History Main / LongRunnerTechMarchesOn

16th Apr '17 7:31:06 PM Rhomega3
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* In the original ''WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget'' cartoon, Penny had a computer shaped like a book long before laptops were invented. The upcoming [[WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget2015 2015 series]] updates this by replacing the computer book with a device that more closely resembles a tablet. In addition, Chief Quimby's exploding messages are now small devices that play recorded messages instead of pieces of paper that detonate [[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct when the last sentence, "This message will self-destruct" is read aloud]].

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* In the original ''WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget'' cartoon, Penny had a computer shaped like a book long before laptops were invented. The upcoming [[WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget2015 2015 series]] updates this by replacing the computer book with a device that more closely resembles a tablet. In addition, Chief Quimby's exploding messages are now small devices that play recorded messages instead of pieces of paper that detonate [[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct when the last sentence, "This message will self-destruct" is read aloud]].
31st Mar '17 1:00:49 AM Tsukireiko
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** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months passed in the story. (There's a lot of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons. And that's not even considering the sheer number of important cases that have occurred. Even condensing the series down to its plot relevant episodes and ignoring repeated holidays renders enough time passage to fill well over a year.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.

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** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months ''about six months'' have passed in the story. (There's a lot ''lot'' of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons. And that's not even considering the sheer number of important cases that have occurred. Even condensing the series down just to its plot and character relevant episodes and ignoring repeated holidays holidays/seasons renders enough time passage to fill well over a year.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.
25th Mar '17 12:07:43 PM nombretomado
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* WordOfGod on ''Webcomic/DumbingOfAge'' is that it'll roll with this, in order to avoid 'slowly becoming a period piece'. Other than an early oopsie of many of the students listing modern movies as their favorites in a gender studies class (Willis laments in a decade that'll seem weird that so many 18-year-olds would be into classic movies), the pop culture references tend to try to stay as generic as possible. The NintendoDS/[[Nintendo3DS 3DS]] may be replaced, but playing a version of ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' on a handheld device will probably be A Thing for the foreseeable future, for instance. Amber's MMORPG is most likely ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' but never named directly, and ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' references are kept as generic as possible, IE "Optimus Prime" and "Bumblebee" being safe choices for future generations.

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* WordOfGod on ''Webcomic/DumbingOfAge'' is that it'll roll with this, in order to avoid 'slowly becoming a period piece'. Other than an early oopsie of many of the students listing modern movies as their favorites in a gender studies class (Willis laments in a decade that'll seem weird that so many 18-year-olds would be into classic movies), the pop culture references tend to try to stay as generic as possible. The NintendoDS/[[Nintendo3DS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS/[[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]] may be replaced, but playing a version of ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' on a handheld device will probably be A Thing for the foreseeable future, for instance. Amber's MMORPG is most likely ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' but never named directly, and ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' references are kept as generic as possible, IE "Optimus Prime" and "Bumblebee" being safe choices for future generations.
22nd Mar '17 1:29:46 PM Tsukireiko
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** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months passed in the story. (There's a lot of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.

to:

** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months passed in the story. (There's a lot of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons. And that's not even considering the sheer number of important cases that have occurred. Even condensing the series down to its plot relevant episodes and ignoring repeated holidays renders enough time passage to fill well over a year.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.


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** This became ridiculous when recently there was a ''flashback case'', ergo, a story that's supposed to have happened prior to the series beginning, that required the use of a phone that had ''video recording capabilities''. Meanwhile we're supposed to believe that chapters containing characters in possession of pagers happened afterwards. Right.
21st Feb '17 8:37:04 PM gewunomox
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* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], {{television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.

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* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], {{television}} UsefulNotes/{{Television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.
13th Feb '17 7:08:50 PM SteveMB
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Added DiffLines:

* Carefully averted in the ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'' series -- the people of Grantville have the knowledge and technology available in a small town in 2000, and Creator/EricFlint has noted that it takes ever-increasing amounts of care to avoid including anything that didn't exist then.
3rd Feb '17 12:44:18 PM VampireBuddha
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], {{television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.
18th Jan '17 11:32:24 PM PhantomRider
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* The Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which reboots its continuity every so often, particularly with those characters -- Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors."

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* The Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which reboots {{Cosmic Retcon}}s its continuity every couple of years nowadays, making it so often, that whatever 1940s Batman or Superman stories that currently still count might have happened last year. Marvel has it particularly bad with those characters -- Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors.""
**Not to mention, Marvel's use of ComicBookTime isn't ignored in the stories. Every so often, a story from decades ago will be referred to as having been five or ten years ago. Hank "Comicbook/TheBeast" [=McCoy=] was in his late teens in the sixties and celebrated his 30th birthday in the nineties. The technology seen and real-world events referenced in the Silver Age that are later established as recent would seem to set all things Marvel in a version of the late seventies that happens to have smartphones and such ([[FridgeBrilliance perhaps due to having people like Peter, Tony, Reed, and Hank hanging around.]] Maybe [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Reed Richards isn't useless]] after all...?)
4th Jan '17 9:26:05 AM ZombieAladdin
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* Averted in ''Manga/HunterXHunter'': Shalnark's WeaponOfChoice, a brick-type cell phone that could mind-control people and instructions given out via texting, was not changed over the years the manga has remained in publication. That being said, hand gestures for texting today remain similar to back then, and the phone itself is unusually flat and rectangular for a brick phone, so when the phone reappeared in a story arc in 2015, the manga depicted as few shots of its front as possible, with most shots of the phone from behind and the user rapidly tapping the front of it.

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* Averted in ''Manga/HunterXHunter'': Shalnark's WeaponOfChoice, a brick-type cell phone that could mind-control people and instructions given out via texting, was not changed over the years the manga has remained in publication. That being said, hand gestures for texting today remain similar to back then, and the phone itself is unusually flat and rectangular for a brick phone, so when the phone reappeared in a story arc in 2015, the manga depicted as few shots of its front as possible, with most shots of the phone from behind and the user rapidly tapping the front of it. That being said, it's played straight with other people's phones, with smartphones popping up with increasing frequency, though a few other characters still have the phones they originally had.
3rd Jan '17 6:11:21 PM ZombieAladdin
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Added DiffLines:

* Averted in ''Manga/HunterXHunter'': Shalnark's WeaponOfChoice, a brick-type cell phone that could mind-control people and instructions given out via texting, was not changed over the years the manga has remained in publication. That being said, hand gestures for texting today remain similar to back then, and the phone itself is unusually flat and rectangular for a brick phone, so when the phone reappeared in a story arc in 2015, the manga depicted as few shots of its front as possible, with most shots of the phone from behind and the user rapidly tapping the front of it.
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