History Main / MarthDebutedInSmashBros

11th Mar '17 6:40:20 PM SecretStrategist
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* Sayo, heroine of ''VideoGame/PockyAndRocky'', first appeared outside Japan as the World 6 boss in the NES version of ''VideoGame/RainbowIslands''.

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* Sayo, heroine the main protagonist of ''VideoGame/PockyAndRocky'', ''VideoGame/KikiKaiKai'' (later known to Western gamers as [[DubNameChange Pocky]] when the series was released SequelFirst), first appeared outside Japan as the World 6 boss in the NES version of ''VideoGame/RainbowIslands''.
10th Mar '17 3:52:33 PM lalalei2001
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* Sayo, heroine of ''VideoGame/KikiKaiKai'' (later known to Western gamers as Pocky when the series was released SequelFirst), first appeared outside Japan as the World 6 boss in the NES version of ''VideoGame/RainbowIslands''.

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* Sayo, heroine of ''VideoGame/KikiKaiKai'' (later known to Western gamers as Pocky when the series was released SequelFirst), ''VideoGame/PockyAndRocky'', first appeared outside Japan as the World 6 boss in the NES version of ''VideoGame/RainbowIslands''.
5th Mar '17 9:23:23 AM nombretomado
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* ''Anime/{{Raideen}}'', ''Anime/PlanetRoboDanguardAce'', and ''Anime/CombattlerV''. They were part of the "Shogun Warriors" toy set Creator/{{Mattel}} introduced into the States in the late 70s - which also included bizzaro versions of ''Anime/MazingerZ'' and the various ''[[Manga/GetterRobo Getters]]'', so if you really want to stretch the trope you could say that a lot of robots "debuted" as oddly huge toys - but the cartoons weren't licensed for American release. Oh no, that would be logical. Instead, the likenesses of the Raideen, Danguard and Combattler robots were licensed to, of all people, ''MarvelComics'' for the creation of a Shogun Warriors American print comic. That eventually featured, among other things, ''Combattler fighting alongside the Fantastic Four against the gigantic robot minion of, basically, the Star of David''. Really, you couldn't make up something like this [[http://www.option38.com/comics/80s/shogun_warriors_19.asp if you tried.]] Raideen and Combattler's shows never made it to the US [[note]](well, ''Raideen'' aired in three cities on local Japanese language commmunity channels, but the majority of the Union and 99% of the public never got to see the show)[[/note]]; Danguard eventually made it to American TV with the franchise name intact as part of the syndicated ''ForceFive'' cartoon package (alongside Grendizer from above), after the toys and comic went out of production.

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* ''Anime/{{Raideen}}'', ''Anime/PlanetRoboDanguardAce'', and ''Anime/CombattlerV''. They were part of the "Shogun Warriors" toy set Creator/{{Mattel}} introduced into the States in the late 70s - which also included bizzaro bizarro versions of ''Anime/MazingerZ'' and the various ''[[Manga/GetterRobo Getters]]'', so if you really want to stretch the trope you could say that a lot of robots "debuted" as oddly huge toys - but the cartoons weren't licensed for American release. Oh no, that would be logical. Instead, the likenesses of the Raideen, Danguard and Combattler robots were licensed to, of all people, ''MarvelComics'' ''Creator/MarvelComics'' for the creation of a Shogun Warriors American print comic. That eventually featured, among other things, ''Combattler fighting alongside the Fantastic Four against the gigantic robot minion of, basically, the Star of David''. Really, you couldn't make up something like this [[http://www.option38.com/comics/80s/shogun_warriors_19.asp if you tried.]] Raideen and Combattler's shows never made it to the US [[note]](well, ''Raideen'' aired in three cities on local Japanese language commmunity channels, but the majority of the Union and 99% of the public never got to see the show)[[/note]]; Danguard eventually made it to American TV with the franchise name intact as part of the syndicated ''ForceFive'' cartoon package (alongside Grendizer from above), after the toys and comic went out of production.
2nd Mar '17 10:10:07 AM PhantomDusclops92
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** Technically, this trope could have been called "Marth Debuted in Anime'', as a 1997 anime OVA of the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was produced and given an English dub by Creator/ADVFilms in 1997, predating even his appearance in ''Smash Bros.'', though he and other characters did receive a DubNameChange.[[labelnote:Speaking of dubs...]]Interestingly, despite this anime giving the character an English voice (Creator/SpikeSpencer), he would not receive one again until ''VideoGame/CodenameSTEAM'' (Creator/YuriLowenthal) almost eighteen years later as [[GrandfatherClause Marth's Japanese voice is retained in the international versions of]] ''Melee'', ''Brawl'', and ''[=3DS/Wii U=]''.[[/labelnote]]

