History Main / LetsJustSeeWhatWouldHaveHappened

3rd Jan '16 7:59:18 PM Gimere
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Also known as a Proveout. For games that rely on the house's honesty like DealOrNoDeal, this is also used to demonstrate that it was in fact possible to win the big prize.

to:

Also known as a Proveout. For games that rely on the house's honesty like DealOrNoDeal, ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'', this is also used to demonstrate that it was in fact possible to win the big prize.
prize.



** Canadian version though sometimes show the question. Quite a few people have been grateful when they find out they wouldn't have gotten the answer at all.

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** The Canadian version though does sometimes show the question. Quite a few people have been grateful when they find out they wouldn't have gotten the answer at all.



* ''Series/{{Catch 21}}'': If a contestant quits before busting out.
* ''Series/LetsMakeADeal'': Quite often. Half the point of the show, really.

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* ''Series/{{Catch 21}}'': ''[[Series/{{Gambit}} Catch 21]]'': If a contestant quits before busting out.
* ''Series/LetsMakeADeal'': Quite often. Half often, and half the point of the show, really.



** Averted on the Donny Osmond version; 99% of the time, he just ran onstage and screamed "OH! OH! OH! OH!" before the audience yelled out whatever the missed box was.

to:

** Averted on the Donny Osmond version; 99% of the time, he just ran onstage and screamed "OH! OH! OH! OH!" before the audience yelled out whatever the missed box was.[[note]]And given how difficult some of the boxes were on that version, that may have been on purpose.[[/note]]



* ''[[TreasureHuntUS (The New) Treasure Hunt]]'' (Geoff Edwards' versions): You quit with the money? Okay, then, but we'll still do the skit!
* Since the early 2000s, ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' has had two Mystery Wedges. These can be taken for their cash value of $1,000 (originally $500) per letter, or flipped over. One has a [[{{Whammy}} Bankrupt]] on the other side, while the other has a $10,000 cash prize (originally a compact car). If a contestant opts not to flip over a Mystery Wedge and solves immediately afterward, Pat will often ask the contestant if he or she wants to see what was on the other side. When the wedges were first introduced, he would often flip over the other one if one had already been flipped.

to:

* ''[[TreasureHuntUS ''[[Series/TreasureHuntUS (The New) Treasure Hunt]]'' (Geoff Edwards' versions): You You're gonna quit with and take the money? Okay, then, Great, but we'll we're still do doing the skit!
skit anyway!
* Since the early 2000s, ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' has had two Mystery Wedges. These can be taken for their cash value of $1,000 (originally $500) per letter, or flipped over. One has a [[{{Whammy}} a Bankrupt]] on the other side, while the other has a $10,000 cash prize (originally a compact car). If a contestant opts not to flip over a Mystery Wedge and solves immediately afterward, Pat will often ask the contestant if he or she wants to see what was on the other side. When the wedges were first introduced, he would often flip over the other one if one had already been flipped.



* ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'': Turned out to be especially heartbreaking during the Tournament Of Ten, where nearly all of the contestants walked...and nearly all of them would've gotten it right.

to:

* ''WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'': ''Series/WhoWantsToBeAMillionaire'': Turned out to be especially heartbreaking during the Tournament Of Ten, where nearly all of the contestants walked...and nearly all of them would've gotten it right.



* ''Tipping Point'', a gameshow based entirely around a penny pusher, has a finale where the player must put a Jackpot counter into the machine, whereby they win said jackpot by pushing it back out again. They can answer questions to win counters to do so, but if they run out of questions and counters, they are allowed to gamble what they have earned already (£50 per counter pushed out throughout the course of the show)and buy 3 more counters in an all-or-nothing shot at the jackpot. This trope is invoked when the player opts out of the jackpot and keeps their winnings - they still go for the three counters, but they can't win the jackpot. Usually accompanied by cheering or crying.

to:

* ''Tipping Point'', a gameshow game show based entirely around a penny pusher, has a finale where the player must put a Jackpot counter into the machine, whereby they win said jackpot by pushing it back out again. They can answer questions to win counters to do so, but if they run out of questions and counters, they are allowed to gamble what they have earned already (£50 per counter pushed out throughout the course of the show)and buy 3 more counters in an all-or-nothing shot at the jackpot. This trope is invoked when the player opts out of the jackpot and keeps their winnings - they still go for the three counters, but they can't win the jackpot. Usually accompanied by cheering or crying.
23rd Sep '15 3:46:46 AM StFan
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* ''[[{{Gambit}} Catch 21]]'': If a contestant quits before busting out.

