History Main / MildlyMilitary

29th Apr '16 6:22:54 PM Pseudoname
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[[caption-width-right:350: Suffice to say, uniform code is lax.]]
29th Apr '16 1:41:45 PM SparkyLurkdragon
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* ''SkiesOfArcadia's'' Valuan Empire seems to avert this trope for the various mooks seen around. However the higher up the chain of the command you go the less militaristic it becomes. Seems that the Admirals are hand picked for their individual talents (or political connections) and once given command are free to do pretty much what they want to get the job done. Ramirez for example is Galcian's Vice-Captain at the start, dispite having no background in any military or sailing organizations, and then later given admiralship and command of his own fleet.

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* ''SkiesOfArcadia's'' ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia's'' Valuan Empire seems to avert this trope for the various mooks seen around. However the higher up the chain of the command you go the less militaristic it becomes. Seems that the Admirals are hand picked for their individual talents (or political connections) and once given command are free to do pretty much what they want to get the job done. Ramirez for example is Galcian's Vice-Captain at the start, dispite having no background in any military or sailing organizations, and then later given admiralship and command of his own fleet.
29th Apr '16 9:43:47 AM Tron80
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* Played with in ''Fanfic/TheSecondTry''. NERV is a semi-military organization, but Misato is very permissive with her subordinates despite of being a commanding officer. Gendo criticized her behavior when Shinji went against his orders.
22nd Apr '16 3:06:16 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* The military of ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'' is highly undisciplined. Hikaru and other pilots regularly talk back to their superior officers, even going so far as to insult them after being given simple orders. In addition Roy Focker openly carries on a romantic relationship with a superior officer throughout the series. Hikaru especially commits all sorts of insubordination, including deserting his post to watch a beauty contest. No one is ever reprimanded for this behavior. Considering that they are in a crisis (aka first contact with Aliens and a Space War) they probably let these things slide as they are minor compared to the bigger problems (aka giant hostile aliens).
** Averted in other ''Macross'' series: the military acts like the military and even minor infractions are dealt with harshly. It's repeatedly made clear that Isamu of ''Anime/MacrossPlus'' is toeing the line for a dishonorable discharge, and the only reason he hasn't been booted yet is his borderline-inhuman skill as a pilot. Gamlin, in ''Anime/{{Macross 7}}'', barely escapes a court martial after he strikes a superior officer. Everyone, including his own superiors, agreed that [[GeneralRipper said officer]] really deserved it, but that still didn't make it okay.

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* The military of ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'' is highly undisciplined. Hikaru and other pilots regularly talk back to their superior officers, even going so far as to insult them after being given simple orders. In addition addition, Roy Focker openly carries on a romantic relationship with a superior officer throughout the series. Hikaru especially commits all sorts of insubordination, including deserting his post to watch a beauty contest. No one is ever reprimanded for this behavior. Considering that they are in a crisis (aka first contact with Aliens aliens and a Space War) War), they probably let these things slide as they are minor compared to the bigger problems (aka giant hostile aliens).
aliens), especially since humanity is desperate for manpower as is.
** Averted in other ''Macross'' ''Anime/{{Macross}}'' series: the military acts like the military and even minor infractions are dealt with harshly. It's repeatedly made clear that Isamu of ''Anime/MacrossPlus'' is toeing the line for a dishonorable discharge, and the only reason he hasn't been booted yet is his borderline-inhuman skill as a pilot. Gamlin, in ''Anime/{{Macross 7}}'', barely escapes a court martial after he strikes a superior officer. Everyone, including his own superiors, agreed that [[GeneralRipper said officer]] really deserved it, but that still didn't make it okay.
10th Apr '16 6:20:43 PM ThraggLootrippa
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** Surprisingly averted in case of Dark Eldar, AlwaysChaoticEvil race with heavy case of ChronicBackstabbingDisorder. Whenever they are on the raid in material universe, discipline in a unit is absolute. [[PragmaticVillainy Might have something to do with]] the big nasty EldritchAbomination that has automatic claim on their souls upon death regardless of how said death occurred.

