History Main / MildlyMilitary

20th Mar '17 5:45:08 AM Bissek
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* While ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'' primarily takes place in a military academy, from the level of discipline showed by the typical student, you'd think that Thors was actually a high-end civilian high school whose faculty coincidentally happened to be almost entirely ex-military.

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* While ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfHeroesTrailsOfColdSteel'' primarily takes place in a military academy, from the level of discipline showed by the typical student, you'd think that Thors was actually a high-end civilian high school whose faculty coincidentally happened to be almost entirely ex-military. There is no mention of PT, drills, or training exercises beyond duels supervised by the combat instructor. It's even mentioned that only 40% of graduates actually go into a military career (despite the fact that producing junior officers is the point of a military academy), and a good chunk of them go into the provincial armies rather than the national army.
11th Mar '17 11:27:05 PM Knock29
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* Most police forces. They have military ranks and follow many military ways, but are supposed to be a civilian force (in Britain they are now called a "service" instead of a "force" but...). Unfortunately, in the U.S., because of "the [[DrugsAreBad War on Drugs]]" and "TheWarOnTerror", for the past 25 years or so they have become more and more militarized.

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* Most police forces. They have military ranks and follow many military ways, but are supposed to be a civilian force (in Britain they are now called a "service" instead of a "force" but...). Unfortunately, in the U.S., because of "the [[DrugsAreBad War on Drugs]]" and "TheWarOnTerror", for the past 25 years or so they have become more and more militarized.militarized and the training or reforms that can help reduce unintended incidents and outrage is just not there.
7th Mar '17 1:54:18 PM Discar
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* The military of ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'' is highly undisciplined. Hikaru and other pilots regularly talk back to their superior officers, even going so far as to insult them after being given simple orders. In addition, Roy Focker openly carries on a romantic relationship with a superior officer throughout the series. Hikaru especially commits all sorts of insubordination, including deserting his post to watch a beauty contest. No one is ever reprimanded for this behavior. Considering that they are in a crisis (aka first contact with aliens and a Space War), they probably let these things slide as they are minor compared to the bigger problems (aka giant hostile aliens), especially since humanity is desperate for manpower as is.

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* ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'':
**
The military of ''Anime/SuperDimensionFortressMacross'' is highly undisciplined. Hikaru and other pilots regularly talk back to their superior officers, even going so far as to insult them after being given simple orders. In addition, Roy Focker openly carries on a romantic relationship with a superior officer throughout the series. Hikaru especially commits all sorts of insubordination, including deserting his post to watch a beauty contest. No one is ever reprimanded for this behavior. Considering that they are in a crisis (aka first contact with aliens and a Space War), they probably let these things slide as they are minor compared to the bigger problems (aka giant hostile aliens), especially since humanity is desperate for manpower as is.



* The {{Ninja}} organizations in ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' serve as the setting's military forces, albeit more of the "special" variety. The creator has said that one of his inspirations for the village of Konoha was a military base located nearby his childhood home. Many ninja are...[[BunnyEarsLawyer odd]], [[ChildSoldiers there are plenty of 12-year old ninja]] (although [[TykeBomb Naruto and Gaara]] at least are both power equivalents to nuclear weapons even ''before'' much training on their part), and of all the teen main characters, roughly two of them actually wear their village's uniform.

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* ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'':
**
The {{Ninja}} organizations in ''Manga/{{Naruto}}'' serve as the setting's military forces, albeit more of the "special" variety. The creator has said that one of his inspirations for the village of Konoha was a military base located nearby his childhood home. Many ninja are...[[BunnyEarsLawyer odd]], [[ChildSoldiers there are plenty of 12-year old ninja]] (although [[TykeBomb Naruto and Gaara]] at least are both power equivalents to nuclear weapons even ''before'' much training on their part), and of all the teen main characters, roughly two of them actually wear their village's uniform.



* Varies by character in the ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BaitAndSwitchSTO''. Captain Kanril Eleya nearly always calls her command staff by their first names, and though she follows a semblance of military discipline when speaking to superiors she also isn't afraid to speak her mind. Her first officer [[InSeriesNickname Tess]] Phohl has two modes. She's perfectly professional when speaking as first officer, but when speaking as Eleya's best friend they chitchat informally about everything from holonovels to Eleya's sex life. Her science officer Birail Riyannis doesn't bother with it at all, even on duty.
** Specifically called out in the short "Fanfic/{{Downbelow}}". It turns out it's Eleya's preference to run a loose ship, but that's contingent on the work getting done. In an address to the crew she threatens to dock weeks of pay from entire sections if individual crew are caught shirking combat drills.

