History Main / MultipleChoicePast

20th Mar '17 9:47:54 PM Adept
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** This is played with in ''Film/TheDarkKnight'', as The Joker gives two wildly different tragic origins for his scars.
*** Tellingly, when Website/SFDebris reviewed the movie, he made the case that you can create ''any'' backstory for The Joker and it would be just as plausible as any of the others.
*** Which leads him to showcase his own take on it: During his time on WesternAnimation/{{Superfriends}},[[note]]"''[[InsistentTerminology We're the Justice League...]]''"[[/note]] Batman tried giving an example of a cooler, legitimate villain of his to impress Superman. Unfortunately, he decided to rope Aquaman into this, who came up with the idea of a psychotic clown[[note]]Funnily enough, Aquaman actually said the "villain" was the one thing that Superman was afraid of... which he revealed was a clown.[[/note]]. As such, Batman (out of spite) decided to go out and screw with a random clown long enough so that he'd fit the bill. Or, in other words, ''[[CreateYourOwnVillain Batman created The Joker]]''.
6th Mar '17 1:49:52 PM DoctorMengele
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Added DiffLines:

**[[MagnificentBastard Primarch Alpharius]] as befitting to a character that thrives on secrecy and mind-games have five different origin stories. All of them are lies, but all have a grain of truth... Or so we are told. He also have three stories of his death, and no one knows which (if any) of them is true.
5th Mar '17 9:35:51 AM nombretomado
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* {{Deadpool}} of MarvelComics also has a large number of competing origins for his past. There's also some disagreement as to whether Wade Wilson is his real name or a name he stole from someone else. Pretty much the only thing all the origin stories have in common is that his regeneration abilities are a result of time spent as a Weapon X test subject. Like the Joker, Deadpool is insane enough that he probably has no idea himself which one is correct. He does seem fairly certain that Wade Wilson is his real name, however.

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* {{Deadpool}} SelfDemonstrating/{{Deadpool}} of MarvelComics Creator/MarvelComics also has a large number of competing origins for his past. There's also some disagreement as to whether Wade Wilson is his real name or a name he stole from someone else. Pretty much the only thing all the origin stories have in common is that his regeneration abilities are a result of time spent as a Weapon X test subject. Like the Joker, Deadpool is insane enough that he probably has no idea himself which one is correct. He does seem fairly certain that Wade Wilson is his real name, however.
4th Mar '17 2:56:14 PM nighttrainfm
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** When asked about all this, scenario writer Kazushige Nojima [[WordOfGod has said]] that there ''is'' no definitive version of the Nibelheim story because it's impossible to be objective about memories.

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** When asked about all this, scenario writer Kazushige Nojima [[WordOfGod has said]] that there ''is'' no definitive version of the Nibelheim story because [[RashomonStyle it's impossible to be objective about memories.]]
4th Mar '17 2:53:49 PM nighttrainfm
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** The OVA ''Last Order'' is also diverging, but probably the most radical in terms of what it implies about Cloud's past - it contains a strange scene where Cloud summons a great strength and his eyes begin glowing, causing Sephiroth to ask "What are you?", ''long'' before Cloud was granted Mako abilities in the original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', implying that Cloud isn't human or was experimented on previously. The events of ''Last Order'' have been explained that since most of the animated-special takes place from the Turks' point of view (the opening scene shows the report on the Nibelheim incident, which implies that the whole flashback is from what the official Shin-Ra history report says) its account is different from what was shown in the original game and ''Crisis Core''. When asked about this, scenario writer Kazushige Nojima [[WordOfGod has said]] that there ''is'' no definitive version of the Nibelheim story because it's impossible to be objective about memories.

