History Main / NegativeContinuity

31st Aug '16 12:27:52 PM Vir
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* WesternAnimation/{{Justified|Trope}} in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'': Thanks to the [[ResetButton "Returns to the Past"]], any injuries or problems the kids face can be easily resolved and the [[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]] unchanged, even for no real reason. The only exception is death, though the series did end up trying to decrease the RTTP power by giving a consequence for its overuse. Even with the ResetButton, the first season still had a bit of unexplained negative continuity, such as certain characters never being mentioned again. The later seasons stopped doing this, as a side-effect of not using the returns to the past in [[OnceAnEpisode every episode]] any more.

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* WesternAnimation/{{Justified|Trope}} {{Justified|Trope}} in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'': Thanks to the [[ResetButton "Returns to the Past"]], any injuries or problems the kids face can be easily resolved and the [[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]] unchanged, even for no real reason. The only exception is death, though the series did end up trying to decrease the RTTP power by giving a consequence for its overuse. Even with the ResetButton, the first season still had a bit of unexplained negative continuity, such as certain characters never being mentioned again. The later seasons stopped doing this, as a side-effect of not using the returns to the past in [[OnceAnEpisode every episode]] any more.
31st Aug '16 7:51:05 AM Prinzenick
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Added DiffLines:

* Nearly all of the WesternAnimation/FelixTheCat cartoons and comics have no continuity at all--for starters, Felix committed suicide in his first film, WesternAnimation/FelineFollies, [[DeathIsCheap but is back no worse for wear in future films]]. The Joe Oriolo era of the series is the sole exception, varying between having some [[BroadStrokes very light continuity going on in them]] to having no continuity at all, due to some of its episodes having story elements that completely contradict each other.
9th Aug '16 4:13:00 PM nombretomado
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* ''TheDementedCartoonMovie'' is 30 minutes of NegativeContinuity. Examples include the Earth in the cartoon actually blew up several times in the course of the story ({{Lampshade|Hanging}}ed by the characters that were watching the events on TV), the fact that "[[FlyingBrick Super Blah]]" had his head blown off twice, etc.

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* ''TheDementedCartoonMovie'' ''WebAnimation/TheDementedCartoonMovie'' is 30 minutes of NegativeContinuity. Examples include the Earth in the cartoon actually blew up several times in the course of the story ({{Lampshade|Hanging}}ed by the characters that were watching the events on TV), the fact that "[[FlyingBrick Super Blah]]" had his head blown off twice, etc.
6th Aug '16 2:29:57 AM xneon
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* The ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' series has some outside of the main canon. You can kill any character and they can still come back in the ending or next game. Averted and played with in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9''. Apparently everything up to Armageddon happened and Raiden tried to reverse it all with time travel, Resulting in a very different series of events. Averted in that each character apparently still has their own side stories, which do not run canonically with the main story.

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* The ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' series has some outside of the main canon. You can kill any character and they can still come back in the ending or next game. Averted and played with in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9''. Apparently everything up to Armageddon happened and Raiden tried to reverse it all with time travel, travel (actually sending a vision to his younger, possibly alternate-reality self), Resulting in a very different series of events. Averted in that each character apparently still has their own side stories, which do not run canonically with the main story.
31st Jul '16 12:39:44 PM nombretomado
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* The concept of "Hypertime" - outlined by Mark Waid and Creator/GrantMorrison as, basically, a way to remove the possibility of continuity errors in DCComics while freeing writers from the need to remain consistent with the works of previous writers - could be described as "negative continuity through ''total'' continuity." The main points were (1) every story ever written did happen and is {{Canon}}, even the stuff that [[SeriesContinuityError contradicts the other stuff]], however (2) every story takes place in its own [[AlternateUniverse discrete world]], and (3) the writer of any given story gets to decide which previously-written stories did and didn't happen in the "world" his or her story is taking place in, and therefore can just toss out anything they don't like and HandWave discrepancies with earlier stories by saying [[CanonDiscontinuity "that never happened in my world."]] While the idea has its proponents, most tend to feel it causes more problems than it solves, not the least of which is the fact that the only people comfortable with its "anything goes" approach to continuity are the people who never minded continuity errors to begin with. It's now implied that Hypertime has ceased to exist because [[spoiler:in the future (a relative concept since he's already a time traveler), a more competent version of ComicBook/BoosterGold will [[CosmicRetcon deliberately eliminate it]]]].