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* Varies by character in the ''VideoGame/StarTrekOnline'' fanfic ''Fanfic/BaitAndSwitchSTO''. Captain Kanril Eleya nearly always calls her command staff by their first names, and though she follows a semblance of military discipline when speaking to superiors she also isn't afraid to speak her mind. Her first officer [[InSeriesNickname Tess]] Phohl has two modes. She's perfectly professional when speaking as first officer, but when speaking as Eleya's best friend they chitchat informally about everything from holonovels to Eleya's sex life. Her science officer Birail Riyannis doesn't bother with it at all, even on duty.
**
duty. Specifically called out in the short "Fanfic/{{Downbelow}}". It turns out it's Eleya's preference to run a loose ship, but that's contingent on the work getting done. In an address to the crew she threatens to dock weeks of pay from entire sections if individual crew are caught shirking combat drills.



* James Cameron has admitted that the {{Space Marine}}s in ''Film/{{Aliens}}'' came off as a lot less disciplined than actual Marines; rather, they were more a reflection of Vietnam-era regular Army conscripts. Some specific examples:

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* ''Film/{{Aliens}}'':
**
James Cameron has admitted that the {{Space Marine}}s in ''Film/{{Aliens}}'' came off as a lot less disciplined than actual Marines; rather, they were more a reflection of Vietnam-era regular Army conscripts. Some specific examples:



* ''Film/TheATeam'' wasn't particularly interested in "spit and polish", but being a Special Forces style group with a good track record they were given a lot of slack up until they were framed for stealing money printing press plates.
** The rest of the military is mildly military in this movie. Face spends at least six years as a first lieutenant for some reason when in real life, he wouldn't have that rank more than two years before receiving a promotion to captain.

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* ''Film/TheATeam'' wasn't particularly interested in "spit and polish", but being a Special Forces style group with a good track record they were given a lot of slack up until they were framed for stealing money printing press plates.
**
plates. The rest of the military is mildly military in this movie. Face spends at least six years as a first lieutenant for some reason when in real life, he wouldn't have that rank more than two years before receiving a promotion to captain.



* ''Film/PacificRim'': Stacker's "last hurrah", by del Toro's design (he's a pacifist). Noticeably, he stops wearing a uniform and switches to a civilian suit, albeit one that looks a lot like his uniform. The closest thing they have to a command structure is him as "Marshall", then Mako in an unranked secondary role, and that's about it.
** [[AllThereInTheManual Supplemental material]] goes into a little more detail, explaining multiple divisions and some of the intricacies of how they interact. Mako would appear to be the "Kwoon Fightmaster", in charge of combat training. The organization itself is the Pan-Pacific Defense Corps.

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* ''Film/PacificRim'': Stacker's "last hurrah", by del Toro's design (he's a pacifist). Noticeably, he stops wearing a uniform and switches to a civilian suit, albeit one that looks a lot like his uniform. The closest thing they have to a command structure is him as "Marshall", then Mako in an unranked secondary role, and that's about it.
**
it. [[AllThereInTheManual Supplemental material]] goes into a little more detail, explaining multiple divisions and some of the intricacies of how they interact. Mako would appear to be the "Kwoon Fightmaster", in charge of combat training. The organization itself is the Pan-Pacific Defense Corps.



** Another one goes like this: "American and Russian submarines run into each other in the Pacific. They surface to give salute. American submarine sonar operator hears yelling from Russian sub: "Who threw a boot on the controls? Who the fuck threw a boot on controls?" American Captain tells Russians: "In the US we would never have such problem!" Russian Captain replies: "There is no such thing as US no more, WHO THE FUCK THREW A BOOT ON THE CONTROLS?!"

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** * Another one goes like this: "American and Russian submarines run into each other in the Pacific. They surface to give salute. American submarine sonar operator hears yelling from Russian sub: "Who threw a boot on the controls? Who the fuck threw a boot on controls?" American Captain tells Russians: "In the US we would never have such problem!" Russian Captain replies: "There is no such thing as US no more, WHO THE FUCK THREW A BOOT ON THE CONTROLS?!"



* The way the Global Defense Initiative is represented in the terrible official {{Novelization}} of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer: Tiberium Wars'' is appalling. Among other things, it had a Private being promoted to Sergeant ''on his first day'' out of boot camp, when he showed no exceptional skill or capability worth promoting him.
** Not just that, but that apparently the chain of promotion in the GDI military goes from private to sergeant... straight to lieutenant to captain (then possibly major). The only corporal in the book is a technician. One would get the the impression that the author got all of his knowledge of military hierarchy from skimming a few war movies.
** At least it's mentioned that Vega got promoted on his first day mostly to boost morale than because of anything he did. In fact, his immediate superior fought ''against'' the promotion, as Vega's achievements were based either on pure luck or skills he earned prior to joining the military (although it's not entirely clear why the second reason is bad). He is also promoted over much more experienced soldiers in his platoon, which triggers a lot of anger and resentment among them, having the exact opposite effect that the morale boost was supposed to achieve.
* The Possiltum military seen in the early ''Literature/MythAdventures'' novels is underfunded and undertrained, so it's {{justified|Trope}} that they're insubordinate and incompetent. Later, though, an enormous and highly successful Mob-trained army is assimilated into Possiltum's, and we see it from the inside ... and the viewpoint character who infiltrates it is insubordinate, makes trouble with civilians, hires civilians to perform military duties without authorization, ignores paperwork and willfully violates orders. The result? ''Repeated promotions for "showing initiative."'' WTF?

