. They also spin the thinness of the blade in an attempt to muddle the concepts of sharpness and thinness in viewers' minds. Chef Tony can slice food more thinly than you can because he's more experienced and practiced doing that for the routine, not because his knife is thinner than yours. Thin blades wear out more quickly and can even snap during use, sending shards of sharp metal flying around the place and possibly into your food ([[EyeScream if not worse places]]). Sure, thinness and sharpness actually are linked... but only for ''the actual cutting edge.'' One reason that obsidian has long been a favored material for cutting implements is the fact that it's relatively easy to make ''incredibly'' thin, sharp edges on it, and this is also the principle behind the common science-fiction concept of [[SharpenedToASingleAtom monomolecular blades]]. As mentioned above, the downside is that it's difficult for such a thin edge to actually remain sharp for long... and also as mentioned above, making the ''rest of the blade'' thin has entirely negative effects.
to:
* Miracle Blade uses the same phrase for the same reason. They also spin the thinness of the blade in an attempt to muddle the concepts of sharpness and thinness in viewers' minds. Chef Tony can slice food more thinly than you can because he's more experienced and practiced doing that for the routine, not because his knife is thinner than yours. Thin blades wear out more quickly and can even snap during use, sending shards of sharp metal flying around the place and possibly into your food ([[EyeScream if not worse places]]). Sure, thinness and sharpness actually are linked... but only for ''the actual cutting edge.'' One reason that obsidian has long been a favored material for cutting implements is the fact that it's relatively easy to make ''incredibly'' thin, sharp edges on it, and this is also the principle behind the common science-fiction concept of [[SharpenedToASingleAtom monomolecular blades]]. As mentioned above, the downside is that it's difficult for such a thin edge to actually remain sharp for long... and also as mentioned above, making the ''rest of the blade'' thin has entirely negative effects.effects on the structure.

* In most diamond mines, alongside the select few that are the most desirable colors (clear, yellow, pink, green and blue) there tends to be a large number of undesirable diamonds that are only able to be sold as industrial diamonds (such as for diamond-tipped power tools) because they have a dirty brown color to them. Industrial diamonds are far cheaper than diamonds for jewelry, so to try to push them into the more lucrative jewelry market, there's been a push to marketing them as "chocolate diamonds." This had been done once before, in the 70s, they were marketed as "cognac diamonds" and pushed as the more masculine alternative to white diamonds and better suited for men's jewelry. They're trying again, but now with different sexist undertones (women will buy anything as long as we call it chocolate).
to:
* In most diamond mines, alongside the select few that are the most desirable colors (clear, yellow, pink, green and blue) there tends to be a large number of undesirable diamonds that are only able to be sold as industrial diamonds (such as for diamond-tipped power tools) because they have a dirty brown color to them. Industrial diamonds are far cheaper than diamonds for jewelry, so to try to push them into the more lucrative jewelry market, there's been a push to marketing them as "chocolate diamonds." This had been done once before, in the 70s, they were marketed as "cognac diamonds" and pushed as the more masculine alternative to white diamonds and better suited for men's jewelry. They're trying again, but now with different sexist undertones (women will buy anything as long as we call it chocolate). The irony is that brown diamonds can be [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_diamonds#/media/File:National_Museum_of_Natural_History_Gold_Colored_Diamonds.JPG quite lovely without the marketing spin]].
14th Jan '16 9:31:18 PM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The granddaddy of all such products was the Ginsu Knife, [[TropeNamers which was advertised as "never needs sharpening".]] The implication was that they never went dull, which was only technically true. Most Ginsus broke or rusted long before they dulled.
to:
* The granddaddy of all such products was the Ginsu Knife, [[TropeNamers which was advertised as "never needs sharpening".]] The implication was that they never went dull, which was only technically true. Most Ginsus broke or rusted long before they dulled. And if they did last long enough to go dull (about a year), they were so heavily serrated that they literally ''couldn't'' be sharpened, or at least not without more difficulty than buying a new knife.
29th Dec '15 8:22:12 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message
what happened to my english help
** Open-world games that advertise how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to give away is something like "we had so many ideas that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this", but it often comes across more as them having set the map of the size in stone ''before'' thinking up anything to fill it with, then ending up with a large game world that's a chore to navigate and is mostly boring and empty.
to:
** Open-world games that advertise how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to give take away is something like "we had so many ideas that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this", but it often comes across more as them having set the map size of the size map in stone simply to be larger than the previously-largest game world, ''before'' thinking up anything to fill it with, then and ending up with a large massive game world that's a chore to navigate and is mostly boring and empty.
29th Dec '15 7:24:48 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The granddaddy of all "Never Needs Sharpening" products was the Ginsu Knife, [[TropeNamers which was advertised as "never needs sharpening".]] The implication was that they never went dull, which was only technically true. Most Ginsus broke or rusted long before they dulled.
to:
* The granddaddy of all "Never Needs Sharpening" such products was the Ginsu Knife, [[TropeNamers which was advertised as "never needs sharpening".]] The implication was that they never went dull, which was only technically true. Most Ginsus broke or rusted long before they dulled.

