History Main / MildlyMilitary

11th Dec '17 2:35:24 PM Overfiend
Is there an issue? Send a Message
11th Dec '17 2:33:54 PM Overfiend
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''ComicBook/ G.I.Joe:'' : is, as we all know, "America's Highly Trained Special Mission Force", consisting of the elite of the nation's armed forces. As such, Joes enjoy privileges like extremely lax uniform and grooming regulations. Joes sporting full beards, non-regulation haircuts and battle togs including baseball caps,sports jerseys, blue jeans, sunglasses and/or full face masks are pretty much par for the course. But the most egregious breach of military protocol is arguably the Joes extremely loose observation of chain of command. Three star army General Clayton "Hawk" Abernathy, by virtue of his appropriately high rank, pretty much averts this as the overall Commander and head honcho of the team. But Duke, G.I. Joe's First Sergeant, despite never accepting a promotion to a rank higher than E-8 (Enlisted), is nevertheless universally recognized as Hawk's immediate second in command and not only gives orders to officers such as fighter pilot Ace and Green Beret lieutenant Falcon, but also seamlessly assumes command if Hawk is ever missing, indisposed, or otherwise unavailable. Warrant Officer Flint, Hawk's designated third in command, is also guilty of this to a lesser degree.

to:

* ''ComicBook/ G.''ComicBook/G.I.Joe:'' Joe'' : is, as we all know, "America's Highly Trained Special Mission Force", consisting of the elite of the nation's armed forces. As such, Joes enjoy privileges like extremely lax uniform and grooming regulations. Joes sporting full beards, non-regulation haircuts and battle togs including baseball caps,sports jerseys, blue jeans, sunglasses and/or full face masks are pretty much par for the course. But the most egregious breach of military protocol is arguably the Joes extremely loose observation of chain of command. Three star army General Clayton "Hawk" Abernathy, by virtue of his appropriately high rank, pretty much averts this as the overall Commander and head honcho of the team. But Duke, G.I. Joe's First Sergeant, despite never accepting a promotion to a rank higher than E-8 (Enlisted), is nevertheless universally recognized as Hawk's immediate second in command and not only gives orders to officers such as fighter pilot Ace and Green Beret lieutenant Falcon, but also seamlessly assumes command if Hawk is ever missing, indisposed, or otherwise unavailable. Warrant Officer Flint, Hawk's designated third in command, is also guilty of this to a lesser degree.
11th Dec '17 2:32:19 PM Overfiend
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''ComicBook/G.I.Joe:'' : is, as we all know, "America's Highly Trained Special Mission Force", consisting of the elite of the nation's armed forces. As such, Joes enjoy privileges like extremely lax uniform and grooming regulations. Joes sporting full beards, non-regulation haircuts and battle togs including baseball caps,sports jerseys, blue jeans, sunglasses and/or full face masks are pretty much par for the course. But the most egregious breach of military protocol is arguably the Joes extremely loose observation of chain of command. Three star army General Clayton "Hawk" Abernathy, by virtue of his appropriately high rank, pretty much averts this as the overall Commander and head honcho of the team. But Duke, G.I. Joe's First Sergeant, despite never accepting a promotion to a rank higher than E-8 (Enlisted), is nevertheless universally recognized as Hawk's immediate second in command and not only gives orders to officers such as fighter pilot Ace and Green Beret lieutenant Falcon, but also seamlessly assumes command if Hawk is ever missing, indisposed, or otherwise unavailable. Warrant Officer Flint, Hawk's designated third in command, is also guilty of this to a lesser degree.

to:

* ''ComicBook/G.''ComicBook/ G.I.Joe:'' : is, as we all know, "America's Highly Trained Special Mission Force", consisting of the elite of the nation's armed forces. As such, Joes enjoy privileges like extremely lax uniform and grooming regulations. Joes sporting full beards, non-regulation haircuts and battle togs including baseball caps,sports jerseys, blue jeans, sunglasses and/or full face masks are pretty much par for the course. But the most egregious breach of military protocol is arguably the Joes extremely loose observation of chain of command. Three star army General Clayton "Hawk" Abernathy, by virtue of his appropriately high rank, pretty much averts this as the overall Commander and head honcho of the team. But Duke, G.I. Joe's First Sergeant, despite never accepting a promotion to a rank higher than E-8 (Enlisted), is nevertheless universally recognized as Hawk's immediate second in command and not only gives orders to officers such as fighter pilot Ace and Green Beret lieutenant Falcon, but also seamlessly assumes command if Hawk is ever missing, indisposed, or otherwise unavailable. Warrant Officer Flint, Hawk's designated third in command, is also guilty of this to a lesser degree.
11th Dec '17 2:31:34 PM Overfiend
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ''ComicBook/G.I.Joe:'' : is, as we all know, "America's Highly Trained Special Mission Force", consisting of the elite of the nation's armed forces. As such, Joes enjoy privileges like extremely lax uniform and grooming regulations. Joes sporting full beards, non-regulation haircuts and battle togs including baseball caps,sports jerseys, blue jeans, sunglasses and/or full face masks are pretty much par for the course. But the most egregious breach of military protocol is arguably the Joes extremely loose observation of chain of command. Three star army General Clayton "Hawk" Abernathy, by virtue of his appropriately high rank, pretty much averts this as the overall Commander and head honcho of the team. But Duke, G.I. Joe's First Sergeant, despite never accepting a promotion to a rank higher than E-8 (Enlisted), is nevertheless universally recognized as Hawk's immediate second in command and not only gives orders to officers such as fighter pilot Ace and Green Beret lieutenant Falcon, but also seamlessly assumes command if Hawk is ever missing, indisposed, or otherwise unavailable. Warrant Officer Flint, Hawk's designated third in command, is also guilty of this to a lesser degree.
30th Nov '17 2:59:47 PM CrypticMirror
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ''Series/{{Quincy}}'': In the "Holding Pattern" episode, a plane is hijacked with terrorists [[HostageSituation making demands with hostages on board]]. When the plane lands at LAX, it's found out that there's a deadly virus on board. Dr. Quincy's [[HomeGuard Naval Reserve status]] is reactivated and his mission is to find an antidote. He carries out his mission in civilian clothing.

to:

* ''Series/{{Quincy}}'': ''Series/QuincyME'': In the "Holding Pattern" episode, a plane is hijacked with terrorists [[HostageSituation making demands with hostages on board]]. When the plane lands at LAX, it's found out that there's a deadly virus on board. Dr. Quincy's [[HomeGuard Naval Reserve status]] is reactivated and his mission is to find an antidote. He carries out his mission in civilian clothing.
27th Nov '17 5:54:16 AM TheDocCC
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* MassEffectParagonLost shows a marine blatantly sexually harassing another marine as well as her violent retaliation in front of their CO without any consequences other than him being humiliated that she "shot him down." Rank barely seems to matter, the marines bicker about routine orders, and civilians are brought along on a mission without much concern. Given that the ME universe is usually shown to be remarkably egalitarian, it portrays the Alliance Marines as anything but the disciplined force we're told they are throughout the video games and other media.
26th Nov '17 7:10:17 PM Tacitus
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Imperial Guard often sees PDF units are this. Their lack of discipline, morale and combat ability can usually be attributed to lack of combat experience, training and communication equipment.
** Orks and Chaos are not particularly well organized. The Orks at least have the excuse that they're a barbarian culture; Chaos marines ''used'' to have the discipline of loyal Marines, but they've become more dedicated to personal ambition than the common interest over their time in a place where sufficient ambition can be rewarded with daemonic ascension, meaning that Chaos Marines are slightly more individually powerful than loyal Space Marines, but as a whole they lack the tactical advantages of loyalists such as the ability to make disciplined withdrawals (as opposed to just running away to preserve their own skin, as Chaos tends to do).
*** The orks do have one exception: Stormboyz are orks who maintain such discipline as they can, march around in goosestep and PuttingOnTheReich uniforms, viewing the rest of their species as degenerate rabble. The rest of their species thinks they're idiots, but since they're the only ones crazy enough to strap homemade rokkits to their packs as jetpacks...
** Surprisingly averted in case of Dark Eldar, AlwaysChaoticEvil race with heavy case of ChronicBackstabbingDisorder. Whenever they are on the raid in material universe, discipline in a unit is absolute. Whatever feuds the kabals have in their home is completely shelved until they come back to Commorragh and divvy up the slaves and loot. [[PragmaticVillainy Might have something to do with]] the big nasty EldritchAbomination that has automatic claim on their souls upon death regardless of how said death occurred.
** Played totally straight by the Craftworld Eldar, however. Though your average Aspect Warrior or Guardian will defer to the advice of an [[FourStarBadass Autarch]], a [[CombatClairvoyance Farseer]] or an [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Exarch]], they have no rigid ranking structure as we understand. The PsychicLink they all share seems to compensate.