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* The way the Global Defense Initiative is represented in the terrible official {{Novelization}} of ''VideoGame/CommandAndConquer: Tiberium Wars'' is appalling. Among other things, it had a Private being promoted to Sergeant ''on his first day'' out of boot camp, when he showed no exceptional skill or capability worth promoting him.
**
him. Not just that, but that apparently the chain of promotion in the GDI military goes from private to sergeant... straight to lieutenant to captain (then possibly major). The only corporal in the book is a technician. One would get the the impression that the author got all of his knowledge of military hierarchy from skimming a few war movies.
**
movies. At least it's mentioned that Vega got promoted on his first day mostly to boost morale than because of anything he did. In fact, his immediate superior fought ''against'' the promotion, as Vega's achievements were based either on pure luck or skills he earned prior to joining the military (although it's not entirely clear why the second reason is bad). He is also promoted over much more experienced soldiers in his platoon, which triggers a lot of anger and resentment among them, having the exact opposite effect that the morale boost was supposed to achieve.
* ''Literature/MythAdventures'':
**
The Possiltum military seen in the early ''Literature/MythAdventures'' novels is underfunded and undertrained, so it's {{justified|Trope}} that they're insubordinate and incompetent. Later, though, an enormous and highly successful Mob-trained army is assimilated into Possiltum's, and we see it from the inside ... and the viewpoint character who infiltrates it is insubordinate, makes trouble with civilians, hires civilians to perform military duties without authorization, ignores paperwork and willfully violates orders. The result? ''Repeated promotions for "showing initiative."'' WTF?



* Some of the characters in Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser's ''Literature/McAuslan'' series, about the Gordon Highlanders shortly after WW2. The Adjutant (Executive Officer) - normally a "feckless young man much given to babbling" and one of a few Englishmen in a Scottish regiment. Vague, seemingly unmilitary, and unworldy, when he has to lead in the absence of senior officers and take command of the full regiment, he does so admirably, assessing the situation, barking good orders and delegating tasks to the right people for the job.
** The battalion as a whole really; the enlisted men, particularly the sergeants, run the place. As Fraser puts it:
-->It looks terribly military, and indeed it is, but under the surface a Highland unit has curious currents which are extremely irregular. There is a sort of unspoken yet recognized democracy which may have its roots in clanship, or in the Scottish mercenary tradition, and which can play the devil with rank and authority unless it is properly understood.

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* Some of the characters in Creator/GeorgeMacDonaldFraser's ''Literature/McAuslan'' series, about the Gordon Highlanders shortly after WW2. The Adjutant (Executive Officer) - normally a "feckless young man much given to babbling" and one of a few Englishmen in a Scottish regiment. Vague, seemingly unmilitary, and unworldy, when he has to lead in the absence of senior officers and take command of the full regiment, he does so admirably, assessing the situation, barking good orders and delegating tasks to the right people for the job.
**
job. The battalion as a whole really; the enlisted men, particularly the sergeants, run the place. As Fraser puts it:
-->It --->It looks terribly military, and indeed it is, but under the surface a Highland unit has curious currents which are extremely irregular. There is a sort of unspoken yet recognized democracy which may have its roots in clanship, or in the Scottish mercenary tradition, and which can play the devil with rank and authority unless it is properly understood.



* Armies in the Literature/{{Discworld}} series tend to be quite shambolic, if only for the sake of comedy -- although it's also clear that conventionally disciplined, properly trained armies, which do exist, can be expected to had those idiots their butts. The presence of the trope is usually justified by the plots.

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* ''Literature/{{Discworld}}'':
**
Armies in the Literature/{{Discworld}} series tend to be quite shambolic, if only for the sake of comedy -- although it's also clear that conventionally disciplined, properly trained armies, which do exist, can be expected to had those idiots their butts. The presence of the trope is usually justified by the plots.



** In Lancre, the royal army is a noble institution that takes its job very seriously. Unfortunately, it consists entirely of Nanny Ogg's son Shawn, who is also the captain of the royal guard, the royal guard, the royal herald, the royal butler, the royal mailman, and countless others. This means that his battle tactics mainly consist of running off to find the king and queen so that they can give him orders that don't involve fighting.



* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': Starfleet is both a military and an exploration and research organization, also acting as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gendarmerie top-level]] [[SpacePolice law enforcement]] and the [[GunboatDiplomacy advance scouts and bodyguards]] of TheFederation's diplomatic corps and intelligence network. It is a conglomeration of the US Navy and Coast Guard, the USMC, the FBI, the CIA, the Department of State, the United Nations, UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} and a few research universities; a captain may need to think like Colin Powell or like Jacques Cousteau--or all of these may apply at once. Creator/GeneRoddenberry suggested something like the civilian space program ([[YanksWithTanks if it were operated by the military.]]) Since he was in the Army Air Forces during World War II, it's ''very'' likely that some part of his experience had a part in shaping Star Trek. Nicholas Meyer was proudly made military sci-fi, while Creator/JJAbrams has it stated verbatim in his film that "Starfleet is a peace-keeping military armada" and (per Scotty) "We're not a military agency!". Sometimes characters within the story will comment on Starfleet's ambiguous position. However, all in all, Captain Kirk says it best:
-->CHRISTOPHER: "Must have taken quite a lot to build a ship like this."
-->KIRK: "There are only twelve like it in the fleet."
-->CHRISTOPHER: "I see. Did the Navy-"
-->KIRK: "We're a combined service, Captain."

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* ''Franchise/StarTrek'': ''Franchise/StarTrek'':
**
Starfleet is both a military and an exploration and research organization, also acting as [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gendarmerie top-level]] [[SpacePolice law enforcement]] and the [[GunboatDiplomacy advance scouts and bodyguards]] of TheFederation's diplomatic corps and intelligence network. It is a conglomeration of the US Navy and Coast Guard, the USMC, the FBI, the CIA, the Department of State, the United Nations, UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} and a few research universities; a captain may need to think like Colin Powell or like Jacques Cousteau--or all of these may apply at once. Creator/GeneRoddenberry suggested something like the civilian space program ([[YanksWithTanks if it were operated by the military.]]) Since he was in the Army Air Forces during World War II, it's ''very'' likely that some part of his experience had a part in shaping Star Trek. Nicholas Meyer was proudly made military sci-fi, while Creator/JJAbrams has it stated verbatim in his film that "Starfleet is a peace-keeping military armada" and (per Scotty) "We're not a military agency!". Sometimes characters within the story will comment on Starfleet's ambiguous position. However, all in all, Captain Kirk says it best:
-->CHRISTOPHER: "Must --->'''Christopher:''' Must have taken quite a lot to build a ship like this."
-->KIRK: "There
\\
'''Kirk:''' There
are only twelve like it in the fleet."
-->CHRISTOPHER: "I
\\
'''Christopher:''' I
see. Did the Navy-"
-->KIRK: "We're
Navy--\\
'''Kirk:''' We're
a combined service, Captain."



* Averted with UNIT from ''Series/DoctorWho''; commanded by the [[TropeNamer original]] [[TheBrigadier Brigadier]], military [=SOP=] were a large part of their character, and caused more than a little friction between the Doctor and the Brigadier.

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* ''Series/DoctorWho'':
**
Averted with UNIT from ''Series/DoctorWho''; UNIT; commanded by the [[TropeNamer original]] [[TheBrigadier Brigadier]], military [=SOP=] were a large part of their character, and caused more than a little friction between the Doctor and the Brigadier.



* ''ComicStrip/BeauPeep'' is much the same. In fact, probably ''any'' gag-strip set in the military.
** Except [[http://www.pvtmurphy.com/ Private Murphy's Law]], which was drawn by an US Army NCO, published in ''Army Times'', and generally follows military protocol in its humor.
* ''ComicStrip/BeetleBailey'' features extremely laid-back discipline and has not had a real combat situation in the entirety of its 57-year history. Then again, it is a parody.
** "Laid-back discipline" ... except when Sarge "disciplines" Beetle with a BigBallOfViolence.
** Of course if you read it from the beginning, it's a series about a college kid whose experiences in basic training when he briefly joined the Army on a lark turned into a 60-year digression from the main plot.

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* ''ComicStrip/BeauPeep'' is much the same. In fact, probably ''any'' gag-strip set in the military.
**
military. Except [[http://www.pvtmurphy.com/ Private Murphy's Law]], which was drawn by an US Army NCO, published in ''Army Times'', and generally follows military protocol in its humor.
* ''ComicStrip/BeetleBailey'' features extremely laid-back discipline and has not had a real combat situation in the entirety of its 57-year history. Then again, it is a parody.
**
parody. "Laid-back discipline" ... except when Sarge "disciplines" Beetle with a BigBallOfViolence.
**
BigBallOfViolence. Of course if you read it from the beginning, it's a series about a college kid whose experiences in basic training when he briefly joined the Army on a lark turned into a 60-year digression from the main plot.



