History Main / LongRunnerTechMarchesOn

20th Apr '16 4:36:15 PM JMQwilleran
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* The young ''Literature/AmeliaBedelia'' are a prequel to the original ''Amelia Bedelia'' franchise, but don't try to pretend as though they're set in the time period that would actually fit the Amelia Bedelia seen in the original books. ''Amelia Bedelia'' on the Job shows Amelia Bedelia's father working on a laptop, even though personal computers didn't even exist during the 1960s time period in which the books with the adult Amelia Bedelia were first published.
25th Mar '16 4:33:02 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* ''WanderingSon'' began in the early years of TheNoughties, which was a fast paced decade for technology, thus this is inevitable for a SliceOfLife. For example, early on few characters had cellphones but recently most characters do. There's also a case of TechnologyMarchesOn where in the manga, in a volume that came out in 2006, two characters record their voice using a tape recorder. Cut to the 2011 anime adaptation and the scene is changed to them using their cellphones instead. The series barely takes place within 6 years so far, so it seems a bit realistic compared to other examples.

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* ''WanderingSon'' ''Manga/WanderingSon'' began in the early years of TheNoughties, which was a fast paced decade for technology, thus this is inevitable for a SliceOfLife. For example, early on few characters had cellphones but recently most characters do. There's also a case of TechnologyMarchesOn where in the manga, in a volume that came out in 2006, two characters record their voice using a tape recorder. Cut to the 2011 anime adaptation and the scene is changed to them using their cellphones instead. The series barely takes place within 6 years so far, so it seems a bit realistic compared to other examples.
24th Mar '16 10:47:01 AM Dvandemon
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* The 2016 revival of The Powerpuff Girls turns the girls' hotline into a cordless phone and an app on their individual smart phones.
7th Feb '16 5:30:58 PM grapesandmilk
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** In "The Blunder Years", there was a joke about a 12-year-old Carl talking about "this new thing called the Internet", only to reveal he was talking about "inner netting" in swim trunks. At the time it aired, it was obvious that the Internet was invented too recently to have been around during his childhood, but by the mid-2010s someone in their thirties would likely have considered the Internet a novelty when they were his age.
4th Dec '15 3:14:48 AM jormis29
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* ''Film/MissionImpossible'' (1996) featured the then-current computer technology of the mid-90s. As the franchise went on, computer technology upgraded with it, such as ''Film/MissionImpossibleGhostProtocol'' (2011) and ''Film/MissionImpossibleRogueNation'' (2015) prominently featuring tablet PCs and other smart devices.

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* ''Film/MissionImpossible'' (1996) featured the then-current computer technology of the mid-90s. As the franchise went on, computer technology upgraded with it, such as ''Film/MissionImpossibleGhostProtocol'' (2011) and ''Film/MissionImpossibleRogueNation'' (2015) prominently featuring tablet PCs [=PCs=] and other smart devices.



* In the early ''[[TheCatWhoSeries Cat Who...]]'' books Qwill has a clunky manual typewriter that he refuses to replace with an electric one. In the later ones he has a clunky electric typewriter that he refuses to replace with a word processor. It's still claimed to be the machine he used his entire journalistic career.
* ''YoungWizards'': A computer obtained by one of the characters in the third book starts out as a typical 80s Macintosh-like device. By the seventh book, it has "evolved" into a modern-day laptop, despite less than five years passing in-universe.

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* In the early ''[[TheCatWhoSeries ''[[Literature/TheCatWhoSeries Cat Who...]]'' books Qwill has a clunky manual typewriter that he refuses to replace with an electric one. In the later ones he has a clunky electric typewriter that he refuses to replace with a word processor. It's still claimed to be the machine he used his entire journalistic career.
* ''YoungWizards'': ''Literature/YoungWizards'': A computer obtained by one of the characters in the third book starts out as a typical 80s Macintosh-like device. By the seventh book, it has "evolved" into a modern-day laptop, despite less than five years passing in-universe.



* Lampshaded in the pilot episode of the 1980s revival of ''Series/MissionImpossible'', which saw the mission briefings upgraded from tapes to CDs, leading Jim Phelps to say "Time ''does'' march on..."

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* Lampshaded in the pilot episode of the 1980s revival of ''Series/MissionImpossible'', which saw the mission briefings upgraded from tapes to CDs, [=CDs=], leading Jim Phelps to say "Time ''does'' march on..."



* The greater {{DCAU}} has something like this, since the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was deliberately made to evoke the character's 1930's noir roots, while ''SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' and others are more modern. As a result, Gotham City got a massive tech upgrade between seasons as BTAS was updated to match STAS.

