History Main / LinearWarriorsQuadraticWizards

25th Dec '17 8:40:14 AM Temporary14
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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' play it straight thanks to their spell-crafting systems, as spells can be created which scale up with the player's level. For example, a simple custom fire spell of (x + 1)*(x + 1), where "x" is the player's level, may be a useful but not overly powerful {{Fireball}} spell at low levels, but then become a [[FantasticNuke Blazing Inferno Hellfire]] spell that [[OneHitKO One-Hit KOs]] nearly anything in the game that doesn't resist it at high levels.

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** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIArena ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' play it straight thanks to their spell-crafting systems, as spells can be created which scale up with the player's level. For example, a simple custom fire spell of (x + 1)*(x + 1), where "x" is the player's level, may be a useful but not overly powerful {{Fireball}} spell at low levels, but then become a [[FantasticNuke Blazing Inferno Hellfire]] spell that [[OneHitKO One-Hit KOs]] nearly anything in the game that doesn't resist it at high levels. Both games being NintendoHard with EarlyGameHell means that dedicated warriors will have it much easier on, but ''Daggerfall'' gives the option of having the best of both worlds by creating a MagicKnight custom class.
25th Dec '17 8:37:31 AM Temporary14
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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** Played with throughout the series in general. The abundance of high-level enemies with [[AttackReflector Reflect]] spells and/or [[AntiMagic magical resistances]] means that being able to bash/slash/stab things to death will always remain useful. The "wizard" types also usually come with a bad case of [[SquishyWizard squishiness]] unless you spread your skill points around, which of course lowers the ceiling on your magical abilities (or at makes it take longer to reach that ceiling.) Essentially, throughout the series, whatever combat style you prefer is viable if you're willing to put in a little work.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' plays it straight thanks to its spell-crafting system, as spells can be created which scale up with the player's level. For example, a simple custom fire spell of (x + 1)*(x + 1), where "x" is the player's level, may be a useful but not overly powerful {{Fireball}} spell at low levels, but then become a [[FantasticNuke Blazing Inferno Hellfire]] spell that [[OneHitKO One-Hit KOs]] nearly anything in the game that doesn't resist it at high levels.

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* ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls''
** Played
''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' plays with throughout the series this trope in general. The abundance of high-level enemies with [[AttackReflector Reflect]] spells and/or [[AntiMagic magical resistances]] means that being able to bash/slash/stab things to death will always remain useful. The "wizard" types also usually come with a bad case of [[SquishyWizard squishiness]] unless you spread your skill points around, which of course lowers the ceiling on your magical abilities (or at makes it take longer to reach that ceiling.) Essentially, throughout the series, whatever combat style you prefer is viable if you're willing to put in a little work.
** ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'' plays play it straight thanks to its their spell-crafting system, systems, as spells can be created which scale up with the player's level. For example, a simple custom fire spell of (x + 1)*(x + 1), where "x" is the player's level, may be a useful but not overly powerful {{Fireball}} spell at low levels, but then become a [[FantasticNuke Blazing Inferno Hellfire]] spell that [[OneHitKO One-Hit KOs]] nearly anything in the game that doesn't resist it at high levels.
25th Dec '17 5:45:59 AM TheOneWhoTropes
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* Similarly inverted in Lineage2. The damage is linearly proportionate to Physical Attack stat for archers and warriors and proportionate to a square root of Magic Attack for wizards. As a result, while magic users can still provide a steady DPS during late game, they are overshadowed by top archers by a large margin.

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* Similarly inverted in Lineage2.UsefulNotes/Lineage2. The damage is linearly proportionate to Physical Attack stat for archers and warriors and proportionate to a square root of Magic Attack for wizards. As a result, while magic users can still provide a steady DPS during late game, they are overshadowed by top archers by a large margin.
15th Dec '17 2:57:18 AM TroperDoper
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** Buffy finally caught up in Season Eight by temporarily becoming a FlyingBrick.

