History Main / LuckyTranslation

21st May '17 5:05:26 PM nombretomado
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* In the original ''Manga/LuckyStar'', Konata Izumi's favourite anime icon is ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'', and many of the jokes are dependent on the fact that the two are voiced by the same person (Creator/AyaHirano). The jokes were left in the English dub because luckily, the same English voice actress (WendeeLee) ''also'' had enough range to play both Haruhi and Konata. The same goes for Creator/MinoruShiraishi in regards to Taniguchi (SamRiegel plays both in the dub).

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* In the original ''Manga/LuckyStar'', Konata Izumi's favourite anime icon is ''LightNovel/HaruhiSuzumiya'', and many of the jokes are dependent on the fact that the two are voiced by the same person (Creator/AyaHirano). The jokes were left in the English dub because luckily, the same English voice actress (WendeeLee) (Creator/WendeeLee) ''also'' had enough range to play both Haruhi and Konata. The same goes for Creator/MinoruShiraishi in regards to Taniguchi (SamRiegel plays both in the dub).
17th May '17 2:22:59 AM Cryoclaste
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** The name of [[SuperMarioBros Mario's]] EvilTwin, "Wario," is originally a {{portmanteau}} of the Japanese word "waru" (bad) and Mario. Thanks to the negative connotations of the word "war" in the English language, and the fact that "W" can be read as an upside-down "M", Mario fans the world over are treated to a wordplay that translates exceptionally well.

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** The name of [[SuperMarioBros [[Franchise/SuperMarioBros Mario's]] EvilTwin, "Wario," is originally a {{portmanteau}} of the Japanese word "waru" (bad) and Mario. Thanks to the negative connotations of the word "war" in the English language, and the fact that "W" can be read as an upside-down "M", Mario fans the world over are treated to a wordplay that translates exceptionally well.
2nd May '17 1:29:34 AM Milarqui
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** During "Thirty Minutes Over Tokyo" (the episode where the family visits Japan) Homer tells Emperor Akihito (mistaking him for a sumo wrestler) "As we say in my country, '[[Franchise/TheTerminator Hasta la vista, baby]]'!". The Spanish version of that sentence is '¡Sayonara, baby!', "Sayonara" being a Japanese word.
9th Mar '17 7:21:05 AM pinkdalek
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* The word ''emoji'' is derived from Japanese 'e' (picture) and 'moji' (word). It coincidentally happens to sound like the English 'emotion', so when they took off in the West, English speakers understood from the name that they were expressive picture-words.
4th Mar '17 3:46:09 PM Emperor_Oshron
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* There is the Russian joke: "Какая разница между слоном и роялем?" ("What's the difference between a grand piano and an elephant?"). The answer is "К роялю можно прислонится, а к слону нельзя прироялиться" ("You can lean upon a grand piano, put you can't grandpiano upon an elephant"), which works because the root of "leaning upon" is "slon", same as the word for elephant. A very similar joke exists in Hebrew, where the answer to the same question is "פסנתר אפשר להפיל, אבל פיל אי אפשר לפסנתר" ("You can drop a piano, but you can't piano an elephant"), which works because the Hebrew word for elephant is "pil'", and the one for "to drop" is "lehapil'".

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* There is the Russian joke: "Какая разница между слоном и роялем?" ("What's the difference between a grand piano and an elephant?"). The answer is "К роялю можно прислонится, а к слону нельзя прироялиться" ("You can lean upon a grand piano, put you can't grandpiano upon an elephant"), which works because the root of "leaning upon" is "slon", same as the word for elephant. A very similar joke exists in Hebrew, where the answer to the same question is "פסנתר אפשר להפיל, אבל פיל אי אפשר לפסנתר" ("You can drop a piano, but you can't piano an elephant"), which works because the Hebrew word for elephant is "pil'", and the one for "to drop" is "lehapil'". Think of it like the English pun "What's the difference between a fish and a piano? You can tune a piano but you can't tuna (tune a) fish."
25th Feb '17 11:58:46 PM ninjamitsuki2
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* A joke in ''Anime/GinTama'' involved characters [[ItMakesJustAsMuchSenseInContext becoming sick and turning into]] Creator/WillSmith. He's called "Virus Smith". In Japanese "Virus" and "Wills" are pronounced similarly, so it's a pun. This pun doesn't work with English pronunciation, so the subs decided to go with an equally fitting English pun, "Ill Smith".
20th Feb '17 2:04:14 AM MoonlightBomber
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* In episode 6 of the ''Anime/KantaiCollection'' anime, Akatsuki attempts to say the word "elegant" in GratuitousEnglish but ends up saying "elephant". In the Filipino dub, this is translated as "elegante" and "elepante", with the exact meanings intact.
18th Feb '17 3:30:01 AM Zeke
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* The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' series is filled with {{Punny Name}}s, and some actually went well in the translation: Misty in Japanese was called Kasumi, the word for "mist", for example.

