History Main / MinmaxersDelight

14th Jun '18 11:30:38 AM BeerBaron
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*** Good Natured (which is also in ''New Vegas'') gives boosts to several non-combat skills while reducing all combat skills. The total number lost and gained are equal, so it seems like a fair trade. The thing is, most players specialize in one type of weapon while each non-combat ability has a separate use, thus it's a very significant net increase of the combined level of all the skills most will actually ''use.''

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*** Good Natured (which is also in ''New Vegas'') gives boosts to several non-combat skills while reducing all combat skills. The total number lost and gained are equal, so it seems like a fair trade. The thing is, most players specialize in one type of weapon while each non-combat ability has a separate use, thus it's a very significant net increase of the combined level of all the skills most will actually ''use.''


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*** Good-Natured returns, this time granting +5 each to Barter/Medicine/Repair/Science/Speech at the cost of -5 to Energy Weapons/Explosives/Guns/Melee/Unarmed. All five of the former are useful from the beginning of the game, and five points is a huge boon at Level 1, whereas the player is well-advised to choose only one of the latter to focus on until the late-game, so you're basically getting 20 free points. If you select one of the combat skills as your tag skill (+15 at the start of the game), your performance won't noticeably suffer at that either.
8th Jun '18 10:24:01 PM HighCrate
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** The Distraction Buoy augment makes the enemy fleet pursuing you do so more slowly, granting you more time to scour for resources. Unless you run into it very late in the game, it's always a good idea.
8th Jun '18 8:26:47 PM thatother1dude
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** There's the Archer class's Support Ability, Concentration, with which you never miss in physical and some magical attacks. Then there's the Samurai class's Blade Grasp Reaction Ability, which ensures that your units will rarely get physically hit ever again.
** There's the Calculator skillset, which lets you cast nearly any spell instantly, at infinite range, at 0 MP cost, essentially turning the character you give it to a PersonOfMassDestruction. The Calculator has the shortcoming of its spell targeting being very different from any other class, with the result that the only way to hit the intended target(s) might also put some (or in extreme cases, all) of your own party members in the line of fire. Fortunately, that flaw can very easily be turned in an asset by spamming Holy (a strong spell that no enemy is immune to) and equipping your party members with items that absorb Holy. Once that's done, it's a ''good'' thing if your Calculator hits himself and/or an ally with his spell, because they'll be healed by it.
** There is also the Samurai's Draw Out skill. It is a varied and powerfull skill that has healing, buffing, and large area magic damage spells that are all instant casting and zero MP cost. It is balanced out by the Samurai's low magic skill, it being far down the fighting job class tree and the fact that every time it's used, there's a chance that it might break the katana used in the skill, and the stronger the skill, the harder the said katana is to aquire, with some of them being normally one-of-a-kind items. Give this skill to a high level black mage and it becomes ridiculously good, especially since the attack spells become one hit kills due to the damage formula's being optimized for the Samurai, and the risk of katanas breaking can be mitigated by either duplicating them or catching thrown copies of them from high level ninjas.
** And, of course, the hugely powerful Monk + Double-Strike combo. At level 50 or so, these tend to deal ~200 damage ''per hit'' a feat only [[GameBreaker matched by Cid]].
** ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' also has Concentrate, here increasing the accuracy of physical attacks by a flat 50% and status effects by 20% (20 and 50 of 100, not of base accuracy). This includes OneHitKill moves whose only weakness was a low natural accuracy.
** ''[[VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2 A2]]'' {{nerf}}ed Concentration to a flat 5% accuracy bonus (as in 5% of 100%, not 5% of the current accuracy) and also made base accuracy for most physical attacks 99% instead of tremendously varying by class. Though it has its own in [[ReducedManaCost Halve MP]] (because MP starts at 0 and grows each turn) or [[CastFromHitPoints Blood Price]] for any Magick-user.\\