* The Pasta Pro, a big pasta pot with a lid that doubles as a colander, proudly advertises that the lid locks on tight so you won't scald yourself when the lid falls off. Sounds like a great idea--one less dish to wash--but some reviewers have reported that the lid isn't "locking on" so much as it's ''warping''. It sticks so badly that it won't come off when the pot is hot. Other manufacturers have [[FollowTheLeader improved upon]] the idea with better results. * Dyson vacuum cleaners. The last infomercial contained a testimonial from a young man who looked to be about thirty years old, stating that "every Dyson he'd ever owned" worked great. He was on his fifth Dyson and he loved it. Sounds like a great testimonial, but [[FridgeLogic think about it for a moment]]: a thirty-year-old man who has owned five vacuums must be replacing his vacuum every ''two years''. This is not a mobile phone or a laptop that needs to be upgraded regularly, it's a vacuum. All it does is suck up dirt. There is no reason to buy a new one unless the old one breaks down and can't be repaired. A vacuum costing what a Dyson does should last between twenty and thirty years. So ''why is this guy on his fifth vacuum''?
to:
* The Pasta Pro, a big pasta pot with a lid that doubles as a colander, proudly advertises that the lid locks on tight so you won't scald yourself when the lid falls off. Sounds like a great idea--one less dish to wash--but wash -- but some reviewers have reported that the lid isn't "locking on" so much as it's ''warping''. It sticks so badly that it won't come off when the pot is hot. Other manufacturers have [[FollowTheLeader improved upon]] the idea with better results. * Dyson vacuum cleaners. The last infomercial contained a testimonial from a young man who looked to be about thirty years old, stating that "every Dyson he'd ever owned" worked great. He was on his fifth Dyson and he loved it. Sounds like a great testimonial, but [[FridgeLogic think about it for a moment]]: a thirty-year-old man who has owned five vacuums must be replacing his vacuum every ''two years''. This is not a mobile phone or a laptop that needs to be upgraded regularly, regularly because newer versions explicitly have better technology; it's a vacuum.vacuum. The exact same model of vacuum as the last one. All it does is suck up dirt. There is no reason to buy a new one unless the old one breaks down and can't be repaired. A vacuum costing what a Dyson does should last between twenty and thirty years. So ''why is this guy on his fifth '''fifth''' vacuum''?

* A commercial for a brand of tea touts the health benefits of drinking more water, then lets its viewers know that women who drink their tea get more water than those who drink the leading brand. How one brand of tea can ''contain more water'' than another is left as an exercise to the reader. Perhaps anyone who drinks their tea feels the need to wash it down with water afterwards. (If it's bottled tea, as oppposed to bags or an instant tea mix, it is presumably rather diluted.) * Commercials for the {{PSP}} Go touted "download-only" as a selling point. What this means is that the PSP Go lacks a UMD drive: if you "upgrade" to a Go, then your entire existing library is useless apart from whatever games you've already bought for download. In addition to forcing you to buy games twice, many PSP titles never became available as downloads.
to:
* A commercial for a brand of tea touts the health benefits of drinking more water, then lets its viewers know that women who drink their tea get more water than those who drink the leading brand. How one brand of tea can ''contain more water'' than another is left as an exercise to the reader. Perhaps anyone who drinks their tea feels the need to wash it down with water afterwards. (If If it's bottled tea, as oppposed opposed to bags or an instant tea mix, it is presumably rather diluted.) diluted. * Commercials for the {{PSP}} Go [[UsefulNotes/PlayStationPortable PSP Go]] touted "download-only" as a selling point. What this means is that the PSP Go lacks a UMD drive: if you "upgrade" to a Go, then your entire existing PSP library is useless useless, apart from whatever games you've already bought for download. In addition to forcing you to buy games twice, many the vast majority of PSP titles never became available as downloads.