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** Surprisingly averted in case of Dark Eldar, AlwaysChaoticEvil race with heavy case of ChronicBackstabbingDisorder. Whenever they are on the raid in material universe, discipline in a unit is absolute. Whatever feuds the kabals have in their home is completely shelved until they come back to Commorragh and divvy up the slaves and loot. [[PragmaticVillainy Might have something to do with]] the big nasty EldritchAbomination that has automatic claim on their souls upon death regardless of how said death occurred.
6th Apr '16 9:24:37 AM molotov
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* In the U.S., high school JROTC (when not at a MilitarySchool) is often this. Even in the top ten percent of programs, there are units that don't even do a military salute. Same goes for other paramilitary organizations affiliated with the U.S. military aimed at youths - Sea Cadets, Civil Air Patrol...

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* In the U.S., high school JROTC (when not at a MilitarySchool) is often this. Even in the top ten percent of programs, there are units that don't even do a military salute.salute -- doesn't stop some ROTC people from giving off the opinion that they're super knowledgeable about warfare and trying to shout down people who know more than them, including people who have firsthand combat experience, just not with the US Military. Same goes for other paramilitary organizations affiliated with the U.S. military aimed at youths - Sea Cadets, Civil Air Patrol...
6th Apr '16 1:26:45 AM Tron80
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* Subverted in ''Fanfic/ThousandShinji''. NERV was pretty informal and disorganized, but Shinji changed that. Under his gradual influence, NERV became a more formal and serious military organization.
5th Apr '16 9:13:04 PM Bissek
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* While ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'' primarily takes place in a military academy, from the level of discipline showed by the typical student, you'd think that Thors was actually a high-end civilian high school whose faculty coincidentally happened to be almost entirely ex-military.
1st Apr '16 1:16:00 PM Morgenthaler
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*** The US Navy, yes. In some other navies (such as the 80s-era Soviet Navy) it was not uncommon to see junior officers personally handling repair jobs because the enlisted men, being poorly-trained conscripts, didn't have enough technical knowledge to do them.



*** Indeed. The infiltrators didn't do their research when they figured a [[spoiler:'safe' failure rate]]...that turned out to be a [[spoiler:huge improvement over normal troops.]]



** In other words, they're not too different from your average [[StarTrek Federation exploratory vessel.]]
** And their idea (and ''established procedure'') for most cautious behavior on a clearly [[DeathWorld environmentally hostile planet]] (that previously killed a starship of the same class) caused half of the crew to be incapacitated, and no less than a dozen dead. [[RedShirt Again, comparisons may be in order.]]



*** That said, the Rogues get called out on their behavior by General Salm - after utterly demolishing his three Y-Wing squadrons during a training exercise, one of the Rogues hacked into the bomber pilots' computers so the screens would flash the Rogue Squadron crest after a simulated death. Beyond that, Wedge lets the Rogues hog the entertainment facilities and gym, put more recreational equipment in their briefing room than the entire Officer's Lounge, and one of their number spends more time as a social secretary than training. Salm complains that the morale of his own squadrons is suffering, Wedge replies that his squadron is going to get the most difficult missions and will need to trust each other, and if this means they're cliquish, so be it.
*** Ironically, later in that same book Salm flirts with insubordination by taking the long way home after being ordered to quit an operation early, allowing him and his wing to turn around and [[BigDamnHeroes dramatically save]] Rogue Squadron when things went south. Salm talks with Wedge afterward and notes that it's exactly the sort of thing Wedge would have done, which is why he needs to be reported.
---->'''Salm:''' It doesn't matter that it worked. I'm not you. My people are not your people. The only thing that keeps my people alive out there is rigid adherence to discipline, and this discipline is instilled through consciously constructed drills that build them into a unit. My people lack the native talent in your squadron, but we make up for it because we cover for one another and watch out for each other.
---->'''Wedge:''' As you watched out for ''my'' people.
---->'''Salm:''' Yes, I did that, but only by disobeying an order from a superior officer. And you have to write it up that way.



