History Main / NegativeContinuity

22nd Dec '17 4:23:48 AM Merseyuser1
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* Canadian cartoon ''The Bagel and Becky Show'' (about a cat-and-dog brother and sister, [[ArtMajorBiology although how so isn't explained]] ''runs'' mostly on this trope. However, certain things seem to be referenced via a ContinuityNod - [[TheEeyore Old Man Jenkinsbot]] gets a new personality every time he's rebooted.
11th Dec '17 6:40:22 PM merotoker
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* The {{anime}} ''Anime/GalaxyAngel'' is ''made'' of NegativeContinuity. The only times an episode counts is when they're introducing a new regular cast member, such as [[TheDitz Milfeulle]], Chitose, [[WeaselMascot Normad]] and the Twin Star Force.
* In ''Anime/ExcelSaga'', negative continuity is ''[[AnthropomorphicPersonification personified]]'' by a being known as The Great Will of the Macrocosm, who resets things at least OnceAnEpisode. Though this is also [[SubvertedTrope subverted]] insofar as the Will is not always available, and also episodes 22-25 have [[GainaxEnding dramatic elements]] and more or less logical continuity for significant events. Throughout the series, there is also a slight bit of continuity in with all the general weirdness. Then the next episode, aptly titled "Going Too Far" jumps right back to this.

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* The {{anime}} ''Anime/GalaxyAngel'' is ''made'' of NegativeContinuity.this. The only times an episode counts is when they're introducing a new regular cast member, such as [[TheDitz Milfeulle]], Chitose, [[WeaselMascot Normad]] and the Twin Star Force.
* In ''Anime/ExcelSaga'', negative continuity is ''[[AnthropomorphicPersonification personified]]'' by a being known as The Great Will of the Macrocosm, who resets things at least OnceAnEpisode.OncePerEpisode. Though this is also [[SubvertedTrope subverted]] insofar as the Will is not always available, and also episodes 22-25 have [[GainaxEnding dramatic elements]] and more or less logical continuity for significant events. Throughout the series, there is also a slight bit of continuity in with all the general weirdness. Then the next episode, aptly titled "Going Too Far" jumps right back to this.



* All through ''Anime/TheAdventuresOfMiniGoddess'', especially with regard to Gan-chan. {{Lampshaded}} in the finale.

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* All through ''Anime/TheAdventuresOfMiniGoddess'', especially with regard to Gan-chan. {{Lampshaded}} {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the finale.



* ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo'' had Negative Continuity in two episodes just before the end of the series. The first one, titled ''Cosmic Collisions'', introduces the characters to [[spoiler:a group of dead people who are always searching for a buried treasure that never existed in the first place]]. The episode ends and [[spoiler:everyone is killed by a meteor that destroys the surrounding area]]. The next episode, ''Baseball Blues'', shows the characters competing in a game of baseball against an American team and everyone on the team [[spoiler:is severely injured or killed in the end (it's never satisfactorily explained if they actually were killed or not)]], while the finale shows everyone in perfect health and in exactly the place where they had been headed for the entire series.

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* ''Anime/SamuraiChamploo'' had Negative Continuity negative continuity in two episodes just before the end of the series. The first one, titled ''Cosmic Collisions'', introduces the characters to [[spoiler:a group of dead people who are always searching for a buried treasure that never existed in the first place]]. The episode ends and [[spoiler:everyone is killed by a meteor that destroys the surrounding area]]. The next episode, ''Baseball Blues'', shows the characters competing in a game of baseball against an American team and everyone on the team [[spoiler:is severely injured or killed in the end (it's never satisfactorily explained if they actually were killed or not)]], while the finale shows everyone in perfect health and in exactly the place where they had been headed for the entire series.



** You think they possibly can't top this but then you have the ending of [[UpToEleven the seventh episode]] where [[spoiler: Dandy has flung far to the distant future in a far end of the universe and having [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence ascended to a higher plane of existence]].]] "THE END" pops up. Credits roll.
** The second season finale plays with the series' disregard with continuity. The reason that Dr. Gel [[spoiler:or rather, [[TheStarscream Bea]]]] went after Dandy is because [[spoiler:he has a rare element called Pionium that can transcend through different universes.]]

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** You think they possibly can't top this but then you have the ending of [[UpToEleven the seventh episode]] where [[spoiler: Dandy has flung far to the distant future in a far end of the universe and having [[AscendToAHigherPlaneOfExistence ascended to a higher plane of existence]].]] existence]]]]. "THE END" pops up. Credits roll.
** The second season finale plays with the series' disregard with continuity. The reason that Dr. Gel [[spoiler:or rather, [[TheStarscream Bea]]]] went after Dandy is because [[spoiler:he has a rare element called Pionium that can transcend through different universes.]]universes]].