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** The OVA ''Last Order'' is also diverging, but probably the most radical in terms of what it implies about Cloud's past - it contains a strange scene where Cloud summons a great strength and his eyes begin glowing, causing Sephiroth to ask "What are you?", ''long'' before Cloud was granted Mako abilities in the original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', implying that Cloud isn't human or was experimented on previously. The events of ''Last Order'' have been explained that since most of the animated-special takes place from the Turks' point of view (the opening scene shows the report on the Nibelheim incident, which implies that the whole flashback is from what the official Shin-Ra history report says) its account is different from what was shown in the original game and ''Crisis Core''. Core''.
**
When asked about all this, scenario writer Kazushige Nojima [[WordOfGod has said]] that there ''is'' no definitive version of the Nibelheim story because it's impossible to be objective about memories.
4th Mar '17 2:53:17 PM nighttrainfm
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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', about five versions of Cloud's past in Nibelheim have been officially released so far. At least one of these (the most detailed) is eventually revealed as a lie within the story, although due to the circumstances of the lie and due to it covering more than the others do, it's still debatable whether huge chunks of it are true or not. The other four are wildly divergent with ''Crisis Core'' and ''Final Fantasy VII''`s "[[TheReveal true]]" account having roughly equal canoninity despite ''Crisis Core'' having an entirely new character provoke Sephiroth's downwards spiral and despite the fact that Zack doesn't get the opportunity to do all the silly things ''Final Fantasy VII'''`s "lie" account implied he did. The OVA ''Last Order'' is also diverging, but probably the most radical in terms of what it implies about Cloud's past - it contains a strange scene where Cloud summons a great strength and his eyes begin glowing, causing Sephiroth to ask "What are you?", ''long'' before Cloud was granted with Mako abilities in the original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', implying that Cloud isn't human or was experimented on previously. The events of ''Last Order'' have been explained that since most of the animated-special takes place from the Turks' point of view (the opening scene shows the report on the Nibelheim incident, which implies that the whole flashback is from what the official Shin-Ra history report says) its account is different from what was shown in the original game and ''Crisis Core''. When asked about this, scenario writer Kazushige Nojima [[WordOfGod has said]] that there ''is'' no definitive version of the Nibelheim story because it's impossible to be objective about memories.

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* In ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', about ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'':
** About
five versions of Cloud's past in Nibelheim have been officially released so far. At least one of these (the most detailed) is eventually revealed as a lie within the story, although due to the circumstances of the lie and due to it covering more than the others do, it's still debatable whether huge chunks of it are true or not.
**
The other four are wildly divergent divergent, with ''Crisis Core'' and ''Final Fantasy VII''`s "[[TheReveal true]]" account having roughly equal canoninity despite ''Crisis Core'' having an entirely new character provoke Sephiroth's downwards spiral and despite the fact that Zack doesn't get the opportunity to do all the silly things ''Final Fantasy VII'''`s "lie" account implied he did. did.
**
The OVA ''Last Order'' is also diverging, but probably the most radical in terms of what it implies about Cloud's past - it contains a strange scene where Cloud summons a great strength and his eyes begin glowing, causing Sephiroth to ask "What are you?", ''long'' before Cloud was granted with Mako abilities in the original ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'', implying that Cloud isn't human or was experimented on previously. The events of ''Last Order'' have been explained that since most of the animated-special takes place from the Turks' point of view (the opening scene shows the report on the Nibelheim incident, which implies that the whole flashback is from what the official Shin-Ra history report says) its account is different from what was shown in the original game and ''Crisis Core''. When asked about this, scenario writer Kazushige Nojima [[WordOfGod has said]] that there ''is'' no definitive version of the Nibelheim story because it's impossible to be objective about memories.
10th Feb '17 9:10:28 AM DreamerCynist2
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** The backstory to ''Ride/TheHauntedMansion'' is basically whatever the cast members decide it is that day.

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** The backstory to ''Ride/TheHauntedMansion'' is basically whatever the cast members decide it is that day. Spin-off material has attempted to clarify things, but not without invoking this trope (particularly with regards to the backstories of certain characters).
6th Feb '17 7:58:51 AM narm00
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* ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}, of the ''Comicbook/XMen'', was especially susceptible to this; his amnesia about his past was a common plot driver in early-90s stories, and what we knew kept getting {{retcon}}ned. Even after it was made so that he could remember every single thing that ever happened to him, the series ''Wolverine: Origins'' is still trying to milk the concept.

