History Main / NeverNeedsSharpening

15th Dec '17 4:29:52 PM DastardlyDemolition
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1oHp-VvhDE Juicero: Making Juice is Easy]]" [[TooIncompetentToOperateABlanket went to great lengths to make the old juicing method of "buy produce, wash it, chop it up, put it in a juicer, enjoy your juice, and then clean the juicer" seem hopelessly difficult]] before introducing the simpler Juicero. This is because the Juicero was a "juice press" that could ''only'' produce juice from expensive pre-made packets. You couldn't even use your own produce if you want to.

to:

* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1oHp-VvhDE Juicero: Making Juice is Easy]]" [[TooIncompetentToOperateABlanket went to great lengths to make the old juicing method of "buy produce, wash it, chop it up, put it in a juicer, enjoy your juice, and then clean the juicer" seem hopelessly difficult]] before introducing the simpler Juicero. This is because the Juicero was a "juice press" that could ''only'' produce juice from expensive ($5-7 USD each) pre-made packets.packets that only last a few days. You couldn't even use your own produce if you want to. And that's before it needs to connect to your wifi to read the qr code on the bag and have the Juicero app on your phone (after you sign in it as well). So you need to connect your "juicer" to the wifi, pull out your phone, have it read the qr code on the pack, then you can put the pack on the machine and have it press your juice into your cup in minutes. Is it any wonder that the machine dropped in price after seven months and then flopped in little over a year?
15th Dec '17 3:28:28 PM eroock
Is there an issue? Send a Message


-->--'''[[http://scottfoglesong.com/wordpress/?p=625 Scott Foglesong]]'''

to:

-->--'''[[http://scottfoglesong.-->-- '''[[http://scottfoglesong.com/wordpress/?p=625 Scott Foglesong]]'''
11th Dec '17 9:23:26 PM Kadorhal
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Compare and contrast OurProductSucks, where product flaws are described more honestly, and GoodBadBugs, which is (generally) a software and gaming trope when a bug makes its way into the game, isn't picked up or fixed by the developers, but eventually becomes useful for some reason. Also compare AsbestosFreeCereal, when the advertisement is trying to sell the product on trumped-up claims that are [[ExactWords technically true]] but also insignificant in the first place. See also DeliberateFlawRetcon, when the creator of an artistic work claims that flaws in the work were actually put in there intentionally. See also PolishTheTurd and DamnedByFaintPraise.

to:

Compare and contrast OurProductSucks, where product flaws are described more honestly, and GoodBadBugs, which is (generally) a software and gaming trope when a bug makes its way into the game, isn't picked up or fixed by the developers, but eventually becomes useful ends up left in the game for some reason.reason (usually because it's harmless and [[RuleOfFunny funny]]). Also compare AsbestosFreeCereal, when the advertisement is trying to sell the product on trumped-up claims that are [[ExactWords technically true]] but also insignificant in the first place. See also DeliberateFlawRetcon, when the creator of an artistic work claims that flaws in the work were actually put in there intentionally. See also PolishTheTurd and DamnedByFaintPraise.



* The granddaddy of all such products was the Ginsu Knife, [[TropeNamers which was advertised as "never needs sharpening".]] The implication was that they never went dull, which was only technically true. Most Ginsus broke or rusted long before they dulled. And if they did last long enough to go dull (about a year), they were so heavily serrated that they literally ''couldn't'' be sharpened, or at least not without more difficulty than buying a new knife.
* Miracle Blade uses the same phrase for the same reason. They also spin the thinness of the blade in an attempt to muddle the concepts of sharpness and thinness in viewers' minds. Chef Tony can slice food more thinly than you can because he's more experienced and practiced doing that for the routine, not because his knife is thinner than yours. Thin blades wear out more quickly and can even snap during use, sending shards of sharp metal flying around the place and possibly into your food ([[EyeScream if not worse places]]). Sure, thinness and sharpness actually are linked... but only for ''the actual cutting edge.'' One reason that obsidian has long been a favored material for cutting implements is the fact that it's relatively easy to make ''incredibly'' thin, sharp edges on it, and this is also the principle behind the common science-fiction concept of [[SharpenedToASingleAtom monomolecular blades]]. As mentioned above, the downside is that it's difficult for such a thin edge to actually remain sharp for long... and also as mentioned above, making the ''rest of the blade'' thin has entirely negative effects on the structure.

