History Main / LostAesop

16th May '18 5:40:10 AM RedScharlach
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** It gets even worse with the introduction of "The Initiative". It is an effective anti-vampire unit, showing that ordinary humans can pull their weight in the fight against evil, except that it's a front for evil experiments, except that its founders were unaware of this, except they decide to scrap it anyway. Was there ever a point to it all except "Muggles will inevitably fuck everything anyway, so they shouldn't even bother"?

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** It gets even worse with the introduction of "The Initiative". It is an effective anti-vampire unit, showing that ordinary humans can pull their weight in the fight against evil, except that it's a front for evil experiments, except that its founders were unaware of this, except they decide to scrap it anyway. Was there ever a point to it all except "Muggles will inevitably fuck everything up anyway, so they shouldn't even bother"?



* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'': The episode "Hatchery" involves Archer stumbling upon a nest of Xindi eggs and trying to help them. Nobody else wants to help and at first, it's because they're [[FantasticRacism prejudiced]] against Xindi, but then it turn's into because he's neglecting his work...and then T'Pol and Malcolm try to take over the ship...and then it's revealed that [[spoiler: Archer only wanted to help the Xindi eggs because he was affected by some sap that made him think he was their dad.]] So is the Aesop....''Do'' be prejudiced against aliens? No, that's not like Star Trek. Helping baby animals makes you and everyone else go crazy? We only help animals because we think we're their parents? Who knows.

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* ''Series/StarTrekEnterprise'': The episode "Hatchery" involves Archer stumbling upon a nest of Xindi eggs and trying to help them. Nobody else wants to help and at first, it's because they're [[FantasticRacism prejudiced]] against Xindi, but then it turn's turns into because he's neglecting his work...and then T'Pol and Malcolm try to take over the ship...and then it's revealed that [[spoiler: Archer only wanted to help the Xindi eggs because he was affected by some sap that made him think he was their dad.]] So is the Aesop....''Do'' be prejudiced against aliens? No, that's not like Star Trek. Helping baby animals makes you and everyone else go crazy? We only help animals because we think we're their parents? Who knows.



* In the ''Series/TheWestWing'', Josh meets with a [[GayConservative gay Republican congressman]] who's there to convince him that the president should sign rather than veto a bill defining marriage at the federal level as being between a man and a woman. The way this is framed at first is with the congressman confirming that yes, he supports this bill, and yes, he's gay. They debate both the ideology and the politics of the situation in a series of scenes, and in the end Josh asks him how he can be a Republican. He explains that he agrees with most Republican positions and considers them to outweigh the one position he doesn't, and implies that he's hoping to change the party's attitude toward gays from the inside. This is treated as some kind of revelation for Josh... but his question and the congressman's answer [[DebateAndSwitch don't really reflect]] the conflict brought up in that initial exchange, which is of a gay man supporting ''this particular bill''. He's supposed to be a sympathetic character, but the overall impression given is that he doesn't agree with the bill at all and was just lying out of party allegiance, [[HonorBeforeReason which is generally frowned on by this show]], and letting himself be used by his fellow Republicans.

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* In the ''Series/TheWestWing'', Josh meets with a [[GayConservative gay Republican congressman]] who's there to convince him that the president should sign rather than veto a bill defining marriage at the federal level as being between a man and a woman. The way this is framed at first is with the congressman confirming that yes, he supports this bill, and yes, he's gay. They debate both the ideology and the politics of the situation in a series of scenes, and in the end Josh asks him how he can be a Republican. He explains that he agrees with most Republican positions and considers them to outweigh the one position he doesn't, and implies that he's hoping to change the party's attitude toward gays from the inside. This is treated as some kind of revelation for Josh... but his question and the congressman's answer [[DebateAndSwitch don't really reflect]] the conflict brought up in that initial exchange, which is of a gay man supporting ''this particular bill''. He's supposed to be a sympathetic character, but the overall impression given is that he doesn't agree with the bill at all and was just lying out of party allegiance, [[HonorBeforeReason which is generally frowned on by this show]], and letting himself be used by his fellow Republicans.



** Played for laughs in the Christmas Special "You're a Rotten Dirty Bastard", in which [[ItMakesSenseInContext Santa Christ]] tells a story that turns out to be a bizarre parody of ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'', culminating in [[spoiler: The Nostalgia Critic being betrayed by and subsequently ''murdering'' his own Guardian Angel, then becoming even more selfish than ever]]. The special ends with Santa Christ staring off into space in confusion over just what the moral was.

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** Played for laughs in the Christmas Special "You're a Rotten Dirty Bastard", in which [[ItMakesSenseInContext Santa Christ]] tells a story that turns out to be a bizarre parody of ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'', culminating in [[spoiler: The [[spoiler:the Nostalgia Critic being betrayed by and subsequently ''murdering'' his own Guardian Angel, then becoming even more selfish than ever]]. The special ends with Santa Christ staring off into space in confusion over just what the moral was.



** Another ''Simpsons'' episode with a Lost Aesop can be the 10th season episode "Lisa Gets an 'A'". Lisa is forced to stay home from school because she's sick. Forced to relax instead of working, she gets addicted to a video game and falls behind on her homework. When she returns to school just in time for the test on the material she didn't read, she panics and Bart convinces her to cheat in order to pass. Later, it turns out her high score on the test brought the entire school's GPA up to its minimum standard and the school now qualifies for a grant. Even after Lisa deliberately confesses to having cheated, Principal Skinner and Superintendent Chalmers try to have her stay quiet long enough so the school can get the grant money, feeling it would do a lot of good for the school. In the end, they trick Lisa into thinking she confessed and was pardoned, while actually just covering the whole thing up so they can collect the money. Lisa fixes her grade in the privacy of her own home, while the school staff gets the grant money and they cash it at a liquor store. What... exactly is the message of this episode? [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop It's okay to cheat and lie as long as it helps people?]] No, that's not right. Could it be "[[SpaceWhaleAesop Don't worry about your grades Lisa, you're surrounded by idiots]]"? No, measuring intelligence on nothing but academic achievements is rather asinine. Maybe it's [[CaptainObviousAesop Do your homework and don't abuse your sick leave?]] Eh, too blatant. Maybe it's... you know what, forget it. I'll just say the message truly lies in the subplot with Homer and his pet lobster Pinchy: If you adopt a lobster as a pet, don't give it a hot bath for too long or you'll accidentally cook it. There, satisfied.

