History Main / NegativeContinuity

15th Jul '17 11:16:44 AM Rubber_Lotus
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** Many WesternAnimation/TreehouseOfHorror episodes have various characters die. The Halloween specials are officially non-canon, so it makes sense, though most deaths outside of that remain that way.

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** Many WesternAnimation/TreehouseOfHorror episodes have various characters die. [[note]]The original FramingDevice was that all the shorts are scary stories being told by the kids, but this was quickly dropped.[[/note]] The Halloween specials are officially non-canon, so it makes sense, though most deaths outside of that remain that way.
11th Jul '17 4:09:11 PM ZombieAladdin
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Manga/{{Doraemon}}'', most stories are about Nobita receiving a device from the future from Doraemon that does something no modern appliance can, and circumstances ensure Nobita will suffer for it, whether it be losing all of his hair, leaking embarrassing videos of himself to his friends, getting hit by a car, drowning in his own bathtub, stranding himself in another dimension, and so forth. By the next story, he and anyone else he drags down with him are perfectly fine, and Doraemon is ready to give Nobita another device that will inevitably get Nobita into more trouble.
1st Jul '17 1:19:30 PM jamespolk
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** Not to mention that even the time period when these cartoons take place can vary dramatically. Most ''Tom and Jerry'' stories are set in the present (the time they were made anyway), for instance, but then there's stuff like "The Two Mouseketeers," which is set in Renaissance-era France, and "Advance and Be Mechanized," set in the far future. (The former, incidentally, is a rather famous, or perhaps infamous, case of negative continuity as the episode ends with Tom's ''death''. Naturally, Tom is just fine by the beginning of the next short.)

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** Not to mention that even the time period when these cartoons take place can vary dramatically. Most ''Tom and Jerry'' stories are set in the present (the time they were made anyway), for instance, but then there's stuff like "The Two Mouseketeers," "WesternAnimation/TheTwoMouseketeers," which is set in Renaissance-era France, and "Advance and Be Mechanized," set in the far future. (The former, incidentally, is a rather famous, or perhaps infamous, case of negative continuity as the episode ends with Tom's ''death''. Naturally, Tom is just fine by the beginning of the next short.)
27th Jun '17 3:58:36 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* ''WesternAnimation/TingaTingaTales is probably by far one of the worst offenders of this trope. Every episode portrays the animal of whom the episode is ADayInTheLimelight to be the last to have their problems fixed. For example, tick bird is not friends with hippo in her own episode, despite already being friends with her back when hippo had fur.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TingaTingaTales ''WesternAnimation/TingaTingaTales'' is probably by far one of the worst offenders of this trope. Every episode portrays the animal of whom the episode is ADayInTheLimelight to be the last to have their problems fixed. For example, tick bird is not friends with hippo in her own episode, despite already being friends with her back when hippo had fur.
27th Jun '17 3:53:26 PM Thomasfan
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* ''WesternAnimation/TingaTingaTales is probably by far one of the worst offenders of this trope. Every episode portrays the animal of whom the episode is ADayInTheLimelight to be the last to have their problems fixed. For example, tick bird is not friends with hippo in her own episode, despite already being friends with her back when hippo had fur.
14th Jun '17 9:34:33 PM nombretomado
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-->-- ''TheWorstWitch'', "Let Them Eat Cake"

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-->-- ''TheWorstWitch'', ''Series/TheWorstWitch'', "Let Them Eat Cake"
5th Jun '17 1:20:06 AM RacattackForce
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However, sometimes there is a bit of continuity played seriously, like an origin story never being contradicted, a new character having a proper introduction, and a dead character staying dead.

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However, sometimes there This doesn't mean everything is a bit always reset, however. The events that setup the premise of continuity played seriously, the work will always remain, while things like an origin story never being contradicted, a new character having a proper introduction, and introduction or a dead character staying dead.
dead will occasionally be respected as well.



* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.

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* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts.shorts[[note]]after all, when the only limit is what you can draw (and studio budget), there's nothing stopping your creative team from putting DaffyDuck in a variety of exotic locales or even different time periods, so long as the story is good[[/note]]. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.
5th Jun '17 1:10:41 AM RacattackForce
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* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of Western animation still make heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.

to:

* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing. When animation first developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of non-action Western animation still make makes heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.
5th Jun '17 1:08:21 AM RacattackForce
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* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing, perhaps its earliest use starting when cartoons first moved to television in the late 1950s, but even then it took a while to become widespread. When watching something like ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'', or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'', you don't expect anything resembling continuity, even in cartoons with the same characters and similar premise.
** Example: Sylvester and Tom often go from master to master between cartoons, or are pets in one picture and strays in another. Claude Cat, except for "No Barking Here", was always a house pet, though his design changed from sleek to more rangy, and a red stripe was added on his underbelly.

to:

* It should be noted that continuity in Western Animation is a relatively new thing, perhaps its earliest use starting when cartoons thing. When animation first moved to television in the late 1950s, but even then it took a while to become widespread. When watching something like ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'', ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'', or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'', you don't expect anything resembling continuity, even in cartoons developed, cartoonists spent far more time experimenting with the same characters possibilities of the craft instead of telling actual narratives. Following early experimentation and similar premise.
entering TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation, telling funny stories trumped keeping any continuity between, say, ''WesternAnimation/{{Popeye}}'' or ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' shorts. Even as more serialized storytelling became more common following the TurnOfTheMillennium, an overwhelming majority of Western animation still make heavy use of at least SnapBack and StatusQuoIsGod.
** Example: Example from the Golden Age: Sylvester and Tom often go from master to master between cartoons, or are pets in one picture and strays in another. Claude Cat, except for "No Barking Here", was always a house pet, though his design changed from sleek to more rangy, and a red stripe was added on his underbelly.
30th May '17 2:43:38 PM quasarsky
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* Intended in the Creator/FoilArmsAndHog sketch“Ceoil agus Ól 2”, with reference to a Ferrari, but Foil and Arms’ roles were accidentaly switched.

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* Intended in the Creator/FoilArmsAndHog sketch“Ceoil sketch ''Ceoil agus Ól 2”, 2'', with reference to a Ferrari, but Foil and Arms’ roles were accidentaly switched.
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