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* The greater {{DCAU}} Franchise/{{DCAU}} has something like this, since the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was deliberately made to evoke the character's 1930's noir roots, while ''SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' and others are more modern. As a result, Gotham City got a massive tech upgrade between seasons as BTAS was updated to match STAS.



* In the 2011 BeavisAndButthead Revival, the technology is more or less up to date with the 2010s. Computers look modern, they mention the internet and modern video games, one episode features a drone, and their TV has a converter box near to the rabbit ears.
* In the original WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget cartoon, Penny had a computer shaped like a book long before laptops were invented. The upcoming [[WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget2015 2015 series]] updates this by replacing the computer book with a device that more closely resembles a tablet. In addition, Chief Quimby's exploding messages are now small devices that play recorded messages instead of pieces of paper that detonate [[TheScottishTrope when the last sentence, "This message will self-destruct" is read aloud]].

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* In the 2011 BeavisAndButthead ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'' Revival, the technology is more or less up to date with the 2010s. Computers look modern, they mention the internet and modern video games, one episode features a drone, and their TV has a converter box near to the rabbit ears.
* In the original WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget ''WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget'' cartoon, Penny had a computer shaped like a book long before laptops were invented. The upcoming [[WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget2015 2015 series]] updates this by replacing the computer book with a device that more closely resembles a tablet. In addition, Chief Quimby's exploding messages are now small devices that play recorded messages instead of pieces of paper that detonate [[TheScottishTrope [[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct when the last sentence, "This message will self-destruct" is read aloud]].
4th Dec '15 2:51:02 AM StFan
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[[folder: Comics]]
* ''HiAndLois'': Look at the photo on TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi_and_lois here,]] and compare the TV to the modern TV the family has now, not to mention the other conveniences that they have.

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[[folder: Comics]]
* ''HiAndLois'': Look at the photo on TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi_and_lois here,]] and compare the TV to the modern TV the family has now, not to mention the other conveniences that they have.
Comic Books]]



* {{Blondie}}'s family has been around for decades, and (as noted on the main page) has stayed the same age since the 1940's. However, the family now owns a flat-panel LCD screen and keyboard, presumably attached to a computer of some sort. And a bit of changing values, too: Whereas Blondie was a simple housewife early in the comic, in the '90s she finally got her own job, running a business no less (as a caterer).
* ''ArchieComics''. The characters don't age, but the technology is always up-to-date. It's not something that's just quietly slipped in either; a strip in the late 80s saw Veronica replacing her record collection with CD's, and in a more recent one Archie's parents reminisced about the days of dial-up.
* The ComicBook/DisneyMouseAndDuckComics. While [[RetroUniverse aesthetically with many bygone elements]], the level of technology is always assumed to be contemporary ([[ReedRichardsIsUseless not counting]] Gyro Gearloose and other inventors occasionally [[SerialEscalation pushing it well beyond that]]), so that cell phones or desktop computers may crop up in more recent stories. A notable exception are the stories by Creator/DonRosa (active from 1987 to 2005) which are always either set in the timeframe "late forties [[TheFifties to]] [[TheSixties early sixties]]" (the time in which CarlBarks created his classic stories), or are [[Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck prequels taking place at very specific dates in history]].

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* {{Blondie}}'s family has been around for decades, and (as noted on the main page) has stayed the same age since the 1940's. However, the family now owns a flat-panel LCD screen and keyboard, presumably attached to a computer of some sort. And a bit of changing values, too: Whereas Blondie was a simple housewife early in the comic, in the '90s she finally got her own job, running a business no less (as a caterer).
* ''ArchieComics''.
''Franchise/ArchieComics''. The characters don't age, but the technology is always up-to-date. It's not something that's just quietly slipped in either; a strip in the late 80s saw Veronica replacing her record collection with CD's, and in a more recent one Archie's parents reminisced about the days of dial-up.
* The ComicBook/DisneyMouseAndDuckComics. While [[RetroUniverse aesthetically with many bygone elements]], the level of technology is always assumed to be contemporary ([[ReedRichardsIsUseless not counting]] Gyro Gearloose and other inventors occasionally [[SerialEscalation pushing it well beyond that]]), so that cell phones or desktop computers may crop up in more recent stories. A notable exception are the stories by Creator/DonRosa (active from 1987 to 2005) which are always either set in the timeframe "late forties [[TheFifties to]] [[TheSixties early sixties]]" (the time in which CarlBarks Creator/CarlBarks created his classic stories), or are [[Comicbook/TheLifeAndTimesOfScroogeMcDuck prequels taking place at very specific dates in history]].