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* ComicBook/{{Wolverine}}, of the ''Comicbook/XMen'', was especially susceptible to this; his amnesia about his past was a common plot driver in early-90s stories, and what we knew kept getting {{retcon}}ned. Even after it was made so that he could remember every single thing that ever happened to him, the series ''Wolverine: Origins'' is still trying tried to milk the concept.



* MarvelComics' [[DemonLordsAndArchdevils Hell Lords]] have one mutual origin, but most also have their own versions. It doesn't help that they are demons, so ''everything'' they say can be a lie and each story has set arguments and events that either supports or deny it.

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* MarvelComics' Creator/MarvelComics' [[DemonLordsAndArchdevils Hell Lords]] have one mutual origin, but most also have their own versions. It doesn't help that they are demons, so ''everything'' they say can be a lie and each story has set arguments and events that either supports or deny it.



* [[Comicbook/DareDevil Bullseye]] he has multiple tales about his past life, he is either a CIA agent, a baseball star...he makes up so many stories that no one knows who he really is. The only thing that remains consistent in his claims is that he had AbusiveParents and that [[SelfMadeOrphan he killed them]].

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* [[Comicbook/DareDevil Bullseye]] he has multiple tales about his past life, life: he is either a CIA agent, a baseball star...star... he makes up so many stories that no one knows who he really is. The only thing that remains consistent in his claims is that he had AbusiveParents and that [[SelfMadeOrphan he killed them]].



* Arcade, the theme park-themed ProfessionalKiller who has menaced {{Spider-man}} and the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} on numerous occasions, has told a number of different versions of his origin story, although they all involve him murdering his rich dad for his money. Since Arcade's real name is unknown, it could all be lies.

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* Arcade, the theme park-themed ProfessionalKiller who has menaced {{Spider-man}} ComicBook/SpiderMan and the ComicBook/{{X-Men}} on numerous occasions, has told a number of different versions of his origin story, although they all involve him murdering his rich dad for his money. Since Arcade's real name is unknown, it could all be lies.



* Heavily used in regards to ComicBook/TheSentry, especially the relationship between him, his civilian identity Robert Reynolds and his SuperpoweredEvilSide the Void: is the Void the result of a "mind virus" implanted by Mastermind? Are Sentry and the Void the good and evil nature that exist in every person given form by the serum Reynolds took? Is the Void a SplitPersonality formed by Reynolds repression of his past as a thief and junkie? Is the Void Reynolds' ''real'' personality and the Sentry is the fake one? Or is the serum a RedHerring and the Sentry is actually something else entirely like the Angel of Death? All of these were presented as equally likely. Which is pretty appropriate since Sentry is quite crazy. In fact, given that Sentry is crazy ''and'' is a RealityWarper, it's strongly suggested that the "true" version is ''whatever he believes at the time''.

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* Heavily used in regards to ComicBook/TheSentry, especially the relationship between him, his civilian identity Robert Reynolds and his SuperpoweredEvilSide the Void: is the Void the result of a "mind virus" implanted by Mastermind? Are Sentry and the Void the good and evil nature that exist in every person given form by the serum Reynolds took? Is the Void a SplitPersonality formed by Reynolds Reynolds' repression of his past as a thief and junkie? Is the Void Reynolds' ''real'' personality and the Sentry is the fake one? Or is the serum a RedHerring and the Sentry is actually something else entirely like the Angel of Death? All of these were presented as equally likely. Which is pretty appropriate since Sentry is quite crazy. In fact, given that Sentry is crazy ''and'' is a RealityWarper, it's strongly suggested that the "true" version is ''whatever he believes at the time''.



* The focus of a FandomSpecificPlot with VisualNovel/FateStayNight fan works, basically, the plot answering "who was [[EmptyShell Shirou Emiya]] before the Great Fire of Fuyuki?" Two of the most notable examples is FanFic/FateReachOut and FanFic/InFlight, with the idea that Shirou was originally the protagonist of the series each fic crosses over with. Because the fire completely changed his identity and personality, the end result for the plots involved is... Interesting, to say the least.