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** Technically, this trope could have been called "Marth Debuted in Anime'', Anime", as a 1997 anime OVA of the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was produced and given an English dub by Creator/ADVFilms in 1997, predating even his appearance in ''Smash Bros.'', though he and other characters did receive a DubNameChange.[[labelnote:Speaking of dubs...]]Interestingly, despite this anime giving the character an English voice (Creator/SpikeSpencer), he would not receive one again until ''VideoGame/CodenameSTEAM'' (Creator/YuriLowenthal) almost eighteen years later as [[GrandfatherClause Marth's Japanese voice is retained in the international versions of]] ''Melee'', ''Brawl'', and ''[=3DS/Wii U=]''.[[/labelnote]]
27th Feb '17 12:24:10 AM RacattackForce
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* The TropeNamer is, of course, Marth, the star of the first ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' game (''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''). Marth made his (and his series') Western debut in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'' over a decade after the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was released in Japan. His presence and popularity motivated Nintendo to release future games in the franchise internationally. However, it wasn't until 2009, with [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight the remake of his game]], that Marth himself would finally appear outside the ''Super Smash Bros.'' series. In 2009, the NintendoDS remake of his game (''Shadow Dragon'') at last reached Western shores. This was around ''eight years'' after the various Western releases of ''Melee'' and almost '''nineteen years''' after his initial {{Famicom}} debut in Japan.

to:

* The TropeNamer is, of course, Marth, is the star of the first ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' game (''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia'').(''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''), Marth. Marth made his (and his series') Western debut in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'' Melee]]'': over a decade after the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was released in Japan. His presence and popularity motivated Nintendo to release all future games in the franchise internationally. However, it wasn't until 2009, with [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight the remake of his game]], that Marth himself would finally appear outside the ''Super Smash Bros.'' series. In 2009, series in the NintendoDS remake of his game (''Shadow Dragon'') at last reached Western shores. This was around ''eight years'' after the various Western releases of ''Melee'' and almost '''nineteen years''' after his initial {{Famicom}} debut in Japan.West.



* When Corrin, the protagonist of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', was announced as a DLC character for ''3DS/Wii U'', ''Fates'' had already been released in Japan a few months prior, but not internationally. WordOfGod says this was an InvokedTrope, similar to Roy's situation.

to:

* When Corrin, the protagonist of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', was announced as a DLC character for ''3DS/Wii U'', ''Fates'' had already been released in Japan a few months prior, but not internationally. WordOfGod says this was an InvokedTrope, similar to Roy's situation.
situation. The character became available to play as only weeks before the Western release of ''Fates''.
27th Feb '17 12:21:15 AM RacattackForce
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* The TropeNamer and current world record holder of this trope is, of course, Marth, the star of the first ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' game (''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''). Marth made his (and his series') Western debut in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'' over a decade after the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was released in Japan. His presence and popularity motivated Nintendo to release future games in the franchise internationally. However, it wasn't until 2009, with [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight the remake of his game]], that Marth himself would finally appear outside the ''Super Smash Bros.'' series. In 2009, the NintendoDS remake of his game (''Shadow Dragon'') at last reached Western shores. This was around ''eight years'' after the various Western releases of ''Melee'' and almost '''nineteen years''' after his initial {{Famicom}} debut in Japan.

to:

* The TropeNamer and current world record holder of this trope is, of course, Marth, the star of the first ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' game (''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''). Marth made his (and his series') Western debut in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'' over a decade after the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was released in Japan. His presence and popularity motivated Nintendo to release future games in the franchise internationally. However, it wasn't until 2009, with [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight the remake of his game]], that Marth himself would finally appear outside the ''Super Smash Bros.'' series. In 2009, the NintendoDS remake of his game (''Shadow Dragon'') at last reached Western shores. This was around ''eight years'' after the various Western releases of ''Melee'' and almost '''nineteen years''' after his initial {{Famicom}} debut in Japan.
27th Feb '17 12:20:43 AM RacattackForce
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That's how [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Marth]] debuted in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros.]]'' (in the West, anyway). A fairly peculiar subtrope of NoExportForYou that applies often to video games but can happen in any medium where a product is blocked or delayed at length from reaching other countries and then gets referenced in another work. Distinct from SequelFirst in that this often involves characters debuting in crossover works that are often ''nothing like'' their "core" franchises or are at best tangentially connected. This happens to Japanese products fairly often as companies, especially fan-oriented ones, like to have cameos and such as a [[{{Fanservice}} nod to their fans]]. Note that the "source" products for the characters may ''eventually'' come out in other countries, but the fact remains that they debuted in other markets in other, often decidedly odd ways. It's also worth noting that if this happens [[ScrewedByTheNetwork multiple times]] to a single franchise, it can agitate the fans, who may begin to (understandably) wonder why Product A doesn't just come out in the first place instead of appearing minorly in Products B, C, D, and so on. Of course, if Product A comes out ''because'' of its appearances in Products B, C, etc..., that's one explanation right there.

