History Main / MasterOfNone

2nd Feb '16 9:16:33 AM rufusluciusivan
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* The player's ultimate goal in ''Videogame/RakenzarnTales'' is to turn Kyuu, the main character, into a MasterOfAll. His unique class, the Arxus Rogue, is capable of learning plenty of types of physical and magical moves and wield a huge variety of weapons. However, due to the fact that he's not a real fighter and suffers from EmptyLevels and NonStandardSkillLearning, a poorly handled training will turn him into this trope instead.
29th Jan '16 5:26:56 AM UmbrellasWereAwesome
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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' sees Eliwood's mediocre, "balanced" stat growths pale in comparison to Lyn and Hector's respective FragileSpeedster and LightningBruiser statuses, and have earned him the derogatory FanNickname "Eliwuss."
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* ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' ''Franchise/FireEmblem: [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe Blazing Sword]]'' (released in the West as simply "Fire Emblem") sees Eliwood's mediocre, "balanced" stat growths pale in comparison to Lyn and Hector's respective FragileSpeedster and LightningBruiser statuses, and have earned him the derogatory FanNickname "Eliwuss."
22nd Jan '16 5:31:54 PM mlsmithca
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(sigh) "More so" is two words. More. So. Two. Words. Why do so many people type it as one word??
** And long before that, ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' gave us the Prince of Cannock, a MagicKnight eclipsed in magic by [[SquishyWizard the Princess of Moonbrooke]] with a scant few unique cleric spells, and even moreso physically and equip-wise by [[TheHero the Prince of Lorasia]]. ** The concept is referenced in typical punny fashion in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'': one of the breezes in the game's HurricaneOfPuns is Abbot Jack of Alltrades Abbey, who consumes a Fygg and [[Main/FaceHeelTurn becomes the "Master of Nu'un"]].
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** And long before that, ''VideoGame/DragonQuestII'' gave us the Prince of Cannock, a MagicKnight eclipsed in magic by [[SquishyWizard the Princess of Moonbrooke]] with a scant few unique cleric spells, and even moreso more so physically and equip-wise by [[TheHero the Prince of Lorasia]]. ** ** The concept is referenced in typical punny fashion in ''VideoGame/DragonQuestIX'': one of the breezes in the game's HurricaneOfPuns is Abbot Jack of Alltrades Abbey, who consumes a Fygg and [[Main/FaceHeelTurn [[FaceHeelTurn becomes the "Master of Nu'un"]].
17th Jan '16 7:56:11 AM zarpaulus
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* Unlike the other, specialized {{Mega Corp}}s in ''TabletopGame/HcSvntDracones'' [=MarsCo=] does a bit of everything. This is represented in their educational system, characters with a scholarship from [=MarsCo=] can train in any proficiencies, but only up to two dots at character creation rather than the usual three. In addition, their ships have Omnislots where the other corps put weapons arrays, flak barriers, or drone bays on their ships. While that allows [=MarsCo=] ships more versatility and a greater ability to specialize from mission to mission it does make them more expensive.
31st Dec '15 9:07:42 AM megarockman
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* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-classic" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders). That's not to say that nowadays stadiums couldn't be converted to host sporting events other than what they're designed for (e.g., the college football Pinstripe Bowl is held year in Yankee Stadium), but they're saved for special occasions for the most part now.
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* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-classic" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders). That's not to say that nowadays stadiums couldn't be converted to host sporting events other than what they're designed for (e.g., the college football Pinstripe Bowl is held year yearly in Yankee Stadium), but they're saved for special occasions for the most part now.part.
31st Dec '15 9:07:03 AM megarockman
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* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-classic" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders).
to:
* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-classic" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders). That's not to say that nowadays stadiums couldn't be converted to host sporting events other than what they're designed for (e.g., the college football Pinstripe Bowl is held year in Yankee Stadium), but they're saved for special occasions for the most part now.
30th Dec '15 1:41:03 PM megarockman
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* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-modern" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders).
to:
* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-modern" "retro-classic" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders).
30th Dec '15 1:35:40 PM megarockman
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* During the 1960's, multi-purpose stadiums that could accommodate both baseball and American football teams became all the rage for civic infrastructure projects. The idea seemed sound enough - why build two separate stadiums and rack up twice as much infrastructure and construction cost, especially as with the concurrent rise of American suburbia cars became the dominant form of transportation and parking lots would be needed? As it turned out, the differing infrastructure requirements for each sport (field dimensions, equipment, possibility of both teams' seasons overlapping in August-October, among others) meant the stadiums ended up doing a bad job of satisfying their requirements for both sports' teams and their fans. Starting in the late 1980's sport-specific stadiums came back into vogue; the first of the "retro-modern" ballparks for the major leagues was built in 1992 (Oriole Park at Camden Yards in Baltimore) to rave reviews. As of 2015, only one stadium from this era remains that a baseball and football team still both call home (O.co Coliseum in Oakland, home of baseball's Athletics and football's Raiders).
21st Dec '15 10:55:50 PM jormis29
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* In {{Homeworld}} 2, frigates, especially Vaygr frigates, are rather hard to find a tactical niche for. The core problem is that they are [[TacticalRockPaperScissors scissors in a game with rocks but no paper]]: Heavier capital ships aren't useful against strikecraft and corvettes, but extremely useful against frigates and captial ships, while the lighter strikecraft and corvettes are moderately usefull against everything. As such, no type of frigate can handle anything bigger, even in a ZergRush, while they can't catch (and can, at a cost, be {{ZergRush}}ed by) lighter ships. They could be used to protect bigger ships against smaller ships, but other small ships can do that too ''without'' getting slaughtered by enemy capital ships.
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* In {{Homeworld}} 2, ''Videogame/{{Homeworld 2}}'', frigates, especially Vaygr frigates, are rather hard to find a tactical niche for. The core problem is that they are [[TacticalRockPaperScissors scissors in a game with rocks but no paper]]: Heavier capital ships aren't useful against strikecraft and corvettes, but extremely useful against frigates and captial ships, while the lighter strikecraft and corvettes are moderately usefull against everything. As such, no type of frigate can handle anything bigger, even in a ZergRush, while they can't catch (and can, at a cost, be {{ZergRush}}ed by) lighter ships. They could be used to protect bigger ships against smaller ships, but other small ships can do that too ''without'' getting slaughtered by enemy capital ships.
14th Dec '15 4:04:42 PM gophergiggles
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** The changelings are this as a species, by essentially being watered-down [[MasterOfAll alicorns]]. They can't fly nearly as fast as a pegasus, they can't use magic nearly as well as a unicorn, and they're not nearly as tough physically as an earth pony, but they ''do'' have limited access to all three traits. They compensate for this by [[ZergRush attacking in swarms]] and [[VoluntaryShapeshifting disguising themselves as ponies]] to get their food source: [[EmotionEater the love of others]].
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