* The concept of "Hypertime" - outlined by Mark Waid and Creator/GrantMorrison as, basically, a way to remove the possibility of continuity errors in Creator/DCComics while freeing writers from the need to remain consistent with the works of previous writers - could be described as "negative continuity through ''total'' continuity." The main points were (1) every story ever written did happen and is {{Canon}}, even the stuff that [[SeriesContinuityError contradicts the other stuff]], however (2) every story takes place in its own [[AlternateUniverse discrete world]], and (3) the writer of any given story gets to decide which previously-written stories did and didn't happen in the "world" his or her story is taking place in, and therefore can just toss out anything they don't like and HandWave discrepancies with earlier stories by saying [[CanonDiscontinuity "that never happened in my world."]] While the idea has its proponents, most tend to feel it causes more problems than it solves, not the least of which is the fact that the only people comfortable with its "anything goes" approach to continuity are the people who never minded continuity errors to begin with. It's now implied that Hypertime has ceased to exist because [[spoiler:in the future (a relative concept since he's already a time traveler), a more competent version of ComicBook/BoosterGold will [[CosmicRetcon deliberately eliminate it]]]].
* Less obvious but almost as intrusive as Hypertime is DC's "Ten Year Rule" (closer to twelve years since the One Year Later issues), which in the late '90s-early '00s unambiguously stated that no matter when you're reading a given comic, Batman and Superman started their careers 10 years ago, and they were the first significant superheroes to debut since the Justice Society disbanded in the 50s. Other heroes began their careers within the following year and the Justice League was formed roughly at the beginning of the next year. Between this and the fact that some stories weren't [[RetCon retconned]] out of existence by the ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths (predominantly because none of the characters affected by the Crisis had a full, unambiguous reboot -- they just kept on going as they were but some miniseries -- "Superman: The Man of Steel" and "Batman: Year One" -- re-wrote the BackStory as needed) has made a mess of the continuity, requiring multiple mini-{{Crisis Crossover}}s to shear off the dead weight.
* Marvel has a similar rule to the above, but they don't play quite so hard and fast by it; their flagship characters have aged about 15-20 years since their respective debuts in the 1960s. (But they ''do'' adhere to the rule in some capacity, which is why it's not currently, say, 1979 in the Marvel universe right now.)
* Despite Creator/DonRosa's attempts to create a duck "continuity", the vast majority of writers gleefully ignore it at their leisure, but just as is the case with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' there are occasional continuity nods. Several stories have ended up with Scrooge ruined, for instance. Still, 99% of all duck stories use negative continuity, making it possible for DonaldDuck and Huey, Dewey and Louie to be surprised at seeing, for instance, dragons, even though they've seen much stranger things at least a hundred times.

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* The concept of "Hypertime" - outlined by Mark Waid Creator/MarkWaid and Creator/GrantMorrison as, basically, a way to remove the possibility of continuity errors in Creator/DCComics while freeing writers from the need to remain consistent with the works of previous writers - could be described as "negative continuity through ''total'' continuity." The main points were (1) every story ever written did happen and is {{Canon}}, even the stuff that [[SeriesContinuityError contradicts the other stuff]], however (2) every story takes place in its own [[AlternateUniverse discrete world]], and (3) the writer of any given story gets to decide which previously-written stories did and didn't happen in the "world" his or her story is taking place in, and therefore can just toss out anything they don't like and HandWave discrepancies with earlier stories by saying [[CanonDiscontinuity "that never happened in my world."]] While the idea has its proponents, most tend to feel it causes more problems than it solves, not the least of which is the fact that the only people comfortable with its "anything goes" approach to continuity are the people who never minded continuity errors to begin with. It's now implied that Hypertime has ceased to exist because [[spoiler:in the future (a relative concept since he's already a time traveler), a more competent version of ComicBook/BoosterGold will [[CosmicRetcon deliberately eliminate it]]]].
* Less obvious but almost as intrusive as Hypertime is DC's "Ten Year Rule" (closer to twelve years since the One ''One Year Later Later'' issues), which in the late '90s-early '00s unambiguously stated that no matter when you're reading a given comic, Batman and Superman started their careers 10 years ago, and they were the first significant superheroes to debut since the Justice Society disbanded in the 50s. Other heroes began their careers within the following year and the Justice League was formed roughly at the beginning of the next year. Between this and the fact that some stories weren't [[RetCon retconned]] {{retcon}}ned out of existence by the ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths ''ComicBook/CrisisOnInfiniteEarths'' (predominantly because none of the characters affected by the Crisis had a full, unambiguous reboot -- they just kept on going as they were but some miniseries -- "Superman: The Man of Steel" and "Batman: Year One" -- re-wrote the BackStory as needed) has made a mess of the continuity, requiring multiple mini-{{Crisis Crossover}}s to shear off the dead weight.
* Marvel Creator/{{Marvel|Comics}} has a similar rule to the above, but they don't play quite so hard and fast by it; their flagship characters have aged about 15-20 years since their respective debuts in the 1960s. (But they ''do'' adhere to the rule in some capacity, which is why it's not currently, say, 1979 in the Marvel universe right now.)
* Despite Creator/DonRosa's attempts to create a duck "continuity", the vast majority of writers gleefully ignore it at their leisure, but just as is the case with ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' there are occasional continuity nods. Several stories have ended up with Scrooge ruined, for instance. Still, 99% of all duck stories use negative continuity, making it possible for DonaldDuck WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck and Huey, Dewey and Louie to be surprised at seeing, for instance, dragons, even though they've seen much stranger things at least a hundred times.



* In the AnthologyComic ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' Lord Snooty one of the older strips in the comic first appearing in the first issue is a victim of this. Originally the character was an upper class child who liked to run off and play with working class kids, then the kids appeared to live with him with no reference to the past, After disappearing from the comic for about a decade Lord Snooty then appears in a Beano retirement home (he is still a child physically though) at one point in 2001, he briefly appears again in a longer Kev F Sutherland strip as normal and then by Lord Snooty the Third it is implied he is dead and Lord Snooty the Third's grandfather. Whilst characters which are still children eg Dennis the Menace interacted with him whilst they were both still children and some of these characters also interacted with Lord Snooty the Third whilst they were both children as well.

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* In the AnthologyComic ''ComicBook/TheBeano'' Lord Snooty one of the older strips in the comic first appearing in the first issue is a victim of this. Originally the character was an upper class child who liked to run off and play with working class kids, then the kids appeared to live with him with no reference to the past, After disappearing from the comic for about a decade Lord Snooty then appears in a Beano retirement home (he is still a child physically though) at one point in 2001, he briefly appears again in a longer Kev F Sutherland strip as normal and then by Lord Snooty the Third it is implied he is dead and Lord Snooty the Third's grandfather. Whilst characters which are still children eg e.g. Dennis the Menace interacted with him whilst they were both still children and some of these characters also interacted with Lord Snooty the Third whilst they were both children as well.



