History Main / MugglePower

27th Jun '16 8:21:28 PM Teitei
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* AzureStrikerGunvolt's [[TheRival Copen]] lives in a future where people with powerful psychic abilities known as Adepts have ravaged the world outside of the city where the game and its sequel take place, and the MegaCorp that practically owns the city subjugates the ones that do live within the city to further their grip on the world. His soltuion? Take both options. [[PowerCopying He copies of powers of fallen Adepts]] using his advanced weapons and uses them to further his goal of wiping Adepts from the face of the planet, including TheHero, because [[BlackAndWhiteInsanity he believes Adepts are irredeemable monsters who are too dangerous to be allowed to live]]... [[{{Revenge}} and because one killed his father]].
3rd Jun '16 6:49:50 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* IDW's ''[[TheTransformersIDW Transformers]]'' series uses this trope as well. When the Decepticons were recouping from Megatron's apparent death, the Autobots were being hunted by Skywatch, a government group that acquired Cybertronian technology. While Skywatch eventually comes on somewhat friendly terms with the Autobots, a new group known as Earth's Children rises up, wishing for the removal of all Transformers, and apparently headed by a really SmugSnake. [[spoiler: Who turns out to be a [[ArtificialHuman facsimile]] for Swindle to stir conflict and make a market for him.]]

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* IDW's ''[[TheTransformersIDW ''[[ComicBook/TheTransformersIDW Transformers]]'' series uses this trope as well. When the Decepticons were recouping from Megatron's apparent death, the Autobots were being hunted by Skywatch, a government group that acquired Cybertronian technology. While Skywatch eventually comes on somewhat friendly terms with the Autobots, a new group known as Earth's Children rises up, wishing for the removal of all Transformers, and apparently headed by a really SmugSnake. [[spoiler: Who turns out to be a [[ArtificialHuman facsimile]] for Swindle to stir conflict and make a market for him.]]
9th May '16 10:08:34 PM Vir
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* The second season of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'' dealt with the US government's efforts to build a force capable of stopping the JLU in the event they went rogue. Naturally, they ended up going the route of the WellIntentionedExtremist and a bit of JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope when their efforts included such things as creating TykeBomb SuperSoldier {{clon|ingBlues}}es with a shelf life shorter than a decade, trusting Comicbook/LexLuthor and other super criminals, as well as turning JLU member Comicbook/CaptainAtom against Franchise/{{Superman}}. The pilot of JLU specifically said that the non-super Comicbook/GreenArrow was a member specifically to call them on abuses of power. There's also that evil psychopathic Supergirl clone, and that 'super soldier' serum that turned the general into a mutant monster, andů
** The Justice Lords were an example where humans ''did'' have something to fear from metahumans. This knowledge is what drove Comicbook/TheQuestion into [[GoMadFromTheRevelation such a tizzy]].

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* The second season of ''WesternAnimation/JusticeLeagueUnlimited'' ''[[WesternAnimation/JusticeLeague Justice League Unlimited]]'' dealt with the US government's efforts to build a force capable of stopping the JLU in the event they went rogue. Naturally, they ended up going the route of the WellIntentionedExtremist and a bit of JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope when their efforts included such things as creating TykeBomb SuperSoldier {{clon|ingBlues}}es with a shelf life shorter than a decade, trusting Comicbook/LexLuthor and other super criminals, as well as turning JLU member Comicbook/CaptainAtom against Franchise/{{Superman}}. The pilot of JLU specifically said that the non-super Comicbook/GreenArrow was a member specifically to call them on abuses of power. There's also that evil psychopathic Supergirl clone, and that 'super soldier' serum that turned the general into a mutant monster, andů
** The Justice Lords were an example where humans ''did'' have something to fear from metahumans. This knowledge is what drove Comicbook/TheQuestion ComicBook/TheQuestion into [[GoMadFromTheRevelation such a tizzy]].
9th May '16 10:07:58 PM Vir
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* In ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce 3'' Joker invokes this during his degrading of Luna, who walked in at the worst possible time (while Mega Man and Jack Corvus were tangled in combat). Shortly afterwards is the PlayerPunch - he skips both the steps in the trope description and outright ''kills her'' - and then [[EvilLaugh laughs]] about it. That sound you heard was the harshest plot whiplash in the history of the continuity.

