History Main / MadeOfExplodium

13th Oct '17 2:07:08 PM Abodos
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** The entire Metroid Prime Trilogy gives us Phazon, which in the first game does nothing, except look pretty and kill anything that touches it. In Corruption, several stashes exists throughout the game, holding a large number of crates with Phazon, that blow up when shot enough. And it's not just a modest explosion either, if you shoot them with the Phazon Beam.

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** The entire Metroid Prime Trilogy ''VideoGame/MetroidPrimeTrilogy'' gives us Phazon, which in the first game does nothing, except look pretty and kill anything that touches it. In Corruption, ''VideoGame/MetroidPrime3Corruption'', several stashes exists throughout the game, holding a large number of crates with Phazon, that blow up when shot enough. And it's not just a modest explosion either, if you shoot them with the Phazon Beam.
3rd Oct '17 6:34:58 PM Phys101
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* Invoked in a cartoon in ''ComicStrip/TheFarSide'': A worker is hammering nails, manufacturing a huge weapon. A coworker with a mischievous expression has slipped up behind him with an inflated paper grocery bag, and is about to slam it.
3rd Oct '17 3:30:09 PM randomguy5850
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** Anything elemental fluorine touches, other than an already fluorinated compound like Teflon, bursts into flame as it strips electrons from more stable atoms. This includes things like ''glass'', ''air'', ''metal'', and, in the right conditions, [[BeyondTheImpossible the non-reactive noble gasses]]. The pain goes double if you are dumb enough to put it with sodium or other alkali metals mentioned above (for example, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLOFaWdPxB0 caesium]]...).

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** Anything elemental fluorine touches, other than an already fluorinated compound like Teflon, bursts into flame as it strips electrons from more stable atoms. This includes things like ''glass'', ''air'', ''metal'', and, in the right conditions, [[BeyondTheImpossible the non-reactive noble gasses]]. The pain goes double if you are dumb enough to put it with sodium or other alkali metals mentioned above (for example, with [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TLOFaWdPxB0 caesium]]...cesium]]...).



** And speaking of fluor compounds, [[http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2010/02/23/things_i_wont_work_with_dioxygen_difluoride Dioxygen Difluoride]]. Even when freezing at -183 Celsius, it ''still'' blows up. Just a few molecules of it put together with some sulfur can let out enough energy to rival your breakfast. It's been given the humorous nickname "FOOF" (a pun on its chemical composition) due to its reactivity.

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** And speaking of fluor compounds, [[http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2010/02/23/things_i_wont_work_with_dioxygen_difluoride Dioxygen Difluoride]]. Even when freezing at -183 Celsius, -183°C, it ''still'' blows up. Just a few molecules of it put together with some sulfur can let out enough energy to rival your breakfast. It's been given the humorous nickname "FOOF" (a pun on its chemical composition) due to its reactivity.



*** [[http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2013/01/09/things_i_wont_work_with_azidoazide_azides_more_or_less N-amino azidotetrazole]] is already explodium by itself, but some of the derivatives are even worse. One of them, which isn't named, is explosive enough to go off when trying to get an infrared spectrum of it. In layman's terms, an ''infrared light'' shining on it sets it off. [[https://youtu.be/ckSoDW2-wrc?t=288 One YouTube video]] even cheerfully says that azidoazide azide ([=C2N=]'''14''') can explode ''by itself''. To put it in perspective, most things mentioned in this part of the page have been made in large amounts and even have some use. These compounds don't even have that luxury.

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*** [[http://blogs.sciencemag.org/pipeline/archives/2013/01/09/things_i_wont_work_with_azidoazide_azides_more_or_less N-amino azidotetrazole]] is already explodium by itself, but some of the derivatives are even worse. One of them, which isn't named, is explosive enough to go off when trying to get an infrared spectrum of it. In layman's terms, an ''infrared light'' shining on it sets it off. [[https://youtu.be/ckSoDW2-wrc?t=288 One YouTube video]] even cheerfully says that azidoazide azide ([=C2N=]'''14''') (C[[subscript:2]]N'''[[subscript:14]]''') can explode ''by itself''. To put it in perspective, most things mentioned in this part of the page have been made in large amounts and even have some use. These compounds don't even have that luxury.



** Finally, every contact explosive, starting with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitroglycerin nitroglycerin]] and ending with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_triiodide nitrogen triiodide]]. [=NI3=] has been known to explode when exposed to radiation. That's right, a contact explosive so sensitive that ''bits of atoms hitting it'' will set it off. Curiously, [=NI3=] is only explosive when dry. As it's made using a wet chemical process (that is, one involving being dissolved in water), making it is perfectly safe, and leaves you with a solution you can paint on a surface and allow to dry to a thin layer of explosive that will detonate on contact (but not be thick enough to ''carry'' the explosion past the points of contact or produce enough force to be dangerous, if you do it properly). There are reports that painting various surfaces in bathrooms (such as the floor, or toilet seats) with this went through a phase of being a popular prank in at least one teacher's college.