to:

That's how [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia Marth]] debuted in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros.]]'' (in the West, anyway). A fairly peculiar subtrope of NoExportForYou that applies often to video games but can happen in any medium where a product is blocked or delayed at length from reaching other countries and then gets referenced in another work. Distinct from SequelFirst in that this often involves characters debuting in crossover works that are often ''nothing like'' their "core" franchises or are at best tangentially connected.connected (the trope namer is a character from a StrategyRPG series, with ''Smash Bros.'' being a PlatformFighter series). This happens to Japanese products fairly often as companies, especially fan-oriented ones, like to have cameos and such as a [[{{Fanservice}} nod to their fans]]. Note that the "source" products for the characters may ''eventually'' come out in other countries, but the fact remains that they debuted in other markets in other, often decidedly odd ways. It's also worth noting that if this happens [[ScrewedByTheNetwork multiple times]] to a single franchise, it can agitate the fans, who may begin to (understandably) wonder why Product A doesn't just come out in the first place instead of appearing minorly in Products B, C, D, and so on. Of course, if Product A comes out ''because'' of its appearances in Products B, C, etc..., that's one explanation right there.



[[folder: Trope Namer/''SSB'']]

* The TropeNamer and current world record holder of this trope is, of course, Marth, the star of the original ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' game who made his (and the series as a whole) Western debut in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'', over a decade after the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was released in Japan. His presence and popularity motivated Nintendo to release ''Fire Emblem'' games in the West at last. However, since that series uses mostly [[NonLinearSequel Non-Linear Sequels]], until 2009 Marth would not appear in any of [[Videogame/FireEmblemAkaneia his own games]], despite appearing in ''Super Smash Brothers'' twice. In 2009, the NintendoDS remake of his game (''Shadow Dragon'') at last reached Western shores. This was around ''eight years'' after the various Western releases of ''Melee'' and almost '''nineteen years''' after his initial Famicom debut in Japan. Because of how long it took to localize the game, [[GrandfatherClause Marth's Japanese voice is retained in the international versions of]] ''Melee'', ''Brawl'', and ''[=3DS/Wii U=]'', instead of being given an English dub. On a different note, the Fire Emblem OVA, which received an English Dub, ''did'' come out in the states... making the instance of Marth having an English voice in ''VideoGame/CodenameSTEAM'' another instance of this, since that's where a lot of people know of Marth speaking English from, rather than the obscure OVA. Which even predated the ''series''' release in the states.
* In comparison, Roy actually '''did''' debut in ''Melee'' -- [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe his own game]] hadn't come out yet in Japan when the game was released, and his inclusion was meant to promote the upcoming game. His game, unlike the first of Marth's (though, unfortunately, not his second (the series's third installment)), never even made it to the US, which instead got the next game in the series, a prequel starring his father, Eliwood, in which Roy only makes a cameo in the epilogue as a child. For Europe and Australia, however, this is a straight example, as ''Melee'' was delayed in those regions and came out after Roy's game had already been released in Japan. As with Marth, Roy [[GrandfatherClause continues to speak Japanese regardless of region]], following his [[TheBusCameBack return]] in ''3DS/Wii U'' as a [[DownloadableContent downloadable fighter]].
* As newer ''Fire Emblem'' games have been released internationally, later ''Fire Emblem'' characters in ''Super Smash Bros.'' ([[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Ike]] in ''Brawl'', [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Robin and Lucina]] in ''3DS/Wii U'') have avoided this altogether.
* But this happened ''again''. When Corrin, the protagonist of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' was announced as a DLC character for ''Smash 4'', ''Fates'' had already been released in Japan a few months before, but not internationally. Corrin was released in Smash on Feb. 3, 2016 for the US (Feb. 4th for Europe), 2 weeks before ''Fates's'' US release date (and longer for Europe). WordOfGod says this was an InvokedTrope, similar to Roy's situation.

to:

[[folder: Trope Namer/''SSB'']]

Namer/''Super Smash Bros.'']]