* Discipline is remarkably light in ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'', to the point where Captain Varrot (the party's CO) is able to basically call a general from the regular Army (and her own superior officer) a bad soldier ''to his face'' without much more in response than an angry "HEY!" Note that the Gallian Militia is a result of universal {{conscription}} and most if not all of its soldiers were civilians very recently. It does get a little extreme when [[spoiler: Faldio shoots Alicia to awaken her Valkyria powers. Friendly fire, and his punishment was only 10 days in the brig.]]
** He was only being held until he could be properly tried; the militia was really lacking in leadership higher than Varrot and there was a lot of chaos going on. The REAL total lack of military protocol goes into Alicia [[spoiler:once she does awaken to her powers.]] You'd think the army would actually bother to ''approach'' her about her newfound issues exactly like she's afraid of, but General Damon and whatever other commanders are running the show couldn't give a damn if you paid them for it in advance.

to:

* ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'':
**
Discipline is remarkably light in ''VideoGame/ValkyriaChronicles'', to the point where Captain Varrot (the party's CO) is able to basically call a general from the regular Army (and her own superior officer) a bad soldier ''to his face'' without much more in response than an angry "HEY!" Note that the Gallian Militia is a result of universal {{conscription}} and most if not all of its soldiers were civilians very recently. It does get a little extreme when [[spoiler: Faldio shoots Alicia to awaken her Valkyria powers. Friendly fire, and his punishment was only 10 days in the brig.]]
**
]] He was only being held until he could be properly tried; the militia was really lacking in leadership higher than Varrot and there was a lot of chaos going on. The REAL total lack of military protocol goes into Alicia [[spoiler:once she does awaken to her powers.]] You'd think the army would actually bother to ''approach'' her about her newfound issues exactly like she's afraid of, but General Damon and whatever other commanders are running the show couldn't give a damn if you paid them for it in advance.



* In ''VideoGame/RainbowSix Vegas 2'' you disobey a direct (and sensible) order from your CO to get some rest and (probably) go AWOL along with your team and a helicopter pilot to Costa Rica for the last level to hunt down some terrorist dude. Rather than being disciplined for misappropriating equipment, going AWOL on an unauthorised mission you are [[spoiler: offered a promotion to Deputy Director!]]

to:

* In ''VideoGame/RainbowSix Vegas 2'' you 2'':
** You
disobey a direct (and sensible) order from your CO to get some rest and (probably) go AWOL along with your team and a helicopter pilot to Costa Rica for the last level to hunt down some terrorist dude. Rather than being disciplined for misappropriating equipment, going AWOL on an unauthorised mission you are [[spoiler: offered a promotion to Deputy Director!]]



* The Systems Alliance in ''Franchise/MassEffect'' is fairly spit and polish, but the ''[[CoolStarship Normandy]]'' itself goes completely [[BunnyEarsLawyer bunny ears]] after Shepard takes command. Shepard can get away with this because, as a Spectre, s/he's not answerable to the brass who would otherwise be his/her superiors, and one minor character who is critical of the ''Normandy's'' situation can actually be told off on these grounds. Shepard is also able to blow off the council in the first game because the politics are in his/her favor for awhile, but this changes as the series progresses.

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* ''Franchise/MassEffect'':
**
The Systems Alliance in ''Franchise/MassEffect'' is fairly spit and polish, but the ''[[CoolStarship Normandy]]'' itself goes completely [[BunnyEarsLawyer bunny ears]] after Shepard takes command. Shepard can get away with this because, as a Spectre, s/he's not answerable to the brass who would otherwise be his/her superiors, and one minor character who is critical of the ''Normandy's'' situation can actually be told off on these grounds. Shepard is also able to blow off the council in the first game because the politics are in his/her favor for awhile, but this changes as the series progresses.



---> "This is technically a civilian ship. I'm probably lucky you're still wearing pants."

to:

---> "This --->'''Shepard:''' This is technically a civilian ship. I'm probably lucky you're still wearing pants."



* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'': For an MilitaryAcademy that produces the [[BadassArmy toughest and most elite soldiers in the world]], Balamb Garden is surprisingly cozy and cheerful. And that [[EarWorm music that plays while you're in there]]...
** During the first disc, the Garden is far more spit-and-polish; while there's still plenty of leeway for horsing around and [[SidetrackedByTheGoldSaucer playing card games while on duty]], there are lines that should not be crossed. Zell gets his futuristic skateboard confiscated when he brings it into Garden, and when Seifer heroically disobeys orders on a mission because he was assigned to a makework position, he's imprisoned and effectively cashiered despite basically shredding the entire enemy force. Finally, your initial [=SeeD=] rank is partly determined by your willingness to stick to the regs on that mission (the Attitude score). Later on, your rank can drop if you [[TakeYourTime spend too much time]] [[AvertedTrope playing around]] and don't stick to the mission at hand.[[note]]...supposedly. Though the official guide may say otherwise, the amount of time you spend on side quests and Triple Triad has no bearing on your salary. Outside of scripted events and written exams, your rank is determined entirely by how many monsters you kill in between paydays. It's the same "kill monsters for money" formula seen in every RPG, just in a different package.[[/note]]

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* ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVIII'': For an MilitaryAcademy that produces the [[BadassArmy toughest and most elite soldiers in the world]], Balamb Garden is surprisingly cozy and cheerful. And that [[EarWorm music that plays while you're in there]]...
**
there]]... During the first disc, the Garden is far more spit-and-polish; while there's still plenty of leeway for horsing around and [[SidetrackedByTheGoldSaucer playing card games while on duty]], there are lines that should not be crossed. Zell gets his futuristic skateboard confiscated when he brings it into Garden, and when Seifer heroically disobeys orders on a mission because he was assigned to a makework position, he's imprisoned and effectively cashiered despite basically shredding the entire enemy force. Finally, your initial [=SeeD=] rank is partly determined by your willingness to stick to the regs on that mission (the Attitude score). Later on, your rank can drop if you [[TakeYourTime spend too much time]] [[AvertedTrope playing around]] and don't stick to the mission at hand.[[note]]...supposedly. Though the official guide may say otherwise, the amount of time you spend on side quests and Triple Triad has no bearing on your salary. Outside of scripted events and written exams, your rank is determined entirely by how many monsters you kill in between paydays. It's the same "kill monsters for money" formula seen in every RPG, just in a different package.[[/note]]



* ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia's'' Valuan Empire seems to avert this trope for the various mooks seen around. However the higher up the chain of the command you go the less militaristic it becomes. Seems that the Admirals are hand picked for their individual talents (or political connections) and once given command are free to do pretty much what they want to get the job done. Ramirez for example is Galcian's Vice-Captain at the start, dispite having no background in any military or sailing organizations, and then later given admiralship and command of his own fleet.
** The UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube version provides backstory that show Ramirez did rise through the ranks, starting off as a regular Valuan soldier and advancing rapidly due to his abilities.

to:

* ''VideoGame/SkiesOfArcadia's'' Valuan Empire seems to avert this trope for the various mooks seen around. However the higher up the chain of the command you go the less militaristic it becomes. Seems that the Admirals are hand picked for their individual talents (or political connections) and once given command are free to do pretty much what they want to get the job done. Ramirez for example is Galcian's Vice-Captain at the start, dispite having no background in any military or sailing organizations, and then later given admiralship and command of his own fleet.
**
fleet. The UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube version provides backstory that show Ramirez did rise through the ranks, starting off as a regular Valuan soldier and advancing rapidly due to his abilities.



* [[DarkActionGirl Annette Durand]] of ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' uses her radio chatter to complain about how heavy her gun is, or how she hasn't had any proper training. She also doesn't confirm her kills. [[JustifiedTrope After all, she isn't a trained soldier, she's just a civilian who was roped into XCOM because of her phenomenal psionic ability]]. Certainly {{averted|Trope}} with the rest of XCOM.

to:

* ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'':
**
[[DarkActionGirl Annette Durand]] of ''VideoGame/XCOMEnemyUnknown'' uses her radio chatter to complain about how heavy her gun is, or how she hasn't had any proper training. She also doesn't confirm her kills. [[JustifiedTrope After all, she isn't a trained soldier, she's just a civilian who was roped into XCOM because of her phenomenal psionic ability]]. Certainly {{averted|Trope}} with the rest of XCOM.



* There's some question as to how professional your unit is going to be in the various ''VideoGame/MechWarrior'' games. There isn't a lot of character ''per se'' until around the time of ''Mechwarrior 3''. Before then, you played a member of the extremely martial [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Clans]] for much of ''Mechwarrior 2'', and the Inner Sphere based ''1'' and ''2: Mercenaries'' had very little interaction with the chain of command, though your lancemates in ''2: Mercs'' varied from military professionals to mouthy psychos--at least they'd obey orders. Come ''3'', however, and you get your DeadpanSnarker lancemates getting mouthy with MissionControl, and not an awful lot of professional behavior out of people who are ostensibly professional soldiers on a commando operation of significant importance. This trend increases as the series goes on through ''Mechwarrior 4'', ''4: Black Knight'', and ultimately ''4: Mercenaries'', where your character has a callsign, a personality, and a tendency to make cracks at everyone, including the people trying to kill him and the people who cut his checks. No, your lancemates don't get any less sarcastic and individualistic as time goes on, either.
** In the TournamentPlay for the games, every unit had their own internal rules, but the trend is that units favoring the Clans adopted a more rigid FantasticRankSystem based on the system the Clans use in [[Tabletopgame/BattleTech the boardgame]], with players gaining rank by completing a [[AsskickingEqualsAuthority Trial Of Position]] against their clanmates, while Inner Sphere units are more egalitarian, such as the Knights of the Inner Sphere and 12th Vegan Rangers of ''Living Legends'' having no real leadership outside of one person to handle the paperwork for matches and a volunteer lance leader in each match.

