History Main / LongRunnerTechMarchesOn

31st May '17 8:00:00 AM Technomaru
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** Ironically in "That 90's show", Sonic and Amy Rose resemble their look from ''Videogame/SonicAdventure'' which came out in 1998.
26th May '17 10:31:16 PM merotoker
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A SubTrope of ComicBookTime, LongRunner, and TechnologyMarchesOn. Sister Trope to NotAllowedToGrowUp.

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A SubTrope of ComicBookTime, LongRunner, {{Long Runner|s}}, and TechnologyMarchesOn. Sister Trope to NotAllowedToGrowUp.



* People in the Anime/{{Pokemon}} world have surprisingly begun to implement current technology in the recent series, despite the series starting in the '90s and the passage of time remaining ambiguous after the Kanto saga (which is approximately one year long). This includes giving James a tablet with the new Rocket logo on the back, and characters using smartphones.
* Played with in ''Anime/HisCooolSehaGirls'': [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] can connect to the internet wherever and whenever she wants, but can use only sluggish dial-up (in an age where Wifi and broadband are the norm). She also prefers to connect only during certain times to avoid running a fee, on account of [[MythologyGag being from a poor family]].

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* People in the Anime/{{Pokemon}} ''Anime/{{Pokemon}}'' world have surprisingly begun to implement current technology in the recent series, despite the series starting in the '90s and the passage of time remaining ambiguous after the Kanto saga (which is approximately one year long). This includes giving James a tablet with the new Rocket logo on the back, and characters using smartphones.
* Played with in ''Anime/HisCooolSehaGirls'': [[UsefulNotes/SegaDreamcast Dreamcast]] can connect to the internet Internet wherever and whenever she wants, but can use only sluggish dial-up (in an age where Wifi and broadband are the norm). She also prefers to connect only during certain times to avoid running a fee, on account of [[MythologyGag being from a poor family]].



* The Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which {{Cosmic Retcon}}s its continuity every couple of years nowadays, making it so that whatever 1940s Batman or Superman stories that currently still count might have happened last year. Marvel has it particularly bad with those characters -- Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors."
** Not to mention, Marvel's use of ComicBookTime isn't ignored in the stories. Every so often, a story from decades ago will be referred to as having been five or ten years ago. Hank "Comicbook/TheBeast" [=McCoy=] was in his late teens in the sixties and celebrated his 30th birthday in the nineties. The technology seen and real-world events referenced in the Silver Age that are later established as recent would seem to set all things Marvel in a version of the late seventies that happens to have smartphones and such ([[FridgeBrilliance perhaps due to having people like Peter, Tony, Reed, and Hank hanging around.]] Maybe [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Reed Richards isn't useless]] after all...?)
* Cerebro, the mutant-detecting computer from ComicBook/XMen, first appeared in the '60s using punch-cards and tape drives. It has wildly fluctuated in both appearance and capabilities throughout the years before the everyone just went with the device's portrayal in the movies, a hollow ball-shaped room.

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* The Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which {{Cosmic Retcon}}s its continuity every couple of years nowadays, making it so that whatever 1940s Batman or Superman stories that currently still count might have happened last year. Marvel has it particularly bad with those characters -- [[Franchise/SpiderMan Peter Parker, Parker]], [[ComicBook/IronMan Tony Stark, Stark]], [[ComicBook/FantasticFour Reed Richards Richards]] -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors."
** Not to mention, Marvel's use of ComicBookTime isn't ignored in the stories. Every so often, a story from decades ago will be referred to as having been five or ten years ago. Hank "Comicbook/TheBeast" "Beast" [=McCoy=] was in his late teens in the sixties and celebrated his 30th birthday in the nineties. The technology seen and real-world events referenced in the Silver Age that are later established as recent would seem to set all things Marvel in a version of the late seventies that happens to have smartphones and such ([[FridgeBrilliance perhaps due to having people like Peter, Tony, Reed, and Hank hanging around.]] Maybe [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Reed Richards isn't useless]] after all...?)
* Cerebro, the mutant-detecting computer from ComicBook/XMen, first appeared in the '60s using punch-cards and tape drives. It has wildly fluctuated in both appearance and capabilities throughout the years before the everyone just went with the device's portrayal in the movies, a hollow ball-shaped room.



* ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'': Look at the photo on TheOtherWiki [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi_and_lois here,]] and compare the TV to the modern TV the family has now, not to mention the other conveniences that they have.

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* ''ComicStrip/HiAndLois'': Look at the photo on TheOtherWiki [[Wiki/{{Wikipedia}} The Other Wiki]] [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hi_and_lois here,]] and compare the TV to the modern TV the family has now, not to mention the other conveniences that they have.



* Creator/AlanDeanFoster started the Literature/HumanxCommonwealth series in 1972; its older novels show Flinx looking up information on microfiche, whereas recent ones have him hacking a global computer network when he's only a few years older. Notable in that one of the novels, ''Bloodhype'', was set chronologically near the end of the series, but written back in the 70s. Foster himself acknowledges that this makes for a jarring plunge in tech-level whenever you read them according to the in-universe timeline.

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* Creator/AlanDeanFoster started the Literature/HumanxCommonwealth ''Literature/HumanxCommonwealth'' series in 1972; its older novels show Flinx looking up information on microfiche, whereas recent ones have him hacking a global computer network when he's only a few years older. Notable in that one of the novels, ''Bloodhype'', was set chronologically near the end of the series, but written back in the 70s. Foster himself acknowledges that this makes for a jarring plunge in tech-level whenever you read them according to the in-universe timeline.



* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], UsefulNotes/{{Television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.

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* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ''Literature/AtlasShrugged'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], UsefulNotes/{{Television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.



* The entire ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series takes place across the course of only a few years. ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' takes place immediately after ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''. The story is still taking place in the 1990s, but that isn't stopping C. Viper, Chun-Li, Juri, and a few other characters from using modern smartphones and ultra-thin laptops.
** There is some in-universe justification if one looks at SharedUniverse ''Street Fighter'' is part of. Even discounting the events of ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha 3]]'' (theorized to take place in the late 80s/early 90s), where -- among other things -- Karin's family owns a KillSat, the decidedly futuristic ''VideoGame/CaptainCommando'' takes place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2026]]; [[AnachronicOrder in order]], ''II'', ''IV'', and ''III'' collectively span from the early 90s to the turn of the 21st century, complete with technology that matches and even surpasses what's currently available in the real world (never mind all of the genetic manipulation experiments going around, which seemed to have started before [[VideoGame/StreetFighterI 1987]]). Given the overall moveset similarities, the high-tech battle suit Viper wears is commonly speculated to be a possible prototype for Cap's gear.

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* The entire ''Franchise/StreetFighter'' series takes place across the course of only a few years. ''VideoGame/StreetFighterIV'' takes place immediately after ''VideoGame/StreetFighterII''. The story is still taking place in the 1990s, but that isn't stopping C. Viper, Chun-Li, Juri, and a few other characters from using modern smartphones and ultra-thin laptops.
**
laptops. There is some in-universe justification if one looks at SharedUniverse ''Street Fighter'' is part of. Even discounting the events of ''[[VideoGame/StreetFighterAlpha Alpha 3]]'' (theorized to take place in the late 80s/early 90s), where -- among other things -- Karin's family owns a KillSat, the decidedly futuristic ''VideoGame/CaptainCommando'' takes place in [[TwentyMinutesIntoTheFuture 2026]]; [[AnachronicOrder in order]], ''II'', ''IV'', and ''III'' collectively span from the early 90s to the turn of the 21st century, complete with technology that matches and even surpasses what's currently available in the real world (never mind all of the genetic manipulation experiments going around, which seemed to have started before [[VideoGame/StreetFighterI 1987]]). Given the overall moveset similarities, the high-tech battle suit Viper wears is commonly speculated to be a possible prototype for Cap's gear.



