History Main / MinmaxersDelight

30th Aug '16 8:17:35 PM VeryMelon
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*** Ballistic Weave is an armor modification that gives a rather large ballistic and energy defense boost. The majority of light clothing and a small handful of hats in the game can be modded with Ballistic Weave, gifting defenses only surpassed by wearing Power Armor.

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*** Ballistic Weave is an armor modification that gives a rather large ballistic and energy defense boost. The majority of light clothing and a small handful of hats in the game can be modded with Ballistic Weave, gifting mass defenses only surpassed by wearing Power Armor.to any build with 3 STR.
29th Aug '16 5:58:51 PM justanid
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--> ''Webcomic/TheOrderOfTheStick'': [[http://www.giantitp.com/comics/oots0354.html "Wait, I'm confused--there are druids who DON'T take the Natural Spell feat??"]]
29th Aug '16 4:31:56 PM justanid
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* In the TabletopGame/D20Modern sourcebook Cyberscape (a sourcebook about [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]]), you get that little gem: An implant called Nasal Filter. It does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, filtering any airborne harmful chemicals or bacterias, giving a +6 to Fortitude saves (i.e. good extra protection) against airborne poisons and disease (including tear gas). ButWaitTheresMore Its purchase DC is a mere 18 (meaning it can be purchased by any level one character) and it doesn't counts against implant limits (in the standard cybernetics rules, you can only have a limited number of implants, depending on how much constitution you have (that is to say how physically healthy you are). Far from a gamebreaker in a game where gas masks can be readily bought from the Internet, but still an implant you have no legitimate reason not to take, just in case.
** In the TabletopGame/D20Modern sourcebook D20 Future, there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires you to have a bite attack), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost.

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* In the TabletopGame/D20Modern ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' sourcebook Cyberscape (a sourcebook about [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]]), you get that little gem: An implant called Nasal Filter. It does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, filtering any airborne harmful chemicals or bacterias, giving a +6 to Fortitude saves (i.e. good extra protection) against airborne poisons and disease (including tear gas). ButWaitTheresMore Its purchase DC is a mere 18 (meaning it can be purchased by any level one character) and it doesn't counts against implant limits (in the standard cybernetics rules, you can only have a limited number of implants, depending on how much constitution you have (that is to say how physically healthy you are). Far from a gamebreaker in a game where gas masks can be readily bought from the Internet, but still an implant you have no legitimate reason not to take, just in case.
** In the TabletopGame/D20Modern ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' sourcebook D20 Future, ''D20 Future'', there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires you to have a bite attack), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost.



** This applies to flaws in pretty much any system where they raise their ugly head. In ''oWoD'' games and ''GURPS'' you can almost always pick a bunch of minor disadvantages that will never ever hinder you in actual play. In worse cases, these disadvantages actually give you justifications for being an asshole.

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** This applies to flaws in pretty much any system where they raise their ugly head. In ''oWoD'' ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness oWoD]]'' games and ''GURPS'' ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' you can almost always pick a bunch of minor disadvantages that will never ever hinder you in actual play. In worse cases, these disadvantages actually give you justifications for being an asshole.



** Dragon Magazine had some of the best 3.5 flaws for this trope. One of them was called "No Familiar," for Sorcerers and Wizards, which was the same as a free feat with no drawbacks, since nobody ever used the familiar anyway (a weak creature that caused you to lose XP if it was killed.) If you actually did want your familiar for some reason, there was a feat that granted you a one with abilities based on your caster level instead of your class level, so if you were going into a Prestige class (and thanks to EmptyLevels, everyone went for prestige classes), this flaw-feat combo amounted to a free net advantage.
* In the TabletopGame/D20Modern sourcebook D20 Future, there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires a bite attack to be taken), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost. In the same vein, Festering Sores is a mutation that covers your character's skin with festering sores. The effect is more aggravating than harmful, but it reduces an armor's max Dexterity bons by 2 and increases armor penalties by 2. A fast hero with maxed out dexterity gains no benefits from armors anyway, so he/she might as well take this mutation. There is also "Neutrad Dependency" and "Poisonous blood". The first being a mutation that gives you 6 points and makes you roll fortitude saves or get Constitution damage unless you take a Neutrad dose every day (and taking a Neutrad dose fixes the damage), the second making your blood poison itself and requiring a daily [[MagicalAntidote Antitox dose]] or suffer the same effects, and gives you as many points. Sounds bad right? Except Neutrad and Antitox are cheap and freely available commodities (unless you play D20 Apocalypse).
** Traits an flaws from Unearthed Arcana make a comeback in TabletopGame/D20Modern. So for a character whom isn't a tech guy/gal, technophobe is a real bargain. By taking penalties to technical skills, most of those cannot be used untrained, you gain a free feat.

