History Main / LostInImitation

15th Oct '17 4:33:48 AM TheGameMaster
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* Cloud from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyVII'' was the epitome of IJustWantToBeBadass who did his best to act cool and play up his reputation as a badass super soldier, acting like a loose cannon and only really getting serious wherever the villain is concerned. Even a certain [[ItWasHisSled death]] didn't effect him enough to stop him from going snowboarding immediately afterwards. When he appeared in ''VideoGame/KingdomHearts'' however, he ended up having Vincent's design and personality, essentially becoming Cloud InNameOnly. Now Cloud is known for a reputation of being an "emo" hero with a perpetually somber expression and spending a lot of time brooding, with these traits also carrying over to his appearances in TheMovie ''Anime/FinalFantasyVIIAdventChildren'' and in ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy''. Outside of the source material, only his appearance in ''VideoGame/DirgeofCerberus'' accurately depicts his original cocky, showy hero personality, enhancing it further with sunglasses.
14th Oct '17 6:52:11 PM JoeMerl
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* Virtually all modern adaptations of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' portray the prince/Beast as an initially unpleasant person who was cursed as a direct result of his selfishness and has to learn kindness and humility to win over the Beauty. Most people don't even know that in the original Villeneuve story, the prince was a genuinely innocent victim who was cursed by an evil fairy after he refused to marry her and was kind and gentlemanly to Beauty from the start. Another example of how much the Disney film has influenced later ''Beauty and the Beast'' adaptations is the 2014 French film ''Film/LaBelleEtLaBete'''s inclusion of a DanceOfRomance scene clearly inspired by the Disney film's ballroom scene despite it being a remake of the 1946 French film that had no dancing scenes.

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* Virtually all modern adaptations of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' portray the prince/Beast as an initially unpleasant person who was cursed as a direct result of his selfishness and has to learn kindness and humility to win over the Beauty. Most people don't even know that in the original Villeneuve story, the prince was a genuinely innocent victim who was cursed by an evil fairy after he refused to marry her and was kind and gentlemanly to Beauty from the start. As such, the newer versions pretty much eschew the original moral, which is that the Beauty character needs to accept the Beast as a suitable husband despite his appearance, since now she has ''good'' reasons to reject him.
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Another example of how much the Disney film has influenced later ''Beauty and the Beast'' adaptations is the 2014 French film ''Film/LaBelleEtLaBete'''s inclusion of a DanceOfRomance scene clearly inspired by the Disney film's ballroom scene despite it being a remake of the 1946 French film that had no dancing scenes.



* Our conception of FrankensteinsMonster ([[IAmNotShazam not to be confused]] with Victor Frankenstein himself) is based largely on Creator/BorisKarloff's [[Film/{{Frankenstein1931}} depiction of him]] as a largely [[TheVoiceless silent]] and [[TheGrotesque misunderstood giant]], which, in turn, has largely been {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed into a flat-headed [[SmashMook hulkish killing machine]] with green skin that was based on the advertising art (the film was black and white). Very rarely will we get to see him as the verbose and vengeful monster portrayed in Creator/MaryShelley's [[Literature/{{Frankenstein}} original book]]. To be entirely fair, he was [[NotEvilJustMisunderstood misunderstood]] in the book as well, but his reaction to it was indeed vengeful, rather than ever being Creator/BorisKarloff's gentle giant.

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* Our conception of FrankensteinsMonster ([[IAmNotShazam not to be confused]] with Victor Frankenstein himself) is based largely on Creator/BorisKarloff's [[Film/{{Frankenstein1931}} depiction of him]] as a largely [[TheVoiceless silent]] and [[TheGrotesque misunderstood giant]], which, in turn, has largely been {{Flanderiz|ation}}ed into a flat-headed [[SmashMook hulkish killing machine]] with green skin that was based on the advertising art (the film was black and white). Very rarely will we get to see him as the verbose and vengeful monster portrayed in Creator/MaryShelley's [[Literature/{{Frankenstein}} original book]]. To be entirely fair, he was [[NotEvilJustMisunderstood misunderstood]] in the book as well, but his reaction to it [[ThenLetMeBeEvil was indeed vengeful, vengeful]], rather than ever being Creator/BorisKarloff's gentle giant.