* In most ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' games, the latest Nintendo console will be featured. The only real inversion of this is in the remakes ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen]]'', which feature an UsefulNotes/{{NES}} (as opposed to the original games which featured a UsefulNotes/{{SNES}}, which was the newest main Nintendo console at the time the game was released in Japan). This happens despite remakes which in theory take place at the same time the originals did (for instance, ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' feature the UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 but the remakes feature the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}). In the case of ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'', it took place chronologically ''before'' the ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'', yet had a newer console (the UsefulNotes/GameCube).

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* In most ''VideoGame/{{Pokemon}}'' games, the latest Nintendo console will be featured. The only real inversion of this is in the remakes ''[[VideoGame/PokemonRedAndBlue Pokémon FireRed and LeafGreen]]'', which feature an UsefulNotes/{{NES}} UsefulNotes/{{N|intendoEntertainmentSystem}}ES (as opposed to the original games which featured a UsefulNotes/{{SNES}}, UsefulNotes/{{S|uperNintendoEntertainmentSystem}}NES, which was the newest main Nintendo console at the time the game was released in Japan). This happens despite remakes which in theory take place at the same time the originals did (for instance, ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'' feature the UsefulNotes/Nintendo64 but the remakes feature the UsefulNotes/{{Wii}}). In the case of ''VideoGame/PokemonRubyAndSapphire'', it took place chronologically ''before'' the ''VideoGame/PokemonGoldAndSilver'', yet had a newer console (the UsefulNotes/GameCube).UsefulNotes/NintendoGameCube).



* ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance''. The very first strip opened with Torg talking about the potential of the internet in 1997. The march of tech is sometimes downplayed and sometimes lampshaded, especially in the 10th and 15th anniversary strips which redo the first strip but with Torg talking about the internet's potential in 2007 and 2012 instead.

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* ''Webcomic/SluggyFreelance''. The very first strip opened with Torg talking about the potential of the internet Internet in 1997. The march of tech is sometimes downplayed and sometimes lampshaded, especially in the 10th and 15th anniversary strips which redo the first strip but with Torg talking about the internet's potential in 2007 and 2012 instead.



* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The technology in the early episodes definitely reflected that the show took place around the same time they were produced, the 90s. Bart used a typewriter to write a paper in an early episode, and the kids in the series played video games on what appeared to be a SNES/NES mashup. Later episodes reflected the 2000s/2010s period, though it took until the show's 2009 HD conversion for the family to have a flatscreen rather than the dials-and-rabbit-ears cabinet TV they had. It gets even more bizarre in an episode where Homer remembers his teenage times which happened in "That '90s Show", Homer mentions {{Sonic the Hedgehog}} as his idol. The show started 2 years before the first Sonic the Hedgehog game so the game should be a novelty even for Bart.

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* ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons'': The technology in the early episodes definitely reflected that the show took place around the same time they were produced, the 90s. Bart used a typewriter to write a paper in an early episode, and the kids in the series played video games on what appeared to be a SNES/NES mashup. Later episodes reflected the 2000s/2010s period, though it took until the show's 2009 HD conversion for the family to have a flatscreen rather than the dials-and-rabbit-ears cabinet TV they had. It gets even more bizarre in an episode where Homer remembers his teenage times which happened in "That '90s Show", Show"; Homer mentions {{Sonic the Hedgehog}} Franchise/SonicTheHedgehog as his idol. The show started 2 years before the first Sonic the Hedgehog game so the game should be a novelty even for Bart.



* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': In early seasons a DVD-player was a sign of rich status, that only one family in town could afford. Now, various characters can be seen buying [=DVDs=], playing Xbox games, and having a Facebook account. Yet the boys have only advanced one year in the school.
** The episode "The New Terrence and Phillip Movie Trailer" involves the boys watching TV to catch a movie trailer during commercial breaks. It aired in 2002. If it aired after 2005, they could just watch the trailer on Youtube or recorded it on a DVR and skipped to the commercials.
* The greater Franchise/{{DCAU}} has something like this, since the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was deliberately made to evoke the character's 1930s noir roots, while ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' and others are more modern. As a result, Gotham City got a massive tech upgrade between seasons as BTAS was updated to match STAS.
** This has always been inconsistent. BTAS seemed to have modern tech from the start, just with a 30s art-deco aesthetic.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' is a pretty jarring comparison between the first season in 1999 and its current seasons, though numerous episodes address this issue by introducing new technologies to the family (mostly because they were still new technologies in real life, and ripe for parody). The series starts off by mentioning using a VCR to tape Monday Night Football, singing about how owning a cellphone was status of great wealth and importance, having a home computer and the internet was completely unheard of. Now, taking advantage of modern technology for the sake of jokes, everyone has a smartphone, the old tube TV was replaced by a Hi-Def LCD, the VCR was replaced by a Blu-ray player and [=TiVo,=] Stewie makes jokes about Twitter, Lois has a Facebook account, etc etc.
* In the 2011 ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'' Revival, the technology is more or less up to date with the 2010s. Computers look modern, they mention the internet and modern video games, one episode features a drone, and their TV has a converter box near to the rabbit ears.

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* ''WesternAnimation/SouthPark'': In early seasons a DVD-player was a sign of rich status, that only one family in town could afford. Now, various characters can be seen buying [=DVDs=], playing Xbox games, and having a Facebook account. [[ComicBookTime Yet the boys have only advanced one year in the school.
school.]]
** The episode "The New Terrence and Phillip Movie Trailer" involves the boys watching TV to catch a movie trailer during commercial breaks. It aired in 2002. If it aired after 2005, they could just watch the trailer on Youtube Website/YouTube or recorded it on a DVR and skipped to the commercials.
* The greater Franchise/{{DCAU}} Franchise/DCAnimatedUniverse has something like this, since the original ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' was deliberately made to evoke the character's 1930s noir roots, while ''WesternAnimation/SupermanTheAnimatedSeries'' and others are more modern. As a result, Gotham City got a massive tech upgrade between seasons as BTAS was updated to match STAS.
**
STAS. This has always been inconsistent. BTAS seemed to have modern tech from the start, just with a 30s art-deco aesthetic.
* ''WesternAnimation/FamilyGuy'' is a pretty jarring comparison between the first season in 1999 and its current seasons, though numerous episodes address this issue by introducing new technologies to the family (mostly because they were still new technologies in real life, and ripe for parody). The series starts off by mentioning using a VCR to tape Monday Night Football, singing about how owning a cellphone was status of great wealth and importance, having a home computer and the internet Internet was completely unheard of. Now, taking advantage of modern technology for the sake of jokes, everyone has a smartphone, the old tube TV was replaced by a Hi-Def LCD, the VCR was replaced by a Blu-ray player and [=TiVo,=] Stewie makes jokes about Twitter, Lois has a Facebook account, etc etc.
* In the 2011 ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButthead'' ''WesternAnimation/BeavisAndButtHead'' Revival, the technology is more or less up to date with the 2010s. Computers look modern, they mention the internet Internet and modern video games, one episode features a drone, and their TV has a converter box near to the rabbit ears.



* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Young_(astronaut) John W Young]] was is a [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} NASA]] astronaut and test pilot with 6 space flights under his belt. Sounds unimpressive? Young was selected as NASA's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_astronauts_by_selection#1962 2nd ever batch of astronauts in 1962]]. His first space flight was the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_3 first manned flight]] of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_program Gemini program]]; piloted the first mission to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_10 dock with two target vehicles]]; performed a "dress rehearsal" for the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11 first Moon landing]] by testing the Lunar module by separating it from the command module in Lunar orbit during [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_10 Apollo 10]] (and as {{Cracked}} mentions, [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/4-randomly-hilarious-pieces-found-comedy-internet_p2/ they had a]] {{Potty Emergency}}) walked ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_Roving_Vehicle and drove]]) on The Moon himself on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_16 Apollo 16]] (making him the second person to visit The Moon's vicinity twice); piloted [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-1 the first space flight]] of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle Space Shuttle]]; delivered the first Skylab module on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-9 STS-9]], before finally retiring as an astronaut in 2004, ''[[BadassGrandpa at the age of 74]]''; and, according to Swedish astronaut [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christer_Fuglesang Christer Fuglesang]], Young voluntarily continued attending NASA Astronaut Office meetings for years after retirement [[ItAmusedMe just for the lulz]]. Despite such an [[AcePilot illustrious]] and {{Troperiffic}} career, Young ended up {{overshadowed by awesome}}, being not as famous as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Armstrong Neil Armstrong]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_8 1st manned docking]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11 1st man on The Moon]]), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buzz_Aldrin Buzz Aldrin]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_12 made Extravehicular Activity safer and more useful]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11 2nd man on The Moon]]), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Shepard Alan Shepard]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury-Redstone_3 1st American in space]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_14 oldest person to visit The Moon]]), or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Lovell Jim Lovell]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_7 rendezvoused with Young]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_12 helped Buzz Aldrin make Extravehicular Activity safer and more useful]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_8 became one off the first 3 humans to enter Lunar orbit]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_13 averted disaster when he became the first person to enter The Moon's vicinity twice]] + played by {{Tom Hanks}} in a [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/Apollo13 Hollywood movie based on his heroic act of avoiding an Apollo 13 disaster]]). As {{The Other Wiki}} puts it:
--> "Young enjoyed the longest career of any astronaut, becoming the first person to make six space flights over the course of 42 years of active NASA service,and is the only person to have piloted, and been commander of, four different classes of spacecraft: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_program Gemini]], the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Command/Service_Module Apollo Command/Service Module]], the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Lunar_Module Apollo Lunar Module]], and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle Space Shuttle]]."

to:

* [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Young_(astronaut) John W Young]] was is a [[UsefulNotes/{{NASA}} NASA]] astronaut and test pilot with 6 space flights under his belt. Sounds unimpressive? Young was selected as NASA's [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_astronauts_by_selection#1962 2nd ever batch of astronauts in 1962]]. His first space flight was the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_3 first manned flight]] of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_program Gemini program]]; piloted the first mission to [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_10 dock with two target vehicles]]; performed a "dress rehearsal" for the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11 first Moon landing]] by testing the Lunar module by separating it from the command module in Lunar orbit during [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_10 Apollo 10]] (and as {{Cracked}} ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' mentions, [[http://www.cracked.com/blog/4-randomly-hilarious-pieces-found-comedy-internet_p2/ they had a]] {{Potty Emergency}}) PottyEmergency) walked ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunar_Roving_Vehicle and drove]]) on The Moon himself on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_16 Apollo 16]] (making him the second person to visit The Moon's vicinity twice); piloted [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-1 the first space flight]] of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle Space Shuttle]]; delivered the first Skylab module on [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/STS-9 STS-9]], before finally retiring as an astronaut in 2004, ''[[BadassGrandpa at the age of 74]]''; and, according to Swedish astronaut [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christer_Fuglesang Christer Fuglesang]], Young voluntarily continued attending NASA Astronaut Office meetings for years after retirement [[ItAmusedMe just for the lulz]]. Despite such an [[AcePilot illustrious]] and {{Troperiffic}} career, Young ended up {{overshadowed by awesome}}, being not as famous as [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Armstrong Neil Armstrong]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_8 1st manned docking]] and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11 1st man on The Moon]]), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buzz_Aldrin Buzz Aldrin]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_12 made Extravehicular Activity safer and more useful]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_11 2nd man on The Moon]]), [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Shepard Alan Shepard]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury-Redstone_3 1st American in space]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_14 oldest person to visit The Moon]]), or [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jim_Lovell Jim Lovell]] ([[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_7 rendezvoused with Young]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_12 helped Buzz Aldrin make Extravehicular Activity safer and more useful]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_8 became one off the first 3 humans to enter Lunar orbit]] + [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_13 averted disaster when he became the first person to enter The Moon's vicinity twice]] + played by {{Tom Hanks}} in a [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Film/Apollo13 Hollywood movie based on his heroic act of avoiding an Apollo 13 disaster]]). As {{The Other Wiki}} puts it:
--> "Young enjoyed the longest career of any astronaut, becoming the first person to make six space flights over the course of 42 years of active NASA service,and service, and is the only person to have piloted, and been commander of, four different classes of spacecraft: [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_program Gemini]], the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Command/Service_Module Apollo Command/Service Module]], the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo_Lunar_Module Apollo Lunar Module]], and the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_Shuttle Space Shuttle]]."