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* In ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce 3'' 3'', Joker invokes this during his degrading of Luna, who walked in at the worst possible time (while Mega Man and Jack Corvus were tangled in combat). Shortly afterwards is the PlayerPunch - he skips both the steps in the trope description and outright ''kills her'' - and then [[EvilLaugh laughs]] about it. That sound you heard was the harshest plot whiplash in the history of the continuity.
9th May '16 10:07:39 PM Vir
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* [[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Joker]] invokes this during his degrading of Luna, who walked in at the worst possible time (while Mega Man and Jack Corvus were tangled in combat). Shortly afterwards is the PlayerPunch - he skips both the steps in the trope description and outright ''kills her'' - and then [[EvilLaugh laughs]] about it. That sound you heard was the harshest plot whiplash in the history of the continuity.

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* [[VideoGame/MegaManStarForce Joker]] In ''VideoGame/MegaManStarForce 3'' Joker invokes this during his degrading of Luna, who walked in at the worst possible time (while Mega Man and Jack Corvus were tangled in combat). Shortly afterwards is the PlayerPunch - he skips both the steps in the trope description and outright ''kills her'' - and then [[EvilLaugh laughs]] about it. That sound you heard was the harshest plot whiplash in the history of the continuity.
3rd May '16 1:27:49 PM DarkHunter
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** However, Level 0's are shown to be immune to the "Capacity Down" anti-esper sonic weapon, which completely disables any espers who hear it (though this weapon was portrayed only in the first season's non-canon arc, so it's unclear whether they would actually be affected).

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** However, Level 0's are shown to be immune to the "Capacity Down" anti-esper sonic weapon, which completely disables any espers who hear it (though this weapon was portrayed only in the first season's non-canon arc, so it's unclear whether they would actually be affected).it.
22nd Apr '16 3:31:08 AM Yozzy
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** Harry once made the comparison that regular humans are the nukes of the supernatural world. When two scary guys duke it out where the public can see them, even if one is on their side, regular people would burn the both of them at the stake to be able to sleep at night.
9th Apr '16 4:52:26 AM Morgenthaler
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* [[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer The Watcher's Council]] is basically a group of Muggles who got together and decided that they and they alone were going to be in charge of the fight against evil, and they employ and monitor various agents (the most important of which being the Slayer) in their fight. The fact that most of them are incompetent dullards and piss-poor mages (which still qualifies as Muggledom, as most everyone in the Buffyverse is capable of magic) doesn't seem to occur to anyone until Buffy comes along.

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* [[Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer ''Series/BuffyTheVampireSlayer'':
**
The Watcher's Council]] Council is basically a group of Muggles who got together and decided that they and they alone were going to be in charge of the fight against evil, and they employ and monitor various agents (the most important of which being the Slayer) in their fight. The fact that most of them are incompetent dullards and piss-poor mages (which still qualifies as Muggledom, as most everyone in the Buffyverse is capable of magic) doesn't seem to occur to anyone until Buffy comes along.
9th Apr '16 4:52:00 AM Morgenthaler
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** It has to be noted, however, that Level 0s are potentially even weaker than [[{{Muggles}} normal humans]], as they do not possess any esper powers, and are additionally incapable of using magic.
*** Not quite accurate, an esper can increase his level by training (while there are some inherently broken powers, most of the time the level is related to how good/creative a person is at controlling his powers), there are however some people labeled as 0's because their skills simply can't be measured (for example Touma, the main character, who's power is to cancel other's powers and it is implied that there's a limit to what he can nullify, but finding out would kill him since he already counters abilities strong enough to kill a person).



** ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'' has a similar exchange during Brian K. Vaughun's run; as two police officers investigate the murder of a young mutant (probably the Ultimate equivalent of Marrow), one of them makes a comment on the nature of mutants. The other officer says that she was born with a thirteenth rib, and asks if that makes ''her'' a mutant.
*** One bit that happened during one X-men storyline where a Mutant Registration Act was being proposed...''again''...but having Congress stop dead in its tracks in enacting it when they were quietly informed that a significant number of Representatives and Senators themselves were mutants, possessing assorted weak abilities capable of unconsciously influencing people which had, unknowingly, given them the advantage when they'd become politicians.