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** There's the The Archer class's class' Support Ability, Concentration, with which you never miss in makes physical and some magical attacks. Then there's the attacks [[AlwaysAccurateAttack perfectly accurate]] when they'd otherwise have a large chance of missing.
** The
Samurai class's Blade Grasp Reaction Ability, which Ability ensures that your units will rarely get physically hit ever again.
** There's the The Calculator skillset, which skillset lets you cast nearly any spell instantly, at infinite range, at 0 MP cost, essentially turning the character you give it to a PersonOfMassDestruction. The Calculator has the shortcoming of its spell targeting being very different from any other class, with the result that the only way to hit the intended target(s) might also put some (or in extreme cases, all) of your own party members in the line of fire. Fortunately, that flaw can very easily be turned in an asset by spamming Holy (a strong spell that no enemy is immune to) and equipping your party members with items that absorb Holy. Once that's done, it's a ''good'' thing if your Calculator hits himself and/or an ally with his spell, because they'll be healed by it.
** There is also the The Samurai's Draw Out skill. It skill is a varied and powerfull skill that has healing, buffing, and large area magic damage spells that are all instant casting and zero MP cost. It is balanced out by the Samurai's low magic skill, it being far down the fighting job class tree and the fact that every time it's used, there's a chance that it might break the katana used in the skill, and the stronger the skill, the harder the said katana is to aquire, with some of them being normally one-of-a-kind items. Give this skill to a high level black mage and it becomes ridiculously good, especially since the attack spells become one hit kills due to the damage formula's being optimized for the Samurai, and the risk of katanas breaking can be mitigated by either duplicating them or catching thrown copies of them from high level ninjas.
** And, of course, the The hugely powerful Monk + Double-Strike combo. At level 50 or so, these tend to deal ~200 damage ''per hit'' a feat only [[GameBreaker matched by Cid]].
** Concentrate in ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsAdvance'' also has Concentrate, here increasing increases the accuracy of physical attacks by a flat 50% and status effects by 20% (20 and 50 of 100, not of base accuracy). This is in a game where a bunch of classes are balanced around low accuracy, and the latter includes OneHitKill moves whose only weakness was a low natural accuracy.
accuracy. ''A2'' massively nerfed it to just a 5% increase (along with making base accuracy for physical attacks 99%).
** Because MP in ''[[VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2 A2]]'' {{nerf}}ed Concentration to a flat 5% accuracy bonus (as in 5% of 100%, not 5% of the current accuracy) starts at 0 and also made base accuracy for most physical attacks 99% instead of tremendously varying by class. Though it has its own in grows each turn. [[ReducedManaCost Halve MP]] (because MP starts at 0 and grows each turn) or [[CastFromHitPoints Blood Price]] are by far the best Support ability for any Magick-user.Magick-users.\\
8th Jun '18 5:09:29 PM thatother1dude
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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', completing the Temple of Mara quest line confers the Agent of Mara blessing, a permanent, passive, always-on magic resistance. Magic resistance is useful for any character build and relatively hard to come by, generally requiring high levels of Enchanting skill or using the Lord Stone, which requires forgoing any of several other useful Standing Stone abilities. The quest line is very easy and can be undertaken as soon as the Dragonborn reaches Riften, which can be done by cart almost immediately after starting the game, so there's never any real reason ''not'' to do it as soon as possible.

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* In ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'', completing ''VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim'':
** Completing
the Temple of Mara quest line confers the Agent of Mara blessing, a permanent, passive, always-on magic resistance. Magic resistance is useful for any character build and relatively hard to come by, generally requiring high levels of Enchanting skill or using the Lord Stone, which requires forgoing any of several other useful Standing Stone abilities. The quest line is very easy and can be undertaken as soon as the Dragonborn reaches Riften, which can be done by cart almost immediately after starting the game, so there's never any real reason ''not'' to do it as soon as possible.
17th May '18 8:11:49 AM Moopsball
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* In ''VideoGame/PathOfExile'' endgame levels are accessed through Map items, which follow the same RandomlyGeneratedLoot system as other items. Each modifier on a map adds a complication and increases the quantity and rarity of items dropped. Depending on your build some mods will be completely irrelevant, such as a modifier that reduces critical multiplier when using a DamageOverTime build that cannot crit, turning the modifier into a free RandomDropBooster.
16th May '18 6:50:16 PM Luigifan
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* In ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion 2: Battle at Antares'' you had the trait picks: creative (get every tech at each tech level instead of only picking one, this logarithmically makes you more powerful if you remember to stop improving planets and make ships at some point) as well as the Unification government that grants a flat 50% bonus to food and production. Klackons (who naturally have Unification) are balanced because they are '''un'''creative and get a random tech instead of choosing one, a custom race can take both advantages for 15 points, leaving 'em 5 to get some more advantages. Theortically you could decide not to get max flaws instead, but since creative will let you fix most/all disadvantages in midgame at no extra cost you SHOULD get as many flaws as you can get for "free" advantages.