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* The concept of "Hypertime" - outlined by Mark Waid and Creator/GrantMorrison as, basically, a way to remove the possibility of continuity errors in DCComics Creator/DCComics while freeing writers from the need to remain consistent with the works of previous writers - could be described as "negative continuity through ''total'' continuity." The main points were (1) every story ever written did happen and is {{Canon}}, even the stuff that [[SeriesContinuityError contradicts the other stuff]], however (2) every story takes place in its own [[AlternateUniverse discrete world]], and (3) the writer of any given story gets to decide which previously-written stories did and didn't happen in the "world" his or her story is taking place in, and therefore can just toss out anything they don't like and HandWave discrepancies with earlier stories by saying [[CanonDiscontinuity "that never happened in my world."]] While the idea has its proponents, most tend to feel it causes more problems than it solves, not the least of which is the fact that the only people comfortable with its "anything goes" approach to continuity are the people who never minded continuity errors to begin with. It's now implied that Hypertime has ceased to exist because [[spoiler:in the future (a relative concept since he's already a time traveler), a more competent version of ComicBook/BoosterGold will [[CosmicRetcon deliberately eliminate it]]]].
20th Jul '16 2:02:25 PM Morgenthaler
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* A few specific examples of this are called out below, but really, until fairly recently this was more the rule than the exception in American sitcoms. Even though syndication and the idea of reruns had been around since ''I Love Lucy,'' the sheer lack of channels meant airing many reruns was unlikely, and because of this, most writers would not pay attention to previous continuity if it got in the way of their own story, especially since most audiences wouldn't remember or care about smaller details (hence the reason a character could mention having a childhood pet cat in one episode and be deathly allergic to them the next.) It really wasn't until several factors in the Nineties that made it easier to recall information, such as an explosion of new cable channels desperate for content heavily airing reruns, the beginning of home video releases on DVD, and the rise of the internet leading to people easily storing and accessing information about shows and characters, that audiences really began expecting tighter continuity from shows and started holding writers to higher standards.

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* A few specific examples of this are called out below, but really, until fairly recently this was more the rule than the exception in American sitcoms. Even though syndication and the idea of reruns had been around since ''I Love Lucy,'' the sheer lack of channels meant airing many reruns was unlikely, and because of this, most writers would not pay attention to previous continuity if it got in the way of their own story, especially since most audiences wouldn't remember or care about smaller details (hence the reason a character could mention having a childhood pet cat in one episode and be deathly allergic to them the next.) It really wasn't until several factors in the Nineties that made it easier to recall information, such as an explosion of new cable channels desperate for content heavily airing reruns, the beginning of home video releases on DVD, and the rise of the internet leading to people easily storing and accessing information about shows and characters, that audiences really began expecting tighter continuity from shows and started holding writers to higher standards.standards.
5th Jul '16 8:14:15 AM editproboss
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* ''WebAnimation/RetardedAnimalBabies'', also hosted on Website/{{Newgrounds}}, takes full advantage of NegativeContinuity to kill/maim the main cast (especially [[ButtMonkey Bunny]]) each episode, only to have them back by the next. In one later episode, the entire ''universe'' was destroyed by one of the cast [[spoiler:when he tried to f*** a ''black hole'']]. Surprisingly, the series actually reveals ''why'' it has NegativeContinuity (aside from RuleOfFunny): [[spoiler:in one timeline the cast grew up; while they ultimately became successful adults (somehow) they also became smart enough to realize that their world ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]'']]. Cat, [[spoiler:who became a MadScientist, then invented a Physical Law Usurper, which gave them all the chance to go to a place outside of normal space and time, where they could remain blissfully ignorant forever]]. As a side character in a later episode notes, "they exist in a continuity proof bubble, like a bunch of Kennys from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''!"