to:

* ''[[{{Gambit}} Catch 21]]'': ''Series/{{Catch 21}}'': If a contestant quits before busting out.
17th Sep '15 9:48:59 AM MarsJenkar
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Added DiffLines:

** Whether or not the player solves the bonus puzzle, Pat will reveal the prize in the envelope. If the player fails to solve the puzzle, it counts as this trope.
11th Sep '15 1:47:34 PM MarsJenkar
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* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'' (Dick Clark's versions): Dick would come out and try to give clues; quite often, he gave ''the perfect clue'' due to having plenty of time to think about it and hindsight regarding what clues ''didn't'' work, leaving the actual celebrity dumbfounded (and, in the case of Vicki Lawrence, visibly pissed). Occasionally, though, even '''he''' whiffed.

to:

* ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'' (Dick Clark's versions): Dick would come out and try to give clues; quite often, he gave ''the perfect clue'' due to having plenty of time to think about it and hindsight regarding what clues ''didn't'' work, leaving the actual celebrity dumbfounded (and, in the case of Vicki Lawrence, visibly pissed). Occasionally, though, even '''he''' whiffed.whiffed (either by the contestant ''still'' failing to guess, or the judges buzzing him out).
16th Aug '15 8:20:44 AM Morgenthaler
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* ''AreYouSmarterThanAFifthGrader'': Happened in the event of a bailout, especially with the final question (Million-Dollar Question during the FOX era, 10x Bonus Question during the syndicated run).

to:

* ''AreYouSmarterThanAFifthGrader'': ''Series/AreYouSmarterThanAFifthGrader'': Happened in the event of a bailout, especially with the final question (Million-Dollar Question during the FOX era, 10x Bonus Question during the syndicated run).



* ''DealOrNoDeal'': Oh, does it '''ever''' in some countries, and especially prevalent if they take a commercial break while doing so. Often, [[{{Troll}} they'll inflate the hypothetical offers by 10%, which means that's not what truly would've happened had the contestant played on.]]

to:

* ''DealOrNoDeal'': ''Series/DealOrNoDeal'': Oh, does it '''ever''' in some countries, and especially prevalent if they take a commercial break while doing so. Often, [[{{Troll}} they'll inflate the hypothetical offers by 10%, which means that's not what truly would've happened had the contestant played on.]]



* ''LetsMakeADeal'': Quite often. Half the point of the show, really.
* ''{{Pyramid}}'' (Dick Clark's versions): Dick would come out and try to give clues; quite often, he gave ''the perfect clue'' due to having plenty of time to think about it and hindsight regarding what clues ''didn't'' work, leaving the actual celebrity dumbfounded (and, in the case of Vicki Lawrence, visibly pissed). Occasionally, though, even '''he''' whiffed.

to:

* ''LetsMakeADeal'': ''Series/LetsMakeADeal'': Quite often. Half the point of the show, really.
* ''{{Pyramid}}'' ''Series/{{Pyramid}}'' (Dick Clark's versions): Dick would come out and try to give clues; quite often, he gave ''the perfect clue'' due to having plenty of time to think about it and hindsight regarding what clues ''didn't'' work, leaving the actual celebrity dumbfounded (and, in the case of Vicki Lawrence, visibly pissed). Occasionally, though, even '''he''' whiffed.



* ''TheJokersWild'': If a contestant stopped during the bonus game.
* ''ThePriceIsRight'': Usually happens following a bailout in Punch-A-Bunch, Pass The Buck, Temptation, It's In The Bag, Step Up, Spelling Bee, and Pay The Rent.

to:

* ''TheJokersWild'': ''Series/TheJokersWild'': If a contestant stopped during the bonus game.
* ''ThePriceIsRight'': ''Series/ThePriceIsRight'': Usually happens following a bailout in Punch-A-Bunch, Pass The Buck, Temptation, It's In The Bag, Step Up, Spelling Bee, and Pay The Rent.