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** Buffy finally caught up in Season Eight by temporarily becoming a FlyingBrick. The trope then resumes the following seasons. Buffy has improved since her TV days while Willow is ''significantly'' more potent in a fight than in the show (a lack of budget restrictions is thanks to that).
1st Dec '17 4:50:46 PM Temporary14
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However, if this results from a development mistake, or enough complaints convince the author/programmer to change things, there are ways to limit the awesomeness of wizards. These include [[PowerAtAPrice restrictions on magic itself]], the two classic examples being the {{Mana}} mechanic or the even more restrictive VancianMagic. Both of these serve to cap how often a wizard can cast spells. Preventing casting spells while wearing armour is another, though this is often partially countered by providing a range of protective magics that work much like normal armour ''only better'', but of course for a limited time. Other restrictions also exist; a common one is simply to make the wizard [[SquishyWizard Squishy]]. Others involve sanity and [[KarmaMeter corruption]] systems, or making the casting of a spell a tactically debilitating act.

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However, if this results from a development mistake, or enough complaints convince the author/programmer to change things, there are ways to limit the awesomeness of wizards. These include [[PowerAtAPrice restrictions on magic itself]], the two classic examples being the {{Mana}} mechanic or the even more restrictive VancianMagic. Both of these serve to cap how often a wizard can cast spells. [[ArmorAndMagicDontMix Preventing casting spells while wearing armour armour]] is another, though this is often partially countered by providing a range of protective magics that work much like normal armour ''only better'', but of course for a limited time. Other restrictions also exist; a common one is simply to make the wizard [[SquishyWizard Squishy]]. Others involve sanity and [[KarmaMeter corruption]] systems, or making the casting of a spell a tactically debilitating act.
29th Nov '17 2:06:35 AM SeptimusHeap
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* In Creator/MarvelComics, [[ComicBook/FantasticFour the Invisible Woman]], [[ComicBook/{{X-Men}} Jean Grey]], and [[Comicbook/TheAvengers the Scarlet Witch]] were initially the weakest members of their respective teams. But over the years, their powers evolved to where they became the most powerful by a wide margin; Sue became a BarrierWarrior with omnipotent control of HardLight constructs, Jean became a world-class psychic with [[PlayingWithFire cosmic pyrokinesis]] up her sleeve, and Wanda became a full-blown RealityWarper who [[ComicBook/HouseOfM nearly wiped out the Mutant race after she had a really bad day]]. In fact, the primary reason Jean is always dying/fainting is because it's damn near impossible for writers to make a worthwhile challenge for her.

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* In Creator/MarvelComics, [[ComicBook/FantasticFour the Invisible Woman]], [[ComicBook/{{X-Men}} [[ComicBook/XMen Jean Grey]], and [[Comicbook/TheAvengers the Scarlet Witch]] were initially the weakest members of their respective teams. But over the years, their powers evolved to where they became the most powerful by a wide margin; Sue became a BarrierWarrior with omnipotent control of HardLight constructs, Jean became a world-class psychic with [[PlayingWithFire cosmic pyrokinesis]] up her sleeve, and Wanda became a full-blown RealityWarper who [[ComicBook/HouseOfM nearly wiped out the Mutant race after she had a really bad day]]. In fact, the primary reason Jean is always dying/fainting is because it's damn near impossible for writers to make a worthwhile challenge for her.
21st Nov '17 11:06:28 PM TrevMUN
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* ''Franchise/PhantasyStar'' (excluding the [=MMOs=], see the MMORPG folder below)

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* ''Franchise/PhantasyStar'' ''VideoGame/PhantasyStar'' (excluding the [=MMOs=], see the MMORPG folder below)
21st Nov '17 11:05:43 PM TrevMUN
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* In the ''Franchise/PhantasyStar'' series (excluding the MMOs, see the MMORPG section below):
** Inverted in ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarIII''. Most characters have techniques; the handful who don't, including Rhys, your PC in the first generation, start out as competent warriors but by mid-generation are dishing out the most damage, hands-down. Only healing techniques tend to be useful; combat techniques are far outclassed by standard attacks.
** Also inverted, but to a lesser extent, in ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarIV''. The first and second times he joins your party, Rune is of much higher level than the rest of your party and he can wipe out entire screens of enemies with a single spell. As the game progresses and the rest of the characters catch up to him, the difference in damage output tends to even out.