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** * ''ComicBook/UltimateXMen'' has a similar exchange during Brian K. Vaughun's run; as two police officers investigate the murder of a young mutant (probably the Ultimate equivalent of Marrow), one of them makes a comment on the nature of mutants. The other officer says that she was born with a thirteenth rib, and asks if that makes ''her'' a mutant.
*** * One bit that happened during one X-men ''ComicBook/XMen'' storyline where a Mutant Registration Act was being proposed...''again''...but having Congress stop dead in its tracks in enacting it when they were quietly informed that a significant number of Representatives and Senators themselves were mutants, possessing assorted weak abilities capable of unconsciously influencing people which had, unknowingly, given them the advantage when they'd become politicians.



* Syndrome takes both options in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'', reacting to what he sees as a snub by his hero for all the wrong reasons. Buddy was endangering himself and Mr. Incredible by being an untrained and self-appointed "sidekick," but Buddy misinterpreted it as being rejected because he had no superpowers. So, when Buddy grows up, he puts all his GadgeteerGenius ability into making weapons and gear that allows him to be a genuine threat, enacting a vendetta on all super-abled people out of petty revenge, and then saying that he would sell his weaponry openly, making it so "if everyone is super, then no one will be."

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'':
**
Syndrome takes both options in ''WesternAnimation/TheIncredibles'', options, reacting to what he sees as a snub by his hero for all the wrong reasons. Buddy was endangering himself and Mr. Incredible by being an untrained and self-appointed "sidekick," but Buddy misinterpreted it as being rejected because he had no superpowers. So, when Buddy grows up, he puts all his GadgeteerGenius ability into making weapons and gear that allows him to be a genuine threat, enacting a vendetta on all super-abled people out of petty revenge, and then saying that he would sell his weaponry openly, making it so "if everyone is super, then no one will be."



* ''Series/TrueBlood'' has examples of both Option 1, in the form of so-called "Fang Bangers" and Option 2 in groups such as the Fellowship of the Sun. Given that even the friendliest vampires are [[AntiVillain closet murderers]] trying to pass as just [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire ordinary, if immortal, blood-drinking, people]], this tends to lead to a [[GreyAndGrayMorality grey-scale]] world. The other supernaturals are not much better.

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* ''Series/TrueBlood'' has ''Series/TrueBlood'':
** There are
examples of both Option 1, in the form of so-called "Fang Bangers" and Option 2 in groups such as the Fellowship of the Sun. Given that even the friendliest vampires are [[AntiVillain closet murderers]] trying to pass as just [[FriendlyNeighborhoodVampire ordinary, if immortal, blood-drinking, people]], this tends to lead to a [[GreyAndGrayMorality grey-scale]] world. The other supernaturals are not much better.



** Jane lampshades the injustice, but can't really do anything about it because she would most likely be executed for disobedience. She was shanghaied into joining the organization because she was seen as useful.
*** While it's extremely-difficult to kill her, it can be done, as demonstrated in one GroundhogDayLoop episode, where one of the loops has Jane step on a claymore mine and get blown to bits. Naturally, she's fine in the next loop. Decapitating would probably also do the trick.
** Before the series was canceled, it is revealed that [[spoiler:chipping a second-generation Neuro like Jane does nothing; at least, it did not work on the Chameleon.]]



** Of course, there could be far more of them out there. Mulder and Scully just encounter the ones who go bad because those are the ones whose actions catch the FBI's attention.



** Not that this is not completely unjustified, given that it was the Nietzscheans who were responsible for the fall of the [[TheFederation Commonwealth]]. The rest, not so much. 92% of humanity is modified by this point.



* The Hunters in ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'' are renegade members of {{The Watcher}}s who want every Immortal dead.
** The reason they're successful is because they hunt in groups, while Immortals are required to duel each other one-on-one. Additionally, being {{Muggles}}, the Hunters aren't required to follow the "holy ground" rule. Also, Immortals can sense each others' presence, but they can't sense regular humans execpt by the normal mundane means. The common tactic is to shoot the Immortal first. Then, when he's incapacitated, either behead him or put him into a guillotine. If there are no other Immortals in the vicinity, then there won't be a Quickening.

