History Main / LuckyTranslation

27th Jan '16 10:28:18 AM Willbyr
Is there an issue? Send a Message

* ''IchigoMashimaro'': Nobue's name sounds close enough to "no boobies" that Miu was able to spin an insult out of it.
to:
* ''IchigoMashimaro'': ''Manga/StrawberryMarshmallow'': Nobue's name sounds close enough to "no boobies" that Miu was able to spin an insult out of it.

* At one point in the [[LadyLand Amazon Lily]] arc of ''OnePiece'', Luffy is being stared at completely naked by a group of amazons who don't know anything about men. When one of them asks what's in the 'bag' attached between his legs, Luffy replies with 'kintama', which is a Japanese slang term for testicles that also means 'balls of gold', so of course the amazons think he's saying that he has actual balls of gold between his legs. The English translation uses 'family jewels', which fits the joke perfectly.
to:
* At one point in the [[LadyLand Amazon Lily]] arc of ''OnePiece'', ''Manga/OnePiece'', Luffy is being stared at completely naked by a group of amazons who don't know anything about men. When one of them asks what's in the 'bag' attached between his legs, Luffy replies with 'kintama', which is a Japanese slang term for testicles that also means 'balls of gold', so of course the amazons think he's saying that he has actual balls of gold between his legs. The English translation uses 'family jewels', which fits the joke perfectly.
31st Dec '15 7:56:26 PM Specialist290
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Lewis Carroll, not wanting to ridicule clergy, did not feature Bishops in ''[[Literature/AliceInWonderland Through the Looking Glass]]''. However, it still featured two Messengers of the White King -- and in some languages (German, Polish) chess bishops are called runners or messengers. In French they're called ''fou'' -- fools, which triples the lucky translation, as the messengers are [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the March Hare and the Mad Hatter. However, because Carroll was an educated Victorian, it is possible that he was already aware at least of the French terminology.
to:
* Lewis Carroll, not wanting to ridicule clergy, did not feature Bishops in ''[[Literature/AliceInWonderland Through the Looking Glass]]''. However, it still featured two Messengers of the White King -- and in some languages (German, Polish) chess bishops are called runners or messengers. In French they're called ''fou'' -- fools, which triples the lucky translation, as the messengers are [[{{Expy}} Expies]] of the March Hare and the Mad Hatter. However, because Carroll was an educated Victorian, it is possible that he was already aware at least of the French terminology. For that matter, he was probably also aware of ancient Greek as well -- the word for "messenger" in that language is the etymological root for the word "evangelist."
30th Dec '15 11:45:16 AM Psyclone
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* In the Portuguese dub of ''WesternAnimation/MonstersVsAliens'', Doctor Cockroach PhD's name becomes "Professor Barata". While "barata" is the literal translation of "Cockroach", it's also a real Portuguese surname that happens to be significantly associated with academia.
16th Dec '15 12:38:42 PM tropower
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Removed duplicate entry.
* In VideoGame/StreetFighterII, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets to cut costs (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[{{Mondegreen}} misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my crescent!/my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
16th Dec '15 12:35:57 PM tropower
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Not quite. "Warui" is an informal, somewhat condescending way of apologizing.
* The name of [[SuperMarioBros Mario's]] EvilTwin, "Wario," is originally a {{portmanteau}} of the Japanese word "warui" (bad) and Mario. Thanks to the negative connotations of the word "war" in the English language, and the fact that "W" can be read as an upside-down "M", Mario fans the world over are treated to a wordplay that translates exceptionally well. ** Luigi's rival, "Waluigi", still works but a little less well. In Japan, it's an even better pun on "warui" than "Wario" is. Anywhere else, it hinges on the fact that there's already an established EvilTwin whose name starts with "Wa". [[StuckInTheirShadow Seems that Luigi doesn't even get his own nemesis without Mario overshadowing him.]] In Japanese, "Waluigi" (or rather the more literal "waruiji") is also an anagram for "ijiwaru", which more or less translates as "mean", which Waluigi (and Wario for that matter) are. ** Polish language has "wariować" which means "to go insane" and "wariat" for a crazy person. It's like the lottery grand prize of lucky translations.
to:
* The name of [[SuperMarioBros Mario's]] EvilTwin, "Wario," is originally a {{portmanteau}} of the Japanese word "warui" "waru" (bad) and Mario. Thanks to the negative connotations of the word "war" in the English language, and the fact that "W" can be read as an upside-down "M", Mario fans the world over are treated to a wordplay that translates exceptionally well. ** Luigi's rival, "Waluigi", still works but a little less well. In Japan, it's an even better pun on "warui" than "Wario" is. Anywhere well, since anywhere else, it hinges on the fact that there's already an established EvilTwin whose name starts with "Wa". [[StuckInTheirShadow Seems that Luigi doesn't even get his own nemesis without Mario overshadowing him.]] ]]. In Japanese, it's a pun on "warui", which is an informal, somewhat condescending way of apologizing. "Waluigi" (or rather the more literal "waruiji") is also an anagram for "ijiwaru", which more or less translates as "mean", which Waluigi (and Wario for that matter) are. ** The Polish language has "wariować" which means "to go insane" and "wariat" for a crazy person. It's like the lottery grand prize of lucky translations.
16th Dec '15 12:27:02 PM tropower
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* ''Manga/{{Toriko}} has an arc that involves a temple called "Shokurin Tera". "Shokurin" is a pun both "shoku", one of the words for "food", and "shourin", the Japanese pronunciation of "Xiao Lin". Both the official manga and anime translations (by Viz and Funimation respectively) successfully preserve the pun by translating it as the "Chow-lin Temple".
to:
* ''Manga/{{Toriko}} ''Manga/{{Toriko}}'' has an arc that involves a temple called "Shokurin Tera". "Shokurin" is a pun both "shoku", one of the words for "food", and "shourin", the Japanese pronunciation of "Xiao Lin". Both the official manga and anime translations (by Viz and Funimation respectively) successfully preserve the pun by translating it as the "Chow-lin Temple".
16th Dec '15 12:26:40 PM tropower
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Added DiffLines:
* ''Manga/{{Toriko}} has an arc that involves a temple called "Shokurin Tera". "Shokurin" is a pun both "shoku", one of the words for "food", and "shourin", the Japanese pronunciation of "Xiao Lin". Both the official manga and anime translations (by Viz and Funimation respectively) successfully preserve the pun by translating it as the "Chow-lin Temple".
5th Dec '15 9:07:37 AM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In VideoGame/StreetFighterII, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[{{Mondegreen}} misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my crescent!/my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
to:
* In VideoGame/StreetFighterII, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets to cut costs (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[{{Mondegreen}} misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my crescent!/my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
5th Dec '15 9:06:59 AM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In VideoGame/StreetFighterII, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[Mondegreen misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
to:
* In VideoGame/StreetFighterII, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[Mondegreen [[{{Mondegreen}} misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my crescent!/my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
5th Dec '15 9:06:16 AM RAMChYLD
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In VideoGame/StreetFighter2, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[Mondegreen misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
to:
* In VideoGame/StreetFighter2, VideoGame/StreetFighterII, Guile's attack is called a ''Sonic Boom''. In Malaysia (and certain parts of Indonesia), due to arcades usually retrofitting games into older cabinets (made possible due to the JAMMA standard) and then turning up the volume on the machines to the point where there's distortions, Guile's attacks are often [[Mondegreen misheard]] as ''Sabit-ku''. Strangely enough, this actually translates to ''my sickle!'', which works because ''the sonic booms are rendered as spinning crescents on screen''.
This list shows the last 10 events of 436. Show all.