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* There's some question as to how professional your unit is going to be in the various ''VideoGame/MechWarrior'' games. There isn't a lot of character ''per se'' until around the time of ''Mechwarrior 3''. Before then, you played a member of the extremely martial [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Clans]] for much of ''Mechwarrior 2'', and the Inner Sphere based ''1'' and ''2: Mercenaries'' had very little interaction with the chain of command, though your lancemates in ''2: Mercs'' varied from military professionals to mouthy psychos--at least they'd obey orders. Come ''3'', however, and you get your DeadpanSnarker lancemates getting mouthy with MissionControl, and not an awful lot of professional behavior out of people who are ostensibly professional soldiers on a commando operation of significant importance. This trend increases as the series goes on through ''Mechwarrior 4'', ''4: Black Knight'', and ultimately ''4: Mercenaries'', where your character has a callsign, a personality, and a tendency to make cracks at everyone, including the people trying to kill him and the people who cut his checks. No, your lancemates don't get any less sarcastic and individualistic as time goes on, either.
**
either. In the TournamentPlay for the games, every unit had their own internal rules, but the trend is that units favoring the Clans adopted a more rigid FantasticRankSystem based on the system the Clans use in [[Tabletopgame/BattleTech the boardgame]], with players gaining rank by completing a [[AsskickingEqualsAuthority Trial Of Position]] against their clanmates, while Inner Sphere units are more egalitarian, such as the Knights of the Inner Sphere and 12th Vegan Rangers of ''Living Legends'' having no real leadership outside of one person to handle the paperwork for matches and a volunteer lance leader in each match.



* ''VideoGame/PlanetSide'' is about a ForeverWar between three opposing factions, each composed of thousands of players. Some players can attain high command ranks, which in ''theory'' should give them some sway over players, but when someone starts barking orders over the command channel, they are usually promptly ignored. Mildly amusing when two commanders start broadcasting opposing orders (Defend so-and-so! Fall back from so-and-so!) then [[MissionControlIsOffItsMeds start yelling at each other in global chat.]]

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* ''VideoGame/PlanetSide'' ''VideoGame/PlanetSide'':
** The game
is about a ForeverWar between three opposing factions, each composed of thousands of players. Some players can attain high command ranks, which in ''theory'' should give them some sway over players, but when someone starts barking orders over the command channel, they are usually promptly ignored. Mildly amusing when two commanders start broadcasting opposing orders (Defend so-and-so! Fall back from so-and-so!) then [[MissionControlIsOffItsMeds start yelling at each other in global chat.]]



* ''Machinima/RedVsBlue''. Both teams are almost completely incompetent in every aspect. On the Red Team Grif sometimes outright refuses orders from Sarge. And the Blue Team has no commanding officer at all, they're all privates. Justified in that no-one cares about the war.

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* ''Machinima/RedVsBlue''. ''Machinima/RedVsBlue'':
**
Both teams are almost completely incompetent in every aspect. On the Red Team Grif sometimes outright refuses orders from Sarge. And the Blue Team has no commanding officer at all, they're all privates. Justified in that no-one cares about the war.



* Nigh-universal in ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' series. The Autobots we see are almost always a military contingent... and always act like they're just guys on vacation. Particularly notable with the obligatory [[KidAppealCharacter Bumblebee]], who generally acts like a TagalongKid on a military mission who somehow managed to get a formal rank instead of being shooed away or receiving proper training. Even when there ''is'' [[TransformersAnimated proper training]], he will act like he just got out of elementary school and doesn't feel like doing his homework today.