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* The Hunters in ''Series/{{Highlander}}: The Series'' are renegade members of {{The Watcher}}s who want every Immortal dead.
**
dead. The reason they're successful is because they hunt in groups, while Immortals are required to duel each other one-on-one. Additionally, being {{Muggles}}, the Hunters aren't required to follow the "holy ground" rule. Also, Immortals can sense each others' presence, but they can't sense regular humans execpt by the normal mundane means. The common tactic is to shoot the Immortal first. Then, when he's incapacitated, either behead him or put him into a guillotine. If there are no other Immortals in the vicinity, then there won't be a Quickening.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' secret societies include the mutant supremacist group Psion and the mutant-hating group [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Anti-Mutant]].
** Played for laughs, of course. ([[DontExplainTheJoke The joke being]] that ''every'' person in the setting - other than the theoretically subservient AIs - is a mutant... and everybody seems to ''know'' it... except for the all-seeing, all-knowing Computer which designates mutants as inferior, genetically treasonous creatures.)
*** Well, the players know it, the characters don't necessarily. In particular, Anti-Mutant characters may be ignorant or in denial about their own mutant powers.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Paranoia}}'' secret societies include the mutant supremacist group Psion and the mutant-hating group [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin Anti-Mutant]].
**
Anti-Mutant]]. Played for laughs, of course. ([[DontExplainTheJoke The joke being]] that ''every'' person in the setting - other than the theoretically subservient AIs - is a mutant... and everybody seems to ''know'' it... except for the all-seeing, all-knowing Computer which designates mutants as inferior, genetically treasonous creatures.)
*** Well, the players know it, the characters don't necessarily. In particular, Anti-Mutant characters may be ignorant or in denial about their own mutant powers.
)



** Strictly speaking, whether in the [[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness Classic]] or [[TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness New]] World of Darkness, the masquerade was never entirely founded purely on fear of muggles; on the ''local'' level, yes, the break could be dangerous, but it wouldn't upset the world as a whole. In the Classic version, it was more that, as a whole, mortals were just insignificant; various monster-based ancient conspiracies were already running the world, and it would just be more trouble than it would be worth to go public. In the New version, the masquerade is upheld mainly because the result would probably ''not'' be particularly good for either side. A full-fledged "War on the Supernatural" would be like "The War on Terror" turned UpToEleven, since monsters have all the advantages of terrorists[[note]]operating inside a defender's own territory, anonymity, etc[[/note]] combined with supernatural advantages like MoreThanMindControl or "escape into another dimension virtually at will". Of course, the monsters themselves wouldn't really benefit from the amount of overkill they'd need to do in order to terrorize humans into submission. To say nothing of the fact that there are God-tier {{Eldritch Abomination}}s like the [[TabletopGame/DemonTheDescent God-Machine]] and the [[TabletopGame/MageTheAwakening Exarchs]] who actively like the world the way it is and are willing to use all their powers, up to and including [[RealityWarper resetting time and reshuffling space]] to keep things as they prefer.
*** To put in perspective how a monster/human war would probably be a PyrrhicVictory for either side in the New World: consider that Washington D.C has the world's largest active population of [[TabletopGame/MummyTheCurse the Arisen]], undead slaves from [[TimeAbyss beyond the recognized dawn of civilization]] who serve the unspeakable wills of prehuman gods. And they look just like any other person, when they're not slumbering as desiccated corpses. What's the army going to do to get rid of them? Nuke Washington? Which is a bad idea even before you take into account the fact that the Arisen are NighInvulnerable and have ResurrectiveImmortality, so even if they don't survive the bomb, they ''will'' come back just as strong and twice as mad. At the same time, if the Arisen use their powers and flatten Washington under a meteorite shower, or level it with an earthquake... then what are they going to do?



** It ''does'' go a bit farther than that, though more psychologically -- Sokka, for example, seems to feel inferior to his teammates, which is why he [[TookALevelInBadass Takes a Level In Badass]] by becoming a sword master. Growing up with Katara (a Bender) probably also explains his general distrust of "magic," as a way of coping with his own inferiority complex.
** Later played straight in the sequel series, ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'', where an anti-bending revolt threatens to tear the metropolis of Republic City apart.
** The series takes a fairly realistic approach in that there's no single, over-arching reaction to someone with the power. There's rarely outright oppression simply *because* you're a bender - not counting POW camps the Fire Nation sets up - but individuals range the entire spectrum from awe and wonder, to jealousy and bitterness, to "Meh, so he can punch a fireball."
*** May be largely due to the fact that even being born with the ability to bend, there's a vast difference between being able to do it and being able to do it with enough skill/power to clearly make it better than a muggle way of doing something. We see the show mostly through the experiences of benders from the [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous elite range]] and are thus, important. Toph gets special mention: every application of earthbending ''other'' than "make that rock move" was ''invented by her after previously having been thought impossible.'' And everyone who is spectacularly good at bending has been established as having worked at it their entire life. Civilian benders are more than once shown to be incapable, or at least requiring the cooperation of many, to do anything like the feats of the main cast. There is also the fact that benders are not immune to conventional weaponry and the [[FullContactMagic physical moves]] are ''very much'' necessary. This means dodging a fire strike works on the same principle as dodging a fist (the consequences of zigging when you should have zagged are just a lot higher.) So, while a rogue bender could level a few city blocks if he raged unchecked, he probably wouldn't get to: a warrior who's good with a sword or a bow versus a civilian bender is ''not'' a total mismatch. Then ''Korra'' adds ''mecha-tanks'' to the equation.