to:

* The granddaddy of all such products was the Ginsu Knife, [[TropeNamers which was advertised as "never needs sharpening".]] The implication was that they never went dull, which was only technically true. Most true - most Ginsus broke or rusted long ''long'' before they dulled. And if they did last long enough to go dull (about a year), they were so heavily serrated that they literally ''couldn't'' be sharpened, or at least not without much more difficulty and expense than simply buying a new knife.
* Miracle Blade uses the same phrase for the same reason. They also spin the thinness of the blade in an attempt to muddle the concepts of sharpness and thinness in viewers' minds. Chef Tony can slice food more thinly than you can because he's more experienced and practiced doing that for the routine, not because his knife is thinner than yours. Thin blades wear out more quickly and can even snap during use, sending shards of sharp metal flying around the place and possibly into your food ([[EyeScream if not worse places]]). Sure, thinness and sharpness actually are linked... but only for ''the actual cutting edge.'' One reason that obsidian has long been a favored material for cutting implements is the fact that it's relatively easy to make ''incredibly'' thin, sharp edges on it, and this is also the principle behind the common science-fiction concept of [[SharpenedToASingleAtom monomolecular blades]]. As mentioned above, the downside is that it's difficult for such a thin edge to actually remain sharp for long... and also as mentioned above, making the ''rest of the blade'' ''entire'' blade thin has entirely negative effects on the structure.



* For cheap pocket and[=/=]or utility knives, it's not uncommon to see "surgical steel" used as a selling point. Obviously, the intended takeaway is that the knife is great because it's made from the same type of steel as a surgeon's scalpel, but savvy buyers know to steer clear of these knives because a scalpel is strictly used for the low-torque job of cutting soft tissue, and most modern scalpel blades are designed to be single-use and disposable. As such, they use very inexpensive, brittle steel; not the sort you'd want any practical utility knife to be made from.

to:

* For cheap pocket and[=/=]or and/or utility knives, it's not uncommon to see "surgical steel" used as a selling point. Obviously, the intended takeaway is that the knife is great because it's made from the same type of steel as a surgeon's scalpel, but savvy buyers know to steer clear of these knives because a scalpel is strictly used for the low-torque job of cutting soft tissue, and most modern scalpel blades are designed to be single-use and disposable. As such, they use very inexpensive, brittle steel; not the sort you'd want any practical utility knife to be made from.



* Dyson vacuum cleaners. The last infomercial contained a testimonial from a young man who looked to be about thirty years old, stating that "every Dyson he'd ever owned" worked great. He was on his fifth Dyson and he loved it. Sounds like a great testimonial, but [[FridgeLogic think about it for a moment]]: a thirty-year-old man who has owned five vacuums must be replacing his vacuum every ''two years''. This is not a mobile phone or a laptop that needs to be upgraded regularly because newer versions explicitly have better technology; it's a vacuum. The exact same model of vacuum as the last one. All it does is suck up dirt. There is no reason to buy a new one unless the old one breaks down and can't be repaired. A vacuum costing what a Dyson does should last between twenty and thirty years. So ''why is this guy on his '''fifth''' vacuum''?

to:

* Dyson vacuum cleaners. The last infomercial contained a testimonial from a young man who looked to be about thirty years old, stating that "every Dyson he'd ever owned" worked great. He was on his fifth Dyson and he loved it. Sounds like a great testimonial, but [[FridgeLogic think about it for a moment]]: a thirty-year-old man who has owned five vacuums must be replacing his vacuum every ''two years''. This is not a mobile phone or a laptop that needs to be upgraded regularly because newer versions are explicitly have better technology; faster and more powerful; it's a vacuum. The vacuum, the exact same model of vacuum as the last one. All it does is suck up dirt. There is no reason to buy a new one unless the old one breaks down and can't be repaired. A vacuum costing what a Dyson does should last between twenty and thirty years. So ''why is this guy on his '''fifth''' vacuum''?vacuum by the time he's hit 30''?