** In addition, every adaptation has Frankenstein using some form of electricity to animate his creation. In the book, the framing device is the Doctor telling his story to a sea captain, and when he gets to ''how'' he created the monster he basically says, "And then I gave it life. [[AndSomeOtherStuff I'm not telling you how, because I don't want anybody to repeat what I did.]]" Obviously, that wouldn't have worked on the big screen. The only exceptions are [[Film/{{Frankenstein 1910}} the 1910 version]] by Edison Studios -- that one uses a vat of chemicals -- and the 1973 TV-movie ''Frankenstein: The True Story'', which uses solar energy. Ever since the famous Universal version, however, electricity has been standard.\\

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** In addition, every adaptation has Frankenstein using some form of electricity to animate his creation. In the book, the framing device is the Doctor telling his story to a sea captain, and when he gets to ''how'' he created the monster he basically says, "And then I gave it life. [[AndSomeOtherStuff I'm not telling you how, because I don't want anybody to repeat what I did.]]" did]]." Obviously, that wouldn't have worked on the big screen. The only exceptions are [[Film/{{Frankenstein 1910}} the 1910 version]] by Edison Studios -- that one uses a vat of chemicals -- and the 1973 TV-movie ''Frankenstein: The True Story'', which uses solar energy. Ever since the famous Universal version, however, electricity has been standard.\\



** ''Film/MaryShelleysFrankenstein'' is also much more faithful to the original source material-- [[{{Dissimile}} except where it isn't.]]

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** ''Film/MaryShelleysFrankenstein'' is also much more faithful to the original source material-- [[{{Dissimile}} except where it isn't.]]isn't]].



** A ''lot'' of manga fans were surprised at ''Creator/JunjiIto''s take on Frankenstein for how "unique and creative it was". Hilariously, his take on it is ''one of the closest and most faithful to the original source material'' that you can find.

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** A ''lot'' of manga fans were surprised at ''Creator/JunjiIto''s take on Frankenstein for how "unique and creative it was". was." Hilariously, his take on it is ''one of the closest and most faithful to the original source material'' that you can find.
4th Oct '17 5:57:56 PM Pamina
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** The iconic bridge scene from ''ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied'' gets adapted a lot -- ''WesternAnimation/SpidermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman'', [[Film/SpiderMan1 the movie]] -- and they always replace Gwen with Mary-Jane but letting her live. The child-friendly cartoon series actually came the closest to adapting the tragedy by having Mary-Jane fall into a dimensional time and space rift (alive but in an AndIMustScream state of floating through a no-mans-land outside reality, and definitely believed dead by Peter, with an arc about grieving her loss.) When the ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderman2'' FINALLY gets the right girl they have to replace the iconic setting with a clock tower because people have already seen the familiar set up with Mary-Jane too many times. They also replace Norman with Harry. Don't expect a 100 percent faithful adaption anytime soon.

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** The iconic bridge scene from ''ComicBook/TheNightGwenStacyDied'' gets adapted a lot -- ''WesternAnimation/SpidermanTheAnimatedSeries'', ''ComicBook/UltimateSpiderman'', [[Film/SpiderMan1 the movie]] -- and they always replace Gwen with Mary-Jane but letting and let her live. The child-friendly cartoon series actually came the closest to adapting the tragedy by having Mary-Jane fall into a dimensional time and space rift (alive but in an AndIMustScream state of floating through a no-mans-land outside reality, and definitely believed dead by Peter, with an arc about grieving her loss.) When the ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderman2'' FINALLY gets the right girl girl, and [[KilledOffForReal kills her off for real]], they have to replace the iconic setting with a clock tower because people have already seen the familiar set up with Mary-Jane too many times. They also replace Norman with Harry. Don't expect a 100 percent faithful adaption anytime soon.



* References to fairy tales generally have more to do with the Franchise/{{Disney a|nimatedCanon}}daptation than to the original story. The Seven Dwarves will have names, Cinderella only goes to one ball instead of two, and the wicked stepmother will inexplicably ''not'' be put to death (though that probably had also been removed from earlier {{Bowdlerise}}d editions).