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** Another ''Simpsons'' episode with a Lost Aesop can be is the 10th season episode "Lisa Gets an 'A'". Lisa is forced to stay home from school because she's sick. Forced to relax instead of working, she gets addicted to a video game and falls behind on her homework. When she returns to school just in time for the test on the material she didn't read, she panics and Bart convinces her to cheat in order to pass. Later, it turns out her high score on the test brought the entire school's GPA up to its minimum standard and the school now qualifies for a grant. Even after Lisa deliberately confesses to having cheated, Principal Skinner and Superintendent Chalmers try to have her stay quiet long enough so the school can get the grant money, feeling it would do a lot of good for the school. In the end, they trick Lisa into thinking she confessed and was pardoned, while actually just covering the whole thing up so they can collect the money. Lisa fixes her grade in the privacy of her own home, while the school staff gets the grant money and they cash it at a liquor store. What... exactly is the message of this episode? [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop It's okay to cheat and lie as long as it helps people?]] No, that's not right. Could it be "[[SpaceWhaleAesop Don't worry about your grades Lisa, you're surrounded by idiots]]"? No, measuring intelligence on nothing but academic achievements is rather asinine. Maybe it's [[CaptainObviousAesop Do your homework and don't abuse your sick leave?]] Eh, too blatant. Maybe it's... you know what, forget it. I'll just say the message truly lies in the subplot with Homer and his pet lobster Pinchy: If you adopt a lobster as a pet, don't give it a hot bath for too long or you'll accidentally cook it. There, satisfied.
6th Apr '18 2:05:37 PM TheNerevarine
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6th Apr '18 2:04:50 PM TheNerevarine
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* ''Film/ClashOfTheTitans2010'' and its sequel ''Wrath of the Titans'' make a point about "humanity doesn't need any gods" with humans openly defying the gods for their tyrannical treatment. This is seemingly glossed over in the first movie after Hades is stopped from usurping Olympus from Zeus, and the second movie revolves around [[HellOnEarth Tartarus being unleashing monsters and other abominations into the world]] specifically because of [[GodsNeedPrayerBadly humans are loosing faith on gods]]. It doesn't help that the gods are the only thing standing between mankind from such threats.
6th Apr '18 12:19:39 PM Beedle
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[[/folder]]* Played for laughs in the ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'' episode "Cartmanland": when Kyle loses his faith in God, his parents read him [[Literature/BookOfJob the story of Job]] to change his mind. However, they forget to mention the part where Job's faith is rewarded after all his hardship, so Kyle is left thinking that the story is about God allowing a good man to suffer just to prove a point to the Devil.
23rd Feb '18 12:46:01 PM MeaJae97
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* Good luck trying to discern what we were meant to learn in ''WesternAnimation/TheEmojiMovie.'' Is [[BeYourself being yourself]] all about standing out in society, not caring what others think, or does it mean conforming to societal expectations and never chancing your identity. This ties into [[{{UsefulNotes/Feminism}} the feminist lesson.]] Jailbreak is at first meant to be an independent minded female character who rejected the sexism of Textopolis, [[RealWomenDontWearDresses and forms her identity around this.]] And then we run into the lesson about not valuing freedom, which apparently means that she should fully embrace those same sexist gender roles.
22nd Feb '18 11:19:02 AM TheMountainKing
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* In the sixth book of ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheCheysuli'', Keely -- who is somewhat of an IndecisiveParody of a RebelliousPrincess ActionGirl to start with - is kidnapped, raped and impregnated by the BigBad. After escaping, she is determined to have an abortion, but a lot of sympathetic characters -- including the ''[[AnimalCompanion lir]]'', who usually serve as the voice of wisdom in the series -- tell her that GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion, giving the impression that the narrative wants us to agree. But then when Keely ignores them and goes to purchase an abortifacient, the herbalist refuses to sell it to her and acts like such a [[SmugSnake smug,]] [[StrawMisogynist sexist]], [[SlutShaming slut-shaming]] JerkAss that it's hard to imagine we're not [[StrawCharacter supposed to want to be on whichever side of the argument he's not on]]. And then, following some gratuitous MindRape by another villain, she has a ConvenientMiscarriage anyway. So... was that a pro-life message? A pro-choice message? ''[[ShaggyDogStory Just what was the point of any of it?]]''

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* In the sixth book of ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheCheysuli'', Keely -- who is somewhat of an IndecisiveParody of a RebelliousPrincess ActionGirl to start with - is kidnapped, raped and impregnated by the BigBad. After escaping, she is determined to have an abortion, but a lot of sympathetic characters -- including the ''[[AnimalCompanion lir]]'', who usually serve as the voice of wisdom in the series -- tell her that GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion, giving the impression that the narrative wants us to agree. But then when Keely ignores them and goes to purchase an abortifacient, the herbalist refuses to sell it to her and acts like such a [[SmugSnake smug,]] [[StrawMisogynist sexist]], [[SlutShaming slut-shaming]] JerkAss that it's hard to imagine we're not [[StrawCharacter supposed to want to be on whichever side of the argument he's not on]]. And then, following some gratuitous MindRape by another villain, she has a ConvenientMiscarriage anyway. So... was that a pro-life message? A pro-choice message? ''[[ShaggyDogStory Just what was the point of any of it?]]''
30th Jan '18 1:15:59 AM StFan
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!!Examples

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!!Examples
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[[folder:Anime and Manga]]

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[[folder:Comics]]
* Because the Marvel ''Comicbook/CivilWar'' crossover was written by multiple authors, most of whom didn't agree with the direction Marvel was going, the moral behind the story seems to jump from book to book. (Unless the moral was to make every superhero apart from Spider-Man as unpleasant as possible.)