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** Finally, every contact explosive, starting with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitroglycerin nitroglycerin]] and ending with [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nitrogen_triiodide nitrogen triiodide]]. [=NI3=] NI[[subscript:3]] has been known to explode when exposed to radiation. That's right, a contact explosive so sensitive that ''bits of atoms hitting it'' will set it off. Curiously, [=NI3=] NI[[subscript:3]] is only explosive when dry. As it's made using a wet chemical process (that is, one involving being dissolved in water), making it is perfectly safe, and leaves you with a solution you can paint on a surface and allow to dry to a thin layer of explosive that will detonate on contact (but not be thick enough to ''carry'' the explosion past the points of contact or produce enough force to be dangerous, if you do it properly). There are reports that painting various surfaces in bathrooms (such as the floor, or toilet seats) with this went through a phase of being a popular prank in at least one teacher's college.



* Wet charge in a SteelMill. A charge of scrap containing water, snow or other watery impurities such as organic residues, or oil or lubricants, loaded in an electric arc furnace or basic oxygen furnace, will cause a VERY showy - and dangerous - explosion. The water or oil will evaporate suddenly and splash molten steel and gases around, causing havoc and even damaging the oven itself. This is called a wet charge. The usual way of avoiding it is to pre-heat the charge to 300 degrees C to evaporate and burn off any moisture and oil.
* Noble Gas compounds tend to be... touchy. The fluorides and oxides are an uneasy partnership of either Fluorine or Oxygen (both of which love stealing electrons) and an element that does not like sharing electrons. Eventually, the Noble Gas will get its electrons back while the Fluorine and Oxygen atoms go off to fluorinate or oxidize something else. Xenon compounds are also known to be among the strongest oxidisers, so even if it doesn't blow up on its own, any trace of organics will make it explode.

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* Wet charge in a SteelMill. A charge of scrap containing water, snow or other watery impurities such as organic residues, or oil or lubricants, loaded in an electric arc furnace or basic oxygen furnace, will cause a VERY showy - and dangerous - explosion. The water or oil will evaporate suddenly and splash molten steel and gases around, causing havoc and even damaging the oven itself. This is called a wet charge. The usual way of avoiding it is to pre-heat the charge to 300 degrees C 300°C to evaporate and burn off any moisture and oil.
* Noble Gas gas compounds tend to be... touchy. The fluorides and oxides are an uneasy partnership of either Fluorine fluorine or Oxygen oxygen (both of which love stealing electrons) and an element that does not like sharing electrons. Eventually, the Noble Gas noble gas will get its electrons back while the Fluorine fluorine and Oxygen oxygen atoms go off to fluorinate or oxidize something else. Xenon compounds are also known to be among the strongest oxidisers, oxidizers, so even if it doesn't blow up on its own, any trace of organics will make it explode.



* A TearJerker example: On January 27, 1967, during a ground test inside their Command Module spacecraft, atop an unfueled rocket, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_1 Apollo 1]] crew of first American spacewalker Ed White, second American in space Gus Grissom and rookie Roger Chaffee were asphyxiated in 15 seconds when the interior of their spacecraft burst into flame. Internal electrical flaws caused a spark. Worst of all, the spacecraft was pressurized at 15 psi with a pure-oxygen atmosphere, soaking even flame-resistant materials to the point that they would burn. The spacecraft burst as the internal pressure reached over 29 psi during the fire. The redesigned Command Module not only proved fireproof as the moon missions began, but ''waterproof''. When the Apollo 13 command module lost all long-term power and had to be shutdown for an emergency flight home in April, 1970, significant water condensation built up inside the spacecraft. Thankfully, there were no electrical shorts when the command module was restarted from battery power as the crew prepped the spacecraft for its reentry and splashdown.