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* The focus of a FandomSpecificPlot with VisualNovel/FateStayNight fan works, basically, the plot answering "who was [[EmptyShell Shirou Emiya]] before the Great Fire of Fuyuki?" Two of the most notable examples is are FanFic/FateReachOut and FanFic/InFlight, with the idea that Shirou was originally the protagonist of the series each fic crosses over with. Because the fire completely changed his identity and personality, the end result for the plots involved is... Interesting, to say the least.



* Lucien of ''Character Issues'' continuously claims that his father died in a variety of ways, ranging from crushed by a TV to poisoned by an Elf-like creature which snuck into his house at midnight every night. Depending on the view point, this is either hilarious or horrific.

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* Lucien of ''Character Issues'' continuously claims that his father died in a variety of ways, ranging from crushed by a TV to poisoned by an Elf-like creature which snuck into his house at midnight every night. Depending on the view point, viewpoint, this is either hilarious or horrific.



* An odd case is the main character of ''ThisImmortal'' by RogerZelazny, who time and again tells [[UnreliableNarrator some different story about himself]]. The novel opens with Conrad/Konstatin's new wife finding out he's ''not'' twenty-something like she is, he's around eighty. Then other characters wonder if he's somehow connected to other Greeks named Konstantin, each with one brown eye and one blue eye, who happen to be even older, one of whom was a world-famous terrorist. Then ''more'' characters come into the story, and they have their own stories about his past. [[spoiler:He's hundreds of years old, has never physically aged past 23, and he was ''every one'' of these people.]]
** Either confusing pasts is a theme with Zelazny, or he just has trouble making up his mind when he's writing a story: the Chronicles of Amber involves ''dozens'' of "histories" for Corwin, and he spends much of the series trying to unravel which ones are true. (Adding to the confusion: Corwin is immortal, he can travel to as many worlds as he wants, there are "shadows" of him in a lot of those worlds, ''and'' he has about 15 siblings with similar powers who all lie and scheme and plot.)
** Zelazny's ''Lord of Light'' mentions a woman who was Sam's "mother or daughter or wife, or perhaps all three," which seems tricky even with reincarnation.

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* An odd case is the main character of ''ThisImmortal'' ''Literature/ThisImmortal'' by RogerZelazny, Creator/RogerZelazny, who time and again tells [[UnreliableNarrator some different story about himself]]. The novel opens with Conrad/Konstatin's new wife finding out he's ''not'' twenty-something like she is, he's around eighty. Then other characters wonder if he's somehow connected to other Greeks named Konstantin, each with one brown eye and one blue eye, who happen to be even older, one of whom was a world-famous terrorist. Then ''more'' characters come into the story, and they have their own stories about his past. [[spoiler:He's hundreds of years old, has never physically aged past 23, and he was ''every one'' of these people.]]
** Either confusing pasts is was a theme with Zelazny, or he just has had trouble making up his mind when he's he was writing a story: the Chronicles of Amber involves ''dozens'' of "histories" for Corwin, and he spends much of the series trying to unravel which ones are true. (Adding to the confusion: Corwin is immortal, he can travel to as many worlds as he wants, there are "shadows" of him in a lot of those worlds, ''and'' he has about 15 siblings with similar powers who all lie and scheme and plot.)
** Zelazny's ''Lord of Light'' ''Literature/LordOfLight'' mentions a woman who was Sam's "mother or daughter or wife, or perhaps all three," which seems tricky even with reincarnation.



** Also true of Galadriel and Celebornó''Unfinished Tales'' gives multiple drafts of their history that Tolkien wrote, with no clear chronology to tell us which version is the latest (and presumably most authoritative, though some version cause other continuity problems) and with more notes that suggest Tolkien [[AuthorExistenceFailure was planning on revising it again before the publication]] of ''Literature/TheSilmarillion''. We donít even know whether Celeborn was a Sindarin or Telerin elf, or whether Galadriel was actually part of Fëanorís rebellion or just went along because she wanted to carve out her own kingdom in Middle-Earth. And those are some pretty major differences.