** In some cases, no-dye-lot yarn is still dyed in lots: the manufacturer just doesn't bother to keep track of them. Hope you like your blue sweater with one green sleeve.
to:
** In some cases, no-dye-lot yarn is still dyed in lots: the manufacturer just [[TheyJustDidntCare doesn't bother to keep track of them.them]]. Hope you like your blue sweater with one green sleeve.

* ''ComicStrip/FrankAndErnest'' occasionally has fun with this in Sunday strips, with Frank looking over an advertisement Ernie has written, pointing out issues or missed points regarding his advertised item along the way, and Ernie promptly explaining how his advertisement has spun these issues into alleged positives. For instance, a run-down theater whose roof is missing is referred to as "the place to see the stars" ([[DontExplainTheJoke because you can see stars through the open roof at night...]]).
to:
* ''ComicStrip/FrankAndErnest'' occasionally has fun with this in Sunday strips, with Frank looking over an advertisement Ernie has written, pointing out issues or missed points regarding his advertised item along the way, and Ernie promptly explaining how his advertisement has spun these issues into alleged positives. For instance, a run-down theater whose roof is missing is referred to as "the place to see the stars" ([[DontExplainTheJoke because you can see stars through the open roof at night...]]).night]]).

-->'''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Marge Simpson]]''': It's dilapidated! -->'''Lionel Hutz''': "Rustic." -->'''Marge Simpson''': But that one's on fire! -->'''Lionel Hutz''': ...Motivated seller! ** Similarly, on ''WillAndGrace,'' Grace was translating an apartment want ad: "Cozy" means "Tiny," "Chelsea-adjacent" meant "New Jersey," and "Regularly maintained" meant "The Super hoses blood off the sidewalk every morning."[[note]]Aw, c'mon, Hoboken isn't that bad! OK maybe it was back then...[[/note]]
to:
-->'''[[WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons Marge Simpson]]''': It's dilapidated! -->'''Lionel dilapidated!\\ '''Lionel Hutz''': "Rustic." -->'''Marge "\\ '''Marge Simpson''': But that one's on fire! -->'''Lionel fire!\\ '''Lionel Hutz''': ...Motivated seller! ** Similarly, on ''WillAndGrace,'' ''Series/WillAndGrace,'' Grace was translating an apartment want ad: "Cozy" means "Tiny," "Chelsea-adjacent" meant "New Jersey," and "Regularly maintained" meant "The Super hoses blood off the sidewalk every morning."[[note]]Aw, c'mon, Hoboken isn't that bad! OK maybe it was back then...[[/note]]

--->'''Nancy:''' What about this one? --->'''Dave:''' No good. See this here? Easy access to basement? Means there's a hole in the floor. --->'''Nancy:''' Close to the woods? --->'''Dave:''' Bats roost in the attic. --->'''Nancy:''' Easy heating and cooling? --->'''Dave:''' Removed the asbestos. Didn't put in new insulation. --->'''Nancy:''' Private atrium? --->'''Dave:''' Hole in the ceiling. --->'''Nancy:''' Rustic scenery? --->'''Dave:''' In Dunwich.
to:
--->'''Nancy:''' What about this one? --->'''Dave:''' one?\\ '''Dave:''' No good. See this here? Easy access to basement? Means there's a hole in the floor. --->'''Nancy:''' floor.\\ '''Nancy:''' Close to the woods? --->'''Dave:''' woods?\\ '''Dave:''' Bats roost in the attic. --->'''Nancy:''' attic.\\ '''Nancy:''' Easy heating and cooling? --->'''Dave:''' cooling?\\ '''Dave:''' Removed the asbestos. Didn't put in new insulation. --->'''Nancy:''' insulation.\\ '''Nancy:''' Private atrium? --->'''Dave:''' atrium?\\ '''Dave:''' Hole in the ceiling. --->'''Nancy:''' ceiling.\\ '''Nancy:''' Rustic scenery? --->'''Dave:''' scenery?\\ '''Dave:''' In Dunwich.