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* The ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' examples:
** The
series is filled with {{Punny Name}}s, and some actually went well in the translation: Misty in Japanese was called Kasumi, the word for "mist", for example.example.
** The second movie, ''Anime/{{Pokemon 2000}}'', involves a prophecy about a disaster that only TheChosenOne (Ash, naturally) can stop. There's no wordplay here in the Japanese original, but the English translators couldn't resist adding some: the prophecy's English version says that "the earth shall turn to ash". Translators into other languages had to decide what to do with this -- Ash is still Ash in most places, but the pun only works in English. Several translations solved the problem by outright citing the English pun (i.e. the characters notice that Ash's name is the English word for that stuff the earth shall turn to). But the Italian translators got lucky: they noticed that the prophecy could be rephrased to include the words "a scendere", pronounced "Ash endere"!



* In ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'', a serial killer character obsessed with romanticised pretty boys explains that she kills people because she is a "rotten girl", which in addition to a description of her character is the Japanese term for a YaoiFangirl. The Project Zetsubou FanTranslation changed this to "[[SlashFic slash]]er", which has a similarly appropriate double meaning for a serial killer.

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* In ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'', The Project Zetsubou FanTranslation of ''VisualNovel/{{Danganronpa}}'' benefitted from a few lucky accidents:
** A
serial killer character obsessed with romanticised pretty boys explains that she kills people because she is a "rotten girl", which in addition to a description of her character is the Japanese term for a YaoiFangirl. The YaoiFangirl (fujoshi). Project Zetsubou FanTranslation changed this to "[[SlashFic slash]]er", which has a similarly appropriate double meaning for a serial killer.killer.
** The same character takes to addressing Byakuya as "Byakuya-sama". To get the worshipful tone across, Project Zetsubou had her say "my white knight" -- and Byakuya's name literally means white ''night''. (They say in their TL notes that this "fell into place so well itís almost scary".)
** Monokuma likes to talk about the students' "koroshiai", a pun that means "Killing School Life". While mulling this one over, the Zetsubou staff noticed that this word looked a lot like "koroshiamu", which is how Japanese renders the English word "coliseum" -- and that word ''just happens'' to make a good translation on multiple levels!
24th Jan '17 11:31:04 PM PaulA
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* In the original French ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'', Obelix's dog is named Idéfix (a pun on ''idée fixe'', or fixed idea). "Dogmatix" is a more-or-less accurate translation ''and'' a pun on "dog".
** The names "Astérix" and "Obélix" themselves are quite fortunate as the pun on "Asterisk" and "Obelisk" work in English - and most languages - as well, meaning translators don't have to change the title characters' names.

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* In the original French ''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'', Obelix's dog is named Idéfix (a pun on ''idée fixe'', or fixed idea). "Dogmatix" is a more-or-less accurate translation ''and'' a pun on "dog".
''ComicBook/{{Asterix}}'':
** The names "Astérix" and "Obélix" themselves are quite fortunate as the pun on "Asterisk" and "Obelisk" work in English - and most languages - as well, meaning translators don't have to change the title characters' names.names.
** In the original French, Obelix's dog is named Idéfix (a pun on ''idée fixe'', or fixed idea, because on his first appearance he doggedly followed Obelix everywhere). "Dogmatix" is a more-or-less accurate translation ''and'' a pun on "dog".
6th Jan '17 4:21:13 AM ExeloMinish
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* In ''Mother 2'' (the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/EarthBound''), there's a pun about "Alps no Shoujo ___ji" (Hai/Iie). In the English localization, ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', this is translated as "A Beatles song, ___terday" (Yes/No). Apparently this sort of pun doesn't work in any other language.

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* In ''Mother 2'' (the Japanese version of ''VideoGame/EarthBound''), there's a pun about "Alps "[[Anime/HeidiGirlOfTheAlps Alps no Shoujo ___ji" ___ji]]" (Hai/Iie). In the English localization, ''VideoGame/EarthBound'', this is translated as "A Beatles song, ___terday" (Yes/No). Apparently this sort of pun doesn't work in any other language.
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