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** Also true of Galadriel and Celebornó''Unfinished Celeborn ó ''Unfinished Tales'' gives multiple drafts of their history that Tolkien wrote, with no clear chronology to tell us which version is the latest (and presumably most authoritative, though some version versions cause other continuity problems) and with more notes that suggest Tolkien [[AuthorExistenceFailure was planning on revising it again before the publication]] of ''Literature/TheSilmarillion''. We donít even know whether Celeborn was a Sindarin or Telerin elf, or whether Galadriel was actually part of Fëanorís rebellion or just went along because she wanted to carve out her own kingdom in Middle-Earth. And those are some pretty major differences.



* In [[Creator/JacekDukaj Dukaj's]] "''Ice''" the main character (and pretty much everyone else) seems subject to this. It's actually used as a resurrection technique to revive Nicola Tesla!

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* In [[Creator/JacekDukaj Dukaj's]] "''Ice''" "''Ice''", the main character (and pretty much everyone else) seems subject to this. It's actually used as a resurrection technique to revive Nicola Tesla!



* A mild case: Lord Emsworth, of P.G.Wodehouse's Blandings, acquires another otherwise unmentioned sister in nearly every story. (He consistently has just one brother, though.)
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has a lot of this thanks to that world's history mostly based on legends.

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* A mild case: Lord Emsworth, of P.G.Wodehouse's Blandings, Creator/PGWodehouse's [[Literature/BlandingsCastle Blandings]], acquires another otherwise unmentioned sister in nearly every story. (He consistently has just one brother, though.)
* ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'' has a lot of this thanks to that world's history mostly being based on legends.



** The Doctor has multiple conflicting backstories, due in part to the evolving nature of the show. He might be from the 35th Century ("An Unearthly Child" pilot), he might be a child born into privilege ("The Deadly Assassin") or from poverty ("Listen"), he might have learned spiritual lessons from Time Lord hermits on the hill where he lived ("The Time Monster") or have been raised in the metropolis of the Capitol ("Invasion of Time"), he might have been woven as a young adult on a genetic loom ("Lungbarrow") or be born half-human (the TV Movie), he might have abandoned his family ("An Unearthly Child") or have some sort of relationship with his mother ("The End of Time"), and his madness might originate from a childhood visit from Clara ("Listen"), staring into the Time Vortex as a child ("Utopia") or political issues forcing him to escape, with the time travel itself causing his madness along the way (audio drama "The Beginning" and the ''Gallifrey'' series). Some of these are reconcilable, others aren't, and overall the show doesn't care about nailing the character down, as it's not really the point.

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** The Doctor has multiple conflicting backstories, due in part to the evolving nature of the show. He might be from the 35th Century century ("An Unearthly Child" pilot), he might be a child born into privilege ("The Deadly Assassin") or from poverty ("Listen"), he might have learned spiritual lessons from Time Lord hermits on the hill where he lived ("The Time Monster") or have been raised in the metropolis of the Capitol ("Invasion of Time"), he might have been woven as a young adult on a genetic loom loom, incorporating the biodata of the Other, an enigmatic Gallifreyan founding figure ("Lungbarrow") or be been born half-human (the TV Movie), he might have abandoned his family ("An Unearthly Child") or have some sort of relationship with his mother ("The End of Time"), and his madness might originate from a childhood visit from Clara ("Listen"), staring into the Time Vortex as a child ("Utopia") or political issues forcing him to escape, with the time travel itself causing his madness along the way (audio drama "The Beginning" and the ''Gallifrey'' ''AudioPlay/{{Gallifrey}}'' series). Some of these are reconcilable, others aren't, and overall the show doesn't care about nailing the character down, as it's not really the point.point.
** Susan, the Doctor's granddaughter, received this to a lesser extent, primarily as a result of expanded universe stories desexualising Gallifrey/the Doctor - if she wasn't the Doctor's granddaughter, then she might be the Other's granddaughter, and thus the Doctor's via reincarnation ("Lungbarrow"), an orphaned descendant of Rassilon ("Birth of a Renegade"), or perhaps the Doctor's granddaughter from a previous regeneration cycle ("Cold Fusion").