*** Falynn Sandskimmer is a Wraith with multiple reprimands for insubordination, and Wedge muses that her attitude would have been fine during the days of the Rebel Alliance, but is out of place now that it's transformed into the New Republic and become much more formal. This was part of the reason Wedge founded Wraith Squadron in the first place, to come up with new tactics instead of stagnating like the Empire.
*** Should also be noted that "mildly military" is a status Rogue and Wraith Squadrons' members have to earn. "Iron Fist" features a scene with a new recruit barging into Wedge's office, who simply stares at him wordlessly until he remembers to pull himself to attention. The author notes that Wedge accepts laid back behavior from subordinates, but not when they're brand new recruits.



* The Night's Watch in ''ASongOfIceAndFire'', once you get to know them. Their numbers are, barely, kept adequate only through prisoners being sent their as a punishment in exchange for avoiding death, so this isn't a great surprise that many that even the volunteers and disciplined things are looser in certain areas.
* Britain's Aerial Corps in the ''{{Temeraire}}'' series. Almost all of it is justified by [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the nature of the series' dragons]]. Dragon riders are too rare and valuable to be court-martialed for anything short of treason. Dueling is prohibited for the same reason. One particularly useful breed of dragon will only choose female companions, so by the era the story is set in, women can and often do hold high rank and leadership positions in the Aerial Corps. Dragons generally refuse to serve with any human but a companion who was present at their hatching but some can be convinced to work with children of their original companion, so officers, even female officers, are encouraged to have children. The constantly rumpled, disheveled appearance of the aviators, though, is just because dragon riders tend to pack in a hurry.
** England's Royal Aerial Corps in the ''{{Temeraire}}'' series toes the line rather hard, but is ultimately a poor example. The main character is originally a naval captain, and is used to serving with the Navy's rigorous discipline and strong sense of duty. He finds the Aerial Corps and their dragon-riding crews to be lax in comparison, having relaxed standards of uniform and a less than total adherence to order. As more time passes, it becomes apparent that the Corps' informal nature is a function of building a military branch around dragons and their Captains, and its reputation for uncouth behavior is undeserved.
*** Laurence also notes that the harsh, Navy-style discipline he is used to would be counter-productive. Aerial crews are small, tightly-knit and trained from birth, and are so well-trained and self-disciplined that even his most junior ground crew members are the equivalent of Navy warrant officers.
* The airmen in ''{{Havemercy}}''. They all take orders from their captain Adamo, but there's no military rigor - just don't piss off Adamo too much, or you'll get "put on dog rations." This is justified, since when they're on the ground they're a mess, but up in the air they're [[PrecisionFStrike "so fucking deadly, so fucking precise."]] As for obeying th'Esar himself...it's not uncommon for them to spit on the ground at the mere mention of their esteemed ruler. They'll fight his war, but th'Esar walks a fine line of disciplining them and pleasing them so they'll keep fighting his war at all. This is the way things have to be, of course - men with weaker wills wouldn't be able to handle the dragons at all.

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* The Night's Watch in ''ASongOfIceAndFire'', ''Literature/ASongOfIceAndFire'', once you get to know them. Their numbers are, barely, kept adequate only through prisoners being sent their as a punishment in exchange for avoiding death, so this isn't a great surprise that many that even the volunteers and disciplined things are looser in certain areas.
* Britain's Aerial Corps in the ''{{Temeraire}}'' ''Literature/{{Temeraire}}'' series. Almost all of it is justified by [[OurDragonsAreDifferent the nature of the series' dragons]]. Dragon riders are too rare and valuable to be court-martialed for anything short of treason. Dueling is prohibited for the same reason. One particularly useful breed of dragon will only choose female companions, so by the era the story is set in, women can and often do hold high rank and leadership positions in the Aerial Corps. Dragons generally refuse to serve with any human but a companion who was present at their hatching but some can be convinced to work with children of their original companion, so officers, even female officers, are encouraged to have children. The constantly rumpled, disheveled appearance of the aviators, though, is just because dragon riders tend to pack in a hurry.
** England's Royal Aerial Corps in the ''{{Temeraire}}'' series toes the line rather hard, but is ultimately a poor example. The main character is originally a naval captain, and is used to serving with the Navy's rigorous discipline and strong sense of duty. He finds the Aerial Corps and their dragon-riding crews to be lax in comparison, having relaxed standards of uniform and a less than total adherence to order. As more time passes, it becomes apparent that the Corps' informal nature is a function of building a military branch around dragons and their Captains, and its reputation for uncouth behavior is undeserved.
*** Laurence also notes that the harsh, Navy-style discipline he is used to would be counter-productive. Aerial crews are small, tightly-knit and trained from birth, and are so well-trained and self-disciplined that even his most junior ground crew members are the equivalent of Navy warrant officers.
* The airmen in ''{{Havemercy}}''.''Literature/{{Havemercy}}''. They all take orders from their captain Adamo, but there's no military rigor - just don't piss off Adamo too much, or you'll get "put on dog rations." This is justified, since when they're on the ground they're a mess, but up in the air they're [[PrecisionFStrike "so fucking deadly, so fucking precise."]] As for obeying th'Esar himself...it's not uncommon for them to spit on the ground at the mere mention of their esteemed ruler. They'll fight his war, but th'Esar walks a fine line of disciplining them and pleasing them so they'll keep fighting his war at all. This is the way things have to be, of course - men with weaker wills wouldn't be able to handle the dragons at all.