** The fears of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_3 Gemini 3]] {{mission control}} were totally plausible and the [[RealityEnsues likely consequences]] of eating unapproved foods in space featured in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnPGDWD_oLE an episode]] of {{The Simpsons}}. {{Cracked}} even compares Young to this episode, saying "(Young) was basically Homer Simpson".

to:

** The fears of the [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gemini_3 Gemini 3]] {{mission control}} were totally plausible and the [[RealityEnsues likely consequences]] of eating unapproved foods in space featured in [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnPGDWD_oLE [[Recap/TheSimpsonsS5E15DeepSpaceHomer an episode]] of {{The Simpsons}}. {{Cracked}} ''WesternAnimation/TheSimpsons''. ''Website/{{Cracked}}'' even compares Young to this episode, saying "(Young) was basically Homer Simpson".
Simpson".
16th Apr '17 7:31:06 PM Rhomega3
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* In the original ''WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget'' cartoon, Penny had a computer shaped like a book long before laptops were invented. The upcoming [[WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget2015 2015 series]] updates this by replacing the computer book with a device that more closely resembles a tablet. In addition, Chief Quimby's exploding messages are now small devices that play recorded messages instead of pieces of paper that detonate [[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct when the last sentence, "This message will self-destruct" is read aloud]].

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* In the original ''WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget'' cartoon, Penny had a computer shaped like a book long before laptops were invented. The upcoming [[WesternAnimation/InspectorGadget2015 2015 series]] updates this by replacing the computer book with a device that more closely resembles a tablet. In addition, Chief Quimby's exploding messages are now small devices that play recorded messages instead of pieces of paper that detonate [[ThisPageWillSelfDestruct when the last sentence, "This message will self-destruct" is read aloud]].
31st Mar '17 1:00:49 AM Tsukireiko
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** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months passed in the story. (There's a lot of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons. And that's not even considering the sheer number of important cases that have occurred. Even condensing the series down to its plot relevant episodes and ignoring repeated holidays renders enough time passage to fill well over a year.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.

to:

** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months ''about six months'' have passed in the story. (There's a lot ''lot'' of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons. And that's not even considering the sheer number of important cases that have occurred. Even condensing the series down just to its plot and character relevant episodes and ignoring repeated holidays holidays/seasons renders enough time passage to fill well over a year.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.
25th Mar '17 12:07:43 PM nombretomado
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* WordOfGod on ''Webcomic/DumbingOfAge'' is that it'll roll with this, in order to avoid 'slowly becoming a period piece'. Other than an early oopsie of many of the students listing modern movies as their favorites in a gender studies class (Willis laments in a decade that'll seem weird that so many 18-year-olds would be into classic movies), the pop culture references tend to try to stay as generic as possible. The NintendoDS/[[Nintendo3DS 3DS]] may be replaced, but playing a version of ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' on a handheld device will probably be A Thing for the foreseeable future, for instance. Amber's MMORPG is most likely ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' but never named directly, and ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' references are kept as generic as possible, IE "Optimus Prime" and "Bumblebee" being safe choices for future generations.