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[[folder:Comics]]
[[folder:Comic Books]]
* Because the Marvel ''Comicbook/CivilWar'' ''ComicBook/CivilWar'' crossover was written by multiple authors, most of whom didn't agree with the direction Marvel was going, the moral behind the story seems to jump from book to book. (Unless the moral was to make every superhero apart from Spider-Man as unpleasant as possible.)



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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wizards}}'' is often assumed to have AnAesop that technology is bad, even though the good guys have no problem using it (namely, guns). Creator/RalphBakshi has actually had to state that it's about propaganda.
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[[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]



* In the sixth book of ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheCheysuli'', Keely - who is somewhat of an IndecisiveParody of a RebelliousPrincess ActionGirl to start with - is kidnapped, raped and impregnated by the BigBad. After escaping, she is determined to have an abortion, but a lot of sympathetic characters - including the ''[[AnimalCompanion lir]]'', who usually serve as the voice of wisdom in the series - tell her that GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion, giving the impression that the narrative wants us to agree. But then when Keely ignores them and goes to purchase an abortifacient, the herbalist refuses to sell it to her and acts like such a [[SmugSnake smug,]] [[StrawMisogynist sexist]], [[SlutShaming slut-shaming]] JerkAss that it's hard to imagine we're not [[StrawCharacter supposed to want to be on whichever side of the argument he's not on]]. And then, following some gratuitous MindRape by another villain, she has a ConvenientMiscarriage anyway. So... was that a pro-life message? A pro-choice message? ''[[ShaggyDogStory Just what was the point of any of it?]]''

to:

* In the sixth book of ''Literature/ChroniclesOfTheCheysuli'', Keely - -- who is somewhat of an IndecisiveParody of a RebelliousPrincess ActionGirl to start with - is kidnapped, raped and impregnated by the BigBad. After escaping, she is determined to have an abortion, but a lot of sympathetic characters - -- including the ''[[AnimalCompanion lir]]'', who usually serve as the voice of wisdom in the series - -- tell her that GoodGirlsAvoidAbortion, giving the impression that the narrative wants us to agree. But then when Keely ignores them and goes to purchase an abortifacient, the herbalist refuses to sell it to her and acts like such a [[SmugSnake smug,]] [[StrawMisogynist sexist]], [[SlutShaming slut-shaming]] JerkAss that it's hard to imagine we're not [[StrawCharacter supposed to want to be on whichever side of the argument he's not on]]. And then, following some gratuitous MindRape by another villain, she has a ConvenientMiscarriage anyway. So... was that a pro-life message? A pro-choice message? ''[[ShaggyDogStory Just what was the point of any of it?]]''



[[folder:Live Action Television]]

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[[folder:Web Video]]
* Played for laughs in WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic's Christmas Special ''You're a Rotten Dirty Bastard'', in which [[ItMakesSenseInContext Santa Christ]] tells a story that turns out to be a bizarre parody of Film/ItsAWonderfulLife, culminating in [[spoiler: The Nostalgia Critic being betrayed by and subsequently ''murdering'' his own Guardian Angel, then becoming even more selfish than ever]]. The special ends with Santa Christ staring off into space in confusion over just what the moral was.
** In the actual series itself, the Critic was supposed to grow and evolve to be more understanding (more like the real Doug in other words) while in [[WebVideo/DemoReel the plot hole]]. Ultimately, he came out even more of a JerkAss than when he went in. We don't see much of that evolution with the possible exception of his review of Timothy Green (which took place RIGHT after "The Review Must Go On") where he does express understanding of the hard work of the writers and actors at the end (but then again, he does the same thing in his earlier reviews like of Casper), he's actually much harsher in a lot of his reviews and more of a JerkAss to his friends than before. Of course, given that Demo Reel was cancelled because people really wanted the Critic back, this might be more Doug taking his frustration out in his show than anything else.

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[[folder:Web Video]]
Original]]
* '' WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic'':
**
Played for laughs in WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic's the Christmas Special ''You're "You're a Rotten Dirty Bastard'', Bastard", in which [[ItMakesSenseInContext Santa Christ]] tells a story that turns out to be a bizarre parody of Film/ItsAWonderfulLife, ''Film/ItsAWonderfulLife'', culminating in [[spoiler: The Nostalgia Critic being betrayed by and subsequently ''murdering'' his own Guardian Angel, then becoming even more selfish than ever]]. The special ends with Santa Christ staring off into space in confusion over just what the moral was.
** In the actual series itself, the Critic was supposed to grow and evolve to be more understanding (more like the real Doug in other words) while in [[WebVideo/DemoReel the plot hole]]. Ultimately, he came out even more of a JerkAss {{Jerkass}} than when he went in. We don't see much of that evolution with the possible exception of his review of Timothy Green (which took place RIGHT after "The Review Must Go On") where he does express understanding of the hard work of the writers and actors at the end (but then again, he does the same thing in his earlier reviews like of Casper), ''Casper''), he's actually much harsher in a lot of his reviews and more of a JerkAss Jerkass to his friends than before. Of course, given that Demo Reel ''Demo Reel'' was cancelled because people really wanted the Critic back, this might be more Doug taking his frustration out in his show than anything else.