** A very confusing element of this is Blu's stories where he is portrayed as a [[AnimatedActors comic book star]] living in a [[WorldofFunnyAnimals World of Funny Animals]] but appearing alongside other characters that are more like [[MediumAwareness aware of their existence as comic book characters]] but they aren't acting their stories.

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** A very confusing element of this is Blu's stories where he is portrayed as a [[AnimatedActors comic book star]] living in a [[WorldofFunnyAnimals World of Funny Animals]] WorldOfFunnyAnimals but appearing alongside other characters that are more like [[MediumAwareness aware of their existence as comic book characters]] but they aren't acting their stories.



* The ''Film/XMen'' films have gotten this way due to ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' and ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', both of which were prequels to the first three films and played fast and loose with the timeline. ''Wolverine'' has been [[CanonDiscontinuity officially thrown out of continuity]].

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* The ''Film/XMen'' films have ''Film/XMenFilmSeries'' had gotten this way due to ''Film/XMenOriginsWolverine'' and ''Film/XMenFirstClass'', both of which were prequels to the first three films and played fast and loose with the timeline. timeline. [[Film/XMenDaysOfFuturePast So a new timeline was introduced.]] ''Wolverine'' has been [[CanonDiscontinuity officially thrown out of continuity]].



* The [[LongRunner very long running]] Spanish ''Hombre Lobo'' ("werewolf" or "wolf man") series has ''no'' continuity across its eleven films. Paul Naschy stars in every one of them as a werewolf named Waldemar Daninsky, and...that's it. How Daninsky became a werewolf, what time period he was born in (ranging from the 16th century to the 20th), what he looks like in his wolf form, what his occupation is, what it takes to kill him, and whether or not he even ''can'' be killed all differ dramatically from movie to movie.

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* The [[LongRunner [[LongRunners very long running]] Spanish ''Hombre Lobo'' ("werewolf" or "wolf man") series has ''no'' continuity across its eleven films. Paul Naschy stars in every one of them as a werewolf named Waldemar Daninsky, and...that's it. How Daninsky became a werewolf, what time period he was born in (ranging from the 16th century to the 20th), what he looks like in his wolf form, what his occupation is, what it takes to kill him, and whether or not he even ''can'' be killed all differ dramatically from movie to movie.






* ''Series/TheMightyBoosh'' is hardly the type of show you'd expect to find continuity in anyway but it has a surprising combination of both ResetButton and SnapBack plots. One episode has a main character die only to have him rescued from hell by another, upon returning he's asked "I thought you were dead" only to respond with something to the effect of "Yeah, I'm back now" which is treated very nonchalantly. In other examples, Bollo the gorilla dies on one episodes ending only to appear again later. One {{egregious}} example involves them employing a SnapBack on {{Backstory}}-- Howard reveals that he doesn't play instruments because he [[DealWithTheDevil signed his soul over to the Spirit of Jazz to become a musical genius]] and now every time he picks up an instrument the [[DemonicPossession Spirit of Jazz controls him]]. This isn't remedied in any way at the end of the episode but the ''very next episode'' open with Howard playing a guitar with no ill effects or explanation.

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* ''Series/TheMightyBoosh'' is hardly the type of show you'd expect to find continuity in anyway but it has a surprising combination of both ResetButton and SnapBack plots. One episode has a main character die only to have him rescued from hell by another, upon returning he's asked "I thought you were dead" only to respond with something to the effect of "Yeah, I'm back now" which is treated very nonchalantly. In other examples, Bollo the gorilla dies on one episodes ending only to appear again later. One {{egregious}} JustForFun/{{egregious}} example involves them employing a SnapBack on {{Backstory}}-- Howard reveals that he doesn't play instruments because he [[DealWithTheDevil signed his soul over to the Spirit of Jazz to become a musical genius]] and now every time he picks up an instrument the [[DemonicPossession Spirit of Jazz controls him]]. This isn't remedied in any way at the end of the episode but the ''very next episode'' open with Howard playing a guitar with no ill effects or explanation.



* This trope is one of the charges frequently (and not without ''some'' justification) leveled at ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Things such as significant damage or casualities were brushed off a bit too easily at times, thus hindering any feelings of the ship being stuck and self-reliant in uncharted space.

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* This trope is one of the charges frequently (and not without ''some'' justification) leveled at ''Series/StarTrekVoyager''. Things such as significant damage or casualities causalities were brushed off a bit too easily at times, thus hindering any feelings of the ship being stuck and self-reliant in uncharted space.



* LouisCK said of his show ''{{Louie}}'': "Every episode has its own goal, and if it messes up the goal of another episode, [...] I just don't care." This is reflected in such matters as his character's mother being played by two different actors as having two completely contradictory characters in two episodes.

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* LouisCK said of his show ''{{Louie}}'': ''Series/{{Louie}}'': "Every episode has its own goal, and if it messes up the goal of another episode, [...] I just don't care." This is reflected in such matters as his character's mother being played by two different actors as having two completely contradictory characters in two episodes.



* Series/{{Father Ted}} allows Father Stone to stay with him forever after his brush with death. He is never seen again.

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* Series/{{Father Ted}} Series/FatherTed allows Father Stone to stay with him forever after his brush with death. He is never seen again.



* ''Series/{{Once Upon A Time}}'' has developed this in pretty much every season post season 2.