* On one episode of ''ILoveLucy'', Lucy casually mentions that she met Ricky on a blind date. Later, the first episode of ''The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour'' gives an extended depiction of how they first met, and it's a totally different story.
* Parker from ''Series/{{Leverage}}'', has had several flashbacks to her past, which appear to all be true, but are somewhat contradictory: the first episode shows Parker, age 9 or so, running away from home after [[CrossesTheLineTwice blowing up her foster parents]] after [[DisproportionateRetribution they yelled at her for stealing]], another episode indicates that she was raised as an orphan, and another revealed she had a younger brother who was killed in an accident when she was twelve. All of these can be [[FanWank rationalized]] by her having one or more foster families, but it's still confusing.

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* On one episode of ''ILoveLucy'', ''Series/ILoveLucy'', Lucy casually mentions that she met Ricky on a blind date. Later, the first episode of ''The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour'' gives an extended depiction of how they first met, and it's a totally different story.
* Parker from ''Series/{{Leverage}}'', ''Series/{{Leverage}}'' has had several flashbacks to her past, which appear to all be true, but are somewhat contradictory: the first episode shows Parker, age 9 or so, running away from home after [[CrossesTheLineTwice blowing up her foster parents]] after [[DisproportionateRetribution they yelled at her for stealing]], another episode indicates that she was raised as an orphan, and another revealed she had a younger brother who was killed in an accident when she was twelve. All of these can be [[FanWank rationalized]] by her having one or more foster families, but it's still confusing.



* Captain Peacock from ''Series/AreYouBeingServed'' could never quite keep straight his stories of just what he did in WorldWarII. The most likely story, however, is that he was in the Royal Army Service Corps--the logistics division (he says it when pressed about it, and wears the RASC tie throughout the series). Important work, but not front-line combat.

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* Captain Peacock from ''Series/AreYouBeingServed'' could never quite keep straight his stories of just what he did in WorldWarII.UsefulNotes/WorldWarII. The most likely story, however, is that he was in the Royal Army Service Corps--the logistics division (he says it when pressed about it, and wears the RASC tie throughout the series). Important work, but not front-line combat.



* ''Series/{{Friends}}'': Done very subtly with Chandler. You get the basics of childhood (his mother was an erotic novelist, his father was a gay drag queen, they divorced when was 9 and sent him to boarding school) but what's confusing is their treatment of him. On one hand he talks about how his dad was ''too'' enthusiastic coming to all his swim meets and you see his mom saying on national television that she loves him. Yet he also recounts how they prefered his imaginary friend to him, abandoned him on his first parents day and were callous enough to announce their break up during Thanksgiving dinner. Its not clear if they were just AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents who made poor decisions or uninterested and put him through ParentalNeglect or full out emotionally AbusiveParents.

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* ''Series/{{Friends}}'': Done very subtly with Chandler. You get the basics of childhood (his mother was an erotic novelist, his father was a gay drag queen, they divorced when was 9 and sent him to boarding school) but what's confusing is their treatment of him. On one hand he talks about how his dad was ''too'' enthusiastic coming to all his swim meets and you see his mom saying on national television that she loves him. Yet he also recounts how they prefered his imaginary friend to him, abandoned him on his first parents parents' day and were callous enough to announce their break up during Thanksgiving dinner. Its It's not clear if they were just AmazinglyEmbarrassingParents who made poor decisions or uninterested and put him through ParentalNeglect or full out emotionally AbusiveParents.



* The latter portion of the season of The Late Late Show that was hosted by Craig Ferguson was co-hosted by [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCiZSN62M5Q ... this.]] He gave many different conflicting accounts of how he died, over the course of the show, and once even accidentally gave two within a single episode. This Prompted Craig to respond, upon hearing the second, with the joke "How the heck does someone drive a motorcycle into a shark?!" (The two accounts given that episode being first that he had died in a shark attack, and the second being a motorcycle accident resulting from failure to wear a helmet.)