-->''This is the story of Michael, the ugliest boy in town''\\
''Ugly and weak, they called him a freak''\\
''So he lived on his own underground''\\
''He lived on his own underground'' (x2)\\

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-->''This is the story of Michael, the ugliest boy in town''\\
''Ugly
town\\
Ugly
and weak, they called him a freak''\\
''So
freak\\
So
he lived on his own underground''\\
''He
underground\\
He
lived on his own underground'' (x2)\\



''(beat)''\\

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''(beat)''\\''[beat]''\\



** Yet another example in ''Itchy and Scratchy The Movie'':
--> '''Homer''': You know, when I was a boy I really wanted a catcher's mitt, but my dad wouldn't get it for me. So I held my breath until I passed out and banged my head on the coffee table. The doctor thought I might have brain damage.\\
'''Bart''': Dad, what's the point of this story?\\
'''Homer''': I like stories.

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** Yet another example in ''Itchy "Itchy and Scratchy The Movie'':
--> '''Homer''':
Movie":
--->'''Homer:'''
You know, when I was a boy I really wanted a catcher's mitt, but my dad wouldn't get it for me. So I held my breath until I passed out and banged my head on the coffee table. The doctor thought I might have brain damage.\\
'''Bart''': '''Bart:''' Dad, what's the point of this story?\\
'''Homer''': '''Homer:''' I like stories.



** ''A Better World'' averted this in the finished product, but lost its Aesop when they were ''writing'' it. Batman and an [[KnightTemplar overly enthusiastic]] version of Batman from a [[EvilTwin parallel world]] are engaged in a freedom vs. safety debate. When writing the exchange, the writers intended to have the "real" Batman win with his freedom argument; however, when they gave the "evil" Batman a line about how things like the murder of the Wayne family will never happen again in the "evil" Batman's world, the writers could not think of any retort for the "good" Batman to make. They had meant for him to win the argument, but ended up convincing ''themselves'' that the "evil" argument was the right one (at least from the perspective of the two Batmen). Thankfully, they developed a retort for a later scene which featured one of the downsides of the totalitarian regime, and the final episode maintained its "Safety at all costs is not worth the price" message.
** ''Unlimited'' Seasons One and Two: Even the writers admit that they had written themselves into a corner concerning whether or not superheroes were a good or a bad thing, which was the driving question of the two-season long MythArc. Then [[ConflictKiller the space alien computer]] [[DebateAndSwitch showed up]] and [[DistractedByTheShiny few cared until they reached]] [[FridgeLogic the fridge.]]
*** According to DVD commentary, the creators eventually decided that they believed a super powered vigilante organization like the Justice League would be bad in the real world, but good to have around in a world with supervillains.
* The episode "Defenders of Peace" of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' seemed to be all over the place with its moral. Half the time, the moral seems to be that it is wrong to try and force pacifists into a war, but the other half of the time, it seems to be saying [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop pacifists are cowardly pussies and if war comes your way, you should pick a side, like it or not.]]
** The episode really had two protagonist groups who each learned a different lesson ("Don't drag other people into your problems" for the Jedi and "Once you've been dragged into a problem, ignoring it won't make it go away" for the pacifists). It's a problem shared by most non-propaganda war stories where the good guys need to look like heroes without glorifying war: ultimately, the moral comes down to "Fighting is bad; losing is worse."

to:

** ''A "A Better World'' World" averted this in the finished product, but lost its Aesop when they were ''writing'' it. Batman and an [[KnightTemplar overly enthusiastic]] version of Batman from a [[EvilTwin parallel world]] are engaged in a freedom vs. safety debate. When writing the exchange, the writers intended to have the "real" Batman win with his freedom argument; however, when they gave the "evil" Batman a line about how things like the murder of the Wayne family will never happen again in the "evil" Batman's world, the writers could not think of any retort for the "good" Batman to make. They had meant for him to win the argument, but ended up convincing ''themselves'' that the "evil" argument was the right one (at least from the perspective of the two Batmen). Thankfully, they developed a retort for a later scene which featured one of the downsides of the totalitarian regime, and the final episode maintained its "Safety at all costs is not worth the price" message.
** ''Unlimited'' "Unlimited" Seasons One and Two: Even the writers admit that they had written themselves into a corner concerning whether or not superheroes were a good or a bad thing, which was the driving question of the two-season long MythArc. Then [[ConflictKiller the space alien computer]] [[DebateAndSwitch showed up]] and [[DistractedByTheShiny few cared until they reached]] [[FridgeLogic the fridge.]]
***
]] According to DVD commentary, the creators eventually decided that they believed a super powered vigilante organization like the Justice League would be bad in the real world, but good to have around in a world with supervillains.
* The episode "Defenders of Peace" of ''WesternAnimation/StarWarsTheCloneWars'' seemed to be all over the place with its moral. Half the time, the moral seems to be that it is wrong to try and force pacifists into a war, but the other half of the time, it seems to be saying [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop pacifists are cowardly pussies and if war comes your way, you should pick a side, like it or not.]]
**
]] The episode really had two protagonist groups who each learned a different lesson ("Don't drag other people into your problems" for the Jedi and "Once you've been dragged into a problem, ignoring it won't make it go away" for the pacifists). It's a problem shared by most non-propaganda war stories where the good guys need to look like heroes without glorifying war: ultimately, the moral comes down to "Fighting is bad; losing is worse."