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* ''Series/{{Once Upon A Time}}'' ''Series/OnceUponATime'' has developed this in pretty much every season post season 2.



* On ''Series/{{Cheers}}'', there is an in-universe {{lampshading}} when Norm was watching Casper the Friendly Ghost and noticed that every episode ends with Casper being surrounded by friends and the next episode beginning with Casper once again having no friends

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* On ''Series/{{Cheers}}'', there is an in-universe {{lampshading}} {{lampshad|eHanging}}ing when Norm was watching Casper the Friendly Ghost and noticed that every episode ends with Casper being surrounded by friends and the next episode beginning with Casper once again having no friends






* A common device in radio comedy, where the audience would often consist of whoever happened to be near a radio set at the time. For instance, ''Radio/TheGoonShow'' would often have major characters blown up, bankrupted, thrown into prison, killed by wet elephants, or otherwise removed from the story before bringing them back the following week. There was at least one character (Bluebottle) whose ''entire schtick'' was getting killed in every episode. Bluebottle is also a case of far shorter-term NegativeContinuity: "You've deaded me, you swine!"

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* A common device in radio comedy, where the audience would often consist of whoever happened to be near a radio set at the time. For instance, ''Radio/TheGoonShow'' would often have major characters blown up, bankrupted, thrown into prison, killed by wet elephants, or otherwise removed from the story before bringing them back the following week. There was at least one character (Bluebottle) whose ''entire schtick'' was getting killed in every episode. Bluebottle is also a case of far shorter-term NegativeContinuity: negative continuity: "You've deaded me, you swine!"



* In ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'', there ''is'' an overarching storyline across all six games with consistent characters and villains. However, Negative Continuity is rampant in the area designs: the internet and some recurring real world places (like Sci Lab in 1, 3 and 5; Netopia Castle in 2 and 4) are redesigned in every single game, and there is an almost completely different set of locations to visit in each game. ACDC Town and its houses had all the same design in the first three games, but were heavily redesigned after the graphical revamp of the fourth game. The only place that never got a redesign was the school in ACDC, which never appeared outside of cutscenes in the final three games.
** There's also some Negative Continuity with the characters too. Lan's father Yuichiro works for Sci Lab in every odd-numbered game, but otherwise: It's played straight in 2, where he's working at the Official Center (an "internet police" organization), justified in 4, where he's recruited by NAXA (a play on NASA and JAXA) due to a global emergency, and in 6 he's transferred to a different city to oversee the upcoming Expo. Also, in the third game, Lan's best friend Dex moves to Netopia (another country) in the 3rd game (and returns immediately "as a visit"), but in the following games he is back in ACDC.

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* In ''VideoGame/MegaManBattleNetwork'', there ''is'' an overarching storyline across all six games with consistent characters and villains. However, Negative Continuity negative continuity is rampant in the area designs: the internet and some recurring real world places (like Sci Lab in 1, 3 and 5; Netopia Castle in 2 and 4) are redesigned in every single game, and there is an almost completely different set of locations to visit in each game. ACDC Town and its houses had all the same design in the first three games, but were heavily redesigned after the graphical revamp of the fourth game. The only place that never got a redesign was the school in ACDC, which never appeared outside of cutscenes in the final three games.
** There's also some Negative Continuity negative continuity with the characters too. Lan's father Yuichiro works for Sci Lab in every odd-numbered game, but otherwise: It's played straight in 2, where he's working at the Official Center (an "internet police" organization), justified in 4, where he's recruited by NAXA (a play on NASA and JAXA) due to a global emergency, and in 6 he's transferred to a different city to oversee the upcoming Expo. Also, in the third game, Lan's best friend Dex moves to Netopia (another country) in the 3rd game (and returns immediately "as a visit"), but in the following games he is back in ACDC.



* The ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' series has some outside of the main canon. You can kill any character and they can still come back in the ending or next game. Averted and played with in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9''. Apparently everything up to Armageddon happened and Raiden tried to reverse it all with time travel (actually sending a vision to his younger, possibly alternate-reality self), Resulting in a very different series of events. Averted in that each character apparently still has their own side stories, which do not run canonically with the main story.

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* The ''Franchise/MortalKombat'' series has some outside of the main canon. You can kill any character and they can still come back in the ending or next game. Averted and played with in ''VideoGame/MortalKombat9''. Apparently everything up to Armageddon ''[[VideoGame/MortalKombatArmageddon Armageddon]]'' happened and Raiden tried to reverse it all with time travel (actually sending a vision to his younger, possibly alternate-reality self), Resulting in a very different series of events. Averted in that each character apparently still has their own side stories, which do not run canonically with the main story.



** Webcomic/CaseyAndAndy messes around with this trope to the point of MindScrew. Through more than 400 strips, Casey ''stays'' [[http://www.galactanet.com/comic/view.php?strip=36 dictator]] of [[http://galactanet.com/comic/view.php?strip=438 France]] without us noticing!

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** Webcomic/CaseyAndAndy ''Webcomic/CaseyAndAndy'' messes around with this trope to the point of MindScrew. Through more than 400 strips, Casey ''stays'' [[http://www.galactanet.com/comic/view.php?strip=36 dictator]] of [[http://galactanet.com/comic/view.php?strip=438 France]] without us noticing!