* [[Series/StargateSG1 Stargate Command]] and the [[Series/StargateAtlantis Atlantis Expedition]] are relatively restrained versions of this trope. Make no mistake, they are very Mildly Military; but since both shows are GenreSavvy, this is lampshaded and explained. A GeneralRipper comments on his discomfort with an alien and an archaeologist being on a front-line Special Forces team. But the logic is that [[BunnyEarsLawyer since they get the job done they can get away with it]]. Atlantis is actually a bunch of civilians with a military contingent.
** In SG-1's case, it helps that O'Neill is a full colonel, which is an awful lot of officer for one 4-person team. He has enough legitimate authority to justify a lot.
** There's also the further justification that SG-1 has saved the Earth a few dozen times over, so they earn more slack as the seasons go on. On top of that, O'Neill was pulled out of retirement to lead SG-1, while Hammond was heading towards it when he got the SGC dropped on him, so that can explain their willingness to play more loosely with regulations - they both were about to retire, and if the powers that be want them to stick around...
*** Not only is O'Neill a full colonel, but a colonel with enough connections that, upon being told he's invited to a dinner with the U.S. President, can afford to reply "Do you know what they're having?" before accepting. Though he was probably just snarking, like always.
*** Richard Dean Anderson once asked Gen. John P. Jumper, who was Chief of Staff for the Air Force at the time, if he had any colonels who were as bad as O'Neill. Jumper replied that he has subordinates who are ''worse''.
** Still further justified in that SG-1 wasn't supposed to be a front-line team at all but a "first contact" team. They were intended to have the authority to represent the US government, divine the purpose of whatever inscrutable technology they found, read whatever foreboding runes were on their hosts' buildings, and hopefully have enough experience to take cover before they get shot at if it comes to that. When actual combat forces are required, the SGC has a number of combat SG teams (mostly Marines), as well as one or two other first contact teams, a number of science teams, support teams, technical teams, and so on.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' also justifies it as the expedition is primarily for science and research, with the military for protection. Being in different galaxy from their superiors on Earth also helps. The commander - Dr Elizabeth Weir - is actually a civilian diplomat so far less strict on hierarchy, and the primary team consists of Rodney a scientist, Carson a medical doctor, Teyla and Ronon two alien warriors and John an air force pilot. And a huge part of John's characterization is that the military don't trust him precisely ''because'' he's too rebellious and doesn't follow protocol. (He starts as exiled in Antarctica because of his disobedience and tarnished record.) [[note]]He was only brought on because Elizabeth picked him and she's still the only commander he really listens to. Plus he was originally out ranked by the by-the-book Colonel Sumner who was immediately killed off.[[/note]] In fact an ongoing conflict is that the recurring military characters (Bates, Caldwell, Ellis) follow protocol and so clash with the ragtag TrueCompanions of Atlantis.
** Completely justified in ''Series/StargateUniverse''. Icarus Base was strictly a research base, and a pretty laid back one at that; they just happened to have a military contingent in place, as is standard. Nobody was counting on the bad guys shooting up their base, their planet blowing up, and then getting stranded some unGodly distance from Earth onboard a rickety ship that they can't fully control. Add in the fact that they have to fend off power takeovers from within and hostile takeovers from without and it becomes really clear why SMOP (Standard Military Operating Procedure) went out the airlock.
*** At the very least, Telford is pretty fond of calling Young on his various mistakes/indiscretions, such as sleeping with a subordinate officer, to start. Young gets away with it because Telford was originally in command and the affair was never made public (more of an open secret since they broke it off). Now that he's on ''Destiny'', he can get away with it because they literally cannot replace him. This becomes more pronounced as the series went on and the people on ''Destiny'' realize that Earth can't really help them. After an ill-conceived plan almost destroys ''Destiny'', Colonel Young essentially walks out on General O'Neill, demonstrating that he is only going to be paying lip service to any orders from Earth.
* Largely averted in the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', where you have lots of characters shouting about hierarchy and such. In fact, however, temporary insubordination or inappropriate behaviour are forgotten quickly because StatusQuoIsGod. This seems justified given the near total annihilation of humanity and their situation creating in them a sense of family more than anything else, not to mention having been forced to dip increasingly into the civilian population over time to replace losses. They simply cannot afford to be entirely strict on such matters as they used to be. Even on a bad day they are a lot more military than many on this page though.