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* The latter portion of the season of The Late Late Show that was hosted by Craig Ferguson was co-hosted by [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCiZSN62M5Q ... this.]] He gave many different conflicting accounts of how he died, over the course of the show, and once even accidentally gave two within a single episode. This Prompted prompted Craig to respond, upon hearing the second, with the joke "How the heck does someone drive a motorcycle into a shark?!" (The two accounts given that episode being first that he had died in a shark attack, and the second being a motorcycle accident resulting from failure to wear a helmet.)



* Music/TheBeatles gave varying accounts of where they got their band name from. Music/JohnLennon used to joke to reporters that he had had a vision of a man on a flaming pie who told him, "You are Beatles with an 'a'." In later years, he said that he had simply made it up in imitation of Music/{{BuddyHolly}}'s band, the Crickets. Other versions say that the name was suggested not by Lennon, but by early bassist Stu Sutcliffe. They were briefly known as the Silver Beatles, which may have come out of a suggestion to call them Long John and the Silver Beatles. Another theory comes from Music/GeorgeHarrison suggesting that they got the name from the Creator/MarlonBrando film ''The Wild One,'' in which a motorcycle gang is referred to as "The Beetles."

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* Music/TheBeatles gave varying accounts of where they got their band name from. Music/JohnLennon used to joke to reporters that he had had a vision of a man on a flaming pie who told him, "You are Beatles with an 'a'." In later years, he said that he had simply made it up in imitation of Music/{{BuddyHolly}}'s Music/BuddyHolly's band, the Crickets. Other versions say that the name was suggested not by Lennon, but by early bassist Stu Sutcliffe. They were briefly known as the Silver Beatles, which may have come out of a suggestion to call them Long John and the Silver Beatles. Another theory comes from Music/GeorgeHarrison suggesting that they got the name from the Creator/MarlonBrando film ''The Wild One,'' in which a motorcycle gang is referred to as "The Beetles."



* {{Music/Gorillaz}}'s bass player / leader Murdoc Niccals can't decide if he was an abused child that grew up in the 1960s/70s, or if he is an immortal being who has watched time since it's very beginnings. Then again, you get a different answer from him on generally anything, depending on how knackered he is.

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* {{Music/Gorillaz}}'s bass player / leader Murdoc Niccals can't decide if he was an abused child that grew up in the 1960s/70s, or if he is an immortal being who has watched time since it's its very beginnings. Then again, you get a different answer from him on generally anything, depending on how knackered he is.



*** Even if one (or more) of the above are true, it didn't explain how there cold be ''so many'' of the True Fae until [[spoiler:you read the supplement book that says that Changelings who reach Wyrd 10 and [[MoralityMeter Clarity]] 0 are likely to ''become'' True Fae themselves.]]

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*** Even if one (or more) of the above are true, it didn't explain how there cold could be ''so many'' of the True Fae until [[spoiler:you read the supplement book that says that Changelings who reach Wyrd 10 and [[MoralityMeter Clarity]] 0 are likely to ''become'' True Fae themselves.]]



* A running gag in ''WesternAnimation/ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'', Manfredi and Johnson, two penguins that Skipper continually cites as examples of what could happen if someone doesn't follow his orders. Almost all of these wildly different stories imply their deaths, and the other penguins will corroborate them, so what actually happened is difficult to determine. [[spoiler: The fact that they are seen alive (but not well) in the finale only raises further questions.]]

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* A running gag in ''WesternAnimation/ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'', ''WesternAnimation/ThePenguinsOfMadagascar'' involves Manfredi and Johnson, two penguins that Skipper continually cites as examples of what could happen if someone doesn't follow his orders. Almost all of these wildly different stories imply their deaths, and the other penguins will corroborate them, so what actually happened is difficult to determine. [[spoiler: The fact that they are seen alive (but not well) in the finale only raises further questions.]]