* ''WebAnimation/RetardedAnimalBabies'', also hosted on Website/{{Newgrounds}}, takes full advantage of NegativeContinuity to kill/maim the main cast (especially [[ButtMonkey Bunny]]) each episode, only to have them back by the next. In one later episode, the entire ''universe'' was destroyed by one of the cast [[spoiler:when he tried to destroy a ''black hole'']]. Surprisingly, the series actually reveals ''why'' it has NegativeContinuity (aside from RuleOfFunny): [[spoiler:in one timeline the cast grew up; while they ultimately became successful adults (somehow) they also became smart enough to realize that their world ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]'']]. Cat, [[spoiler:who became a MadScientist, then invented a Physical Law Usurper, which gave them all the chance to go to a place outside of normal space and time, where they could remain blissfully ignorant forever]]. As a side character in a later episode notes, "they exist in a continuity proof bubble, like a bunch of Kennys from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''!"

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* ''WebAnimation/RetardedAnimalBabies'', also hosted on Website/{{Newgrounds}}, takes full advantage of NegativeContinuity this trope to kill/maim the main cast (especially [[ButtMonkey Bunny]]) each episode, only to have them back by the next. In one later episode, the entire ''universe'' was destroyed by one of the cast [[spoiler:when he tried to destroy a ''black hole'']]. Surprisingly, the series actually reveals ''why'' it has NegativeContinuity this (aside from RuleOfFunny): [[spoiler:in one timeline the cast grew up; while they ultimately became successful adults (somehow) they also became smart enough to realize that their world ''[[CrapsackWorld sucks]]'']]. Cat, [[spoiler:who became a MadScientist, then invented a Physical Law Usurper, which gave them all the chance to go to a place outside of normal space and time, where they could remain blissfully ignorant forever]]. As a side character in a later episode notes, "they exist in a continuity proof bubble, like a bunch of Kennys from ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark''!"



* ''WebAnimation/TheDementedCartoonMovie'' is 30 minutes of NegativeContinuity. Examples include the Earth in the cartoon actually blew up several times in the course of the story ({{Lampshade|Hanging}}ed by the characters that were watching the events on TV), the fact that "[[FlyingBrick Super Blah]]" had his head blown off twice, etc.

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* ''WebAnimation/TheDementedCartoonMovie'' is 30 minutes of NegativeContinuity.this. Examples include the Earth in the cartoon actually blew up several times in the course of the story ({{Lampshade|Hanging}}ed by the characters that were watching the events on TV), the fact that "[[FlyingBrick Super Blah]]" had his head blown off twice, etc.



* [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment "There is no continuity, there is only Insano"]]. Spoony is determined to introduce a [[MultipleChoicePast new possible origin story for Dr. Insano]] in nearly every episode he appears in. [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Is he a version of Spoony from another universe?]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI Did Spoony get a doctorate and travel back in time to give his past self all the science he could ever need?]] [[WebVideo/{{Kickassia}} Is he the Mr. Hyde to Spoony's Dr. Jekyll?]] Or is he one of the Schlumper brothers? All we know for sure is that the guy loves him some '''[[ForScience SCIENCE!]]'''
** Actually justified in ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'', where it is revealed that any continuity errors are the result of a literal PlotHole in space. [[spoiler: By the end of the film, the entire universe becomes part of the PlotHole]].

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* [[WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment ''WebVideo/TheSpoonyExperiment'': "There is no continuity, there is only Insano"]].Insano". Spoony is determined to introduce a [[MultipleChoicePast new possible origin story for Dr. Insano]] in nearly every episode he appears in. [[WebVideo/AtopTheFourthWall Is he a version of Spoony from another universe?]] [[VideoGame/FinalFantasyI Did Spoony get a doctorate and travel back in time to give his past self all the science he could ever need?]] [[WebVideo/{{Kickassia}} Is he the Mr. Hyde to Spoony's Dr. Jekyll?]] Or is he one of the Schlumper brothers? All we know for sure is that the guy loves him some '''[[ForScience SCIENCE!]]'''
**
SCIENCE!]]''' Actually justified in ''WebVideo/ToBoldlyFlee'', where it is revealed that any continuity errors are the result of a literal PlotHole in space. [[spoiler: By the end of the film, the entire universe becomes part of the PlotHole]].PlotHole.]]



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'': Several characters[[note]]usually not counting Quack-Quack since [[NighInvulnerable he cannot die]], though this still applies to him sometimes[[/note]] have been decapitated, blown up, launched into orbit, driven to madness, turned into zombies, [[TrappedInAnotherWorld trapped in alternate dimensions]] [[TrappedInThePast or different time periods]]... Heck, [[spoiler: the world even [[ApocalypseHow blew up]]]] once! Yet everything is always back to normal in the next episode.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Kaeloo}}'': Several characters[[note]]usually not counting Quack-Quack since [[NighInvulnerable [[NighInvulnerability he cannot die]], though this still applies to him sometimes[[/note]] have been decapitated, blown up, launched into orbit, driven to madness, turned into zombies, [[TrappedInAnotherWorld trapped in alternate dimensions]] [[TrappedInThePast or different time periods]]... Heck, [[spoiler: the world even [[ApocalypseHow blew up]]]] once! Yet everything is always back to normal in the next episode.



* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' has the episodes "Hot Water", (an episode done InUniverse by Cee-Lo Green, on what you should take into consideration when buying a tub...) "Tear Jerker" and "For Black Eyes Only" as officially non-canon.
** Though originally "Hot Water" was going to be the series finale before they got picked up for another season, so yeah...

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* ''WesternAnimation/AmericanDad'' has the episodes "Hot Water", (an episode done InUniverse by Cee-Lo Green, on what you should take into consideration when buying a tub...) "Tear Jerker" and "For Black Eyes Only" as officially non-canon.
**
non-canon. Though originally "Hot Water" was going to be the series finale before they got picked up for another season, so yeah...