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* ''Franchise/PhantasyStar'' (excluding the [=MMOs=], see the MMORPG folder below)
** Inverted in ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarIII''. Most characters have techniques; the handful who don't, including Rhys, your PC in the first generation, start out as competent warriors but by mid-generation are dishing out the most damage, hands-down. Only healing techniques tend to be useful; combat techniques are far outclassed by standard attacks.
** Also inverted, but to a lesser extent, in ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarIV''. The first and second times he joins your party, Rune is of much higher level than the rest of your party and he can wipe out entire screens of enemies with a single spell. As the game progresses and the rest of the characters catch up to him, the difference in damage output tends to even out.
21st Nov '17 10:58:58 PM TrevMUN
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** ''LighjtNovel/FateZero'' has the Japanese Air Self Defense Force investigate a battle between Servants with two F-15J Eagles. One of the Eagles is quickly dispatched by the Servants. The other is forcibly commandeered by another Servant, who imbues it with mana and then uses it to beat ''Gilgamesh'' in an air-to-air duel.

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** ''LighjtNovel/FateZero'' ''LightNovel/FateZero'' has the Japanese Air Self Defense Force investigate a battle between Servants with two F-15J Eagles. One of the Eagles is quickly dispatched by the Servants. The other is forcibly commandeered by another Servant, who imbues it with mana and then uses it to beat ''Gilgamesh'' in an air-to-air duel.
21st Nov '17 10:58:16 PM TrevMUN
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* In the ''Franchise/PhantasyStar'' series:

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* In the ''Franchise/PhantasyStar'' series:series (excluding the MMOs, see the MMORPG section below):



* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'' plays this straight overall, but it's a long road getting there. Forces start by being barely able to kill a room full of enemies before needing to go recharge their mana, while physical types have a far easier time of it. The Forces quickly outgrow their Hunter and Ranger counterparts, playing the trope straight, but hit a brick wall in Ultimate difficulty where the enemies' magic resistance gets a huge boost, subverting the trope.
** However, if you keep playing that Force and level up their high level area magic, you can easily clear an entire room in seconds without suffering a single attack, while a Hunter or Ranger would be swamped by the sheer number of foes. Even better, a Force with high level Jellen and Deband can raise their defense so high and the reduce enemies' attack so low that even a Force, weak armor and all, is in no real danger.
* The [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMO]][[FirstPersonShooter FPS]] ''Richard Garriott's VideoGame/TabulaRasa'' demonstrated this from the point of view of non-Receptive forces in the Army of Allied Free Sentients compared to the player characters, who are all [[MagicKnight Receptives]]--humans capable of receiving the necessary information to use [[FunctionalMagic Logos]]. Early on, a Receptive is a Recruit that might know a few magic tricks, but won't be a more valuable asset on the battlefield compared to the squads of non-Receptive soldiers, armored fighting vehicles, or the AFS [[HumongousMecha MECHs]]. By the time a Receptive promotes to their Tier 3 class, however, they become walking weapons of mass destruction.


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* ''VideoGame/PhantasyStarOnline'' plays this straight overall, but it's a long road getting there. Forces start by being barely able to kill a room full of enemies before needing to go recharge their mana, while physical types have a far easier time of it. The Forces quickly outgrow their Hunter and Ranger counterparts, playing the trope straight, but hit a brick wall in Ultimate difficulty where the enemies' magic resistance gets a huge boost, subverting the trope.
** However, if you keep playing that Force and level up their high level area magic, you can easily clear an entire room in seconds without suffering a single attack, while a Hunter or Ranger would be swamped by the sheer number of foes. Even better, a Force with high level Jellen and Deband can raise their defense so high and the reduce enemies' attack so low that even a Force, weak armor and all, is in no real danger.


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* The [[MassivelyMultiplayerOnlineRolePlayingGame MMO]][[FirstPersonShooter FPS]] ''Richard Garriott's VideoGame/TabulaRasa'' demonstrated this from the point of view of non-Receptive forces in the Army of Allied Free Sentients compared to the player characters, who are all [[MagicKnight Receptives]]--humans capable of receiving the necessary information to use [[FunctionalMagic Logos]]. Early on, a Receptive is a Recruit that might know a few magic tricks, but won't be a more valuable asset on the battlefield compared to the squads of non-Receptive soldiers, armored fighting vehicles, or the AFS [[HumongousMecha MECHs]]. By the time a Receptive promotes to their Tier 3 class, however, they become walking weapons of mass destruction.
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