One has to wonder if they have a partnership with the exact opposite companies like "Cash 4 Gold" who are urging you to send in your unwanted gold, silver, platinum, or whatever jewelry and get cash in return... with, of course, the company you're sending your jewelry to deciding on exactly ''how much'' cash you get in return. It's actually quite hilarious on the occasions when commercials for these two types of companies air sequentially. ''South Park'' played that exact scenario in one episode. It also relies on people buying into the misconception that gold has an inherent value, so that in a potential post-apocalyptic scenario they will have reliably precious gold on hand instead of "worthless paper". In actuality, should civilization go belly-up, gold could be just as worthless[[note]]Currency are only valuable insofar as society accepts their value. In the event of some kind of economic crash that results in currency becoming worthless, then the default method of trade would switch to the barter method: "I'll give you this in return for that." Currency evolved as an intermediary for determining value (instead of "I'll give you one cow for two loaves of bread", it because "I'll give this other guy one cow for $5, then use that $5 to buy two loaves of bread"), but has no intrinsic value beyond that. Similarly, gold is valuable only as long as ''we say'' it has value: it can't be used for anything in and of itself by most people. On the other hand, it is beautiful, rare and does not rust. But also notes and base metal coins are quite pretty and as they will be rarer and rarer, they may become valuable. Shortly speaking, everything depends on the taste of the people after the cataclysm[[/note]]. Besides, everyone knows the universal currency of Post-Apocalyptia is [[VideoGame/{{Fallout}} bottlecaps]].
to:
One has to wonder if they have a partnership with the exact opposite companies like "Cash 4 Gold" who are urging you to send in your unwanted gold, silver, platinum, or whatever jewelry and get cash in return... with, of course, the company you're sending your jewelry to deciding on exactly ''how much'' cash you get in return. It's actually quite hilarious on the occasions when commercials for these two types of companies air sequentially. ''South Park'' played that exact scenario in one episode. It also relies on people buying into the misconception that gold has an inherent value, so that in a potential post-apocalyptic scenario they will have reliably precious gold on hand instead of "worthless paper". In actuality, should civilization go belly-up, gold could be just as worthless[[note]]Currency are only valuable insofar as society accepts their value. In the event of some kind of economic crash that results in currency becoming worthless, then the default method of trade would switch to the barter method: "I'll give you this in return for that." Currency evolved as an intermediary for determining value (instead of "I'll give you one cow for two loaves of bread", it because "I'll give this other guy one cow for $5, then use that $5 to buy two loaves of bread"), but has no intrinsic value beyond that. Similarly, gold is valuable only as long as ''we say'' it has value: it can't be used for anything in and of itself by most people. On the other hand, it is beautiful, rare and does not rust. But also notes and base metal coins are quite pretty and as they will be rarer and rarer, they may become valuable. Shortly speaking, everything depends on the taste of the people after the cataclysm[[/note]]. Besides, everyone knows the universal currency of Post-Apocalyptia is will be [[VideoGame/{{Fallout}} bottlecaps]].

---> "Guys, this burns." ---> "That's how you know it's working." ---> "No, I mean, it '''really''' burns" as the girl catches on fire.
to:
---> "Guys, this burns." ---> "\\ "That's how you know it's working." ---> "\\ "No, I mean, it '''really''' burns" burns," as the girl catches on fire.

* Some lotteries--namely scratch-offs higher than five dollars--advertise that winning is guaranteed. They fail to mention that the vast majority of the prizes are under the sales price of a ticket, so most "winners" make a net loss.
to:
* Some lotteries--namely lotteries -- namely scratch-offs higher than five dollars--advertise dollars -- advertise that winning is guaranteed. They fail to mention that the vast majority of the prizes are under the sales price of a ticket, so most "winners" make a net loss.