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** Dragon Magazine ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' magazine had some of the best 3.5 flaws for this trope. One of them was called "No Familiar," for Sorcerers and Wizards, which was the same as a free feat with no drawbacks, since nobody ever used the familiar anyway (a weak creature that caused you to lose XP if it was killed.) If you actually did want your familiar for some reason, there was a feat that granted you a one with abilities based on your caster level instead of your class level, so if you were going into a Prestige class (and thanks to EmptyLevels, everyone went for prestige classes), this flaw-feat combo amounted to a free net advantage.
* In the TabletopGame/D20Modern ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' sourcebook D20 Future, ''D20 Future'', there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires a bite attack to be taken), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost. In the same vein, Festering Sores is a mutation that covers your character's skin with festering sores. The effect is more aggravating than harmful, but it reduces an armor's max Dexterity bons bonus by 2 and increases armor penalties by 2. A fast hero with maxed out dexterity gains no benefits from armors anyway, so he/she might as well take this mutation. There is also "Neutrad Dependency" and "Poisonous blood". The first being a mutation that gives you 6 points and makes you roll fortitude saves or get Constitution damage unless you take a Neutrad dose every day (and taking a Neutrad dose fixes the damage), the second making your blood poison itself and requiring a daily [[MagicalAntidote Antitox dose]] or suffer the same effects, and gives you as many points. Sounds bad right? Except Neutrad and Antitox are cheap and freely available commodities (unless you play D20 Apocalypse).
''D20 Apocalypse'').
** Traits an flaws from Unearthed Arcana make a comeback in TabletopGame/D20Modern.''TabletopGame/D20Modern''. So for a character whom isn't a tech guy/gal, technophobe is a real bargain. By taking penalties to technical skills, most of those cannot be used untrained, you gain a free feat.



* Averted for plot-related disadvantages in MutantsAndMasterminds, called "Complications". They only yield their benefit (free Hero Points) when and if they disadvantage your character in some way.

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* Averted for plot-related disadvantages in MutantsAndMasterminds, ''TabletopGame/MutantsAndMasterminds'', called "Complications". They only yield their benefit (free Hero Points) when and if they disadvantage your character in some way.
21st Aug '16 12:32:11 PM nombretomado
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* Similarly, though far more dramatically so, medichines in EclipsePhase. They are cheap, they have no downsides, they give powerful and extremely important bonuses and all too often they literally mean the difference between life and death (many dangers you can't even ''try'' to save against if you don't have medichines). The only reason not to buy them is if your character has some kind of ideological thing going on against nanotech, and even then...

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* Similarly, though far more dramatically so, medichines in EclipsePhase.''TabletopGame/EclipsePhase''. They are cheap, they have no downsides, they give powerful and extremely important bonuses and all too often they literally mean the difference between life and death (many dangers you can't even ''try'' to save against if you don't have medichines). The only reason not to buy them is if your character has some kind of ideological thing going on against nanotech, and even then...
19th Aug '16 5:55:46 PM Gosicrystal
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[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]

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[[folder: Tabletop Games ]]
[[folder:Sports Games]]
* ''VideoGame/ArcStyleBaseball3D'':
** Pitching is all about using Tall characters. They have the second fastest delivery speed and the most useful pitches by far in the game: slider, two-seam and [[ThatOneAttack forkball]]. Also, since a whole lot of batters in the game are left-handed, you might as well make your pitcher a lefty too, so you can exploit the slider on them.
** The "Max power" option is the most useful in batting, and it's only available to Macho characters. Have some of them on your team, and you'll get lots of runs. Granted, they're really slow, but you can compensate that with tons of hits to the gap or over the fence.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Tabletop Games]]
30th Jul '16 11:00:37 AM nombretomado
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* In the D20Modern sourcebook Cyberscape (a sourcebook about [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]]), you get that little gem: An implant called Nasal Filter. It does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, filtering any airborne harmful chemicals or bacterias, giving a +6 to Fortitude saves (i.e. good extra protection) against airborne poisons and disease (including tear gas). ButWaitTheresMore Its purchase DC is a mere 18 (meaning it can be purchased by any level one character) and it doesn't counts against implant limits (in the standard cybernetics rules, you can only have a limited number of implants, depending on how much constitution you have (that is to say how physically healthy you are). Far from a gamebreaker in a game where gas masks can be readily bought from the Internet, but still an implant you have no legitimate reason not to take, just in case.
** In the D20Modern sourcebook D20 Future, there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires you to have a bite attack), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost.