* A ''WesternAnimation/TheWeekenders'' episode opens with Tish distraught that her report card has a negative comment about her being too much of a perfectionist. Later, the other guys ask her to paint a seaweed statue for an auction. She paints the statue, saying, "It's not perfect, but it's good enough..." but then she decides that a different kind of seaweed would work better for the statue, and she ends up returning the statue unpainted because she didn't have time to paint the rebuilt statue. After the auction, Tish is disappointed at her perfectionism streak screwing up the job... and then one of the teachers buys up the statue. The ep ends with her [[MediumAwareness straightening up the shot]] before the usual "Later days!" So... is perfectionism supposed to be good or not?
** It could be taken as saying not to get too hung up on being perfect, because the finished product is still good. That would be a better message to send than just "don't try too hard to be perfect", because some perfectionists try so hard because they think they'll outright fail otherwise. If Tish's statue hadn't sold, it would have confirmed that not being perfect made it a failure, but as it is, it shows that Tish still succeeded while managing to let it go.

to:

* A ''WesternAnimation/TheWeekenders'' episode opens with Tish distraught that her report card has a negative comment about her being too much of a perfectionist. Later, the other guys ask her to paint a seaweed statue for an auction. She paints the statue, saying, "It's not perfect, but it's good enough..." but then she decides that a different kind of seaweed would work better for the statue, and she ends up returning the statue unpainted because she didn't have time to paint the rebuilt statue. After the auction, Tish is disappointed at her perfectionism streak screwing up the job... and then one of the teachers buys up the statue. The ep ends with her [[MediumAwareness straightening up the shot]] before the usual "Later days!" So... is perfectionism supposed to be good or not?
**
not? It could be taken as saying not to get too hung up on being perfect, because the finished product is still good. That would be a better message to send than just "don't try too hard to be perfect", perfect," because some perfectionists try so hard because they think they'll outright fail otherwise. If Tish's statue hadn't sold, it would have confirmed that not being perfect made it a failure, but as it is, it shows that Tish still succeeded while managing to let it go.



--> '''Buttercup:''' But from now on, um, uh... from now on, um, uh, I can't think of anything.

to:

--> '''Buttercup:''' -->'''Buttercup:''' But from now on, um, uh... from now on, um, uh, I can't think of anything.



** In "Feeling Pinkie Keen", [[TheSmartGuy Twilight Sparkle]] is repeatedly skeptical and repeatedly surprised at correlations between [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Pinkie Pie's]] physiology and imminent future events; depending on the series of nerve sensations and muscle spasms, seemingly unconnected events can be predicted. Twilight defaults to being an AgentScully for most of the episode (although, it should be said, she does at one point try and fail to get the kind of data on the phenomenon that she could handle), until at the end she's forced to accept the phenomenon she's actually been seeing all the time with her own eyes "on faith". The point is actually stated as being that you can accept some things even if you don't understand them, but Twilight wasn't even ''trying'' to understand anything for most of the time, just to deny it.\\
\\

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** In "Feeling Pinkie Keen", [[TheSmartGuy Twilight Sparkle]] is repeatedly skeptical and repeatedly surprised at correlations between [[{{Cloudcuckoolander}} Pinkie Pie's]] physiology and imminent future events; depending on the series of nerve sensations and muscle spasms, seemingly unconnected events can be predicted. Twilight defaults to being an AgentScully for most of the episode (although, it should be said, she does at one point try and fail to get the kind of data on the phenomenon that she could handle), until at the end she's forced to accept the phenomenon she's actually been seeing all the time with her own eyes "on faith". The point is actually stated as being that you can accept some things even if you don't understand them, but Twilight wasn't even ''trying'' to understand anything for most of the time, just to deny it.\\
\\
\\\



** "Over a Barrel" is about a conflict between settler ponies and Native American themed buffalo. The historical treatment of Native Americans certainly can't be discussed in it, so the conflict is one of misunderstanding and conflict of interest between equally powerful parties. But really it just seems like an excuse to put the ponies in a WildWest setting for some reason. Pinkie Pie tries to solve the situation by singing an extremely naïve song about how "You gotta share, you gotta care" that only escalates the conflict. However, the parties are actually quite willing to compromise as soon as they figure out how. The conflict is solved mainly because it wasn't that bad to begin with. The official aesop at the end, then, is pretty vacuous, and ends with "You've got to share; you've got to care." (Pinkie Pie: "Hey! That's what I said!") If that wasn't a stealth SpoofAesop, it's kind of confusing; is it good to assume everyone can just be nice and get along, or not?
*** The aesop could be taken as "Everyone can be nice and get along, but only if they actually work out the details of whatever they're arguing about. Vapid slogans alone won't do the trick."
** "A Friend In Deed" spends 90% of its runtime setting the morals that "you can't force someone to be your friend" and "some people just need their personal space, and that's okay", as shown by Pinkie [[{{Determinator}} stopping at nothing]] to get Cranky to be her friend and refusing to leave him alone until he does. Then in the last five minutes she ''succeeds'' in becoming his friend through sheer force of will by realizing that another character [[AssPull introduced only in this episode]] was Cranky's long lost love. It takes the previous moral and tacks a sort of "except when you do something really nice for them!" onto it, muddling the intent somewhat.
** "One Bad Apple" is so clumsy with it's intended messages of "standing up to a bully makes you a bully as well" and "telling an adult is the solution to being bullied" that it makes one wonder if some of the cast or crew [[SpoofAesop secretly disagreed with them]]. In the climax of the episode, almost ''immediately'' after the Crusader's epiphany that they should have told an adult, Diamond Tiara and Silver Spoon pop up and begin bullying them right in front of Applejack who [[AdultsAreUseless does nothing other than frown]], effectively negating aesop number one. Then Babs Seed gets in their faces and intimidates them into leaping back in fear and landing in the mud, [[BrokenAesop effectively solving the current bullying issue by standing up to them]] and negating aesop number two.
** "Bats!" starts with a simple enough issue of a fruit bat infestation that is threatening Applejack's crop and boils down to Applejack's argument of "get rid of them because they're a threat" against Fluttershy's argument of "but they're living creatures and can help in the long run", setting up an apparent argument of necessity vs animal rights. Then Twilight Sparkle decides to TakeAThirdOption, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero causes much more damage by accidentally transforming Fluttershy into a vampire bat pony]], and somehow this wins over Applejack and they set up a reserve on the farm for the fruit bats. The initial conflict is never addressed.
** "Princess Spike" can't seem to make up it's mind at all which aesop it wants to teach. It begins with Spike going to ludicrous lengths, including making questionable decisions on her behalf to preserve the silence so Twilight Sparkle can sleep, then abruptly leaps to him forgetting all about keeping it quiet and instead abusing his relationship with her to solicit freebies from others, then all hell breaks loose when the things he tried to do to keep things quiet ([[BrokenAesop the selfish stuff goes without consequence]]) causes a huge mess, and then out of nowhere ends on the moral "when we all do our part everything works out in the end" which really had nothing to do with anything and actually conflicts with what was presented in the episode.