* The MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which reboots its continuity every so often, particularly with those characters - Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards - who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors."
* Cerebro, the mutant-detecting computer from ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, first appeared in the 60's using punch-cards and tape drives. It has wildly fluctuated in both appearance and capabilities throughout the years before settling on the ball-shaped room made popular in the movies.
* ''ComicStrip/DickTracy'' justifies it with industrial magnate Diet Smith supplying Tracy's tech with continual upgrades.

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* The MarvelUniverse Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which reboots its continuity every so often, particularly with those characters - -- Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards - -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors."
* Cerebro, the mutant-detecting computer from ComicBook/{{X-Men}}, ComicBook/XMen, first appeared in the 60's '60s using punch-cards and tape drives. It has wildly fluctuated in both appearance and capabilities throughout the years before settling on the ball-shaped room made popular in the movies.
* ''ComicStrip/DickTracy'' justifies it with industrial magnate Diet Smith supplying Tracy's tech with continual upgrades.
movies.



[[folder:Comic Strips]]
* ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'': Look at the photo on TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi_and_lois here,]] and compare the TV to the modern TV the family has now, not to mention the other conveniences that they have.
* ComicStrip/{{Blondie}}'s family has been around for decades, and (as noted on the main page) has stayed the same age since the 1940's. However, the family now owns a flat-panel LCD screen and keyboard, presumably attached to a computer of some sort. And a bit of changing values, too: Whereas Blondie was a simple housewife early in the comic, in the '90s she finally got her own job, running a business no less (as a caterer).
* ''ComicStrip/DickTracy'' justifies it with industrial magnate Diet Smith supplying Tracy's tech with continual upgrades.
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[[folder: Literature]]

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[[folder: Literature]][[folder:Literature]]



[[folder: Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', where (set in the present day) the expedition had a seemingly limitless supply of gadgets, which mysteriously kept updating with rather recognizable new models which hadn't even shipped yet at the show's premiere, in spite of being cut off from Earth until the Dædalus showed up in Series 2.

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[[folder: Live-Action [[folder:Live-Action TV]]
* ''Series/StargateAtlantis'', where ''Series/StargateAtlantis'' (set in the present day) day), where the expedition had a seemingly limitless supply of gadgets, which mysteriously kept updating with rather recognizable new models which hadn't even shipped yet at the show's premiere, in spite of being cut off from Earth until the Dædalus showed up in Series 2.



[[folder:VideoGames]]

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[[folder:VideoGames]][[folder:Video Games]]



** There is some in-universe justification if one looks at SharedUniverse ''Street Fighter'' is part of. Even discounting the events of ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha 3]]'' (theorized to take place in the late 80s/early 90s), where--among other things--Karin's family owns a KillSat, the decidedly futuristic ''VideoGame/CaptainCommando'' takes place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2026]]; [[AnachronicOrder in order]], ''II'', ''IV'', and ''III'' collectively span from the early 90s to the turn of the 21st century, complete with technology that matches and even surpasses what's currently available in the real world (never mind all of the genetic manipulation experiments going around, which seemed to have started before [[VideoGame/StreetFighterI 1987]]). Given the overall moveset similarities, the high-tech battle suit Viper wears is commonly speculated to be a possible prototype for Cap's gear.

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** There is some in-universe justification if one looks at SharedUniverse ''Street Fighter'' is part of. Even discounting the events of ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha 3]]'' (theorized to take place in the late 80s/early 90s), where--among where -- among other things--Karin's things -- Karin's family owns a KillSat, the decidedly futuristic ''VideoGame/CaptainCommando'' takes place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2026]]; [[AnachronicOrder in order]], ''II'', ''IV'', and ''III'' collectively span from the early 90s to the turn of the 21st century, complete with technology that matches and even surpasses what's currently available in the real world (never mind all of the genetic manipulation experiments going around, which seemed to have started before [[VideoGame/StreetFighterI 1987]]). Given the overall moveset similarities, the high-tech battle suit Viper wears is commonly speculated to be a possible prototype for Cap's gear.



[[folder: WebComics]]

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[[folder: WebComics]][[folder:Web Comics]]



[[folder: Western Animation]]

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[[folder: Western [[folder:Western Animation]]



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28th Nov '15 10:37:56 PM nombretomado
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* Played with in ''Anime/HisCooolSehaGirls'': [[SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] can connect to the internet wherever and whenever she wants, but can use only sluggish dial-up (in an age where Wifi and broadband are the norm). She also prefers to connect only during certain times to avoid running a fee, on account of [[MythologyGag being from a poor family]].