to:

** Imperial Guard often sees PDF Planetary Defense Force units are this. Their lack of discipline, morale and combat ability can usually be attributed to lack of combat experience, training and communication equipment.
** Orks and Chaos are not particularly well organized. The Orks at least have the excuse that they're a barbarian culture; Chaos marines ''used'' to have culture functioning solely on the discipline principle of loyal Marines, but they've become more dedicated to personal ambition than the common interest over MightMakesRight, so their time in units are explicitly called "mobs" held together by a place where sufficient ambition can be rewarded Nob's gnarled green fist, and the only thing keeping a greenskin army fighting together (instead of fighting each other) is the promise of an enemy to fight. The sole exception are the so-called Stormboyz, Orks obsessed with daemonic ascension, meaning that Chaos Marines are slightly more individually powerful than loyal Space Marines, but as a whole they lack the tactical advantages of loyalists such as the ability to make disciplined withdrawals (as opposed to just running away to preserve their own skin, as Chaos tends to do).
*** The orks do have one exception: Stormboyz are orks who maintain such discipline as they can, march
unit discipline, marching around in goosestep goosestep, and PuttingOnTheReich uniforms, viewing with standardized uniforms. Other Orks consider them cultural deviants, but put up with the rest of their species as degenerate rabble. The rest of their species thinks they're idiots, but Stormboyz since they're the only ones crazy enough to strap homemade rokkits to onto their packs backs as jetpacks...
crude jet packs, and it's always a good laugh when one explodes mid-flight.
** One of the signs of how far Chaos Space Marines have fallen is that they lack the discipline of loyalist Astartes, and are instead more concerned about their own ambitions and potential ascension to daemonhood than the good of the army as a whole. While loyalist Space Marines have the "And They Shall Know No Fear" special rule that means they always make a TacticalWithdrawal and regroup after falling back, Chaos Space Marines can be routed and driven from the battlefield.
** The Craftworld Eldar's army consists of a core of Aspect Warriors obsessively dedicated to one facet of warfare, backed by Guardian units that are basically militia. They don't have a formal ranking structure as outsiders would understand, but with leaders like [[FourStarBadass Autarchs]] a [[CombatClairvoyance Farseers]], who can command with the experience of centuries of combat or maintain a PsychicLink through the entire army, they're still one of the most dangerous forces in the galaxy.
** Surprisingly averted in case of Dark Eldar, an AlwaysChaoticEvil race with heavy case of ChronicBackstabbingDisorder. Whenever Their society is dependent upon slave labor and captured souls, so whenever they are on the raid in material universe, [[PragmaticVillainy discipline in a unit is absolute. Whatever absolute, and whatever feuds the kabals have in their back home is are completely shelved until they come back return to Commorragh and divvy up the slaves and loot. [[PragmaticVillainy Might have something to do with]] the big nasty EldritchAbomination that has automatic claim on their souls upon death regardless of how said death occurred.
** Played totally straight by the Craftworld Eldar, however. Though your average Aspect Warrior or Guardian will defer to the advice of an [[FourStarBadass Autarch]], a [[CombatClairvoyance Farseer]] or an [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Exarch]], they have no rigid ranking structure as we understand. The PsychicLink they all share seems to compensate.
spoils.]]
23rd Nov '17 7:03:02 PM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[Literature/{{Worldwar}} Colonization]]'' trilogy, the US military responds to two officers being overly curious about their new space station by simply telling them "It's classified"... Actually, no. The word "classified" is never even spoken (in fact, both officers muse that being told that by a superior officer would be taken in stride and obeyed). Instead, the officers are ''threatened'' and, when that doesn't work, attempts on the life of one of them are made. Only one person actually orders them to stop their investigation... but he's not even in their chain of command, so he's not authorized to give them orders (Sam Yeager is an Army colonel, while Curtis [=LeMay=] is an Air Force general). One of the officers, an astronaut, tricks his way aboard the space station... only for the station's commander to seriously contemplate [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spacing him]]. Oh, and the secret wasn't even that big to begin with and is revealed in short order anyway. Additionally, the astronaut is then told he CantGoHomeAgain, although this is partially justified by the mission parameters. Considering the whole series is supposed to be military science fiction, it's surprising that Turtledove would get this so spectacularly wrong.