to:

** "Over a Barrel" is about a conflict between settler ponies and Native American themed buffalo. The historical treatment of Native Americans certainly can't be discussed in it, so the conflict is one of misunderstanding and conflict of interest between equally powerful parties. But really it just seems like an excuse to put the ponies in a WildWest setting for some reason. Pinkie Pie tries to solve the situation by singing an extremely naïve song about how "You gotta share, you gotta care" that only escalates the conflict. However, the parties are actually quite willing to compromise as soon as they figure out how. The conflict is solved mainly because it wasn't that bad to begin with. The official aesop at the end, then, is pretty vacuous, and ends with "You've got to share; you've got to care." (Pinkie Pie: "Hey! That's what I said!") If that wasn't a stealth SpoofAesop, it's kind of confusing; is it good to assume everyone can just be nice and get along, or not?
***
not? The aesop could be taken as "Everyone can be nice and get along, but only if they actually work out the details of whatever they're arguing about. Vapid slogans alone won't do the trick."
** "A Friend In in Deed" spends 90% of its runtime setting the morals that "you can't force someone to be your friend" and "some people just need their personal space, and that's okay", as shown by Pinkie [[{{Determinator}} stopping at nothing]] to get Cranky to be her friend and refusing to leave him alone until he does. Then in the last five minutes she ''succeeds'' in becoming his friend through sheer force of will by realizing that another character [[AssPull introduced only in this episode]] was Cranky's long lost love. It takes the previous moral and tacks a sort of "except when you do something really nice for them!" onto it, muddling the intent somewhat.
** "One Bad Apple" is so clumsy with it's its intended messages of "standing up to a bully makes you a bully as well" and "telling an adult is the solution to being bullied" that it makes one wonder if some of the cast or crew [[SpoofAesop secretly disagreed with them]]. In the climax of the episode, almost ''immediately'' after the Crusader's epiphany that they should have told an adult, Diamond Tiara and Silver Spoon pop up and begin bullying them right in front of Applejack who [[AdultsAreUseless does nothing other than frown]], effectively negating aesop number one. Then Babs Seed gets in their faces and intimidates them into leaping back in fear and landing in the mud, [[BrokenAesop effectively solving the current bullying issue by standing up to them]] and negating aesop number two.
** "Bats!" starts with a simple enough issue of a fruit bat infestation that is threatening Applejack's crop and boils down to Applejack's argument of "get rid of them because they're a threat" against Fluttershy's argument of "but they're living creatures and can help in the long run", setting up an apparent argument of necessity vs vs. animal rights. Then Twilight Sparkle decides to TakeAThirdOption, [[NiceJobBreakingItHero causes much more damage by accidentally transforming Fluttershy into a vampire bat pony]], and somehow this wins over Applejack and they set up a reserve on the farm for the fruit bats. The initial conflict is never addressed.
** "Princess Spike" can't seem to make up it's its mind at all which aesop it wants to teach. It begins with Spike going to ludicrous lengths, including making questionable decisions on her behalf to preserve the silence so Twilight Sparkle can sleep, then abruptly leaps to him forgetting all about keeping it quiet and instead abusing his relationship with her to solicit freebies from others, then all hell breaks loose when the things he tried to do to keep things quiet ([[BrokenAesop the selfish stuff goes without consequence]]) causes a huge mess, and then out of nowhere ends on the moral "when we all do our part everything works out in the end" which really had nothing to do with anything and actually conflicts with what was presented in the episode.



* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wizards}}'' is often assumed to have AnAesop that technology is bad, even though the good guys have no problem using it (namely, guns). Creator/RalphBakshi has actually had to state that it's about propaganda.
* An episode of the short-lived ''WesternAnimation/GeorgeOfTheJungle'' [[ContinuityReboot reboot]] has George contract a rash called "Itchy Swell-itis". The only cures are to down [[IfItTastesBadItMustBeGoodForYou a bitter-tasting medicine]] or refrain from scratching it. Since George lacks the self-control to do either, his friends step in via a ConeOfShame. This causes George to think that being "supportive" means not letting someone do what they want, and flees, discovering a hidden utopia full of animals in the same boat as he, and happily spend their lives perpetually scratching themselves. Thus, George [[MisfitMobilizationMoment rouses them all to band together]] and teach their friends the error of their supportive ways. Now you're probably thinking the Aesop will be something along the lines of "sometimes it is necessary to endure unpleasant things", or "what you want and what you need are often two different things, and those who care about you have to put what's needed first". However, never once is there shown a downside to scratching at a jungle rash the rest of one's life, and George's friends pretend to be swayed by their performance, only to [[SlippingAMickey trick them into taking the medicine]].
* In the ''WesternAnimation/WillasWildLife'' episode ''Feathered Friends'', the penguins Inky, Blinky, and Bob invite three penguin friends over for a party at their new place, a winter wonderland they created in the attic of Willa's house. These "friends" not only treat Willa and the other animals like non-entities, they invite over a large number of penguins that Inky, Blink, and Bob don't recognize and proceed to have a large party, excluding Inky, Blink, and Bob's other animal friends. It's not clear whether this was supposed to be an Aesop about being careful that some who call you friends may just be using you. There were additional elements of the Aesop about impressing others that are more interested in what you have than who you are (a phenomenon that continues to be prevalent in many society circles, and the guest penguins did have stereotypical HollywoodNewEngland names like Smitty, Henry, and Boomton). Curiously, enough, Smitty, Henry, and Boomton remained silent during their time onscreen as did all of the other guest penguins. Inky, at least felt that because those so called "friends" were also penguins, they'd be cool with Willa and the rest of the gang. This suggests a not often taken approach on the issue of racism, where you find out that your old group of friends may not like your other group of friends because your new group of friends includes individuals of the wrong race. However, the guest penguins behavior towards Willa and the other animals wasn't so much hostile, but just snobbish and distant (at one point, a guest penguin treats Willa as if she were a servant giving her a fishbone to throw away without so much as acknowledging her). Inky's description of them as friends seems as an InformedAttribute. This is a case where dialogue and character background from the guest penguins would have probably cleared things up.
* In the episode ''Invasion from Below'' from the ''Toys/HeroFactory'' animated specials, monsters are attacking the city after a drilling team has disturbed their nest. The Heroes are dispatched to defeat them, but Breez discovers that they only want to be left alone, and convinces her partners to put down the weapons because violence is not a solution. Sure enough, the monsters turn peaceful and return to their nest. [[spoiler:Just then, one of the monsters accidentally steps on a gun, firing it off and making the [[MonsterLord queen beast]] think the Heroes have fooled them. So the Heroes beat them, the queen, the monsters, their eggs and the entire nest fall into acid]], and... celebration, the end.

to:

* ''WesternAnimation/{{Wizards}}'' is often assumed to have AnAesop that technology is bad, even though the good guys have no problem using it (namely, guns). Creator/RalphBakshi has actually had to state that it's about propaganda.
* An episode of the short-lived ''WesternAnimation/GeorgeOfTheJungle'' [[ContinuityReboot reboot]] has George contract a rash called "Itchy Swell-itis". The only cures are to down [[IfItTastesBadItMustBeGoodForYou a bitter-tasting medicine]] or refrain from scratching it. Since George lacks the self-control to do either, his friends step in via a ConeOfShame. This causes George to think that being "supportive" means not letting someone do what they want, and flees, discovering a hidden utopia full of animals in the same boat as he, and happily spend their lives perpetually scratching themselves. Thus, George [[MisfitMobilizationMoment rouses them all to band together]] and teach their friends the error of their supportive ways. Now you're probably thinking the Aesop will be something along the lines of "sometimes it is necessary to endure unpleasant things", things," or "what you want and what you need are often two different things, and those who care about you have to put what's needed first". first." However, never once is there shown a downside to scratching at a jungle rash the rest of one's life, and George's friends pretend to be swayed by their performance, only to [[SlippingAMickey trick them into taking the medicine]].
* In the ''WesternAnimation/WillasWildLife'' episode ''Feathered Friends'', "Feathered Friends", the penguins Inky, Blinky, and Bob invite three penguin friends over for a party at their new place, a winter wonderland they created in the attic of Willa's house. These "friends" not only treat Willa and the other animals like non-entities, they invite over a large number of penguins that Inky, Blink, and Bob don't recognize and proceed to have a large party, excluding Inky, Blink, and Bob's other animal friends. It's not clear whether this was supposed to be an Aesop about being careful that some who call you friends may just be using you. There were additional elements of the Aesop about impressing others that are more interested in what you have than who you are (a phenomenon that continues to be prevalent in many society circles, and the guest penguins did have stereotypical HollywoodNewEngland names like Smitty, Henry, and Boomton). Curiously, enough, Smitty, Henry, and Boomton remained silent during their time onscreen as did all of the other guest penguins. Inky, at least felt that because those so called "friends" were also penguins, they'd be cool with Willa and the rest of the gang. This suggests a not often taken approach on the issue of racism, where you find out that your old group of friends may not like your other group of friends because your new group of friends includes individuals of the wrong race. However, the guest penguins behavior towards Willa and the other animals wasn't so much hostile, but just snobbish and distant (at one point, a guest penguin treats Willa as if she were a servant giving her a fishbone to throw away without so much as acknowledging her). Inky's description of them as friends seems as an InformedAttribute. This is a case where dialogue and character background from the guest penguins would have probably cleared things up.
* In the episode ''Invasion "Invasion from Below'' Below" from the ''Toys/HeroFactory'' animated specials, monsters are attacking the city after a drilling team has disturbed their nest. The Heroes are dispatched to defeat them, but Breez discovers that they only want to be left alone, and convinces her partners to put down the weapons because violence is not a solution. Sure enough, the monsters turn peaceful and return to their nest. [[spoiler:Just then, one of the monsters accidentally steps on a gun, firing it off and making the [[MonsterLord queen beast]] think the Heroes have fooled them. So the Heroes beat them, the queen, the monsters, their eggs and the entire nest fall into acid]], and... celebration, the end.
23rd Jan '18 6:12:31 AM Cryoclaste
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* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' animated series comes to mind, first presenting the Aesop of "You can't engage in racial profiling, it's just wrong in multiple senses of the word" when an innocent, intelligent, and very moral black ''prosecutor'' of all people gets arrested and psychologically coerced and tricked into confessing to the "X-Box murder" that he never committed, because he was black... only to just minutes later reveal that a bunch of random middle-eastern men who seem to be innocent store owners are actually a terrorist front... oh wait, they're not really terrorists, just stereotypical Middle Easterners packing heavy firepower for self-defense but everyone believes they're terrorists because Ed Wuncler is [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney the son of a rich white man and therefore could never have been committing armed robbery against the store owners]]. We never truly find out if they're terrorists or just overly-cautious store owners and the XBox killer is caught offscreen after he killed another victim, which makes it unclear if the message is that racial bias is right or wrong. The episode was a Lost Aesop on purpose: it was meant to be a satire of the Iraq War in which the Middle Eastern shopkeeper represented Saddam Hussein, so the idea with him was "He's a rotten person and the world's probably better without him in power, but he wasn't remotely involved in the crime we thought he was and we broke the law by going after him." Which is a valid message, but the way it was pulled off was still at odds with the other "racial profiling" plot and it was so incredibly dense that most viewers didn't get the message.