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** It ''does'' go a bit farther than that, though more psychologically -- Sokka, for example, seems to feel inferior to his teammates, which is why he [[TookALevelInBadass Takes a Level In Badass]] by becoming a sword master. Growing up with Katara (a Bender) probably also explains his general distrust of "magic," as a way of coping with his own inferiority complex.
**
* Later played straight in the sequel series, ''WesternAnimation/TheLegendOfKorra'', where an anti-bending revolt threatens to tear the metropolis of Republic City apart.
** The series takes a fairly realistic approach in that there's no single, over-arching reaction to someone with the power. There's rarely outright oppression simply *because* you're a bender - not counting POW camps the Fire Nation sets up - but individuals range the entire spectrum from awe and wonder, to jealousy and bitterness, to "Meh, so he can punch a fireball."
*** May be largely due to the fact that even being born with the ability to bend, there's a vast difference between being able to do it and being able to do it with enough skill/power to clearly make it better than a muggle way of doing something. We see the show mostly through the experiences of benders from the [[ElitesAreMoreGlamorous elite range]] and are thus, important. Toph gets special mention: every application of earthbending ''other'' than "make that rock move" was ''invented by her after previously having been thought impossible.'' And everyone who is spectacularly good at bending has been established as having worked at it their entire life. Civilian benders are more than once shown to be incapable, or at least requiring the cooperation of many, to do anything like the feats of the main cast. There is also the fact that benders are not immune to conventional weaponry and the [[FullContactMagic physical moves]] are ''very much'' necessary. This means dodging a fire strike works on the same principle as dodging a fist (the consequences of zigging when you should have zagged are just a lot higher.) So, while a rogue bender could level a few city blocks if he raged unchecked, he probably wouldn't get to: a warrior who's good with a sword or a bow versus a civilian bender is ''not'' a total mismatch. Then ''Korra'' adds ''mecha-tanks'' to the equation.
apart.
9th Apr '16 4:46:56 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Paladins in ''Film/{{Jumper}}'' seem to be hunting down the eponymous teleporting mutants mostly because they're too powerful to be permitted to exist.
** It's arguable on whether the Paladins are bad guy muggles, or if the whole thing is a BrokenAesop. Their actions are deplorable, but they claim to be doing the only thing possible to curb a group of people who are criminals and leeches on society. They may even be right: we only get to know ''two'' Jumpers in the movie, the protagonist (who fits the Paladins' expectations pretty well, having immediately turned to bank-robbery when he discovered his power) and one guy who has dedicated himself to fighting back against the Paladins who have been chasing him across the globe trying to kill him. A third is shown briefly, just long enough to demonstrate that the Paladins know how to trap and kill them.
** Unfortunately, the rhetoric the Paladins use smells too much like the Inquisition: "Only God should have the power to be everywhere at once". That's enough to make them seem like religious nutjobs to many people.

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* The Paladins in ''Film/{{Jumper}}'' seem to be hunting down the eponymous teleporting mutants mostly because they're too powerful to be permitted to exist.
** It's arguable on whether the Paladins are bad guy muggles, or if the whole thing is a BrokenAesop. Their actions are deplorable, but they claim to be doing the only thing possible to curb a group of people who are criminals and leeches on society. They may even be right: we only get to know ''two'' Jumpers in the movie, the protagonist (who fits the Paladins' expectations pretty well, having immediately turned to bank-robbery when he discovered his power) and one guy who has dedicated himself to fighting back against the Paladins who have been chasing him across the globe trying to kill him. A third is shown briefly, just long enough to demonstrate that the Paladins know how to trap and kill them.
**
exist. Unfortunately, the rhetoric the Paladins use smells too much like the Inquisition: "Only God should have the power to be everywhere at once". That's enough to make them seem like religious nutjobs to many people.
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