to:

* In the D20Modern TabletopGame/D20Modern sourcebook Cyberscape (a sourcebook about [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]]), you get that little gem: An implant called Nasal Filter. It does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, filtering any airborne harmful chemicals or bacterias, giving a +6 to Fortitude saves (i.e. good extra protection) against airborne poisons and disease (including tear gas). ButWaitTheresMore Its purchase DC is a mere 18 (meaning it can be purchased by any level one character) and it doesn't counts against implant limits (in the standard cybernetics rules, you can only have a limited number of implants, depending on how much constitution you have (that is to say how physically healthy you are). Far from a gamebreaker in a game where gas masks can be readily bought from the Internet, but still an implant you have no legitimate reason not to take, just in case.
** In the D20Modern TabletopGame/D20Modern sourcebook D20 Future, there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires you to have a bite attack), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost.



* In the D20Modern sourcebook D20 Future, there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires a bite attack to be taken), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost. In the same vein, Festering Sores is a mutation that covers your character's skin with festering sores. The effect is more aggravating than harmful, but it reduces an armor's max Dexterity bons by 2 and increases armor penalties by 2. A fast hero with maxed out dexterity gains no benefits from armors anyway, so he/she might as well take this mutation. There is also "Neutrad Dependency" and "Poisonous blood". The first being a mutation that gives you 6 points and makes you roll fortitude saves or get Constitution damage unless you take a Neutrad dose every day (and taking a Neutrad dose fixes the damage), the second making your blood poison itself and requiring a daily [[MagicalAntidote Antitox dose]] or suffer the same effects, and gives you as many points. Sounds bad right? Except Neutrad and Antitox are cheap and freely available commodities (unless you play D20 Apocalypse).
** Traits an flaws from Unearthed Arcana make a comeback in D20Modern. So for a character whom isn't a tech guy/gal, technophobe is a real bargain. By taking penalties to technical skills, most of those cannot be used untrained, you gain a free feat.

to:

* In the D20Modern TabletopGame/D20Modern sourcebook D20 Future, there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires a bite attack to be taken), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost. In the same vein, Festering Sores is a mutation that covers your character's skin with festering sores. The effect is more aggravating than harmful, but it reduces an armor's max Dexterity bons by 2 and increases armor penalties by 2. A fast hero with maxed out dexterity gains no benefits from armors anyway, so he/she might as well take this mutation. There is also "Neutrad Dependency" and "Poisonous blood". The first being a mutation that gives you 6 points and makes you roll fortitude saves or get Constitution damage unless you take a Neutrad dose every day (and taking a Neutrad dose fixes the damage), the second making your blood poison itself and requiring a daily [[MagicalAntidote Antitox dose]] or suffer the same effects, and gives you as many points. Sounds bad right? Except Neutrad and Antitox are cheap and freely available commodities (unless you play D20 Apocalypse).
** Traits an flaws from Unearthed Arcana make a comeback in D20Modern.TabletopGame/D20Modern. So for a character whom isn't a tech guy/gal, technophobe is a real bargain. By taking penalties to technical skills, most of those cannot be used untrained, you gain a free feat.
17th Jul '16 3:46:09 AM BigKlingy
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Added DiffLines:

** Skill example: Galeforce from ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening''. It allows the user a full extra action after killing an enemy, which includes attacking again. This skill greatly increases both a unit's offensive power and mobility, and a full army of Galeforce users can wipe out entire maps in a single turn. It being exclusive to females (being a Pegasus Knight skill) is a big reason behind ''Awakening's'' GameFavouredGender, but male children can inherit it from their mothers. Getting Galeforce on as many characters as possible is ''the'' biggest concern for Minmaxers when making pairings. Galeforce was such a GameBreaker that ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' not only nerfed it, they also made the class that gives it DLC-only.
27th Apr '16 6:53:21 PM Clarste
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* In VideoGame/MasterOfOrion 2: Battle at Antares you had the trait picks: creative (get every tech at each tech level instead of only picking one, this logarithmically makes you more powerful if you remember to stop improving planets and make ships at some point) as well as the Unification government that grants a flat 50% bonus to food and production. Klackons (who naturally have Unification) are balanced because they are UN-creative and get a random tech instead of choosing one, a custom race can take both advantages for 15 points, leaving 'em 5 to get some more advantages. Theortically you could decide not to get max flaws instead, but since creative will let you fix most/all disadvantages in midgame at no extra cost you SHOULD get as many flaws as you can get for "free" advantages.