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* Played with in ''Anime/HisCooolSehaGirls'': [[SegaDreamcast [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] can connect to the internet wherever and whenever she wants, but can use only sluggish dial-up (in an age where Wifi and broadband are the norm). She also prefers to connect only during certain times to avoid running a fee, on account of [[MythologyGag being from a poor family]].
4th Nov '15 4:42:09 PM X2X
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[[folder: VideoGames]]
* Over the course of the VideoGame/NancyDrew adventure games, Nancy transitions from using land lines to basic cell phones to camera phones to smartphones, and from borrowing suspects' desktops to owning a laptop to downloading through her phone. In ''The Secret of the Old Clock'', set in the 1920s, the game pokes fun at this by having Nancy's friend Bess having the latest tech— a party line.[[note]]A party line was where 2, of often more, households were connected to the ''same'' telephone connection.[[/note]]
* The entire ''Series/StreetFighter'' series takes place across the course of only a few years. ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' takes place immediately after ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''. The story is still taking place in the 1990s, but that isn't stopping C. Viper, Chun-Li, Juri, and a few other characters from using modern smartphones and ultra-thin laptops.

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[[folder: VideoGames]]
[[folder:VideoGames]]
* Over the course of the VideoGame/NancyDrew ''VideoGame/NancyDrew'' adventure games, Nancy transitions from using land lines to basic cell phones to camera phones to smartphones, and from borrowing suspects' desktops to owning a laptop to downloading through her phone. In ''The Secret of the Old Clock'', set in the 1920s, the game pokes fun at this by having Nancy's friend Bess having the latest tech— a party line.[[note]]A party line was where 2, of often more, households were connected to the ''same'' telephone connection.[[/note]]
* The entire ''Series/StreetFighter'' ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series takes place across the course of only a few years. ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' takes place immediately after ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''. The story is still taking place in the 1990s, but that isn't stopping C. Viper, Chun-Li, Juri, and a few other characters from using modern smartphones and ultra-thin laptops.laptops.
** There is some in-universe justification if one looks at SharedUniverse ''Street Fighter'' is part of. Even discounting the events of ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha 3]]'' (theorized to take place in the late 80s/early 90s), where--among other things--Karin's family owns a KillSat, the decidedly futuristic ''VideoGame/CaptainCommando'' takes place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2026]]; [[AnachronicOrder in order]], ''II'', ''IV'', and ''III'' collectively span from the early 90s to the turn of the 21st century, complete with technology that matches and even surpasses what's currently available in the real world (never mind all of the genetic manipulation experiments going around, which seemed to have started before [[VideoGame/StreetFighterI 1987]]). Given the overall moveset similarities, the high-tech battle suit Viper wears is commonly speculated to be a possible prototype for Cap's gear.
21st Aug '15 8:51:43 AM Premonition45
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* Happens throughout the ''Film/MissionImpossibleFilmSeries''. [[Film/MissionImpossible The first film]] featured the then-current computer technology of the mid-90s. As the franchise went on, computer technology upgraded with it, such as ''Film/MissionImpossibleGhostProtocol'' and ''Film/MissionImpossibleRogueNation'' prominently featuring tablet PCs and other smart devices.

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* Happens throughout the ''Film/MissionImpossibleFilmSeries''. [[Film/MissionImpossible The first film]] ''Film/MissionImpossible'' (1996) featured the then-current computer technology of the mid-90s. As the franchise went on, computer technology upgraded with it, such as ''Film/MissionImpossibleGhostProtocol'' (2011) and ''Film/MissionImpossibleRogueNation'' (2015) prominently featuring tablet PCs and other smart devices.
21st Aug '15 8:50:22 AM Premonition45
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* Happens throughout the ''Film/MissionImpossibleFilmSeries''. [[Film/MissionImpossible The first film]] featured the then-current computer technology of the mid-90s. As the franchise went on, computer technology upgraded with it, such as ''Film/MissionImpossibleGhostProtocol'' and ''Film/MissionImpossibleRogueNation'' prominently featuring tablet PCs and other smart devices.


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* Lampshaded in the pilot episode of the 1980s revival of ''Series/MissionImpossible'', which saw the mission briefings upgraded from tapes to CDs, leading Jim Phelps to say "Time ''does'' march on..."
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