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* A TearJerker example: On January 27, 1967, during a ground test inside their Command Module spacecraft, atop an unfueled rocket, the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_1 Apollo 1]] crew of first American spacewalker Ed White, second American in space Gus Grissom and rookie Roger Chaffee were asphyxiated in 15 seconds when the interior of their spacecraft burst into flame. Internal electrical flaws caused a spark. Worst of all, the spacecraft was pressurized at 15 psi with a pure-oxygen atmosphere, soaking even flame-resistant materials to the point that they would burn. The spacecraft burst as the internal pressure reached over 29 psi during the fire. The redesigned Command Module not only proved fireproof as the moon missions began, but ''waterproof''. When the Apollo 13 command module lost all long-term power and had to be shutdown for an emergency flight home in April, April 1970, significant water condensation built up inside the spacecraft. Thankfully, there were no electrical shorts when the command module was restarted from battery power as the crew prepped the spacecraft for its reentry and splashdown.
2nd Oct '17 11:17:47 AM StarTropes
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* {{Space|DoesNotWorkThatWay}}craft (especially when there's {{antimatter}} on board

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* {{Space|DoesNotWorkThatWay}}craft (especially when there's {{antimatter}} on boardboard)
2nd Oct '17 11:17:34 AM StarTropes
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* {{Space|DoesNotWorkThatWay}}craft

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* {{Space|DoesNotWorkThatWay}}craft{{Space|DoesNotWorkThatWay}}craft (especially when there's {{antimatter}} on board
20th Sep '17 9:56:12 AM CV12Hornet
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion The Halifax Explosion of 1917]]. It was caused when a passenger ship (the ''Imo'') hit a ship carrying thousands of pounds of explosives. The accident caused a fire on board, and the crew [[ScrewThis exited Dodge as fast as possible]], leaving the ship to drift against the docks. While it was there, the fire reached the cargo, and then everything exploded.

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion The Halifax Explosion of 1917]]. It was caused when a passenger ship (the ''Imo'') hit a ship carrying thousands of pounds of explosives. The accident caused a fire on board, and the crew [[ScrewThis [[ScrewThisImOuttaHere exited Dodge as fast as possible]], leaving the ship to drift against the docks. While it was there, the fire reached the cargo, and then everything exploded.
2nd Jul '17 2:06:25 PM ObsequiousEscargot
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* Averted in Steven Spielberg's ''The Duel''. Dennis Weaver is chased by a tanker truck all that time, [[spoiler:and it doesn't even explode?!]] Poor Dennis.
2nd Jul '17 11:33:40 AM nombretomado
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** And just to show that someone (probably ''thousands'' of "someones") have far too much free time on their hands, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minovsky_particles#Minovsky_Ultracompact_Fusion_Reactor this page]] on TheOtherWiki relating to the AppliedPhlebotinum specific to ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' includes a discussion on exactly why Mobile Suits are Made of Explodium.

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** And just to show that someone (probably ''thousands'' of "someones") have far too much free time on their hands, [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minovsky_particles#Minovsky_Ultracompact_Fusion_Reactor this page]] on TheOtherWiki Wiki/TheOtherWiki relating to the AppliedPhlebotinum specific to ''Franchise/{{Gundam}}'' includes a discussion on exactly why Mobile Suits are Made of Explodium.
23rd Jun '17 4:07:50 AM Andyroid
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* In ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'', there's a mission where you have to rescue a potential ally from a BDSM club with him pulling a pony cart that you and Pierce are riding. The Morningstar follow suit, but when you shoot the gimps pulling the carts, they explode like if you had destroyed any other vehicle.
** The sequel gives you superpowers one of which is basically a fire blast. With an upgrade any enemy killed by the fire blast will explode, possibly setting nearby [=NPCs=]/vehicles on fire. Add that to the fact vehicles explode when damaged enough anyway, battles can get [[StuffBlowingUp interesting.]]

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* In ''VideoGame/SaintsRowTheThird'', there's a mission where you have to rescue a potential ally from a BDSM club with him pulling a pony cart that you and Pierce are riding. The Morningstar follow suit, but when you shoot the gimps pulling the carts, they explode like if you had destroyed any other vehicle.
** The sequel
vehicle.[[note]]WordOfGod is they just used the same physics engine for cars as for the pony carts, and kept the explosions in because [[RuleOfFunny a good chunk of the development team thought it was funny]].[[/note]]
* ''VideoGame/SaintsRowIV''
gives you superpowers superpowers, one of which is basically a fire blast. With an upgrade any enemy killed by the fire blast will explode, possibly setting nearby [=NPCs=]/vehicles on fire. Add that to the fact vehicles explode when damaged enough anyway, battles can get [[StuffBlowingUp interesting.]]
7th Jun '17 10:18:08 PM AnonFangeekGirl
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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion The Halifax Explosion of 1917]].

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* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Explosion The Halifax Explosion of 1917]]. It was caused when a passenger ship (the ''Imo'') hit a ship carrying thousands of pounds of explosives. The accident caused a fire on board, and the crew [[ScrewThis exited Dodge as fast as possible]], leaving the ship to drift against the docks. While it was there, the fire reached the cargo, and then everything exploded.
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