* In various interviews, Yul Brynner gave several inconsistent accounts of his early life to make himself seem mysterious to the public.
* Over the years, comedian Dave Allen's act incorporated a huge number of different stories about how he came to lose part of his left index finger.

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* In various interviews, Yul Brynner Creator/YulBrynner gave several inconsistent accounts of his early life to make himself seem mysterious to the public.
* Over the years, comedian Dave Allen's Creator/DaveAllen's act incorporated a huge number of different stories about how he came to lose part of his left index finger.



* MeatLoaf often tells people how he got that name, only he never tells the same story twice.
* The origins of [[{{UsefulNotes/baseball}} baseball]] are subject to this trope, as it's hard to exactly pinpoint '''A.''' When/where the first game of baseball was played, '''B.''' Whether a sport referred to as "base ball" in early documents from UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution was an early form of the current sport, or just a similarly-named but unrelated sport, or '''C.''' Which game counts as the first "official" game: any of the games played during the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the early game played at [[{{Joisey}} Hoboken, New Jersey]] (depending on whether this early version counts as a version of the modern game or just a precursor), or perhaps an unknown, unrecorded game. The game played at Cooperstown, supposedly organized by Abner Doubleday, is now considered fictitious, but it used to be considered a contender to be one of the great game's possible origins. Many historians view ''all'' of these early games as being partial examples of the game we know today, but that the game evolved a bit with each one.

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* MeatLoaf Music/MeatLoaf often tells people how he got that name, only he never tells the same story twice.
* The origins of [[{{UsefulNotes/baseball}} baseball]] {{UsefulNotes/baseball}} are subject to this trope, as it's hard to exactly pinpoint '''A.''' When/where the first game of baseball was played, '''B.''' Whether a sport referred to as "base ball" in early documents from UsefulNotes/TheAmericanRevolution was an early form of the current sport, or just a similarly-named but unrelated sport, or '''C.''' Which game counts as the first "official" game: any of the games played during the UsefulNotes/TheAmericanCivilWar, the early game played at [[{{Joisey}} Hoboken, New Jersey]] (depending on whether this early version counts as a version of the modern game or just a precursor), or perhaps an unknown, unrecorded game. The game played at Cooperstown, supposedly organized by Abner Doubleday, is now considered fictitious, but it used to be considered a contender to be one of the great game's possible origins. Many historians view ''all'' of these early games as being partial examples of the game we know today, but that the game evolved a bit with each one.
24th Jan '17 8:46:01 AM comicwriter
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* Tom King's ''Comicbook/{{Batman}}'' run has an intentional invocation of this technique, where Batman and Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} argue about when and where they first met. Batman claims it was when he caught a disguised Catwoman during a diamond heist (which is how they met in UsefulNotes/{{The Golden Age|Of Comic Books}}), and Catwoman claims it was when Bruce Wayne saved a young Holly Robinson back during Selina's time as a prostitute (which is how they met in ''[[Comicbook/BatmanYearOne Year One]]'').

to:

* Tom King's ''Comicbook/{{Batman}}'' run has an intentional invocation of this technique, where Batman and Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} argue about when and where they first met. Batman claims it was when he caught a disguised Catwoman during a diamond heist (which is how they met in UsefulNotes/{{The Golden Age|Of Comic Books}}), and Catwoman claims it was when Bruce Wayne saved was stabbed by a young Holly Robinson back during Selina's time as a prostitute (which is how they met in ''[[Comicbook/BatmanYearOne Year One]]'').
18th Jan '17 8:18:26 AM comicwriter
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Added DiffLines:

* Tom King's ''Comicbook/{{Batman}}'' run has an intentional invocation of this technique, where Batman and Comicbook/{{Catwoman}} argue about when and where they first met. Batman claims it was when he caught a disguised Catwoman during a diamond heist (which is how they met in UsefulNotes/{{The Golden Age|Of Comic Books}}), and Catwoman claims it was when Bruce Wayne saved a young Holly Robinson back during Selina's time as a prostitute (which is how they met in ''[[Comicbook/BatmanYearOne Year One]]'').
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MultipleChoicePast