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* In ''VideoGame/MasterOfOrion 2: Battle at Antares'' Antares'', you had the trait picks: creative (get every tech at each tech level instead of only picking one, this logarithmically makes you more powerful if you remember to stop improving planets and make ships at some point) as well as the Unification government that grants a flat 50% bonus to food and production. Klackons (who naturally have Unification) are balanced because they are '''un'''creative and get a random tech instead of choosing one, a custom race can take both advantages for 15 points, leaving 'em 5 to get some more advantages. Theortically you could decide not to get max flaws instead, but since creative will let you fix most/all disadvantages in midgame at no extra cost you SHOULD get as many flaws as you can get for "free" advantages.



** Telepathy can make a lot of disadvantages more or less irrelevant, particularly if you play aggressively in a crowded universe. It allows you to instantly integrate an enemy planet into society as soon as you have defeated planetary defenses if you have a sufficiently large ship in the conquering fleet. You do not need to invade or bombard so there is no damage to the planet. If you know a bit about min-maxing you will immediately see how this can be exploited; you can take unification (essentially a hive-mind: great bonuses to production but it is very hard to integrate other species) as your government since integration is instant anyway. You can choose a race that sucks at ground combat since when you are invading, there is no ground combat and you can rely on other things than ground combat when you are defending. As a matter of fact, you can choose a *race* that sucks at everything: ground combat, farming, working, researching and reproduction. You are going to conquer a more useful race anyway the first thing you do so these disadvantages will not slow you down much anyway. Just choose things that make your *society* very powerful (such as: creativity, telepathy and unification government).

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** Telepathy can make a lot of disadvantages more or less irrelevant, particularly if you play aggressively in a crowded universe. It allows you to instantly integrate an enemy planet into society as soon as you have defeated planetary defenses if you have a sufficiently large ship in the conquering fleet. You do not need to invade or bombard bombard, so there is no damage to the planet. If you know a bit about min-maxing min-maxing, you will immediately see how this can be exploited; you can take unification (essentially a hive-mind: great bonuses to production production, but it is very hard to integrate other species) as your government since integration is instant anyway. You can choose a race that sucks at ground combat since when you are invading, there is no ground combat combat, and you can rely on other things than ground combat when you are defending. As a matter of fact, you can choose a *race* ''race'' that sucks at everything: ground combat, farming, working, researching researching, and reproduction. You are going to conquer a more useful race anyway as the first thing you do do, so these disadvantages will not slow you down much anyway. Just choose things that make your *society* ''society'' very powerful (such as: creativity, telepathy telepathy, and unification government).



** Likewise, anyone playing a Swordsage is going to pick up Adaptive Style at 1st level, as it lets you refresh (swap out) all of your maneuvers in the time it takes to recover ''one'' normally. The feat is considered good for most Martial Adepts, but key for Swordsage -- and it's still not as powerful as other Adepts, to the point that this can be seen as fixing an inherent flaw in the class than an example of this trope.

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** Likewise, anyone playing a Swordsage is going to pick up Adaptive Style at 1st level, as it lets you refresh (swap out) all of your maneuvers in the time it takes to recover ''one'' normally. The feat is considered good for most Martial Adepts, but key for Swordsage -- and it's still not as powerful as other Adepts, to the point that this can be seen as fixing an inherent flaw in the class rather than an example of this trope.



** Power Attack for melee characters. To wit, enemy HP scales quickly. Your damage output does not scale nearly so quickly. Power Attack, and the things that build off of it, end up being responsible for offsetting the bulk of this. Of course it's still a [[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards losing battle]].
** Likewise, the ability to Pounce (or something mechanically similar) is almost mandatory for higher level melee characters. It gives the ability to make a full attack after charging, so it can mean the difference between spending your first turn getting off just one attack, or half a dozen.
** While we're on melee combat, let's talk about the two most favored weapons of Minmaxers and melee. First, we have the Greatsword. Rolls 2d6 for damage, is two-handed so it gets a Strength Bonus buff and Power Attack does more damage, has an increased Critical Threat range like all swords, is a martial weapon, and pairs well with a lot of melee builds. It's BoringButPractical. The other is the Spiked Chain. Normally, exotic weapons are the bane of minmaxers, as very few give any worthwhile bonus in exchange for a precious Feat slot. A Spiked chain, however, is a two-handed weapon, getting the same buffs as mentioned above for Greatswords, has reach so the user can strike farther than normal, and, unlike most reach weapons, can be used against adjacent opponents. It is also a weapon granting bonuses to attempts to trip or disarm opponents, making it very well-liked for technical melee builds that focus on abusing [[CounterAttack Attack of Opportunity]], and [[StunLock limiting the mobility and options of foes]].