* The TropeNamer and current world record holder of this trope is, of course, Marth, the star of the original first ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' game who (''VideoGame/FireEmblemAkaneia''). Marth made his (and the series as a whole) his series') Western debut in ''[[VideoGame/SuperSmashBros Super Smash Bros. Melee]]'', Melee]]'' over a decade after the first ''Fire Emblem'' game was released in Japan. His presence and popularity motivated Nintendo to release ''Fire Emblem'' future games in the West at last. franchise internationally. However, since that series uses mostly [[NonLinearSequel Non-Linear Sequels]], it wasn't until 2009 2009, with [[VideoGame/FireEmblemShadowDragonAndTheBladeOfLight the remake of his game]], that Marth himself would not finally appear in any of [[Videogame/FireEmblemAkaneia his own games]], despite appearing in outside the ''Super Smash Brothers'' twice.Bros.'' series. In 2009, the NintendoDS remake of his game (''Shadow Dragon'') at last reached Western shores. This was around ''eight years'' after the various Western releases of ''Melee'' and almost '''nineteen years''' after his initial Famicom {{Famicom}} debut in Japan. Because Japan.
** Technically, this trope could have been called "Marth Debuted in Anime'', as a 1997 anime OVA
of how long it took to localize the game, first ''Fire Emblem'' game was produced and given an English dub by Creator/ADVFilms in 1997, predating even his appearance in ''Smash Bros.'', though he and other characters did receive a DubNameChange.[[labelnote:Speaking of dubs...]]Interestingly, despite this anime giving the character an English voice (Creator/SpikeSpencer), he would not receive one again until ''VideoGame/CodenameSTEAM'' (Creator/YuriLowenthal) almost eighteen years later as [[GrandfatherClause Marth's Japanese voice is retained in the international versions of]] ''Melee'', ''Brawl'', and ''[=3DS/Wii U=]'', instead of being given an English dub. On a different note, the Fire Emblem OVA, which received an English Dub, ''did'' come out in the states... making the instance of Marth having an English voice in ''VideoGame/CodenameSTEAM'' another instance of this, since that's where a lot of people know of Marth speaking English from, rather than the obscure OVA. Which even predated the ''series''' release in the states.
U=]''.[[/labelnote]]
* In comparison, Roy actually '''did''' debut in ''Melee'' -- [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe his own game]] hadn't come out yet in Japan when the game was released, and his inclusion was meant to promote the upcoming game. His game, unlike the first of Marth's (though, unfortunately, not Oddly enough, his second (the series's third installment)), game never even made it to the US, which instead got [[VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe the next game in the series, series]]: a prequel starring his father, Eliwood, in which Roy only makes a cameo in the epilogue as a child. For Europe and Australia, Australia however, this is a straight example, as ''Melee'' was delayed in those regions and came out after Roy's game had already been released in Japan. As with Marth, Roy [[GrandfatherClause continues to speak Japanese regardless of region]], following his [[TheBusCameBack return]] in ''3DS/Wii U'' as a [[DownloadableContent downloadable fighter]].
* As newer ''Fire Emblem'' games have been released internationally, later ''Fire Emblem'' characters in ''Super Smash Bros.'' ([[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Ike]] in ''Brawl'', [[VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening Robin and Lucina]] in ''3DS/Wii U'') have avoided this altogether.
* But this happened ''again''.
When Corrin, the protagonist of ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemFates'', was announced as a DLC character for ''Smash 4'', ''3DS/Wii U'', ''Fates'' had already been released in Japan a few months before, prior, but not internationally. Corrin was released in Smash on Feb. 3, 2016 for the US (Feb. 4th for Europe), 2 weeks before ''Fates's'' US release date (and longer for Europe).internationally. WordOfGod says this was an InvokedTrope, similar to Roy's situation.



* The mobile game ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'' features characters throughout the series, so it'll be the debut for more Japan-only characters that haven't yet appeared elsewhere.

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* The mobile game ''VideoGame/FireEmblemHeroes'' features characters throughout the entire history of the series, so it'll be making it the debut for more many of the characters who had been Japan-only characters that haven't yet appeared elsewhere.
prior to it.