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* WordOfGod on ''Webcomic/DumbingOfAge'' is that it'll roll with this, in order to avoid 'slowly becoming a period piece'. Other than an early oopsie of many of the students listing modern movies as their favorites in a gender studies class (Willis laments in a decade that'll seem weird that so many 18-year-olds would be into classic movies), the pop culture references tend to try to stay as generic as possible. The NintendoDS/[[Nintendo3DS UsefulNotes/NintendoDS/[[UsefulNotes/Nintendo3DS 3DS]] may be replaced, but playing a version of ''VideoGame/MarioKart'' on a handheld device will probably be A Thing for the foreseeable future, for instance. Amber's MMORPG is most likely ''VideoGame/WorldOfWarcraft'' but never named directly, and ''Franchise/{{Transformers}}'' references are kept as generic as possible, IE "Optimus Prime" and "Bumblebee" being safe choices for future generations.
22nd Mar '17 1:29:46 PM Tsukireiko
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** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months passed in the story. (There's a lot of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.

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** The manga has a particularly hard time of this, due to suffering from an extreme case of ComicBookTime. The series has run since 1994 for about two decades, but WordOfGod claims that only a few months passed in the story. (There's a lot of trouble with that statement, including the number of holidays we've seen, and the changing of the seasons. And that's not even considering the sheer number of important cases that have occurred. Even condensing the series down to its plot relevant episodes and ignoring repeated holidays renders enough time passage to fill well over a year.) Either way, the widespread use of cellphones and personal computers became adapted into the stories concurrently, which created some interesting problems. An early episode had a lunchbox-sized portable fax-machine qualify as an awesome gadget, while a more recent episode had a writer's lack of familiarity with cellphones used as proof that he hadn't left his attic in years. And canonically, those two incidents were - at most - 3 months apart.


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** This became ridiculous when recently there was a ''flashback case'', ergo, a story that's supposed to have happened prior to the series beginning, that required the use of a phone that had ''video recording capabilities''. Meanwhile we're supposed to believe that chapters containing characters in possession of pagers happened afterwards. Right.
21st Feb '17 8:37:04 PM gewunomox
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* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], {{television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.

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* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], {{television}} UsefulNotes/{{Television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.
13th Feb '17 7:08:50 PM SteveMB
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Added DiffLines:

* Carefully averted in the ''Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo'' series -- the people of Grantville have the knowledge and technology available in a small town in 2000, and Creator/EricFlint has noted that it takes ever-increasing amounts of care to avoid including anything that didn't exist then.
3rd Feb '17 12:44:18 PM VampireBuddha
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Literature/{{Atlas Shrugged}}'' ended up doing this in a single book. Ayn Rand started writing the novel in 1943, so for much of the book, {{radio}} is the standard mass medium. Just before the [[{{author filibuster}} Galt speech]], {{television}} is suddenly an established technology as it was in 1957, when the novel was finally published. Sure, the story takes place over a few years, but said story involves the greatest geniuses and innovators mysteriously disappearing.
18th Jan '17 11:32:24 PM PhantomRider
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* The Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which reboots its continuity every so often, particularly with those characters -- Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors."

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* The Franchise/MarvelUniverse is actually more prone to this than DC, which reboots {{Cosmic Retcon}}s its continuity every couple of years nowadays, making it so often, that whatever 1940s Batman or Superman stories that currently still count might have happened last year. Marvel has it particularly bad with those characters -- Peter Parker, Tony Stark, Reed Richards -- who work with fantastic technology, the earliest issues of which involve technology which often wasn't so fantastic 10 years ago or so, when the ComicBook/FantasticFour took their ill-fated space flight to the Moon ([[TheGreatPoliticsMessUp to beat the Russians]]), and contemporary Marvel continuity began. A prime example? Reading the original Iron Man appearance, one might be amused to discover that the secret to his suit's power was "highly miniaturized transistors.""
**Not to mention, Marvel's use of ComicBookTime isn't ignored in the stories. Every so often, a story from decades ago will be referred to as having been five or ten years ago. Hank "Comicbook/TheBeast" [=McCoy=] was in his late teens in the sixties and celebrated his 30th birthday in the nineties. The technology seen and real-world events referenced in the Silver Age that are later established as recent would seem to set all things Marvel in a version of the late seventies that happens to have smartphones and such ([[FridgeBrilliance perhaps due to having people like Peter, Tony, Reed, and Hank hanging around.]] Maybe [[ReedRichardsIsUseless Reed Richards isn't useless]] after all...?)
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