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* Nigh-universal in ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' series. series.
**
The Autobots we see are almost always a military contingent... and always act like they're just guys on vacation. Particularly notable with the obligatory [[KidAppealCharacter Bumblebee]], who generally acts like a TagalongKid on a military mission who somehow managed to get a formal rank instead of being shooed away or receiving proper training. Even when there ''is'' [[TransformersAnimated proper training]], he will act like he just got out of elementary school and doesn't feel like doing his homework today.
28th Feb '17 8:57:43 PM Lightning4119
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** Joker is a much more straightforward example; no military in reality would ever accept a recruit with a crippling disease. Old knee injuries that have ostensibly healed can be grounds for refusal. His backstory specifically excludes any ChildProdigy plot devices to excuse this with his skill; he's only the best pilot in the Alliance because he worked hard to become the best ''after'' joining up. Worse, one of the comics shows that he got his posting on the ''Normandy'' by ''stealing'' it out from under the original pilot's nose and proving he could run the test flight better, gaining the position through [[BunnyEarsLawyer sheer audacity.]] In real life, a stunt like this would end [[{{Prison}} very differently.]]

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** Joker is a much more straightforward example; no military in reality would ever accept a recruit with a crippling disease. Old knee injuries that have ostensibly healed can be grounds for refusal. His backstory specifically excludes any ChildProdigy plot devices to excuse this with his skill; he's only the best pilot in the Alliance because he worked hard to become the best ''after'' joining up. Worse, one of the comics shows that he got his posting on the ''Normandy'' by ''stealing'' it out from under the original pilot's nose and proving he could run the test flight better, gaining the position through [[BunnyEarsLawyer sheer audacity.]] In real life, a stunt like this would end [[{{Prison}} very differently.]]]] Lucky for Joker, the CO of the Normandy at the time (who was also Shepard's mentor, showing where they get it from) also leans towards this trope, albeit to a smaller extent.
26th Feb '17 6:19:42 PM BattleMaster
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** This is all probably justified given that Burke tells Ripley of his plan to smuggle developing xenomorphs through quarantine inside infected soldiers, so he probably made sure that the squad assigned to the mission was the biggest bunch of screw-ups he could fined.
21st Feb '17 5:46:06 PM nombretomado
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* SOLDIER in ''CrisisCore'' seems to work like this. Sure, sometimes they act like one would expect a military to act (all the "Sir! Yes, sir!"s when Zack is giving his speech to the new Thirds, for instance) but most of they time they're hanging out on the SOLDIER Floor talking about girls, company gossip, or whatever else happens to come up. Considering the simplicity of the chain of command (there are only three ranks, despite what some fanfiction might assume), the probable youth of most of the members, and that one SOLDIER is almost an army by himself, this is somewhat understandable.

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* SOLDIER in ''CrisisCore'' ''VideoGame/CrisisCore'' seems to work like this. Sure, sometimes they act like one would expect a military to act (all the "Sir! Yes, sir!"s when Zack is giving his speech to the new Thirds, for instance) but most of they time they're hanging out on the SOLDIER Floor talking about girls, company gossip, or whatever else happens to come up. Considering the simplicity of the chain of command (there are only three ranks, despite what some fanfiction might assume), the probable youth of most of the members, and that one SOLDIER is almost an army by himself, this is somewhat understandable.
16th Feb '17 12:29:46 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': {{Justified}} by the Night's Watch, a combination of a military monastic order and a gulag. Naturally, although fairly disciplined, it doesn't run quite the same as a normal army.
15th Feb '17 1:08:30 PM Morgenthaler
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* ''SpaceAboveAndBeyond'' went up and down on this scale. In an early episode, the rookies are left alone when the officers have to suddenly leave, and none of them is designated as being in charge. This is ridiculous. In the real military, if as few as two soliders are assigned to pick up trash, it will still be clear who is in charge.

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* ''SpaceAboveAndBeyond'' ''Series/SpaceAboveAndBeyond'' went up and down on this scale. In an early episode, the rookies are left alone when the officers have to suddenly leave, and none of them is designated as being in charge. This is ridiculous. In the real military, if as few as two soliders are assigned to pick up trash, it will still be clear who is in charge.
31st Jan '17 11:08:50 AM SmoCro
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* Oddly enough, The Wehrmacht. No army in WW2 allowed their soldiers to grow their hair as long (which made German soldiers something of a darling among the ladies, foreign and domestic) but punishments for uniform violations were quite lax and completly took the backseat when the war started going.

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* Oddly enough, The Wehrmacht. No army in WW2 allowed their soldiers to grow their hair as long (which made German soldiers something of a darling among the ladies, foreign and domestic) but punishments for uniform violations were quite lax and completly took the backseat when the war started going. It also helped that the new Infantry Manual called for self-imposed discipline, self-imposed by the soldier himself for reason of love of his comrades, his country or professionalism, instead of imposing discipline from an outside source.
31st Jan '17 10:30:47 AM SmoCro
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*Oddly enough, The Wehrmacht. No army in WW2 allowed their soldiers to grow their hair as long (which made German soldiers something of a darling among the ladies, foreign and domestic) but punishments for uniform violations were quite lax and completly took the backseat when the war started going.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MildlyMilitary