[[AC:RolePlayingGame]]
* The ''Franchise/{{MOTHER}}'' series got hit with this particularly hard.
** A rather notorious example in SSB is Lucas in ''Brawl''. Fans have been hollering for a ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER 3}}'' release ever since it came out in Japan and Nintendo pointedly ignored them... and then Lucas was put into ''Brawl'', and some of his Subspace Emissary missions were spoilers for his game. This remains a sore spot with a lot of Nintendo fans.
** Ness from ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' has been in the first three ''Smash Bros.'' games before his own game got released in Europe's Virtual Console.
** Elements from the first game (songs, the Devil Car enemy in Smash Run, and the 3DS version of Smash 4's Magicant stage), especially now that it has finally been released worldwide as ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings''.

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[[AC:RolePlayingGame]]
[[AC:RolePlayingGame (other than Fire Emblem)]]
* The ''Franchise/{{MOTHER}}'' series got hit with this particularly hard.
** A rather notorious example in SSB is
hard, with Lucas in ''Brawl''. Fans have had been hollering for a ''VideoGame/{{MOTHER 3}}'' release ever since it came out in Japan and [[NoExportForYou Nintendo pointedly ignored them... them]]... and then Lucas was put into ''Brawl'', and some of his Subspace Emissary missions [[LateArrivalSpoiler were spoilers for the final sections of his game.game]]. This remains a sore spot with a lot of Nintendo fans.
** Ness from ''VideoGame/EarthBound'' has been in appeared the first three ''Smash Bros.'' games before his own game eventually got released in Europe's PAL regions through the Virtual Console.
** Elements from the first game ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings'' (songs, the Devil Car enemy in Smash Run, and the Magicant stage in 3DS version of Smash 4's Magicant stage), especially now ''Smash 4'') were this, with that it has finally been released worldwide as ''Videogame/EarthBoundBeginnings''.
game only seeing international release through the Virtual Console in 2015, '''twenty-six years''' after its initial Japan-only release.



* Though previously released for the Nintendo 64 in Japan, Melee's trophy list included characters from ''VideoGame/DoshinTheGiant'' (Doshin and Jashin), ''VideoGame/{{Cubivore}}'' (Alpha), and ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' (Tom Nook, Mr. Resetti and K.K. Slider/Totakeke), all of which had the words "Future release" in their descriptions in the Western releases of Melee. While ''Animal Crossing'' gained worldwide availability (eventually, after two years of waiting in Europe), ''Cubivore'' was released in the US only, while ''Doshin the Giant'' only came out in the PAL regions. NoExportForYou, indeed.

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* Though previously released for the Nintendo 64 in Japan, Melee's trophy list included characters from ''VideoGame/DoshinTheGiant'' (Doshin and Jashin), ''VideoGame/{{Cubivore}}'' (Alpha), and ''VideoGame/AnimalCrossing'' (Tom Nook, Mr. Resetti and K.K. Slider/Totakeke), all of which had the words "Future release" in their descriptions in the Western releases of Melee. While ''Animal Crossing'' gained worldwide availability (eventually, after two years of waiting in Europe), availability, ''Cubivore'' was only released in the US only, US, while ''Doshin the Giant'' only came out in the PAL regions. NoExportForYou, indeed.
15th Feb '17 7:44:57 AM Mario500
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* The Japanese dub of the ''Film/MastersOfTheUniverse'' film was the only thing from the ''Masters of the Universe'' franchise who was shown in Japan, since none of the original animated series were broadcasted there.

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* The Japanese dub of the ''Film/MastersOfTheUniverse'' film was the only thing from the ''Masters of the Universe'' franchise who was shown in Japan, since none of the original animated series were broadcasted broadcast there.
11th Feb '17 4:17:33 PM mimitchi33
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** Irwin also made dolls of Super Sailor Moon, as well as Chibi Moon and her Super form before S and [=SuperS=] premiered in North America.

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** Irwin also made dolls of Super Sailor Moon, as well as Chibi Moon and her Super form Chibi Moon form, before S and [=SuperS=] premiered in North America.
11th Feb '17 4:15:22 PM mimitchi33
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Added DiffLines:

** Irwin also made dolls of Super Sailor Moon, as well as Chibi Moon and her Super form before S and [=SuperS=] premiered in North America.
* The ''Franchise/PrettyCure'' franchise's first appearance in the United States was, oddly enough, on an episode of ''[[Series/IronChef Iron Chef America]]''. In one part of the episode, sardine tacos that had been made by Morimoto Masaharu [[https://ogiuemaniax.com/2010/05/09/well-they-do-say-that-presentation-matters/ were held together]] by origami paper with the cast of ''[[Anime/YesPrettyCure5 Yes! Pretty Cure 5 [=GoGo=]!]]'' printed on it. The franchise would not show up in the United States until five years after the episode had aired.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.MarthDebutedInSmashBros