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* References to fairy tales generally have more to do with the Franchise/{{Disney a|nimatedCanon}}daptation than to the original story. The Seven Dwarves will have names, Cinderella only goes to one ball instead of two, and the Snow White's wicked stepmother will inexplicably ''not'' be put to death by the newlywed Snow White and the Prince but killed off in some other way (though that probably her [[CruelAndUnusualDeath horrific execution]] had also been removed from earlier {{Bowdlerise}}d editions).
11th Aug '17 10:59:47 AM KingLyger
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* Almost every adaptation of ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'' borrows something from [[YetAnotherChristmasCarol the numerous adaptations that came before it]]. Thus, the things people most commonly know about Ebeneezer Scrooge are that [[TheScrooge he's a miser who cares only about money]] and that [[TheGrinch he hates Christmas]]. In the novel itself, while these flaws are present, the main character flaw that gets examined is that Scrooge has StoppedCaring about the poor (or really, anyone except himself). Adaptations tend to paint him as a JerkassWoobie for the many tragedies that happened to him around Christmas, but the novel points out that this is really no excuse for how Scrooge is acting, especially when the Ghost of Christmas Present throws Scrooge's words back in his face about Tiny Tim. Finally, the whole story was an AuthorTract, like many works of Creator/CharlesDickens, about the disparity between the rich and the poor in Victorian England, and how the rich really need to do more with their to help the underprivileged. The class warfare aspect of the story almost ''never'' gets brought up in modern adaptations.

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* Almost every adaptation of ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'' borrows something from [[YetAnotherChristmasCarol the numerous adaptations that came before it]]. Thus, the things people most commonly know about Ebeneezer Scrooge are that [[TheScrooge he's a miser who cares only about money]] and that [[TheGrinch he hates Christmas]]. In the novel itself, while these flaws are present, the main character flaw that gets examined is that Scrooge has StoppedCaring about the poor (or really, anyone except himself). Adaptations tend to paint him as a JerkassWoobie for the many tragedies that happened to him around Christmas, but the novel points out that this is really no excuse for how Scrooge is acting, especially when the Ghost of Christmas Present throws Scrooge's words back in his face about Tiny Tim. Finally, the whole story was an AuthorTract, like many works of Creator/CharlesDickens, about the disparity between the rich and the poor in Victorian England, and how the rich really need to do more with their money to help the underprivileged.underprivileged instead of hoarding it. The class warfare aspect of the story almost ''never'' gets brought up in modern adaptations.
11th Aug '17 10:57:37 AM KingLyger
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* Almost every adaptation of ''Literature/AChristmasCarol'' borrows something from [[YetAnotherChristmasCarol the numerous adaptations that came before it]]. Thus, the things people most commonly know about Ebeneezer Scrooge are that [[TheScrooge he's a miser who cares only about money]] and that [[TheGrinch he hates Christmas]]. In the novel itself, while these flaws are present, the main character flaw that gets examined is that Scrooge has StoppedCaring about the poor (or really, anyone except himself). Adaptations tend to paint him as a JerkassWoobie for the many tragedies that happened to him around Christmas, but the novel points out that this is really no excuse for how Scrooge is acting, especially when the Ghost of Christmas Present throws Scrooge's words back in his face about Tiny Tim. Finally, the whole story was an AuthorTract, like many works of Creator/CharlesDickens, about the disparity between the rich and the poor in Victorian England, and how the rich really need to do more with their to help the underprivileged. The class warfare aspect of the story almost ''never'' gets brought up in modern adaptations.
11th Aug '17 7:11:29 AM SeaRover
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* In the UK, most cultural understanding of fairy tales and folk tales via the Disney version is supplemented by another medium in which they have also been popularly canonised - Pantomime. These are by no means more 'faithful' to any kind of original than the movies (and are themselves subject to including Disney-originated elements. At least in small-scale productions, theatres can get away with ripping off plenty of copywrited material without anyone suing). Ask most British people whose Aladdin's mother is or who Cinderella's UnluckyChildhoodFriend is and they'll know the answers immediately (Widow Twanky and Buttons respectively) despite these points having no place in the original tales.



[[folder: Western Animation]]
* In the UK, most cultural understanding of fairy tales and folk tales via the Disney version is supplemented by another medium in which they have also been popularly canonised - Pantomime. These are by no means more 'faithful' to any kind of original than the movies (and are themselves subject to including Disney-originated elements. At least in small-scale productions, theatres can get away with ripping off plenty of copywrited material without anyone suing). Ask most British people whose Aladdin's mother is or who Cinderella's UnluckyChildhoodFriend is and they'll know the answers immediately (Widow Twanky and Buttons respectively) despite these points having no place in the original tales.
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10th Aug '17 5:54:30 AM SeaRover
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[[folder: Real Life]]
9th Aug '17 3:11:07 AM jormis29
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* Adaptations of ''Literature/ThePrisonerOfZenda'' such as ''Dave'' and ''The Moon Over Parador'' always present the identical characters as strangers who just happen to look alike. However, in the original novel, the two are distant cousins who look alike due to features introduced by adultery of a previous generation of their families, which [[IdenticalGrandson crop up every couple of generations]].

