History Main / LostInImitation

17th Mar '17 3:55:35 PM Lemia
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* The 1965 and 1974 film adaptations of ''Literature/AndThenThereWereNone'' took more major cues from the 1945 film than the original book: Anthony Marston playing the titular nursery rhyme on a piano, Vera and Lombard falling in love and the two of them actually being innocent of the crimes they were accused of, and the AdaptationalAlternateEnding of [[spoiler:Vera only pretending to shoot Lombard and the two of them surviving after Wargrave falls for their deception and takes poison after delivering a MotiveRant to Vera]] were all absent from the book but were popularized by the 1945 film.
13th Feb '17 6:55:59 AM jamespolk
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* Traditionally, RobinHood is a brilliant archer who steals from the rich and gives to the poor, a noble outlaw fighting corrupt officials, and sometimes even a brave Saxon fighting against the Norman oppressors... or is he? This myth largely originates in 19th century Romantic adaptations of the Robin Hood legend (such as Howard Pyle's ''The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood'' and Walter Scott's ''Literature/{{Ivanhoe}}''), many of which were developed specifically for children. In the original ballads, Robin is a trickster outlaw who steals for himself, couldn't care less about helping the poor, doesn't care about class differences (likely because by the time the stories were born the Norman population had already long assimilated), and can be pretty callous and cruel. Pretty much the only thing Robin's current and original image have in common is him being an outlaw and a great archer.

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* Traditionally, RobinHood Myth/RobinHood is a brilliant archer who steals from the rich and gives to the poor, a noble outlaw fighting corrupt officials, and sometimes even a brave Saxon fighting against the Norman oppressors... or is he? This myth largely originates in 19th century Romantic adaptations of the Robin Hood legend (such as Howard Pyle's ''The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood'' and Walter Scott's ''Literature/{{Ivanhoe}}''), many of which were developed specifically for children. In the original ballads, Robin is a trickster outlaw who steals for himself, couldn't care less about helping the poor, doesn't care about class differences (likely because by the time the stories were born the Norman population had already long assimilated), and can be pretty callous and cruel. Pretty much the only thing Robin's current and original image have in common is him being an outlaw and a great archer.



*** The first such "borrower" was Douglas Fairbanks Sr. for his movie version in 1922. He spent the first several reels trudging along in chain mail on Crusade before receiving an Urgent Message from back home in Merrie Old....

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*** The first such "borrower" was Douglas Fairbanks Creator/DouglasFairbanks Sr. for [[Film/{{Robin Hood 1922}} his movie version in 1922.1922]]. He spent the first several reels trudging along in chain mail on Crusade before receiving an Urgent Message from back home in Merrie Old....
23rd Jan '17 5:37:39 AM TheGreatUnknown
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*** ''VideoGame/PokemonSunAndMoon'' has started to incorporate this into the games. When speaking to Pokemon on the overworld, in previous games they largely simply made sounds, but now they tend to make sounds based on their names.
23rd Jan '17 4:37:07 AM TheGreatUnknown
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* Films based on the biblical Exodus tend to borrow a lot from Creator/CecilBDeMille[='s=] ''Film/TheTenCommandments'', most notably the Pharaoh being called Ramses ([[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep he's referred to only as "Pharaoh" in the Bible]]). It's also common to depict the Pharaoh as bald, apparently just because Creator/YulBrynner was.

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* Films based on the biblical Exodus tend to borrow a lot from Creator/CecilBDeMille[='s=] ''Film/TheTenCommandments'', most notably the Pharaoh being called Ramses ([[EveryoneCallsHimBarkeep he's referred to only as "Pharaoh" in the Bible]]). It's also common to depict the Pharaoh as bald, apparently just because Creator/YulBrynner was. (To be fair, however, most high-class Egyptians ''did'' deliberately shave their heads, though they often wore wigs.)
17th Jan '17 5:00:02 PM nombretomado
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*** Supposedly, Coppola wasn't planning on giving Dracula an Eastern European accent, but GaryOldman said he would only play the part if they allowed him to do the accent.

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*** Supposedly, Coppola wasn't planning on giving Dracula an Eastern European accent, but GaryOldman Creator/GaryOldman said he would only play the part if they allowed him to do the accent.
8th Jan '17 11:59:40 PM PhantomRider
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**Another scene from that series: When the black suit first gets on Spidey and takes him for a ride, he finds himself staring at his reflection in a skyscraper window as he hangs upside down, having no idea how he got there. That scene can now be found in every version of the black suit saga ''except'' the original comics.


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*Of all things, the comedic ''WesternAnimation/TheSuperHeroSquadShow'' gets to provide one of these: its version of ComicBook/TheFalcon has FeatherFlechettes. Every animation since it has had them, though sadly the comic has yet to take them up. (The movies lack them too - as a military man, movie Falcon is a SuperheroPackingHeat.)
2nd Jan '17 10:22:13 AM Ulkomaalainen
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** Holmes inspired a long line of similar imitators. It was to the point that Holmes [[IconicOutfit trademark hat, pipe and browncoat]] became visual shorthand for "detective" and Holmes himself is shown dressed this way in cameos and other popular depictions far more than he actually wore them in the original stories. Also, many adaptations forgot the quirkier aspects of his personality and focused on his famous detective skills. Indeed, he never explicitly wore a deerstalker in the original stories at all. The iconic physical depiction of Holmes comes from Sidney Paget's [[http://www.arthes.com/holmes/ illustrations]] in the stories' first appearances in ''Strand'' magazine. In the books he did smoke a pipe (always the illustrations never depicted the famous calabash pipe which first became associated with Holmes due to a theatrical adaptation) but he smoked cigarettes and cigars almost as often.