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** Power Attack for melee characters. To wit, enemy HP scales quickly. Your damage output does not scale nearly so quickly. Power Attack, and the things that build off of it, end up being responsible for offsetting the bulk of this. Of course course, it's still a [[LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards losing battle]].
** Likewise, the ability to Pounce (or something mechanically similar) is almost mandatory for higher level higher-level melee characters. It gives the ability to make a full attack after charging, so it can mean the difference between spending your first turn getting off just one attack, or half a dozen.
** While we're on melee combat, let's talk about the two most favored weapons of Minmaxers and melee. First, we have the Greatsword. Rolls 2d6 for damage, is two-handed so it gets a Strength Bonus buff and Power Attack does more damage, has an increased Critical Threat range like all swords, is a martial weapon, and pairs well with a lot of melee builds. It's BoringButPractical. The other is the Spiked Chain. Normally, exotic weapons are the bane of minmaxers, as very few give any worthwhile bonus in exchange for a precious Feat slot. A Spiked chain, however, is a two-handed weapon, getting the same buffs as mentioned above for Greatswords, has reach so the user can strike farther than normal, and, unlike most reach weapons, can be used against adjacent opponents. It is also a weapon granting bonuses to attempts to trip or disarm opponents, making it very well-liked for technical melee builds that focus on abusing [[CounterAttack Attack Attacks of Opportunity]], and [[StunLock [[CycleOfHurting limiting the mobility and options of foes]].



** Then there's the Embrace the Dark Chaos/Shun the Dark Chaos feat shuffle. To explain, Embrace the Dark Chaos replaces one of your feats with a vile feat, but forces you to be evil, damned when you die, and no one likes you (not to mention that vile feats generally suck). Shun the Dark Chaos means you can swap out that vile feat for a normal one. This allows you to replace all the sucky mandatory feats with any other feat. Where it really gets broken is that some races, like Elves, get weapon proficiency feats instead of just weapon proficiencies like everyone else that can then be shuffled away to get much better feats (in the case of Elves that's six extra feats).
** Leadership is such a obvious choice for any character with high Charisma, that many [=DMs=] ban it outright. You can get a cohort to loyally follow you, who will be two levels lower than your own character - but since LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards is in effect, your cohort could still easily be more powerful than other members of the party, or even more powerful than ''you''.

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** Then there's the Embrace the Dark Chaos/Shun the Dark Chaos feat shuffle. To explain, Embrace the Dark Chaos replaces one of your feats with a vile feat, but forces you to be evil, damned when you die, and no one likes you (not to mention that vile feats generally suck). Shun the Dark Chaos means you can swap out that vile feat for a normal one. This allows you to replace all the sucky mandatory feats with any other feat. Where it really gets broken is that some races, like Elves, get weapon proficiency feats instead of just weapon proficiencies like everyone else that can then be shuffled away to get much better feats (in the case of Elves Elves, that's six extra feats).
** Leadership is such a an obvious choice for any character with high Charisma, that many [=DMs=] ban it outright. You can get a cohort to loyally follow you, who will be two levels lower than your own character - but since LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards is in effect, your cohort could still easily be more powerful than other members of the party, or even more powerful than ''you''.



* In the ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' sourcebook Cyberscape (a sourcebook about [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]]), you get that little gem: An implant called Nasal Filter. It does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, filtering any airborne harmful chemicals or bacterias, giving a +6 to Fortitude saves (i.e. good extra protection) against airborne poisons and disease (including tear gas). ButWaitTheresMore Its purchase DC is a mere 18 (meaning it can be purchased by any level one character) and it doesn't counts against implant limits (in the standard cybernetics rules, you can only have a limited number of implants, depending on how much constitution you have (that is to say how physically healthy you are). Far from a gamebreaker in a game where gas masks can be readily bought from the Internet, but still an implant you have no legitimate reason not to take, just in case.