to:

* In Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[Literature/{{Worldwar}} Colonization]]'' trilogy, the US military responds to two officers being overly curious about their new space station by simply telling them "It's classified"... Actually, no. The word "classified" is never even spoken (in fact, both officers muse that being told that by a superior officer would be taken in stride and obeyed). Instead, the officers are ''threatened'' and, when that doesn't work, attempts on the life of one of them are made. Only one person actually orders them to stop their investigation... but he's not even in their chain of command, so he's not authorized to give them orders (Sam Yeager is an Army colonel, while Curtis [=LeMay=] is an Air Force general). One of the officers, an astronaut, tricks his way aboard the space station... only for the station's commander to seriously contemplate [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spacing him]]. Oh, and the secret wasn't even that big to begin with and is revealed in short order anyway. Additionally, the astronaut is then told he CantGoHomeAgain, YouCantGoHomeAgain, although this is partially justified by the mission parameters. Considering the whole series is supposed to be military science fiction, it's surprising that Turtledove would get this so spectacularly wrong.
23rd Nov '17 7:02:25 PM WillBGood
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* In Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[Literature/{{Worldwar}} Colonization]]'' trilogy, the US military responds to two officers being overly curious about their new space station by simply telling them "It's classified"... Actually, no. The word "classified" is never even spoken (in fact, both officers muse that being told that by a superior officer would be taken in stride and obeyed). Instead, the officers are ''threatened'' and, when that doesn't work, attempts on the life of one of them are made. Only one person actually orders them to stop their investigation... but he's not even in their chain of command, so he's not authorized to give them orders (Sam Yeager is an Army colonel, while Curtis [=LeMay=] is an Air Force general). One of the officers, an astronaut, tricks his way aboard the space station... only for the station's commander to seriously contemplate [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spacing him]]. Oh, and the secret wasn't even that big to begin with and is revealed in short order anyway. Additionally, the astronaut is then told he can NeverGoHomeAgain, although this is partially justified by the mission parameters. Considering the whole series is supposed to be military science fiction, it's surprising that Turtledove would get this so spectacularly wrong.

to:

* In Creator/HarryTurtledove's ''[[Literature/{{Worldwar}} Colonization]]'' trilogy, the US military responds to two officers being overly curious about their new space station by simply telling them "It's classified"... Actually, no. The word "classified" is never even spoken (in fact, both officers muse that being told that by a superior officer would be taken in stride and obeyed). Instead, the officers are ''threatened'' and, when that doesn't work, attempts on the life of one of them are made. Only one person actually orders them to stop their investigation... but he's not even in their chain of command, so he's not authorized to give them orders (Sam Yeager is an Army colonel, while Curtis [=LeMay=] is an Air Force general). One of the officers, an astronaut, tricks his way aboard the space station... only for the station's commander to seriously contemplate [[ThrownOutTheAirlock spacing him]]. Oh, and the secret wasn't even that big to begin with and is revealed in short order anyway. Additionally, the astronaut is then told he can NeverGoHomeAgain, CantGoHomeAgain, although this is partially justified by the mission parameters. Considering the whole series is supposed to be military science fiction, it's surprising that Turtledove would get this so spectacularly wrong.
18th Nov '17 8:31:14 PM CurledUpWithDakka
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** Technically the only forces deployed to Vietnam were supposed to be active duty units, including such elite ones as the 1st Infantry, 1st Cavalry and 101st Airborne Divisions. A few Army National Guard combat battalions (precisely - two artillery battalions, one engineer company and a single infantry ([[{{Ranger}} Long Range Patrol]]) company) got deployed at the height of the war in terms of US troops deployed, but those were the exception that proved the rule. Actually, serving in the National Guard was considered somewhat akin to the {{DraftDodging}} for most of the war duration.

to:

*** Technically the only forces deployed to Vietnam were supposed to be active duty units, including such elite ones as the 1st Infantry, 1st Cavalry and 101st Airborne Divisions. A few Army National Guard combat battalions (precisely - two artillery battalions, one engineer company and a single infantry ([[{{Ranger}} Long Range Patrol]]) company) got deployed at the height of the war in terms of US troops deployed, but those were the exception that proved the rule. Actually, serving in the National Guard was considered somewhat akin to the {{DraftDodging}} DraftDodging for most of the war duration.
This list shows the last 10 events of 358. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MildlyMilitary