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** Holmes inspired a long line of similar imitators. It was to the point that Holmes [[IconicOutfit trademark hat, pipe and browncoat]] became visual shorthand for "detective" and Holmes himself is shown dressed this way in cameos and other popular depictions far more than he actually wore them in the original stories. Also, many adaptations forgot the quirkier aspects of his personality and focused on his famous detective skills. Indeed, he never explicitly wore a deerstalker in the original stories at all. The iconic physical depiction of Holmes comes from Sidney Paget's [[http://www.arthes.com/holmes/ illustrations]] in the stories' first appearances in ''Strand'' magazine. In the books he did smoke a pipe (always (although the illustrations never depicted the famous calabash pipe which first became associated with Holmes due to a theatrical adaptation) but he smoked cigarettes and cigars almost as often.
24th Dec '16 8:52:44 AM fusilcontrafusil
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* In Romanian folklore, vampires and werewolves aren't really distinct—the word in Romanian that comes from the Slavic for werewolf, ''vârcolaci'', is a type of vampire (it eats the moon to cause eclipses). However, many other cultures do distinguish them—other than that both are often witches, for instance, French loup-garous and [[OurVampiresAreDifferent revenants]] don't really have much in common. Bear in mind also that the tenuous connection of vampires to Vlad the Impaler is non-existent in Romania (bar PopCulturalOsmosis) and was included by Stoker almost as an afterthought. This caused a minor scandal in Romania when somebody suggested building a theme park that would conflate ''Dracula'' and Vlad the Impaler, who is [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation considered a national hero]] for doing his best to keep the Turks out of the country.

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* In Romanian folklore, vampires and werewolves aren't really distinct—the word in Romanian that comes from the Slavic for werewolf, ''vârcolaci'', is a type of vampire (it eats the moon to cause eclipses). However, many other cultures do distinguish them—other than that both are often witches, for instance, French loup-garous and [[OurVampiresAreDifferent revenants]] don't really have much in common. Bear in mind also that the tenuous connection of vampires to Vlad the Impaler UsefulNotes/VladTheImpaler is non-existent in Romania (bar PopCulturalOsmosis) and was included by Stoker almost as an afterthought. This caused a minor scandal in Romania when somebody suggested building a theme park that would conflate ''Dracula'' and Vlad the Impaler, who is [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation considered a national hero]] for doing his best to keep the Turks out of the country.
22nd Dec '16 8:47:53 PM Lemia
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** Virtually all modern adaptations of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' portray the prince/Beast as an initially unpleasant person who was cursed as a direct result of his selfishness and has to learn kindness and humility to win over the Beauty. Most people don't even know that in the original Villeneuve story, the prince was a genuinely innocent victim who was cursed by an evil fairy after he refused to marry her and was kind and gentlemanly to Beauty from the start.

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** Virtually all modern adaptations of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' portray the prince/Beast as an initially unpleasant person who was cursed as a direct result of his selfishness and has to learn kindness and humility to win over the Beauty. Most people don't even know that in the original Villeneuve story, the prince was a genuinely innocent victim who was cursed by an evil fairy after he refused to marry her and was kind and gentlemanly to Beauty from the start. Another example of how much the Disney film has influenced later ''Beauty and the Beast'' adaptations is the 2014 French film ''Film/LaBelleEtLaBete'''s inclusion of a DanceOfRomance scene clearly inspired by the Disney film's ballroom scene despite it being a remake of the 1946 French film that had no dancing scenes.
10th Dec '16 3:16:41 PM Lemia
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* In the original version of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' written by Villeneuve, the prince was an innocent victim who got cursed because he refused to marry an evil fairy who [[WomanScorned didn't take it well]] and he acted gentlemanly towards Beauty from the start, and other early versions of the story followed similar suit or [[AdaptationExplanationExtrication omitted any explanation]] of how the prince got cursed in the first place. Then the [[Disney/BeautyAndTheBeast Disney animated film]] completely changed the prince's backstory and personality to make him a selfish and ill-tempered person who got cursed after refusing shelter to an enchantress disguised as an old woman and had to learn kindness and humility for Belle to come to love him and ever since then, virtually every ''Beauty and the Beast'' adaptation has depicted the prince/Beast in a similar manner.


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** Virtually all modern adaptations of ''Literature/BeautyAndTheBeast'' portray the prince/Beast as an initially unpleasant person who was cursed as a direct result of his selfishness and has to learn kindness and humility to win over the Beauty. Most people don't even know that in the original Villeneuve story, the prince was a genuinely innocent victim who was cursed by an evil fairy after he refused to marry her and was kind and gentlemanly to Beauty from the start.
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