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* In VideoGame/MasterOfOrion 2: Battle at Antares you had the trait picks: creative (get every tech at each tech level instead of only picking one, this logarithmically makes you more powerful if you remember to stop improving planets and make ships at some point) as well as the Unification government that grants a flat 50% bonus to food and production. Klackons (who naturally have Unification) are balanced because they are UN-creative '''un'''creative and get a random tech instead of choosing one, a custom race can take both advantages for 15 points, leaving 'em 5 to get some more advantages. Theortically you could decide not to get max flaws instead, but since creative will let you fix most/all disadvantages in midgame at no extra cost you SHOULD get as many flaws as you can get for "free" advantages.
17th Apr '16 10:29:08 AM thatother1dude
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** The spell Power Within gives 100 seconds of significantly boosted damage and stamina regeneration, which essentially every character build benefits from, at [[CastFromHitPoints the cost of draining a full health bar]] over the duration, which is pretty manageable because you can have as many as twenty [[HealingPotion Estus]]. It can be used by anyone for little to no cost, as its only stat requirement is taking up one Attunement slot (something every starting class either has to begin with or needs 1-2 levels to reach).

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** The spell Power Within gives 100 seconds of significantly boosted damage and stamina regeneration, which essentially every character build benefits from, at [[CastFromHitPoints the cost of draining a full health bar]] over the duration, which is pretty manageable because you can have as many as twenty [[HealingPotion Estus]]. It can be used by anyone for little to no cost, as its only stat requirement is taking up one Attunement slot (something every starting class either has to begin with or needs 1-2 levels to reach). After being entirely absent in [[VideoGame/DarkSoulsII the second game]], it returned in [[VideoGame/DarkSoulsIII the third]] significantly with [[{{Nerf}} half the damage boost, no stamina regeneration boost, and twice the rate of health drain]].
17th Apr '16 10:23:27 AM thatother1dude
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** Havel's Ring for anyone that isn't purely a mage. It increases equipment load by 50%, which is equivalent to at least 20 levels of Endurance (more if your Endurance is high, [[OneStatToRuleThemAll which it usually will be]]) in a game where each level gives one stat point and most people get to the endgame at level 80. This is tremendously useful, because it lets you get better protection from armor in terms of damage and [[ImmuneToFlinching hitstun resistance]] without losing mobility or vice-versa. Most of the other rings not affecting magic have effects that are much more situational (like increasing a single defense by an amount heavier armor would almost cover for all types) or have significant drawbacks (like the Ring of Favor and protection, which boosts several stats but is LostForever if you take it off). Because of this and its early availability, the majority of players not focused entirely on magic have Havel's Ring on for most of their playthrough. Future installments in the series nerfed the amount increased to 10-20% (though partially because both allow two rings instead of four), on top of making armor itself less powerful.
** The spell Power Within gives 100 seconds of significantly boosted damage and stamina regeneration, which essentially every character build benefits from, at [[CastFromHitPoints the cost of health draining]] at a slow, manageable rate. It can be used by anyone for little to no cost, as its only stat requirement is taking up one Attunement slot (something every starting class either has to begin with or needs 1-2 levels to reach).

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** Havel's Ring for anyone that isn't purely a mage. It increases equipment load by 50%, which is equivalent to at least 20 levels of Endurance (more if your Endurance is high, [[OneStatToRuleThemAll which it usually will be]]) in a game where each level gives one stat point and most people get to the endgame at level 80. This is tremendously useful, because it lets you get better protection from armor in terms of damage and [[ImmuneToFlinching hitstun resistance]] without losing mobility or vice-versa. Most of the other rings not affecting magic have effects that are much more situational (like increasing a single defense by an amount heavier armor would almost cover for all types) or have significant drawbacks (like the Ring of Favor and protection, which boosts several stats but is LostForever if you take it off). Because of this and its early availability, the majority of players not focused entirely on magic have Havel's Ring on for most of their playthrough. Future installments in the series nerfed the amount increased to 10-20% (though partially because both allow two rings instead of four), on top of making armor itself less powerful.
** The spell Power Within gives 100 seconds of significantly boosted damage and stamina regeneration, which essentially every character build benefits from, at [[CastFromHitPoints the cost of draining a full health draining]] at a slow, bar]] over the duration, which is pretty manageable rate.because you can have as many as twenty [[HealingPotion Estus]]. It can be used by anyone for little to no cost, as its only stat requirement is taking up one Attunement slot (something every starting class either has to begin with or needs 1-2 levels to reach).
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