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* [[Series/StargateSG1 ''[[Series/StargateSG1 Stargate Command]] and the [[Series/StargateAtlantis Atlantis Expedition]] are relatively restrained versions of this trope. Make no mistake, they are very Mildly Military; but since both shows are GenreSavvy, this is lampshaded and explained. A GeneralRipper comments on his discomfort with an alien and an archaeologist being on a front-line Special Forces team. But the logic is that [[BunnyEarsLawyer since they get the job done they can get away with it]]. Atlantis is actually a bunch of civilians with a military contingent.
** In SG-1's case, it helps that O'Neill is a full colonel, which is an awful lot of officer for one 4-person team. He has enough legitimate authority to justify a lot.
** There's also the further justification that SG-1 has saved the Earth a few dozen times over, so they earn more slack as the seasons go on. On top of that, O'Neill was pulled out of retirement to lead SG-1, while Hammond was heading towards it when he got the SGC dropped on him, so that can explain their willingness to play more loosely with regulations - they both were about to retire, and if the powers that be want them to stick around...
*** Not only is O'Neill a full colonel, but a colonel with enough connections that, upon being told he's invited to a dinner with the U.S. President, can afford to reply "Do you know what they're having?" before accepting. Though he was probably just snarking, like always.
*** Richard Dean Anderson once asked Gen. John P. Jumper, who was Chief of Staff for the Air Force at the time, if he had any colonels who were as bad as O'Neill. Jumper replied that he has subordinates who are ''worse''.
** Still further justified in that SG-1 wasn't supposed to be a front-line team at all but a "first contact" team. They were intended to have the authority to represent the US government, divine the purpose of whatever inscrutable technology they found, read whatever foreboding runes were on their hosts' buildings, and hopefully have enough experience to take cover before they get shot at if it comes to that. When actual combat forces are required, the SGC has a number of combat SG teams (mostly Marines), as well as one or two other first contact teams, a number of science teams, support teams, technical teams, and so on.
** ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' also justifies it as the expedition is primarily for science and research, with the military for protection. Being in different galaxy from their superiors on Earth also helps. The commander - Dr Elizabeth Weir - is actually a civilian diplomat so far less strict on hierarchy, and the primary team consists of Rodney a scientist, Carson a medical doctor, Teyla and Ronon two alien warriors and John an air force pilot. And a huge part of John's characterization is that the military don't trust him precisely ''because'' he's too rebellious and doesn't follow protocol. (He starts as exiled in Antarctica because of his disobedience and tarnished record.) [[note]]He was only brought on because Elizabeth picked him and she's still the only commander he really listens to. Plus he was originally out ranked by the by-the-book Colonel Sumner who was immediately killed off.[[/note]] In fact an ongoing conflict is that the recurring military characters (Bates, Caldwell, Ellis) follow protocol and so clash with the ragtag TrueCompanions of Atlantis.
** Completely justified in
* ''Series/StargateUniverse''. Icarus Base was strictly a research base, and a pretty laid back one at that; they just happened to have a military contingent in place, as is standard. Nobody was counting on the bad guys shooting up their base, their planet blowing up, and then getting stranded some unGodly distance from Earth onboard a rickety ship that they can't fully control. Add in the fact that they have to fend off power takeovers from within and hostile takeovers from without and it becomes really clear why SMOP (Standard Military Operating Procedure) went out the airlock.
*** At the very least, Telford is pretty fond of calling Young on his various mistakes/indiscretions, such as sleeping with a subordinate officer, to start. Young gets away with it because Telford was originally in command and the affair was never made public (more of an open secret since they broke it off). Now that he's on ''Destiny'', he can get away with it because they literally cannot replace him. This becomes more pronounced as the series went on and the people on ''Destiny'' realize that Earth can't really help them. After an ill-conceived plan almost destroys ''Destiny'', Colonel Young essentially walks out on General O'Neill, demonstrating that he is only going to be paying lip service to any orders from Earth.
* Largely averted in the new ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|2003}}'', where you have Galactica|2003}}'':
** There are
lots of characters shouting about hierarchy and such. In fact, however, temporary insubordination or inappropriate behaviour are forgotten quickly because StatusQuoIsGod. This seems justified given the near total annihilation of humanity and their situation creating in them a sense of family more than anything else, not to mention having been forced to dip increasingly into the civilian population over time to replace losses. They simply cannot afford to be entirely strict on such matters as they used to be. Even on a bad day they are a lot more military than many on this page though.