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* In the ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' sourcebook Cyberscape (a sourcebook about [[{{Cyborg}} cybernetic implants]]), you get that little gem: An implant called Nasal Filter. It does ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, filtering any airborne harmful chemicals or bacterias, giving a +6 to Fortitude saves (i.e. good extra protection) against airborne poisons and disease (including tear gas). ButWaitTheresMore Its purchase DC is a mere 18 (meaning it can be purchased by any level one character) and it doesn't counts count against implant limits (in the standard cybernetics rules, you can only have a limited number of implants, depending on how much constitution you have (that is to say say, how physically healthy you are).are)). Far from a gamebreaker in a game where gas masks can be readily bought from the Internet, but still an implant you have no legitimate reason not to take, just in case.



* In 4th edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', the release of the Weapon Expertise and Implement feats was heralded by many screams and gnashing of teeth. Being a re-institution of the forbidden Unnamed Bonus (now a feat bonus under official errata) that, for just a Heroic feat, still scales into Paragon and Epic tiers. Widely remarked by [=CharOp=] superstars as making every class "have one less feat" for any character that does any attacking. What's even worse is that when you break the system in half and look at the gooey math, you can see that the +1 bonus at around the half-way point at all tiers is pretty much expected -- so in some ways, this is a GameBreaker that is pre-broken to be necessary (if one considers a 5% shift in accuracy to be necessary)! Some suspect that this was pretty much a patch to the game system, albeit one accomplished through a feat rather than through more permanent adjustments.

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* In 4th edition ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'', the release of the Weapon Expertise and Implement feats was heralded by many screams and gnashing of teeth. Being a re-institution of the forbidden Unnamed Bonus (now a feat bonus under official errata) that, for just a Heroic feat, still scales into Paragon and Epic tiers. Widely remarked by [=CharOp=] superstars as making every class "have one less feat" for any character that does any attacking. What's even worse is that when you break the system in half and look at the gooey math, you can see that the +1 bonus at around the half-way point at all tiers is pretty much expected -- so in some ways, this is a GameBreaker that is pre-broken to be necessary (if one considers a 5% shift in accuracy to be necessary)! Some suspect that this was pretty much a patch to the game system, albeit one accomplished through a feat rather than through more permanent adjustments.



*** All ''trait'' rolls (where it's just the trait in question, nothing else), so it's no good for things like skills or spellcasting. This is still very useful in the case of the Earth Ring. With a grand total of zero skills innately based on either Stamina or Willpower (okay, there's a couple niche rolls that use them, but no skill has either as its listed linked trait), pretty much every roll using either of those two will be a trait roll, especially since they're the game's resistance stats. This gets a little more delightful for minmaxers in that Touch of the Void, mentioned in the disadvantages section, involves a Willpower trait roll. Moreover, Friend of the Elements and Touch of the Void break roughly even with each other in terms of costs, and in the case of Phoenix Shugenja -- which aren't uncommon, given that having tons of shugenja is the Phoenix Clan's big thing, and as a player they're easily the most versatile shugenja option -- it's actually a net profit in terms of available EXP. This goes a little further in that Phoenix Shugenja also get a discount on the advantage that gives them access to Void spells, which means having potentially ''far'' more resources than normal with which to put the Friend of the Elements/Touch of the Void combination to use.

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*** All ''trait'' rolls (where it's just the trait in question, nothing else), so it's no good for things like skills or spellcasting. This is still very useful in the case of the Earth Ring. With a grand total of zero skills innately based on either Stamina or Willpower (okay, there's a couple niche rolls that use them, but no skill has either as its listed linked trait), pretty much every roll using either of those two will be a trait roll, especially since they're the game's resistance stats. This gets a little more delightful for minmaxers in that Touch of the Void, mentioned in the disadvantages section, involves a Willpower trait roll. Moreover, Friend of the Elements and Touch of the Void break roughly even with each other in terms of costs, and in the case of Phoenix Shugenja -- which aren't uncommon, given that having tons of shugenja is the Phoenix Clan's big thing, and as a player they're easily the most versatile shugenja option -- it's actually a net profit in terms of available EXP. This goes a little further in that Phoenix Shugenja also get a discount on the advantage that gives them access to Void spells, which means having potentially ''far'' more resources than normal with which to put the Friend of the Elements/Touch of the Void combination to use.







