History Main / LoyalToThePosition

7th Jan '16 7:07:25 PM SaniOKh
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* In ''Series/ServantOfThePeople'', Vasiliy inherits two employees from the outgoing president who simply keep doing their job: a secretary and a bodyguard. The latter is in fact so loyal to his job, that when Vasiliy fires him, he loses all sense of purpose in life, and once hired back, resumes doing his job as if nothing happened.
25th Nov '15 8:26:41 PM LadyJaneGrey
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* A curious inversion happens in the original ''WesternAnimation/{{Thundercats}}''. Mum-Rah is a servant of four evil entities called the Ancient Spirits of Evil, and gains his powers from them. However, as Snarf discovered, these four beings will grant the same powers to ''anyone'' who enters the burial chamber and requests it. (Possibly they have a weird sense of humor or are capable of outright betrayal, but then, they ''are'' evil.)
10th Sep '15 5:21:26 PM Khathi
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* Anastas Mikoyan, a Soviet public servant and politician who started his career under Lenin, survived Stalinism from beginning to end, went through Khruschev's reforms and survived a coup against him and finished his career under Leonid Brezhnev. There was even a saying about him: ''From Ilyich (''Lenin'') to Ilyich (''Brezhnev'') without cardiac arrest and paralysis (От Ильича до Ильича без инфаркта и паралича) (Ot Ilyicha do Ilyicha bez infarkta i paralicha'').

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* Anastas Mikoyan, a Soviet public servant and politician who started his career under Lenin, survived Stalinism from beginning to end, went through Khruschev's reforms and survived a coup against him and finished his career under Leonid Brezhnev. There was even a saying about him: ''From Ilyich (''Lenin'') to Ilyich (''Brezhnev'') without cardiac arrest and paralysis (От Ильича до Ильича без инфаркта и паралича) (Ot Ilyicha do Ilyicha bez infarkta i paralicha''). It helps that he was always more of a technocrat [[VetinariJobSecurity working the essential state functions]], leaving ''the politicking'' to the others, and, being an Armenian, [[SlaveToPR he was a display case]] of the Soviet Union's self-professed interntionalism and multiculturalism.
7th Sep '15 4:09:24 AM AdamC
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* In the backstory of ''VideoGame/{{Bioshock}}'', this was Suchong's whole deal. Originally he worked with Frank Fontaine to engineer plasmids and experiment with ADAM. But once Andrew Ryan killed Fontaine and assimilated his business empire into his own, Suchong had no qualms whatsoever with jumping ship to Ryan's company to do exactly the same thing he did for Frank. In his backstory he was a Korean doctor who dealt opium on the side. When the Japanese forces killed every member of his village, he was left alive because he happily offered to extend his services to the new occupying force.
-->"Fontaine is dead. Bad for Fontaine. Good for Suchong."
4th Sep '15 7:55:17 PM nombretomado
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* A good RealLife example was the French statesman [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talleyrand Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord]]. He was a bishop under Louis XVI, held various posts in the governments of the French revolutionary period from 1789, was NapoleonBonaparte's Foreign Minister and was then brought back to be Foreign Minister after 1815 when Napoleon had been defeated and the Bourbon monarchs had returned. He is famously quoted as saying: "Regimes may fall and fail, but I do not." He achieved this by making sure he always backed the stronger side, even when this involved blatantly betraying his current employer. Napoleon once called him "shit in silk stockings, probably after they had a political split over the Peninsular War. He wasn't as bad as all that, and he was quite talented, which just as much as his flexible principles is why everybody kept hiring him as senior staff. He got a worsened rap in England after ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' got popular--the series has a really nasty villain based on him.

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* A good RealLife example was the French statesman [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talleyrand Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord]]. He was a bishop under Louis XVI, held various posts in the governments of the French revolutionary period from 1789, was NapoleonBonaparte's UsefulNotes/NapoleonBonaparte's Foreign Minister and was then brought back to be Foreign Minister after 1815 when Napoleon had been defeated and the Bourbon monarchs had returned. He is famously quoted as saying: "Regimes may fall and fail, but I do not." He achieved this by making sure he always backed the stronger side, even when this involved blatantly betraying his current employer. Napoleon once called him "shit in silk stockings, probably after they had a political split over the Peninsular War. He wasn't as bad as all that, and he was quite talented, which just as much as his flexible principles is why everybody kept hiring him as senior staff. He got a worsened rap in England after ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' got popular--the series has a really nasty villain based on him.
30th Mar '15 10:46:47 AM nombretomado
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* Valharik, the captain of the guard in Melnibone, upon Yyrkoon's taking of power in the first novel of ''TheElricSaga'', betrayed his mistress Cymoril, Elric's LoveInterest, and took her to her tower. He cut down one of his own men who tried to defend her against Yyrkoon, and on Yyrkoon's orders, he fed the poor guy to Cymoril's slaves. When Elric takes back the Ruby Throne from Yyrkoon, Valharik explains that he serves the Ruby Throne, no matter who sits upon it. Needless to say, Elric doesn't buy this, and in a truly ruthless move, he sentences Valharik to execution, with his flesh to be fed to Yyrkoon at the feast that Elric plans to hold.