*** This realization, long before it was voiced by Lee, as well as the influx of civilians onto the ship and into the military likely explain why Galactica gets more and more mild as time goes by. In S3 they even open a bar on the ship. Which, with the destruction of ''Cloud Nine'', might be the only bar left in existence.
*** The appearance of ''Pegasus'' with its tough-as-nails discipline also contrasts with the mild conditions of ''Galactica''.
** It's also worth noting that even before the Cylon attack, things were loose on the Galactica, in some ways even looser than they would be during the first two seasons of the show. The Galactica was in the process of being decommissioned, so a blind eye was turned to some things that wouldn't be tolerated at another post. Colonel Tigh explicitly states this when he calls out Boomer for fraternizing with an enlisted man.



* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'''s Imperial Guard is infamous for using [[ThePoliticalOfficer summary executions]] to ensure discipline, but commanders tend to offer more leeway to Sentinel pilots. These soldiers use their bipedal MiniMecha to scout for enemy positions and support the rest of the regiment, and are accustomed to acting on their own initiative and operating unsupervised. As such, Imperial commanders usually tolerate Sentinel squadrons advancing without orders and don't try to pin them down with a specific battle-plan.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Warhammer 40000}}'''s 40000}}'':
** The
Imperial Guard is infamous for using [[ThePoliticalOfficer summary executions]] to ensure discipline, but commanders tend to offer more leeway to Sentinel pilots. These soldiers use their bipedal MiniMecha to scout for enemy positions and support the rest of the regiment, and are accustomed to acting on their own initiative and operating unsupervised. As such, Imperial commanders usually tolerate Sentinel squadrons advancing without orders and don't try to pin them down with a specific battle-plan.



* The Terran armies in ''{{Starcraft}}'', both games. Then again, given that most of the line troops consist of repurposed criminals, this is hardly surprising.
** Justified with Raynor's Raiders, at least, since they're a rebel organization and wouldn't really have a well organized hierarchy anyway.

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* The Terran armies in ''{{Starcraft}}'', ''VideoGame/{{Starcraft}}'', both games. Then again, given that most of the line troops consist of repurposed criminals, this is hardly surprising.
** Justified with Raynor's Raiders, at least, since they're a rebel organization and wouldn't really have a well organized hierarchy anyway.
surprising.
25th Mar '16 7:55:22 PM ChesterPolarbear
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* This trope applies to the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fLTh0IVOkQ Crest Cavity Patrol]] since they're at war with the Cavity Creeps.

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* This trope applies to the [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0fLTh0IVOkQ Crest Cavity Patrol]] since they're at war with fighting the Cavity Creeps.
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