* In most ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games, a mounted or flying traits is this, since being mounted translates into extra mobility, the ability to re-move after certain actions, and perform rescue dropping actions effectively. Flying combines them with the ability to ignore terrains. Combined with several other factors, and lack of balancing factor between mounted and infantry units, the tier lists for practically every ''Fire Emblem'' games are dominated by Mounted and Flying units, with some utility and exceptional combat units appearing here and there.
** The Jugdral games have it worst. Genealogy have a massive maps, which resulted in mounted unit having complete dominance over the cast. Thracia is filled with obscenely broken staffs on both side to the point that at late game, there are only 2 kind of units, one with staff and high magic and one that don't.

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* In most ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games, a mounted or flying traits is this, since being mounted translates into extra mobility, the ability to re-move after certain actions, and perform rescue dropping actions effectively. efficiently. Flying combines them this with the ability to ignore terrains. terrain, at the cost of no terrain defense bonuses and being slaughtered by bows. Combined with several other factors, and lack of balancing factor factors between mounted and infantry units, and the tier lists for practically every ''Fire Emblem'' games are game is dominated by Mounted and Flying units, with some utility and exceptional combat units appearing here and there.
** The Jugdral games have it worst. Genealogy have a massive ''Genealogy'' has '''massive''' maps, which resulted in mounted unit units having complete dominance over the cast. Thracia ''Thracia'' is filled with obscenely broken staffs on both side sides, to the point that at the late game, there are only 2 kind of units, one ones with a staff rank and high magic and one ones that don't. don't have a staff rank.



** And, of course, the hugely powerful Monk + Double-Strike combo. At level 50 or so, these tend to deal ~200 damage ''per hit'' - a feat only [[GameBreaker matched by Cid]].

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** And, of course, the hugely powerful Monk + Double-Strike combo. At level 50 or so, these tend to deal ~200 damage ''per hit'' - a feat only [[GameBreaker matched by Cid]].



** ''[[VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2 A2]]'' {{nerf}}ed Concentration to a flat 5% accuracy bonus (as in 5% of 100%, not 5% of the current accuracy) and also made base accuracy for most physical attack 99% instead of tremendously varying by class. Though it has its own in [[ReducedManaCost Halve MP]] (because MP starts at 0 and grows each turn) or [[CastFromHitPoints Blood Price]] for any Magick-user.\\

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** ''[[VideoGame/FinalFantasyTacticsA2 A2]]'' {{nerf}}ed Concentration to a flat 5% accuracy bonus (as in 5% of 100%, not 5% of the current accuracy) and also made base accuracy for most physical attack attacks 99% instead of tremendously varying by class. Though it has its own in [[ReducedManaCost Halve MP]] (because MP starts at 0 and grows each turn) or [[CastFromHitPoints Blood Price]] for any Magick-user.\\
8th Apr '18 8:53:37 PM HighCrate
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* The 5th edition of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' saw a big boost to a class no one was expecting: [[SpoonyBard the bard]]. They're now full casters, can specialize in either magic or close combat, the former can pick and choose unique spells from other classes' lists to cherry pick the best ones, and are still incredibly versatile as ever, with great skill boosts. The latter give the player big boosts to melee letting them hang in there with the front line whilst providing their buffs to damage for the other combatants.
** The Sharpshooter and Great Weapon Master feats are generally considered to be the best in the game. They give you the ability to apply a -5 to your accuracy for +10 to damage. Since player damage usually increases by adding more attacks, the +10 usually doubles your damage output on average. Furthermore, Enemy HP scales much faster than Armor Class (essentially dodge rate), so at high levels, you'll usually still hit even with the -5. That's in addition to the other useful abilities these feats grant.
** The Variant Human. Unlike the MasterOfNone default Human, the Variant Human comes with any one feat of your choice. In addition to the above broken feats, you can get stuff like DiskOneNuke Heavy Armor Master, or the always useful Lucky.
** The Lucky feat as well, as the ability to have several free re-rolls every day is useful to just about everyone. There is never a wrong build to pick it on.