* 3DFX marketed its Voodoo line of graphics cards as not requiring users to throw out their old graphics cards. In reality, the Voodoo had no 2D rendering support, and required a 2D card for that purpose, unless not being able to do any non-gaming task wasn't a problem for you. This was less of an issue than other examples, as most users already had suitable cards, and its 3D performance was world-class at the time.
to:
* 3DFX marketed its Voodoo line of graphics cards as not requiring users to throw out their old graphics cards. In reality, this was because the Voodoo had no 2D rendering support, and required a 2D card for that purpose, unless not being able to do any non-gaming task wasn't a problem for you. This was less of an issue than other examples, as most users already had suitable cards, and its 3D performance was world-class at the time.

* Fictional Example: A couple wand makers in ''[[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/5511855/1/Delenda-Est Delenda Est]]'' tell [[Literature/HarryPotter Harry]] that they sell their wands on the basis that people change over time and are no longer compatible with their old wand. They also claim that most of their customers buy new wands every couple years with some replacing theirs every few months. This is because their wands are mass-produced crap that is liable to stop working within months. Compare Ollivander's wands which are expected to (and usually do) last a lifetime.
to:
* Fictional Example: example: A couple wand makers in ''[[http://www.fanfiction.net/s/5511855/1/Delenda-Est Delenda Est]]'' tell [[Literature/HarryPotter Harry]] that they sell their wands on the basis that people change over time and are no longer compatible with their old wand. They also claim that most of their customers buy new wands every couple years with some replacing theirs every few months. This is because their wands are mass-produced crap that is liable to stop working within months. Compare Ollivander's wands which are expected to (and usually do) last a lifetime.

* Similarly, a film advertised as "the UnratedEdition" might have saucy material too risque for theaters... or it might have a couple of deleted scenes no more or less extreme than what was already in there tossed back in, but the distribution company didn't want to go to the trouble to send the new version back through the MPAA ratings process.
to:
* Similarly, a film advertised as "the UnratedEdition" might have saucy material too risque for theaters... or it might have a couple five minutes' worth of deleted scenes no more or less extreme than what was already in there tossed back in, but the distribution company didn't want to go to the trouble to send the almost-identical new version back through the MPAA ratings process.

* Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!"[[note]] Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]]. "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage, or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]] One of a kind! [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals.
to:
** Open-world games that advertise how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to give away is something like "we had so many ideas that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this", but it often comes across more as them having set the map of the size in stone ''before'' thinking up anything to fill it with, then ending up with a large game world that's a chore to navigate and is mostly boring and empty. * Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!"[[note]] Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]]. "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage, damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]] One of a kind! [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals.
7th Nov '15 6:18:24 PM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* The Ford [=GT90=], an [[SuperPrototype actual built concept]] super car made in 1995 was powered with a 720 hp quad-turbocharged V12 DOHC engine with the idea being it would re-kindle the glory days of the GT40 in a then modern version, and be a test bed for new technology. It also had a slight problem in that the heat from the engine exhaust could damage the body of the car, thus requiring Ceramic tiles to protect it, much like those used for the heat shielding for re-entry into Earth's atmosphere on the NASA space shuttles. Ford actually ''bragged'' about this "feature" by citing its need with that powerful of an engine, and the use of space-flight technology.
to:
* The Ford [=GT90=], an [[SuperPrototype actual built concept]] super car made in 1995 was powered with a 720 hp quad-turbocharged V12 DOHC engine with the idea being it would re-kindle the glory days of the GT40 [=GT40=] in a then modern version, and be a test bed for new technology. It also had a slight problem in that the heat from the engine exhaust could damage the body of the car, thus requiring Ceramic tiles to protect it, much like those used for the heat shielding for re-entry into Earth's atmosphere on the NASA space shuttles. Ford actually ''bragged'' about this "feature" by citing its need with that powerful of an engine, and the use of space-flight technology.
This list shows the last 10 events of 200. Show all.