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* Adaptations of ''Literature/ThePrisonerOfZenda'' such as ''Dave'' ''Film/{{Dave}}'' and ''The Moon Over Parador'' ''Film/MoonOverParador'' always present the identical characters as strangers who just happen to look alike. However, in the original novel, the two are distant cousins who look alike due to features introduced by adultery of a previous generation of their families, which [[IdenticalGrandson crop up every couple of generations]].
31st Jul '17 2:32:32 AM SeaRover
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* Most games and promotional images of ''PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' wield the franchise's core characters as a much more cohesive group than they were in the original anime. This is justified in ''The Rebellion Story'', the anime's sequel movie, for plot-related reasons, but really, the ones we know as the "main five" were simply the ''only'' five who had any real role in things (with others appearing for only a few seconds in flashbacks, [[spoiler: Madoka's salvation montage]], and in silhouettes after the last episode's credits. Originally, certain Puellae Magi were never present at the same time, there was a lot of animosity between them (which Mami explicitly states is part of the life in general of being a MagicalGirl), and Madoka never becomes a Puellae Magi until the very last episode, at which point she [[spoiler: wipes herself from the annals of history]]. The only time all five girls ever function as a full-fledged team is [[spoiler: in Homura's third (on-screen) timeline]] (and even then, Sayaka accuses Homura of "teaming up with that Kyoko chick" before Kyoko herself is shown fighting alongside the others against [[spoiler: Sayaka's Witch form]]).

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* Most video games and promotional images of ''PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' wield the franchise's core characters as a much more cohesive group than they were in the original anime. This is justified in ''The Rebellion Story'', the anime's sequel movie, for plot-related reasons, but really, the ones we know as the "main five" were simply the ''only'' five who had any real role in things (with others appearing for only a few seconds in flashbacks, [[spoiler: Madoka's salvation montage]], and in as silhouettes after the last episode's credits. Originally, certain Puellae Magi were never present at the same time, there was a lot of animosity between them (which Mami explicitly states is part of the life in general of being a MagicalGirl), and Madoka never becomes a Puellae Puella Magi until the very last episode, at which point she [[spoiler: wipes herself from the annals of history]]. The only time all five girls ever function as a full-fledged team is [[spoiler: in Homura's third (on-screen) timeline]] (and even then, Sayaka accuses Homura of "teaming up with that Kyoko chick" before Kyoko herself is shown fighting alongside the others against [[spoiler: Sayaka's Witch form]]).
29th Jul '17 4:12:39 PM SeaRover
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* Most games and promotional images of ''PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' wield the franchise's core characters as a much more cohesive group than they were in the original anime. This is justified in ''The Rebellion Story'', the anime's sequel movie, for plot-related reasons, but really, what we know as the "main five" were simply the ''only'' five who had any real role in things (with others appearing for only a few seconds in flashbacks, [[spoiler: Madoka's salvation montage]], and in silhouettes after the last episode's credits. Originally, certain Puellae Magi were never present at the same time, there was a lot of animosity between others (which Mami explicitly states is part of the life in general of being a MagicalGirl), and Madoka never becomes a Puellae Magi until the very last episode, at which point she [[spoiler: wipes herself from the annals of history]]. The only time all five girls ever function as a full-fledged team is [[spoiler: in Homura's third (on-screen) timeline]] (and even then, Sayaka accuses Homura of "teaming up with that Kyoko chick" before Kyoko herself is shown fighting alongside the others against [[spoiler: Sayaka's Witch form]]).

to:

* Most games and promotional images of ''PuellaMagiMadokaMagica'' wield the franchise's core characters as a much more cohesive group than they were in the original anime. This is justified in ''The Rebellion Story'', the anime's sequel movie, for plot-related reasons, but really, what the ones we know as the "main five" were simply the ''only'' five who had any real role in things (with others appearing for only a few seconds in flashbacks, [[spoiler: Madoka's salvation montage]], and in silhouettes after the last episode's credits. Originally, certain Puellae Magi were never present at the same time, there was a lot of animosity between others them (which Mami explicitly states is part of the life in general of being a MagicalGirl), and Madoka never becomes a Puellae Magi until the very last episode, at which point she [[spoiler: wipes herself from the annals of history]]. The only time all five girls ever function as a full-fledged team is [[spoiler: in Homura's third (on-screen) timeline]] (and even then, Sayaka accuses Homura of "teaming up with that Kyoko chick" before Kyoko herself is shown fighting alongside the others against [[spoiler: Sayaka's Witch form]]).
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