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* The 5th edition of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' saw a big boost to a class no one was expecting: [[SpoonyBard the bard]]. They're now full casters, can specialize in either magic or close combat, the former can pick and choose unique spells from other classes' lists to cherry pick the best ones, and are still incredibly versatile as ever, with great skill boosts. The latter give the player big boosts to melee letting them hang in there with the front line whilst providing their buffs to damage for the other combatants.
** The Sharpshooter and Great Weapon Master feats are generally considered to be the best in the game. They give you the ability to apply a -5 to your accuracy for +10 to damage. Since player damage usually increases by adding more attacks, the +10 usually doubles your damage output on average. Furthermore, Enemy HP scales much faster than Armor Class (essentially dodge rate), so at high levels, you'll usually still hit even with the -5. That's in addition to the other useful abilities these feats grant.
** The Variant Human. Unlike the MasterOfNone default Human, the Variant Human comes with any one feat of your choice. In addition to the above broken feats, you can get stuff like DiskOneNuke Heavy Armor Master, or the always useful Lucky.
**
''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'': The Lucky feat as well, as the feat. The ability to have several free re-rolls every day is would already be useful to just about everyone.everyone; to top it off, you can use it on rolls that you have disadvantage (roll two dice and pick the lowest roll) on, allowing you to roll a third time and pick the ''highest'', turning disadvantage into ''super''-advantage. There is never a wrong build to pick it on.




** This applies to flaws in pretty much any system where they raise their ugly head. In ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness oWoD]]'' games and ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' you can almost always pick a bunch of minor disadvantages that will never ever hinder you in actual play. In worse cases, these disadvantages actually give you justifications for being an asshole.
** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' does price its advantages higher than the point value of the opposite-number disadvantage, though, in an attempt to mitigate this (ie. to pile up on points from disadvantages you generally have to take severe ones.)
** The ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' games have a flaw system that averts this; you get no extra points at character creation for taking the flaw, the only way your flaw gives you EXP is if it actually affects you in a completely negative way ''in play''.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Deadlands}}'' did the same thing: Hindrances, as they were called, must come up in play to give you an advantage, though some of them were hysterically fun (like the one where your character [[GenreSavvy knows he's in a pen-and-paper RPG]] and is [[MediumAwareness paranoid about his "character sheet" burning up in a fire]].)
** ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' magazine had some of the best 3.5 flaws for this trope. One of them was called "No Familiar," for Sorcerers and Wizards, which was the same as a free feat with no drawbacks, since nobody ever used the familiar anyway (a weak creature that caused you to lose XP if it was killed.) If you actually did want your familiar for some reason, there was a feat that granted you a one with abilities based on your caster level instead of your class level, so if you were going into a Prestige class (and thanks to EmptyLevels, everyone went for prestige classes), this flaw-feat combo amounted to a free net advantage.
* In the ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'' sourcebook ''D20 Future'', there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires a bite attack to be taken), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost. In the same vein, Festering Sores is a mutation that covers your character's skin with festering sores. The effect is more aggravating than harmful, but it reduces an armor's max Dexterity bonus by 2 and increases armor penalties by 2. A fast hero with maxed out dexterity gains no benefits from armors anyway, so he/she might as well take this mutation. There is also "Neutrad Dependency" and "Poisonous blood". The first being a mutation that gives you 6 points and makes you roll fortitude saves or get Constitution damage unless you take a Neutrad dose every day (and taking a Neutrad dose fixes the damage), the second making your blood poison itself and requiring a daily [[MagicalAntidote Antitox dose]] or suffer the same effects, and gives you as many points. Sounds bad right? Except Neutrad and Antitox are cheap and freely available commodities (unless you play ''D20 Apocalypse'').

