History Main / LudicrousPrecision

20th Jun '17 11:44:45 PM Nulono
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* In the hard sciences (especially physics and chemistry) the use of significant digits is a necessity to correctly reflect the variations between measuring devices and to understand the meaning of the margin of error (and use it). If you are measuring something to the thousandth decimal place, having a reading that just goes to the tenth decimal place is an incongruity (if you are using the same device you can't have both .005 and .05 as measurements, the second number has to be .050 or something with that added decimal place). All that said, unless you are going into something like particle physics there is almost no real world need to be that precise (i.e. a house isn't going to collapse if you are .5 cm off on the span of a beam). This is also part of the reason a lot of old-line engineers miss slide rules -- taking calculator results too literally frequently leads to false precision when it isn't needed. However, besides physics, in classical analytical chemistry (i.e., the kind that nobody does anymore since the advent of spectrometry and spectroscopy methods: gravimetry, titrations, potentiometric analysis etc.) high precision is ''vital'' if it's a quantitative analysis. Same goes for reagent masses in synthesis. Yes, it can really make a difference if you use 0.572 instead of 0.579 g of a reagent.

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* In the hard sciences (especially physics and chemistry) the use of significant digits is a necessity to correctly reflect the variations between measuring devices and to understand the meaning of the margin of error (and use it). If you are measuring something to the thousandth decimal place, having a reading that just goes to the tenth decimal place is an incongruity (if you are using the same device you can't have both .005 and .05 as measurements, measurements; the second number has to be .050 or something with that added decimal place). All that said, unless you are going into something like particle physics there is almost no real world need to be that precise (i.e. a house isn't going to collapse if you are .5 cm off on the span of a beam). This is also part of the reason a lot of old-line engineers miss slide rules -- taking calculator results too literally frequently leads to false precision when it isn't needed. However, besides physics, in classical analytical chemistry (i.e., the kind that nobody does anymore since the advent of spectrometry and spectroscopy methods: gravimetry, titrations, potentiometric analysis etc.) high precision is ''vital'' if it's a quantitative analysis. Same goes for reagent masses in synthesis. Yes, it can really make a difference if you use 0.572 instead of 0.579 g of a reagent.
17th Jun '17 11:34:01 PM Lapuspuer
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* Often PlayedForLaughs in the comics of Creator/CarlBarks and Creator/DonRosa, where it became a RunningGag to give the value Scrooge [=McDuck=]'s fortune as [[EleventyZillion some ludicrously huge number]] plus sixteen cents (or similar). In fact, the page image for EleventyZillion is an example of this.
5th Jun '17 3:36:23 PM ZombieAladdin
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* During the supercomputer Watson's run on ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}'', whenever Watson was asked to make a wager in Daily Double or Final Jeopardy, it would bet amounts as precise as the show's rules would allow, based on its calculations on how likely its answer was correct. Human players almost always bet round numbers. Watson, instead, would bet amounts like $6435 or $947.
12th May '17 8:53:12 AM Trueman001
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* Each 250ml bottle of Original Source Mint shower gel is made with 7,927 leaves of mint. Because, as we all know, using only 7,926 leaves just wouldn't cut it.
5th May '17 8:58:35 PM Anorgil
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See also MouthfulOfPi and GoodWithNumbers. Often used by characters like the ClockKing. Sounds like, but is (usually) unrelated to, ImprobableAimingSkills. AndNinetyNineCents is a trope that plays with this one. Compare to YourDaysAreNumbered.

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See also MouthfulOfPi and GoodWithNumbers. Often used by characters like the ClockKing. Sounds like, but is (usually) unrelated to, ImprobableAimingSkills.ImprobableAimingSkills[[note]]The few times that they are related are when the mass, force, and trajectory of a missile are explicitly and precisely calculated[[/note]]. AndNinetyNineCents is a trope that plays with this one. Compare to YourDaysAreNumbered.
21st Apr '17 12:25:20 AM C2
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'''Han Solo:''' NeverTellMeTheOdds!

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'''Han Solo:''' NeverTellMeTheOdds!NeverTellMeTheOdds
28th Mar '17 11:13:18 AM Anorgil
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* In ''{{Series/Firefly}}'', this is how River killed three of Niska's henchmen: She memorized their positions and "did the math."
11th Mar '17 12:04:48 PM nombretomado
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* Played for laughs in ''MetalWolfChaos'' where Jody flat-out ''guessing'' it will take the Alcatraz Cannon four minutes to recharge turns out to be accurate to the nearest hundredth of a second.

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* Played for laughs in ''MetalWolfChaos'' ''VideoGame/MetalWolfChaos'' where Jody flat-out ''guessing'' it will take the Alcatraz Cannon four minutes to recharge turns out to be accurate to the nearest hundredth of a second.
3rd Feb '17 10:39:17 AM Sullivan
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* So far one of the few practical applications for ludicrous precision that many people take for granted is GPS. A GPS receiver uses the differences in time it received radio waves from the satellites to triangulate position. The thing is, the clocks in the GPS have to be really, ''really'' accurate, on the order of being within 50ns of each other. The reason is because since you're using how long it took for the radio waves to travel (which travel at light speed), if they're off even by a microsecond, the position can be over 300 meters off. It's actually even worse than it sounds, since at that precision it has to account for both general and special relativity as well due to the satellites traveling at a much higher speed relative to you.

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* So far one of the few practical applications for ludicrous precision that many people take for granted is GPS. Each GPS satellite constantly transmits its current time and position. A GPS receiver uses the differences in the time reports it received radio waves receives from multiple satellites to calculate its position. The clocks in the satellites to triangulate position. The thing is, the clocks in the GPS have to be really, ''really'' accurate, on the order of being within 50ns of each other. The reason is because since you're using how long it took for other, to allow the radio waves receivers to travel (which travel at light speed), if they're off even by a microsecond, the display position can be over 300 meters off. It's actually even worse than it sounds, since at that precision it has to account for both general and special relativity as well due to the precisely as they do. The satellites traveling at carry rubidium clocks, a much higher speed relative to you.type of atomic clock, and even these must be monitored and adjusted daily.
7th Jan '17 3:06:55 PM nombretomado
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* The original ''WebVideo/LeeroyJenkinsVideo'': [[MemeticMutation "I'm coming up with thirty-two point three three, repeating of course, percentage of survival."]] (The [[GeniusBonus subtler]] joke is that "thirty-''three'' point three three repeating" is an [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness overelaborate]] way of saying "1 in 3 chance," a much more believable result; so their statistics guy probably doesn't know what he's doing, much like the rest of the team.)

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* The original ''WebVideo/LeeroyJenkinsVideo'': ''Machinima/LeeroyJenkinsVideo'': [[MemeticMutation "I'm coming up with thirty-two point three three, repeating of course, percentage of survival."]] (The [[GeniusBonus subtler]] joke is that "thirty-''three'' point three three repeating" is an [[SesquipedalianLoquaciousness overelaborate]] way of saying "1 in 3 chance," a much more believable result; so their statistics guy probably doesn't know what he's doing, much like the rest of the team.)
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