to:

* An episode of ''WesternAnimation/TheBoondocks'' animated series comes to mind, first presenting the Aesop of "You can't engage in racial profiling, it's just wrong in multiple senses of the word" when an innocent, intelligent, and very moral black ''prosecutor'' of all people gets arrested and psychologically coerced and tricked into confessing to the "X-Box murder" that he never committed, because he was black... only to just minutes later reveal that a bunch of random middle-eastern men who seem to be innocent store owners are actually a terrorist front... oh wait, they're not really terrorists, just stereotypical Middle Easterners packing heavy firepower for self-defense but everyone believes they're terrorists because Ed Wuncler is [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney the son of a rich white man and therefore could never have been committing armed robbery against the store owners]]. We never truly find out if they're terrorists or just overly-cautious store owners and the XBox Xbox killer is caught offscreen after he killed another victim, which makes it unclear if the message is that racial bias is right or wrong. The episode was a Lost Aesop on purpose: it was meant to be a satire of the Iraq War in which the Middle Eastern shopkeeper represented Saddam Hussein, so the idea with him was "He's a rotten person and the world's probably better without him in power, but he wasn't remotely involved in the crime we thought he was and we broke the law by going after him." Which is a valid message, but the way it was pulled off was still at odds with the other "racial profiling" plot and it was so incredibly dense that most viewers didn't get the message.
14th Jan '18 10:26:31 AM ShorinBJ
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* An epsiode of the short-lived ''WesternAnimation/GeorgeOfTheJungle'' [[ContinuityReboot reboot]] has George contract a rash called "Itchy Swell-itis". The only cures are to down [[IfItTastesBadItMustBeGoodForYou a bitter-tasting medicine]] or refrain from scratching it. Since George lacks the self-control to do either, his friends step in via a ConeOfShame. This causes George to think that being "supportive" means not letting someone do what they want, and flees, discovering a hidden utopia full of animals in the same boat as he, and happily spend their lives perpetually scratching themselves. Thus, George [[MisfitMobilizationMoment rouses them all to band together]] and teach their friends the error of their supportive ways. Now you're probably thinking the Aesop will be something along the lines of "sometimes it is necessary to endure unpleasant things", or "what you want and what you need are often two different things, and those who care about you have to put what's needed first". However, never once is there shown a downside to scratching at a jungle rash the rest of one's life, and George's friends pretend to be swayed by their performance, only to [[SlippingAMickey trick them into taking the medicine]].

to:

* An epsiode episode of the short-lived ''WesternAnimation/GeorgeOfTheJungle'' [[ContinuityReboot reboot]] has George contract a rash called "Itchy Swell-itis". The only cures are to down [[IfItTastesBadItMustBeGoodForYou a bitter-tasting medicine]] or refrain from scratching it. Since George lacks the self-control to do either, his friends step in via a ConeOfShame. This causes George to think that being "supportive" means not letting someone do what they want, and flees, discovering a hidden utopia full of animals in the same boat as he, and happily spend their lives perpetually scratching themselves. Thus, George [[MisfitMobilizationMoment rouses them all to band together]] and teach their friends the error of their supportive ways. Now you're probably thinking the Aesop will be something along the lines of "sometimes it is necessary to endure unpleasant things", or "what you want and what you need are often two different things, and those who care about you have to put what's needed first". However, never once is there shown a downside to scratching at a jungle rash the rest of one's life, and George's friends pretend to be swayed by their performance, only to [[SlippingAMickey trick them into taking the medicine]].
27th Dec '17 8:09:42 AM starofjusticev21
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* ''Fanfic/EigaSentaiScanranger'' was written to give the author an outlet to vent his hatred of ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' and glorify ''Franchise/SuperSentai'', but he seemed to forget to say what kind of show he '''wanted''' if ''Power Rangers'' was all wrong. The obvious answer would be he just wanted translated Sentai shows, but with how ''Scanranger'' was about an all-original team of wisecracking multi-ethnic heroes protecting America from LaughablyEvil space aliens, it seems more like it was ''based on'' ''Power Rangers'' than anything.

to:

* ''Fanfic/EigaSentaiScanranger'' was written to give the author an outlet to vent his hatred of ''Franchise/PowerRangers'' and glorify ''Franchise/SuperSentai'', but he seemed to forget to say what kind of show he '''wanted''' if ''Power Rangers'' was all wrong. The obvious answer would be he just wanted translated Sentai shows, but with how ''Scanranger'' was about an all-original team of wisecracking multi-ethnic heroes protecting America from LaughablyEvil space aliens, it seems more like it was ''based on'' based on ''Power Rangers'' than anything.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Main.LostAesop