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** This applies to flaws in pretty much any system where they raise their ugly head. In ''[[TabletopGame/OldWorldOfDarkness oWoD]]'' games and ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' you can almost always pick a bunch of minor disadvantages that will never ever hinder you in actual play. In worse cases, these disadvantages actually give you justifications for being an asshole.
** ''TabletopGame/{{GURPS}}'' does price its advantages higher than
* ''TabletopGame/D20Modern'':In the point value of the opposite-number disadvantage, though, in an attempt to mitigate this (ie. to pile up on points from disadvantages you generally have to take severe ones.)
** The ''TabletopGame/NewWorldOfDarkness'' games have a flaw system that averts this; you get no extra points at character creation for taking the flaw, the only way your flaw gives you EXP is if it actually affects you in a completely negative way ''in play''.
** ''TabletopGame/{{Deadlands}}'' did the same thing: Hindrances, as they were called, must come up in play to give you an advantage, though some of them were hysterically fun (like the one where your character [[GenreSavvy knows he's in a pen-and-paper RPG]] and is [[MediumAwareness paranoid about his "character sheet" burning up in a fire]].)
** ''Magazine/{{Dragon}}'' magazine had some of the best 3.5 flaws for this trope. One of them was called "No Familiar," for Sorcerers and Wizards, which was the same as a free feat with no drawbacks, since nobody ever used the familiar anyway (a weak creature that caused you to lose XP if it was killed.) If you actually did want your familiar for some reason, there was a feat that granted you a one with abilities based on your caster level instead of your class level, so if you were going into a Prestige class (and thanks to EmptyLevels, everyone went for prestige classes), this flaw-feat combo amounted to a free net advantage.
* In the ''TabletopGame/D20Modern''
sourcebook ''D20 Future'', there are mutations. Mutations are point based, you gain points by choosing harmful mutations, and spend them in advantageous mutations. One advantageous mutation, fang, gives you a bite attack. The cost for this mutation is equal to the bonus points you gain blood hunger mutation (which requires a bite attack to be taken), that forces you to drink blood once a day from a living creature. All you need is a person willing to give you blood, and you get a close combat weapon no one can take away from you, at no cost. In the same vein, Festering Sores is a mutation that covers your character's skin with festering sores. The effect is more aggravating than harmful, but it reduces an armor's max Dexterity bonus by 2 and increases armor penalties by 2. A fast hero with maxed out dexterity gains no benefits from armors anyway, so he/she might as well take this mutation. There is also "Neutrad Dependency" and "Poisonous blood". The first being a mutation that gives you 6 points and makes you roll fortitude saves or get Constitution damage unless you take a Neutrad dose every day (and taking a Neutrad dose fixes the damage), the second making your blood poison itself and requiring a daily [[MagicalAntidote Antitox dose]] or suffer the same effects, and gives you as many points. Sounds bad right? Except Neutrad and Antitox are cheap and freely available commodities (unless you play ''D20 Apocalypse'').
8th Apr '18 5:31:10 PM SwordsageRagnar
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\n** The Lucky feat as well, as the ability to have several free re-rolls every day is useful to just about everyone. There is never a wrong build to pick it on.

1st Mar '18 4:39:30 AM Couran
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* The 5th edition of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' saw a big boost to a class no one was expecting: [[SpoonyBard the bard]]. They're now full casters, can pick and choose unique spells from other classes' lists to cherry pick the best ones, and are still incredibly versatile as ever, with great skill boosts and, if the player desires, competent hand-to-hand combatants.

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* The 5th edition of ''TabletopGame/DungeonsAndDragons'' saw a big boost to a class no one was expecting: [[SpoonyBard the bard]]. They're now full casters, can specialize in either magic or close combat, the former can pick and choose unique spells from other classes' lists to cherry pick the best ones, and are still incredibly versatile as ever, with great skill boosts and, if boosts. The latter give the player desires, competent hand-to-hand big boosts to melee letting them hang in there with the front line whilst providing their buffs to damage for the other combatants.
20th Feb '18 2:32:33 AM Cryoclaste
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* In most FireEmblem games, a mounted or flying traits is this, since being mounted translates into extra mobility, the ability to re-move after certain actions, and perform rescue dropping actions effectively. Flying combines them with the ability to ignore terrains. Combined with several other factors, and lack of balancing factor between mounted and infantry units, the tier lists for practically every Fire Emblem games are dominated by Mounted and Flying units, with some utility and exceptional combat units appearing here and there.

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* In most FireEmblem ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games, a mounted or flying traits is this, since being mounted translates into extra mobility, the ability to re-move after certain actions, and perform rescue dropping actions effectively. Flying combines them with the ability to ignore terrains. Combined with several other factors, and lack of balancing factor between mounted and infantry units, the tier lists for practically every Fire Emblem ''Fire Emblem'' games are dominated by Mounted and Flying units, with some utility and exceptional combat units appearing here and there.
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