* Since the early 2000s, ''WheelOfFortune'' has had two Mystery Wedges. These can be taken for their cash value of $1,000 (originally $500) per letter, or flipped over. One has a [[{{Whammy}} Bankrupt]] on the other side, while the other has a $10,000 cash prize (originally a compact car). If a contestant opts not to flip over a Mystery Wedge and solves immediately afterward, Pat will often ask the contestant if he or she wants to see what was on the other side. When the wedges were first introduced, he would often flip over the other one if one had already been flipped.

to:

* Since the early 2000s, ''WheelOfFortune'' ''Series/WheelOfFortune'' has had two Mystery Wedges. These can be taken for their cash value of $1,000 (originally $500) per letter, or flipped over. One has a [[{{Whammy}} Bankrupt]] on the other side, while the other has a $10,000 cash prize (originally a compact car). If a contestant opts not to flip over a Mystery Wedge and solves immediately afterward, Pat will often ask the contestant if he or she wants to see what was on the other side. When the wedges were first introduced, he would often flip over the other one if one had already been flipped.



* In {{Poker}}, when one player wins a pot by way of everyone else folding before the final showdown, sometimes one or more players request that the dealer invoke this Trope by dealing out the remainder of the hand anyway. In Poker parlance, this is called "rabbit hunting". A variation involves the winner showing some but not all of his cards and letting the opponent's imagination run wild.
* ''BullseyeUK'' had a [[Creator/PeterKay notoriously cruel]] variation of this where, if the players failed to win the big prize, Jim Bowen would say "Let's see what you ''could've'' won!" and they would bring out the speedboat accompanied by a sad remix of the usual victory music.

to:

* In {{Poker}}, TabletopGame/{{Poker}}, when one player wins a pot by way of everyone else folding before the final showdown, sometimes one or more players request that the dealer invoke this Trope by dealing out the remainder of the hand anyway. In Poker parlance, this is called "rabbit hunting". A variation involves the winner showing some but not all of his cards and letting the opponent's imagination run wild.
* ''BullseyeUK'' ''Series/BullseyeUK'' had a [[Creator/PeterKay notoriously cruel]] variation of this where, if the players failed to win the big prize, Jim Bowen would say "Let's see what you ''could've'' won!" and they would bring out the speedboat accompanied by a sad remix of the usual victory music.
31st Mar '15 5:23:48 PM Briguy52748
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/SaleOfTheCentury'': During the Instant Cash era, if a contestant declined to gamble his entire lead for a 1:3 shot at the jackpot, host Jim Perry would sometimes ask the contestant what box he/she would have picked. It was about 50-50 as to good or not-so-good decisions.
29th Mar '15 12:13:18 PM TroperJohn
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Also known as a Proveout. For games like that rely on the house's honesty like DealOrNoDeal, this is also used to demonstrate that it was in fact possible to win the big prize.

to:

Also known as a Proveout. For games like that rely on the house's honesty like DealOrNoDeal, this is also used to demonstrate that it was in fact possible to win the big prize.
19th Mar '15 11:05:01 PM carlhummus
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* ''DealOrNoDeal'': Oh, does it '''ever''' in some countries, and especially prevalent if they take a commercial break while doing so. Often, they'll inflate the hypothetical offers by 10%, which means that's not what truly would've happened had the contestant played on.

to:

* ''DealOrNoDeal'': Oh, does it '''ever''' in some countries, and especially prevalent if they take a commercial break while doing so. Often, [[{{Troll}} they'll inflate the hypothetical offers by 10%, which means that's not what truly would've happened had the contestant played on.]]
6th Mar '15 2:12:42 PM TVRulezAgain
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* ''BullseyeUK'' had a [[PeterKay notoriously cruel]] variation of this where, if the players failed to win the big prize, Jim Bowen would say "Let's see what you ''could've'' won!" and they would bring out [[MemeticMutation the speedboat]] accompanied by a sad remix of the usual victory music.

to:

* ''BullseyeUK'' had a [[PeterKay [[Creator/PeterKay notoriously cruel]] variation of this where, if the players failed to win the big prize, Jim Bowen would say "Let's see what you ''could've'' won!" and they would bring out [[MemeticMutation the speedboat]] speedboat accompanied by a sad remix of the usual victory music.
15th Jan '15 5:30:40 AM ikaros975
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* On ''Series/{{Survivor}}'', Jeff Probst often fills time at the reunion show by asking how the jury would have voted had so-and-so appeared before them instead in place of one of the final two or three who generally did. This is often lamented by man fans as so much nonsense, since hindsight is 20/20 and things can change once the players get in front of the actual jury.

to:

* On ''Series/{{Survivor}}'', Jeff Probst often fills time at the reunion show by asking how the jury would have voted had so-and-so appeared before them instead in place of one of the final two or three who generally did. This is often lamented by man many fans as so much nonsense, since hindsight is 20/20 and things can change once the players get in front of the actual jury.
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