* Those commercials for Goldline that you see Creator/{{Fox News|Channel}} and Radio/GlennBeck advertising insist that, since the entire world will soon be descending into poverty-driven madness, you should trade in all of your soon-to-be-worthless cash for their delicious, shiny gold. They don't bother mentioning that since they're taking in all the paper money, they're driving ''themselves'' into the future, gold-driven poorhouse. That's because actually, they're making money by pretending to be gold brokers, trading cash for gold near the current rate, when they're really selling gold at a ''huge'' markup. There's been some Senate inquiries into this. While the price of gold probably is going to go down and isn't that great an investment, if you wish to buy gold anyway, check the current price of gold online so when you go to buy it, you aren't suckered by someone offering it to you at three times what the market says it's worth.\\
One has to wonder if they have a partnership with the exact opposite companies like "Cash 4 Gold" who are urging you to send in your unwanted gold, silver, platinum, or whatever jewelry and get cash in return... with, of course, the company you're sending your jewelry to deciding on exactly ''how much'' cash you get in return. It's actually quite hilarious on the occasions when commercials for these two types of companies air sequentially. ''South Park'' played that exact scenario in one episode. It also relies on people buying into the misconception that gold has an inherent value, so that in a potential post-apocalyptic scenario they will have reliably precious gold on hand instead of "worthless paper". In actuality, should civilization go belly-up, gold could be just as worthless[[note]]Currency are only valuable insofar as society accepts their value. In the event of some kind of economic crash that results in currency becoming worthless, then the default method of trade would switch to the barter method: "I'll give you this in return for that." Currency evolved as an intermediary for determining value (instead of "I'll give you one cow for two loaves of bread", it became "I'll give this other guy one cow for $5, then use that $5 to buy two loaves of bread"), but has no intrinsic value beyond that. Similarly, gold is valuable only as long as ''we say'' it has value: it can't be used for anything in and of itself by most people. On the other hand, it is beautiful, rare and does not rust. But also notes and base metal coins are quite pretty and as they will be rarer and rarer, they may become valuable. Shortly speaking, everything depends on the taste of the people after the cataclysm[[/note]]. Besides, everyone knows the universal currency of Post-Apocalyptia will be [[VideoGame/{{Fallout}} bottlecaps]].
** Speaking of Fallout, [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]] goes into exactly what makes currency valuable. In that instance, genuine caps are valuable because of how they were machined, colored, etc, while paper money printed by the New California Republic is not as valuable as the amount of caps it's supposed to represent, since not too many people in the Mojave use it, defaulting to caps until NCR dollars become backed by the cap enough to be of equal value. Pre-war money and caps trade at a one-to-one exchange because the markings are what make them valuable to post-apocalypse America; the numbers don't mean shit now that the American gold standard is no more. This is also the whole point of the gold standard, X amount of Country A's currency is worth this amount in gold, thus giving it it's value. Counterfeit money is not backed by the standard, thus making it worthless.

to:

* Those commercials for Goldline that you see Creator/{{Fox News|Channel}} and Radio/GlennBeck advertising insist that, since the entire world will soon be descending into poverty-driven madness, you should trade in all of your soon-to-be-worthless cash for their delicious, shiny gold. They don't bother mentioning that since they're taking in all the paper money, they're driving ''themselves'' into the future, gold-driven poorhouse. That's because actually, they're making money by pretending to be gold brokers, brokers who are trading cash for gold near the current rate, when they're really selling gold at a ''huge'' markup. There's been some Senate inquiries into this. While the price of gold probably is going to go down and isn't that great an investment, if you wish to buy gold anyway, check the current price of gold online so when you go to buy it, you aren't suckered by someone offering it to you at three times what the market says it's worth.\\
One has to wonder if they have a partnership with the exact opposite companies like "Cash 4 Gold" who are urging you to send in your unwanted gold, silver, platinum, or whatever jewelry and get cash in return... with, of course, the company you're sending your jewelry to deciding on exactly ''how much'' cash you get in return. It's actually quite hilarious on the occasions when commercials for these two types of companies air sequentially. ''South Park'' played that exact scenario in one episode. It also relies on people buying into the misconception that gold has an inherent value, so that in a potential post-apocalyptic scenario they will have reliably precious gold on hand instead of "worthless paper". In actuality, should civilization go belly-up, gold could be just as worthless[[note]]Currency are only valuable insofar as society accepts their value. In the event of some kind of economic crash that results in currency becoming worthless, then the default method of trade would switch to the barter method: "I'll give you this in return for that." Currency evolved as an intermediary for determining value (instead of "I'll give you one cow for two loaves of bread", it became "I'll give this other guy one cow for $5, then use that $5 to buy two loaves of bread"), but has no intrinsic value beyond that. Similarly, gold is valuable only as long as ''we say'' it has value: it can't be used for anything in and of itself by most people. On the other hand, it is beautiful, rare and does not rust. But also notes and base metal coins are quite pretty and as they will be rarer and rarer, they may become valuable. Shortly speaking, everything depends on the taste of the people after the cataclysm[[/note]]. Besides, everyone knows the universal currency of Post-Apocalyptia will be [[VideoGame/{{Fallout}} bottlecaps]].
bottlecaps]] and [[VideoGame/Metro2033 AK bullets]].
** Speaking of Fallout, [[VideoGame/FalloutNewVegas New Vegas]] goes into exactly what makes currency valuable. In that instance, genuine caps are valuable because of how they were machined, colored, etc, while paper money printed by the New California Republic is not as valuable as the amount of caps it's supposed to represent, represent (exchange rate is about 2 caps per 5 NCR dollars), since not too many people in the Mojave use it, defaulting to caps until NCR dollars become backed by the cap enough to be of equal value. Pre-war money and caps trade at a one-to-one exchange because the markings are what make them valuable to post-apocalypse America; the numbers don't mean shit now that the American gold standard is no more. This is also the whole point of the gold standard, X amount of Country A's currency is worth this amount in gold, thus giving it it's its value. Counterfeit money is not backed by the standard, thus making it worthless.



** This also incorporates a bit of TheCoconutEffect. Some Japanese-made motorcycles are faster and/or more powerful than American-made ones, but because they don't roar as loud or vibrate as much, they're seen as inferior (when the opposite is true, see above).

to:

** This also incorporates a bit of TheCoconutEffect. Some Japanese-made motorcycles are faster and/or more powerful than American-made ones, but because they don't roar as loud or vibrate as much, they're seen as inferior (when the opposite is true, see above)."inferior" products.



* 3DFX marketed its Voodoo line of graphics cards as not requiring users to throw out their old graphics cards. In reality, this was because the Voodoo had no 2D rendering support, and required a 2D card for that purpose, unless not being able to do any non-gaming task wasn't a problem for you. This was less of an issue than other examples, as most users already had suitable cards, and its 3D performance was world-class at the time. Most recognized the technique as a "piggyback" card, similar to MPEG-2 DVD accelerators at the time (the late 90's). As the technology caught up, single cards capable of doing both 2D and 3D competently started appearing, and even 3dfx saw this coming: the [=Voodoo3=] line and beyond were all-in-one cards.

to:

* 3DFX marketed its Voodoo line of graphics cards as not requiring users to throw out their old graphics cards. In reality, this was because the Voodoo had no 2D rendering support, and required a 2D card for that purpose, unless not being able to do any non-gaming task wasn't a problem for you. This was less of an issue than other examples, as most users already had suitable cards, and its 3D performance was world-class at the time. Most recognized the technique as a "piggyback" card, similar to MPEG-2 DVD accelerators at the time (the late 90's). As the technology caught up, single cards capable of doing both 2D and 3D competently started appearing, and even 3dfx saw this coming: the - including 3dfx's own [=Voodoo3=] line and beyond were all-in-one cards.- started appearing.