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* Valharik, the captain of the guard in Melnibone, upon Yyrkoon's taking of power in the first novel of ''TheElricSaga'', ''Literature/TheElricSaga'', betrayed his mistress Cymoril, Elric's LoveInterest, and took her to her tower. He cut down one of his own men who tried to defend her against Yyrkoon, and on Yyrkoon's orders, he fed the poor guy to Cymoril's slaves. When Elric takes back the Ruby Throne from Yyrkoon, Valharik explains that he serves the Ruby Throne, no matter who sits upon it. Needless to say, Elric doesn't buy this, and in a truly ruthless move, he sentences Valharik to execution, with his flesh to be fed to Yyrkoon at the feast that Elric plans to hold.
24th Feb '15 4:28:40 PM Gowan
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Added DiffLines:

* In ''Literature/DragonBones'' Oreg is this, though not by choice. He is bound by magic to serve whoever holds the title of "Hurogmeten" at the time. The title is inherited, but for heirs, KlingonPromotion is a valid means of inheriting it earlier. The ring that signifies who "owns" Oreg at the time is subject only to its own magic, political decisions made by other people have nothing to do with it - and it cannot be taken off, which is why Ward gets it even though his uncle will rule in his place until he is of age.
15th Feb '15 11:42:29 AM Digimonfan12
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* This describes ''Franchise/{{Pokemon}}'' in a nutshell. So long as you have the prerequisite number of badges to command a Pokemon of its Level, its loyalty is guaranteed. (Whether it ''likes'' you or not, however, depends on how well you treat it.)
4th Feb '15 8:07:47 PM AnotherDuck
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4th Feb '15 8:07:04 PM AnotherDuck
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* In theory, how it's supposed to work in democracies where the leader is routinely changed out every so many years. The military and the various groups of people who make the government function who ''aren't'' elected or cycled out after a few years are expected (and required, under sworn oath, in many cases) to be loyal to whoever replaces their boss, regardless of politics. The civil servant administrative tradition (as used in, e.g. the UK, Canada, France) is a well-known user of this trope.
** However, it generally applies to the lower levels; in Canada at least, it's not unusual for Deputy Ministers (the civil service position directly below the cabinet minister) to be pensioned off when the governing party changes. It's also not unusual for civil servants to be shifted from on ministry to another under the same government, for any number of reasons, especially as ministers (who are politicians) also get shuffled between different cabinet positions fairly regularly.
** In the US, there are comparatively more appointed positions in the civil service, so there's a greater number of changes in terms of who has what positions.
* The US Military (and many around the world, for that matter) frequently rotate officers and soldiers to new assignments every few years to enforce this (as well as other reasons, such as benefits to professional development). This concept, as applied to any work environment, is a mark of professionalism.
* A good RealLife example was the French statesman [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talleyrand Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord]]. He was a bishop under Louis XVI, held various posts in the governments of the French revolutionary period from 1789, was NapoleonBonaparte's Foreign Minister and was then brought back to be Foreign Minister after 1815 when Napoleon had been defeated and the Bourbon monarchs had returned. He is famously quoted as saying: "Regimes may fall and fail, but I do not." He achieved this by making sure he always backed the stronger side, even when this involved blatantly betraying his current employer. Napoleon once called him "shit in silk stockings."
** He probably called him that ''after'' they had a political split over the Peninsular War. He wasn't as bad as all that, and he was quite talented, which just as much as his flexible principles is why everybody kept hiring him as senior staff. He got a worsened rap in England after ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' got popular--the series has a really nasty villain based on him.

to:

* In theory, how it's supposed to work in democracies where the leader is routinely changed out every so many years. The military and the various groups of people who make the government function who ''aren't'' elected or cycled out after a few years are expected (and required, under sworn oath, in many cases) to be loyal to whoever replaces their boss, regardless of politics. The civil servant administrative tradition (as used in, e.g. the UK, Canada, France) is a well-known user of this trope.
** However, it generally applies to the lower levels; in Canada at least, it's not unusual for Deputy Ministers (the civil service position directly below the cabinet minister) to be pensioned off when the governing party changes. It's also not unusual for civil servants to be shifted from on ministry to another under the same government, for any number of reasons, especially as ministers (who are politicians) also get shuffled between different cabinet positions fairly regularly.
** In the US, there are comparatively more appointed positions in the civil service, so there's a greater number of changes in terms of who has what positions.
* The US Military (and many around the world, for that matter) frequently rotate officers and soldiers to new assignments every few years to enforce this (as well as other reasons, such as benefits to professional development). This concept, as applied to any work environment, is a mark of professionalism.
* A good RealLife example was the French statesman [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talleyrand Charles Maurice de Talleyrand-Perigord]]. He was a bishop under Louis XVI, held various posts in the governments of the French revolutionary period from 1789, was NapoleonBonaparte's Foreign Minister and was then brought back to be Foreign Minister after 1815 when Napoleon had been defeated and the Bourbon monarchs had returned. He is famously quoted as saying: "Regimes may fall and fail, but I do not." He achieved this by making sure he always backed the stronger side, even when this involved blatantly betraying his current employer. Napoleon once called him "shit in silk stockings."
** He
stockings, probably called him that ''after'' after they had a political split over the Peninsular War. He wasn't as bad as all that, and he was quite talented, which just as much as his flexible principles is why everybody kept hiring him as senior staff. He got a worsened rap in England after ''Literature/TheScarletPimpernel'' got popular--the series has a really nasty villain based on him.



* [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Edgar_Hoover J. Edgar Hoover]] was director of the (American) FBI for nearly forty years, till his death in 1972, despite starting as a WellIntentionedExtremist and progressively turning into a KnightTemplar, because (legend has it) he had too much dirt on everybody in a position to get rid of him. (J. Edgar Hoover is probably the most recently deceased RealLife example we should have on this one, though.)
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