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* ''WebAnimation/RetardedAnimalBabies'', also hosted on Website/{{Newgrounds}}, takes full advantage of NegativeContinuity to kill/maim the main cast (especially [[ButtMonkey Bunny]]) each episode, only to have them back by the next. In one later episode, the entire ''universe'' was destroyed by one of the cast [[spoiler:when he tried to f*** destroy a ''black hole'']]. Surprisingly, the series actually reveals ''why'' it has NegativeContinuity (aside from RuleOfFunny): [[spoiler:in one timeline the cast grew up; while they ultimately became successful adults (somehow) they also became smart enough to realize that their world ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]'']]. Cat, [[spoiler:who became a MadScientist, then invented a Physical Law Usurper, which gave them all the chance to go to a place outside of normal space and time, where they could remain blissfully ignorant forever]]. As a side character in a later episode notes, "they exist in a continuity proof bubble, like a bunch of Kennys from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''!"
28th Jun '16 4:49:48 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' rarely had any continuity from one episode to the next. One ChristmasEpisode had Zack ask a homeless family to live with him, only for them to disappear once the episode ended. This trope was most glaring when it came to the kids' parents (the few times they showed up). Usually, they would be [[TheOtherDarrin played by a different actor/actress each time]], they would be divorced or not divorced, had different occupations, and would even have different names.
** Of course, let's not forget the "Tori season". Essentially, the show filmed its final season, including the graduation. The network wanted more episodes, but two of the three female leads wouldn't return. A new slate of episodes were filmed with a new female character. These episodes where aired alternately with the original final season episodes. Therefore, they had Kelly & Jessie episodes interspersed with Tori episodes with Zack as love interest for both Kelly & Tori and neither set of episodes referencing each other.

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* ''Series/SavedByTheBell'' rarely had any continuity from one episode to the next.
**
One ChristmasEpisode had Zack ask a homeless family to live with him, only for them to disappear once the episode ended. This trope was most glaring when it came to the ended.
** The
kids' parents (the few times they showed up). Usually, they would be [[TheOtherDarrin played by a different actor/actress each time]], they would be divorced or not divorced, had different occupations, and would even have different names.
** Of course, let's not forget the The "Tori season". season." Essentially, the show filmed its final season, including the graduation. The network wanted more episodes, but two of the three female leads wouldn't return. A new slate of episodes were filmed with a new female character. These episodes where aired alternately with the original final season episodes. Therefore, they had Kelly & Jessie episodes interspersed with Tori episodes with Zack as love interest for both Kelly & Tori and neither set of episodes referencing each other.
28th Jun '16 4:46:54 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* The ''Film/XMen'' films have gotten this way due to ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' and ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', both of which were prequels to the first three films and played fast and loose with the timeline. Mainly this is in regards to Emma Frost (is she a 20-something in the 60's or a teen in '79?).
** It's since been clarified that ''First Class'' is the ''true'' prequel to the original trilogy, while ''Wolverine'' has been [[CanonDiscontinuity thrown out of continuity]]. While promoting ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', Creator/BryanSinger and Lauren Shuler Donner officially confirmed ''Origins'' is gone from canon, since it's the only X-Men movie that is absolutely ''impossible'' to reconcile with the other films.

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* The ''Film/XMen'' films have gotten this way due to ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' and ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', both of which were prequels to the first three films and played fast and loose with the timeline. Mainly this is in regards to Emma Frost (is she a 20-something in the 60's or a teen in '79?).
** It's since been clarified that ''First Class'' is the ''true'' prequel to the original trilogy, while
''Wolverine'' has been [[CanonDiscontinuity officially thrown out of continuity]]. While promoting ''Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast'', Creator/BryanSinger and Lauren Shuler Donner officially confirmed ''Origins'' is gone from canon, since it's the only X-Men movie that is absolutely ''impossible'' to reconcile with the other films.
12th Jun '16 4:01:50 PM Prfnoff
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* Similar to ''Galaxy Angel'' above, ''Manga/SgtFrog'' doesn't give much attention to continuity unless it's introducing a new character. However, it does cycle through seasons normally, often changing seasons once per volume, but the characters are never shown graduating or aging at all.

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* Similar to ''Galaxy Angel'' above, ''Manga/SgtFrog'' doesn't give much attention to continuity unless it's introducing a new character. However, it does cycle through seasons normally, often changing seasons once per volume, but the characters are never shown graduating or aging at all.



* Similarly, ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'''s WebAnimation/TeenGirlSquad has at least one of the girls die in almost every episode, but come back in the next.

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* Similarly, ''WebAnimation/HomestarRunner'''s WebAnimation/TeenGirlSquad has at least one of the girls die in almost every episode, but come back in the next.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NegativeContinuity