** A similar can of worms was opened with [[VideoGame/NoMansSky No Man's Sky]] touting the exact same thing.... and did the exact same thing. It went over worse since literally everyone was [[HypeBacklash hyped for the infinite universe the game promised]]. Chances are you know how it went.

to:

** A similar can of worms was opened with [[VideoGame/NoMansSky No Man's Sky]] ''VideoGame/NoMansSky'' touting the exact same thing.... and did the exact same thing. It went over worse since literally everyone was [[HypeBacklash hyped for the infinite universe the game promised]]. Chances are you know how it went.



** [[WideOpenSandbox Open-world games]] that make a big deal in advertising about how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to take away is something like "we had so many ideas to put in the game that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this". What more often seems to be the case is that the size of the map was set in stone in the first meeting, simply to one-up whatever game from last year had the previously-largest playable area, ''before'' actually thinking up anything to fill it with - ending up with an impressively-massive game world that's a chore to navigate and, outside of the city you begin in, is almost entirely boring and lifeless.

to:

** [[WideOpenSandbox Open-world games]] that make a big deal in advertising about how big their sandbox is also usually fall under this. The implication they ''want'' you to take away is something like "we had so many ideas to put in the game that the map can't possibly be any smaller than this". What more often seems to be the case is that the size of the map was set in stone in the first meeting, simply to one-up whatever game from last year had the previously-largest playable area, ''before'' actually thinking up anything to fill it with - ending up with an impressively-massive game world that's a chore to navigate and, outside of the city you begin in, in and some pre-placed enemy encampments, is almost entirely boring and lifeless.



* Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!" [[note]]Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat. Alternately, it may be "hot" in the black market sense: that is, recently stolen.[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]], "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]], and "One of a kind!" [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals. This deceptive terminology was parodied in the ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' episode "Rolling Romance" with the following exchange:[[note]]This episode itself is a parody of ''Literature/{{Christine}}'', meaning the car is alive and violently jealous--a problem even the salesman cannot spin.[[/note]]
--> '''Used Car Salesman''': This car is a steal!
--> '''Garfield''' (to audience): Stolen car.
--> '''Used Car Salesman''': It's a very ''clean'' car.
--> '''Garfield''' (to audience): We just fished it out of a lake.
--> '''Jon''': How much do you want for it?
--> '''Gardield''' (to audience): Take my wallet; I'm a sucker.

to:

* Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!" [[note]]Hot hot!"[[note]]Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat. Alternately, it may be "hot" in the black market sense: that is, recently stolen.[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's damage"[[note]]It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]], "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]], and "One of a kind!" [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals. This deceptive terminology was parodied in the ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' episode "Rolling Romance" with the following exchange:[[note]]This episode itself is a parody of ''Literature/{{Christine}}'', meaning the car is alive and violently jealous--a problem even the salesman cannot spin.[[/note]]
--> '''Used -->'''Used Car Salesman''': This car is a steal!
--> '''Garfield''' (to audience):
steal!\\
'''Garfield''': ''([[AsideGlance to the audience]])''
Stolen car.
-->
car.\\
'''Used Car Salesman''': It's a very ''clean'' car.
--> '''Garfield''' (to audience):
car.\\
'''Garfield''':
We just fished it out of a lake.
-->
lake.\\
'''Jon''': How much do you want for it?
--> '''Gardield''' (to audience):
it?\\
'''Gardield''':
Take my wallet; I'm a sucker.



* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item by applying the money you spent on bids toward retail price and paying the difference. Can't afford the full MSRP? Well, then you're ''boned''.

to:

* Auction sites such as [=QuiBids=] that advertise fantastically low prices on goods either leave out or bury in the fine print that you have to pay ''x'' amount of money for each bid, and that you have to place numerous bids to keep from being edged out. So yes, you can get that high-end laptop or big-screen TV for $98, but only after you've spent several hundred dollars bidding to win it. Lose the auction? Don't worry, you can still get the item by applying the money you spent on bids toward retail price and paying the difference. Can't afford the full MSRP? Well, then you're ''boned''.
25th Nov '17 2:39:49 AM ZombieAladdin
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!" [[note]]Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat. Alternately, it may be "hot" in the black market sense: that is, recently stolen.[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]], "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]], and "One of a kind!" [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals.

to:

* Used cars have had owners and car lot salesman come up with so many excuses to sugar coat various issues, that it's become a joke to genre savvy buyers and the cynical and sarcastic among us. Examples: "This car is hot!" [[note]]Hot as in, it's been on fire, or the radiator doesn't work and the engine may overheat. Alternately, it may be "hot" in the black market sense: that is, recently stolen.[[/note]], "Minor water damage"[[note]] It's been in a major flood, not had some bottled water spill in it[[/note]], "Project Car"[[note]]The owner has been trying to modify his car with aftermarket parts, and either ran out of money to keep working on it, or installed things poorly or that would actually damage or lower the value of the car, meaning that you'll be stuck picking up the pieces where they left off to fix it, complete it, or revert it back to its "stock" parts as intended by the factory that produced it.[[/note]], and "One of a kind!" [[note]]This car is made of two halves of different model cars welded together in the middle.[[/note]] Some of these and more have been used (and illustrated) in Carfax commercials to highlight ''their'' service--which is to help provide ''actual'' vehicle histories to reveal which ads are cases of this trope (or other deceptions), and which really are good deals. This deceptive terminology was parodied in the ''WesternAnimation/GarfieldAndFriends'' episode "Rolling Romance" with the following exchange:[[note]]This episode itself is a parody of ''Literature/{{Christine}}'', meaning the car is alive and violently jealous--a problem even the salesman cannot spin.[[/note]]
--> '''Used Car Salesman''': This car is a steal!
--> '''Garfield''' (to audience): Stolen car.
--> '''Used Car Salesman''': It's a very ''clean'' car.
--> '''Garfield''' (to audience): We just fished it out of a lake.
--> '''Jon''': How much do you want for it?
--> '''Gardield''' (to audience): Take my wallet; I'm a sucker.
7th Nov '17 2:23:24 PM CaptainAmazing
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1oHp-VvhDE Juicero: Making Juice is Easy]]" [[TooIncompetentToOperateABlanket goes to great lengths to make the old juicing method of "buy produce, wash it, chop it up, put it in a juicer, enjoy your juice, and then clean the juicer" seem hopelessly difficult]] before introducing the simpler Juicero. This is because the Juicero is a "juice press" that can ''only'' produce juice from expensive pre-made packets. You can't even use your own produce if you want to.

to:

* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1oHp-VvhDE Juicero: Making Juice is Easy]]" [[TooIncompetentToOperateABlanket goes went to great lengths to make the old juicing method of "buy produce, wash it, chop it up, put it in a juicer, enjoy your juice, and then clean the juicer" seem hopelessly difficult]] before introducing the simpler Juicero. This is because the Juicero is was a "juice press" that can could ''only'' produce juice from expensive pre-made packets. You can't couldn't even use your own produce if you want to.
27th Oct '17 8:17:57 AM DesertDragon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* Of course, estate agents have been doing this for years. No, that house isn't small, it's... cozy! That one isn't over a kebab shop on a main road with 24/7 traffic, it's "moments away from local amenities"! Basement suite? No, it's "bright"!

to:

* Of course, real estate agents have been doing this for years. No, that house isn't small, it's... cozy! That one isn't over a kebab shop on a main road with 24/7 traffic, it's "moments away from local amenities"! Basement suite? No, it's "bright"!"bright"! WrongSideOfTheTracks? Up-and-coming neighborhood!
15th Oct '17 1:38:15 AM TheWildWestPyro
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* When first issued to troops in Vietnam, the M16 was described as a 'self-cleaning' weapon (this only applied to the gas system) which led to its notorious unreliability, until the military issued cleaning kits, trained the soldiers how to maintain the weapon like they should have done in the first place, and made modifications to the powder used in the cartridges (to help prevent undue fouling) and the rifle itself (to actually facilitate cleaning and maintenance; the earliest version could only fix issues via near-complete disassembly). It didn't help that the chrome-plated bore on the prototype weapons was eliminated [[ExecutiveMeddling to reduce cost]].

to:

* When first issued to troops in Vietnam, the original M16 was described as a 'self-cleaning' weapon (this only applied to the gas system) which led to its notorious unreliability, until the military introduced the improved [=M16A1=], issued cleaning kits, kits for it, trained the soldiers how to maintain the weapon rifle like they should have done in the first place, and made modifications to the powder used in the cartridges (to help prevent undue fouling) and the rifle itself (to actually facilitate cleaning and maintenance; the earliest version could only fix issues via near-complete disassembly). It didn't help that the chrome-plated bore on the prototype weapons was eliminated [[ExecutiveMeddling to reduce cost]].
1st Oct '17 10:35:37 AM FordPrefect
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1oHp-VvhDE Juicero: Making Juice is Easy]]" [[TooIncompetentToOperateABlanket goes to great lengths to make the old juicing method of "buy produce, wash it, chop it up, put it in a juicer, enjoy your juice, and then clean the juicer" seem hopelessly difficult]] before introducing the simpler Juicero. This is because the Juicero is a "juice press" that can ''only'' juice produce from expensive pre-made packets. You can't even use your own produce if you want to.

to:

* "[[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X1oHp-VvhDE Juicero: Making Juice is Easy]]" [[TooIncompetentToOperateABlanket goes to great lengths to make the old juicing method of "buy produce, wash it, chop it up, put it in a juicer, enjoy your juice, and then clean the juicer" seem hopelessly difficult]] before introducing the simpler Juicero. This is because the Juicero is a "juice press" that can ''only'' juice produce juice from expensive pre-made packets. You can't even use your own produce if you want to.
16th Sep '17 2:07:28 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* One of Nintendo's [[ProductFacelift revisions]] of the Nintendo3DS is cheaper than the standard version, but at the cost of not having the 3D capability that the system is named for. Nintendo compensated by advertising the "2DS" as for children, as the 3D effect of the regular 3DS could damage young eyes and the 2DS carries no risk of that. Fortunately for them this totally worked, though more so due to the lower cost making 3DS games available to people who didn't want or care about the titular aspect.

to:

* One of Nintendo's [[ProductFacelift revisions]] of the Nintendo3DS UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS is cheaper than the standard version, but at the cost of not having the 3D capability that the system is named for. Nintendo compensated by advertising the "2DS" as for children, as the 3D effect of the regular 3DS could damage young eyes and the 2DS carries no risk of that. Fortunately for them this totally worked, though more so due to the lower cost making 3DS games available to people who didn't want or care about the titular aspect.
16th Sep '17 2:03:23 AM Trueman001
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** This problem goes back to at least 1984, and ''Xavior'' on the [[UsefulNotes/ZXSpectrum Spectrum]]; the blurb boasted "4,096 screens" and "32 great level designs", carefully omitting to mention that these two combined meant that (1) all those screens looked pretty much the same and (2) slogging through them rapidly became a chore. It thus took over 20 years for the game to finally be completed -- and for it to be discovered that [[UnwinnableByMistake the end-game routine doesn't work]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 247. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NeverNeedsSharpening