** Season 18 seems to avert it so far, each episode, except the premiere referenced events from the previous episode.
*** In "Gluten Free Ebola", the kids go back to school after their startup fails (seen in "Go Fund Yourself"). They decide to throw a party to regain favor with their classmates, since they told them to go fuck themselves when they initially launched their startup.
*** In "The Cissy", a journalist investigates Lorde's appearance at the kids' party in the previous episode, and revealed thet Randy actually is Lorde.
** Season 19 has, for the first time, one long story arc with continuity from episode to episode.

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** Beginning with Season 18 seems to avert it so far, 18, each episode, except the premiere referenced events from season would follow a continuous plotline with most episodes having references to the previous episode.
*** In "Gluten Free Ebola", the kids go back to school after their startup fails (seen in "Go Fund Yourself"). They decide to throw a party to regain favor with their classmates, since they told them to go fuck themselves when they initially launched their startup.
*** In "The Cissy", a journalist investigates Lorde's appearance at the kids' party in the previous episode, and revealed thet Randy actually is Lorde.
** Season 19 has, for the first time, one long story arc with continuity from episode to episode.
ones.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' frequently ends with deaths/mutations/evils run amok that don't carry over to the next episode.
** The fan webcomic ''FanFic/GrimTalesFromDownBelow'' explains this as a case of DeathTakesAHoliday -- Billy and Mandy's life timers ran out long ago, but Grim can't bring himself to reap them (well, can't bring himself to reap ''Mandy'', anyway -- Billy's timer is simply so warped he can't make heads or tails of it).

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheGrimAdventuresOfBillyAndMandy'' frequently ends with deaths/mutations/evils run amok that don't carry over to the next episode.
**
episode. The fan webcomic ''FanFic/GrimTalesFromDownBelow'' explains this as a case of DeathTakesAHoliday -- Billy and Mandy's life timers ran out long ago, but Grim can't bring himself to reap them (well, can't bring himself to reap ''Mandy'', anyway -- Billy's timer is simply so warped he can't make heads or tails of it).



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' has an interesting trend in having mostly NegativeContinuity with the occasional ContinuityNod. Characters will often comment on a previous episode's events, such as Homer's Mr. Plow job when he took off Flanders's roof to use as a snow plow, or Mr. Burns and Krusty the Clown not recognizing Homer and Bart, even if someone points out all the major things they've done to them. It doesn't usually affect the plot for that episode other than a joke. ''The Simpsons'' have made something of an art of using a ContinuityNod to {{lampshade|Hanging}} the ''lack'' of continuity.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'' has an interesting trend in having mostly NegativeContinuity negative continuity with the occasional ContinuityNod. Characters will often comment on a previous episode's events, such as Homer's Mr. Plow job when he took off Flanders's roof to use as a snow plow, or Mr. Burns and Krusty the Clown not recognizing Homer and Bart, even if someone points out all the major things they've done to them. It doesn't usually affect the plot for that episode other than a joke. ''The Simpsons'' have made something of an art of using a ContinuityNod to {{lampshade|Hanging}} the ''lack'' of continuity.



** Many WesternAnimation/TreehouseOfHorror episodes have various characters die.[[note]]The original FramingDevice was that all the shorts are scary stories being told by the kids, but this was quickly dropped.[[/note]] The Halloween specials are officially non-canon, so it makes sense, though most deaths outside of that remain that way.
*** Oddly, a clip from the first Halloween special was seen in one of the clip show episodes.

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** Many WesternAnimation/TreehouseOfHorror episodes have various characters die.[[note]]The original FramingDevice was that all the shorts are scary stories being told by the kids, but this was quickly dropped.[[/note]] The Halloween specials are officially non-canon, so it makes sense, though most deaths outside of that remain that way.
***
way. Oddly, a clip from the first Halloween special was seen in one of the clip show episodes.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' lampshades this once, when Fry declares that the most important thing in sitcoms is that "At the end of the episode, everything always goes right back to normal"... as the camera pulls out on the burning ruins of New New York, which is -- of course -- back to normal by the next episode. The series as a whole has a continuity, an explicitly stated timeline, a canon, and at least one running storyline that involves Nibbler and is hinted at from the ''first episode''. It is still affected by NegativeContinuity, though.

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Futurama}}'' lampshades this once, when Fry declares that the most important thing in sitcoms is that "At the end of the episode, everything always goes right back to normal"... as the camera pulls out on the burning ruins of New New York, which is -- of course -- back to normal by the next episode. The series as a whole has a continuity, an explicitly stated timeline, a canon, and at least one running storyline that involves Nibbler and is hinted at from the ''first episode''. It is still affected by NegativeContinuity, negative continuity, though.



* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': Very often, and it often lampshades it.

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* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'': Very often, and it often lampshades it.frequently lampshaded.



** An in-joke in the first UnCancelled season has Beavis and Butt-Head discussing that they used to have a friend named WesternAnimation/{{Daria}} who ended up moving away. Obviously this was an explicit reference to Daria, who indeed moved away and became the subject of her own TV series. The thing is, Daria actually had some plot progression and the show even ended with Daria and her friends splitting up and going off to college. Meanwhile, Beavis and Butt-Head have been in the same grade with the same teacher and classmates for well over 15 years at this point.

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** An in-joke in the first UnCancelled UnCanceled season has Beavis and Butt-Head discussing that they used to have a friend named WesternAnimation/{{Daria}} who ended up moving away. Obviously this was an explicit reference to Daria, who indeed moved away and became the subject of her own TV series. The thing is, Daria actually had some plot progression and the show even ended with Daria and her friends splitting up and going off to college. Meanwhile, Beavis and Butt-Head have been in the same grade with the same teacher and classmates for well over 15 years at this point.



* {{Justified|Trope}} in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'': Thanks to the [[ResetButton "Returns to the Past"]], any injuries or problems the kids face can be easily resolved and the [[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]] unchanged, even for no real reason. The only exception is death, though the series did end up trying to decrease the RTTP power by giving a consequence for its overuse. Even with the ResetButton, the first season still had a bit of unexplained negative continuity, such as certain characters never being mentioned again. The later seasons stopped doing this, as a side-effect of not using the returns to the past in [[OnceAnEpisode every episode]] any more.

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* {{Justified|Trope}} in ''WesternAnimation/CodeLyoko'': Thanks to the [[ResetButton "Returns to the Past"]], any injuries or problems the kids face can be easily resolved and the [[StatusQuoIsGod status quo]] {{status quo|IsGod}} unchanged, even for no real reason. The only exception is death, though the series did end up trying to decrease the RTTP power by giving a consequence for its overuse. Even with the ResetButton, the first season still had a bit of unexplained negative continuity, such as certain characters never being mentioned again. The later seasons stopped doing this, as a side-effect of not using the returns to the past in [[OnceAnEpisode [[OncePerEpisode every episode]] any more.



** The charater [[GratuitousSpanish Juandissimo]], who is the fairy godparent of one of Timmy's enemies, [[LonelyRichKid Remy Buxaplenty]], is often shown living alone in [[MagicalLand Fairy World]], then is shown living with Remy again. In the episode "Fairy Idol" (season 5) he even competes to become a fairy godparent, but in season 7 it's confirmed that he's still Remy's godparent.

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** The charater character [[GratuitousSpanish Juandissimo]], who is the fairy godparent of one of Timmy's enemies, [[LonelyRichKid Remy Buxaplenty]], is often shown living alone in [[MagicalLand Fairy World]], then is shown living with Remy again. In the episode "Fairy Idol" (season 5) he even competes to become a fairy godparent, but in season 7 it's confirmed that he's still Remy's godparent.



* The season 2 finale of ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' addresses the Negative Continuity hitherto present throughout in the show. "The Finale" focuses on the consequences of previous episodes coming back to haunt the main characters. It's the first episode to directly reference other episodes[[note]]a few second season episodes contained subtle nods but nothing major[[/note]], with flashbacks, [[CallBack Call Backs]] and [[ContinuityNod Continuity Nods]] [[ContinuityCavalcade galore]]. [[spoiler: It even ends by invoking Negative Continuity. With Elmore in chaos, the angry townsfolk prepare to end the Wattersons. [[LampshadeHanging Gumball cries]]: "The only thing that could save us is [[ResetButton reality being completely reset]] by [[DeusExMachina some kind of magic device]]!". The credits then role and by the season 3 opener, everything is fine with no reference to those events being made]]. As of its third season, the show regularly dabbles with continuity, with one episode, "The Shell", providing the first major change to the status quo[[note]]excluding the season opener, "The Kids", where Gumball and Darwin's new voice actors take over]][[/note]]and "The Burden" (partly) and "The Bros" acting as [[SequelEpisode follow-ups to it]]. Despite this, each episode remains largely standalone.

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* The season 2 finale of ''WesternAnimation/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball'' addresses the Negative Continuity hitherto present throughout in the show. "The Finale" focuses on the consequences of previous episodes coming back to haunt the main characters. It's the first episode to directly reference other episodes[[note]]a few second season episodes contained subtle nods but nothing major[[/note]], with flashbacks, [[CallBack Call Backs]] {{Call Back}}s and [[ContinuityNod Continuity Nods]] {{Continuity Nod}}s [[ContinuityCavalcade galore]]. [[spoiler: It even ends by invoking Negative Continuity. With Elmore in chaos, the angry townsfolk prepare to end the Wattersons. [[LampshadeHanging Gumball cries]]: "The only thing that could save us is [[ResetButton reality being completely reset]] by [[DeusExMachina some kind of magic device]]!". The credits then role and by the season 3 opener, everything is fine with no reference to those events being made]]. made.]] As of its third season, the show regularly dabbles with continuity, with one episode, "The Shell", providing the first major change to the status quo[[note]]excluding the season opener, "The Kids", where Gumball and Darwin's new voice actors take over]][[/note]]and "The Burden" (partly) and "The Bros" acting as [[SequelEpisode follow-ups to it]]. Despite this, each episode remains largely standalone.



* Happens too many times to count in ''WesternAnimation/LesShadoks''. [[LampshadedTrope Lampshaded]] in the last episode of Season 3: the Shadoks ans Gibis don't care about the fact that it's the end of the story and that they're going to die because by that point, they've all died so many times that they're sure they will recover from that one too.

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* Happens too many times to count in ''WesternAnimation/LesShadoks''. [[LampshadedTrope Lampshaded]] {{Lampshade|Hanging}}d in the last episode of Season 3: the Shadoks ans Gibis don't care about the fact that it's the end of the story and that they're going to die because by that point, they've all died so many times that they're sure they will recover from that one too.
5th Dec '17 5:51:47 PM nombretomado
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* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts[[note]]after all, when the only limit is what you can draw (and studio budget), there's nothing stopping your creative team from putting DaffyDuck in a variety of exotic locales or even different time periods, so long as the story is good[[/note]]. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.

to:

* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts[[note]]after all, when the only limit is what you can draw (and studio budget), there's nothing stopping your creative team from putting DaffyDuck WesternAnimation/DaffyDuck in a variety of exotic locales or even different time periods, so long as the story is good[[/note]]. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.
3rd Dec '17 4:27:19 PM ninja_penguin
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Added DiffLines:

** There are at least two episodes that end by skipping ahead many years and showing that the unusual circumstances of the episode have persisted (even though these circumstances are never seen in another episode). In "The Clowning", we see 67 years into the future where Carl remains a frozen clown and Meatwad remains a (non-frozen) clown. In "Multiple Meat", Meatwas is still cut into a few dozen pieces, and we see the pieces finally finish singing "3 Million Bottles of Beer on the Wall" 27 years after they started.
2nd Dec '17 10:58:37 AM SparkPlugTheTroper
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* Happens too many times to count in ''WewternAnimation/LesShadoks''. [[LampshadedTrope Lampshaded]] in the last episode of Season 3: the Shadoks ans Gibis don't care about the fact that it's the end of the story and that they're going to die because by that point, they've all died so many times that they're sure they will recover from that one too.

to:

* Happens too many times to count in ''WewternAnimation/LesShadoks''.''WesternAnimation/LesShadoks''. [[LampshadedTrope Lampshaded]] in the last episode of Season 3: the Shadoks ans Gibis don't care about the fact that it's the end of the story and that they're going to die because by that point, they've all died so many times that they're sure they will recover from that one too.
2nd Dec '17 10:56:44 AM SparkPlugTheTroper
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to:

* Happens too many times to count in ''WewternAnimation/LesShadoks''. [[LampshadedTrope Lampshaded]] in the last episode of Season 3: the Shadoks ans Gibis don't care about the fact that it's the end of the story and that they're going to die because by that point, they've all died so many times that they're sure they will recover from that one too.
26th Nov '17 10:50:31 AM nombretomado
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* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts[[note]]after all, when the only limit is what you can draw (and studio budget), there's nothing stopping your creative team from putting DaffyDuck in a variety of exotic locales or even different time periods, so long as the story is good[[/note]]. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.

to:

* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts[[note]]after all, when the only limit is what you can draw (and studio budget), there's nothing stopping your creative team from putting DaffyDuck in a variety of exotic locales or even different time periods, so long as the story is good[[/note]]. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.
2nd Nov '17 8:43:37 AM CaptainTedium
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Related to StatusQuoIsGod, except it is (or can be) more deliberate/explicit, and it doesn't require any narrative explanation. See also: NoOntologicalInertia. Also related are BroadStrokes, SnapBack, and UniversalAdaptorCast. Not to be confused with FanonDiscontinuity or CanonDiscontinuity.

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Related to StatusQuoIsGod, StatusQuoIsGod (where the status quo is restored no matter what happens), except it is (or can be) more deliberate/explicit, and it doesn't require any narrative explanation. See also: NoOntologicalInertia. Also related are BroadStrokes, SnapBack, BroadStrokes (where a sequel or reboot implies at least some of the older installments to still be canon), SnapBack (where a single episode ends in a way that is inexplicably undone by the next episode), and UniversalAdaptorCast. UniversalAdaptorCast (where the same characters take on different roles in different stories). Not to be confused with FanonDiscontinuity (when fans disregard the events of installments they dislike) or CanonDiscontinuity.
CanonDiscontinuity (where an installment is confirmed to be non-canon).
29th Oct '17 2:26:14 PM ivfl
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** ''The Simpsons'' also suffers from "continuity bubbles," where some things happen in specific years throughout the show's run while others have sliding dates in relation to the present. For example, Homer and Marge "always" graduated in 1974, even though in 2014, this would mean Marge would have had to give birth to Maggie in her late 50s; also, one episode is about Marge and Homer in college in the 90's, despite the fact that the show started in 1989 and both Homer and Marge were married and settled down with kids when it started.

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** ''The Simpsons'' also suffers from "continuity bubbles," where some things happen in specific years throughout the show's run while others have sliding dates in relation to the present. For example, Homer and Marge "always" graduated in 1974, even though in 2014, 2017, this would mean Marge would have had to give birth to Maggie in her late 50s; early 60's; also, one episode is about Marge and Homer in college in the 90's, despite the fact that the show started in 1989 and both Homer and Marge were married and settled down with kids when it started.
10th Oct '17 9:09:51 PM Dedars1
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* The first three ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' games have continuity, [[Videogame/CrashBandicoot1996 It starts]] with Cortex making Crash, then he gets defeated on his blimp, finds the [[GreenRocks crystal]] and sets the plot of ''[[Videogame/CrashBandicoot2CortexStrikesBack Crash 2]]'' into motion, where at the end his space station gets destroyed. Start of ''[[Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped Crash 3]]'' then shows this released [[TheManBehindTheMan Uka Uka]], and by the end N. Tropy, Uka Uka, and Neo Cortex are all trapped in time. This is where the NegativeContinuity begins, as it's never explained quite how he recovered to [[GoKartingWithBowser race go-karts with Crash]] in time for ''Videogame/CrashTeamRacing''. After that, it sort of deteriorates with different developers messing around with the franchise, earning it an eventual ContinuityReboot.

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* The first three ''Franchise/CrashBandicoot'' games have continuity, [[Videogame/CrashBandicoot1996 It starts]] with Cortex making Crash, then he gets defeated on his blimp, finds the [[GreenRocks crystal]] and sets the plot of ''[[Videogame/CrashBandicoot2CortexStrikesBack Crash 2]]'' into motion, where at the end his space station gets destroyed. Start of ''[[Videogame/CrashBandicoot3Warped Crash 3]]'' then shows this released [[TheManBehindTheMan Uka Uka]], and by the end N. Tropy, Uka Uka, and Neo Cortex are all trapped in time. This is where the NegativeContinuity begins, as it's never explained quite how he recovered to [[GoKartingWithBowser race go-karts with Crash]] in time for ''Videogame/CrashTeamRacing''. After that, it sort of deteriorates with different developers messing around with the franchise, earning it an eventual ContinuityReboot.
This list shows the last 10 events of 234. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.NegativeContinuity