History Main / LanguageOfMagic

18th Dec '15 1:19:19 AM Azek
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* ''VideoGame/{{Bayonetta}}'' games have angels speaking Enochian, incantations written on various in-game props and magic users (Bayonetta, Jeanne, Balder) use spells in Enochian for summons.
10th Dec '15 2:44:39 PM SailorPtah
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* Also the language of the Contract in ''Webcomic/ButImACatPerson'', and the focus of much of the research at Cohen's Being-research division.
8th Dec '15 1:24:58 AM Adept
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* ''{{Everquest}}'' included the requirement to learn Dragon languages to master higher level spells.
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* ''{{Everquest}}'' ''VideoGame/{{Everquest}}'' included the requirement to learn Dragon languages to master higher level spells.

* In ''FireEmblem 9'' and 10 spells are recored as simple pieces of ancient tongue (such as "The light of life! Shine a ray upon my path and...strike my enemy!" or "O light, gather. Open my path...") that are said as part of the casting process. * In ''TreasureOfTheRudras'', the magic system is based on a LanguageOfMagic, and you can create custom spells by stringing the right syllables together.
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* In ''FireEmblem ''VideoGame/FireEmblem 9'' and 10 spells are recored as simple pieces of ancient tongue (such as "The light of life! Shine a ray upon my path and...strike my enemy!" or "O light, gather. Open my path...") that are said as part of the casting process. * In ''TreasureOfTheRudras'', ''VideoGame/TreasureOfTheRudra'', the magic system is based on a LanguageOfMagic, and you can create custom spells by stringing the right syllables together.

* In the ''ArTonelico'' series, all magic uses the Hymmnos language, which most of the time is sung rather then spoken.
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* In the ''ArTonelico'' ''VideoGame/ArTonelico'' series, all magic uses the Hymmnos language, which most of the time is sung rather then spoken.
22nd Nov '15 10:49:07 AM nombretomado
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* In ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'', [[http://xkcd.com/353/ computer programming languages]] occasionally fill this role. A recent [[http://xkcd.com/824/ guest strip]] by Bill Amend of ''{{Foxtrot}}'' fame demonstrates the power of UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}.
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* In ''Webcomic/{{xkcd}}'', [[http://xkcd.com/353/ computer programming languages]] occasionally fill this role. A recent [[http://xkcd.com/824/ guest strip]] by Bill Amend of ''{{Foxtrot}}'' ''ComicStrip/FoxTrot'' fame demonstrates the power of UsefulNotes/{{Unix}}.
17th Nov '15 6:52:33 PM Woggs123
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*** It should also be noted that in previous Elder Scrolls games the spell to keep other magic users from casting is known as "Silence" which implies that normal magic also has a verbal componet
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*** It should also be noted that in previous Elder Scrolls games the spell to keep other magic users from casting is known as "Silence" which implies that normal magic also has a verbal componetcomponent ** The shout in question also doubles as FridgeHorror: It's a BrownNote that forces its target to the ground [[spoiler:[[GoMadFromTheRevelation as the pure concepts of Death and Mortality are injected into their minds.]]]]
13th Nov '15 11:01:25 AM Mr.Bubbles
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** Well, it's considered magic by the rest of [[CargoCult the Imperium.]]
15th Oct '15 7:17:39 PM FactoidCow
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*** Witches and wizards can do a little magic through sheer force of will, without words or wands (though it's very imprecise), and the intent or mood of the caster is a factor in some wand-cast spells. Because of this, some fans have theorized that the words in spells are just a method to help the caster focus their will, and that a caster could theoretically cast his spells in ''any'' language. But the books strongly suggest that the ''specific'' word will ''always'' cast (or attempt to cast) its assigned spell, regardless of the caster's will. In the sixth book, for instance, Harry successfully casts one spell without knowing what it does beforehand, based solely on its word. And the first book notes that accidental mispronunciations of spells can produce entirely unintended effects.
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*** Witches and wizards can do a little magic through sheer force of will, without words or wands (though it's very imprecise), and the intent or mood of the caster is a factor in some wand-cast spells. Because of this, some fans have theorized that the words in spells are just a method to help the caster focus their will, and that a caster could theoretically cast his spells in ''any'' language.any language of their choice. But the books strongly suggest that the ''specific'' word will ''always'' cast (or attempt to cast) its assigned spell, regardless of the caster's will. In the sixth book, for instance, Harry successfully casts one spell without knowing what it does beforehand, based solely on its word. And the first book notes that accidental mispronunciations of spells can produce entirely unintended effects.

** This ends up humorous several times. Once, a group is trying to fool peasants with "magic". One character asks the magical instructor what language it is, to which the tutor replies, gibberish. He then asks where Gibbers are from.
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** This ends up humorous several times. Once, a group is trying to t fool peasants with "magic". One character asks the magical instructor what language it is, to which the tutor replies, gibberish. He then asks where Gibbers are from.
15th Oct '15 7:07:59 PM FactoidCow
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---> Prof. Flitwick: And saying the magic words properly is very important too never forget Wizard Baruffio, who said 's' instead of 'f' and found himself on the floor with a buffalo on his chest.
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---> Prof. Flitwick: '''Prof. Flitwick:''' And saying the magic words properly is very important too never forget Wizard Baruffio, who said 's' instead of 'f' and found himself on the floor with a buffalo on his chest.
15th Oct '15 7:06:57 PM FactoidCow
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replaced ill-supported fan theory with explanation of why it's probably wrong
*** At least one fan theory is that spells can be said in any language, but the important things are the wand and the mind to focus the magic. Using foreign words makes it easier to focus on a specific spell, so that saying stuff in your own language doesn't accidentally create disaster (ie. "Could you give me that pot?" -All pots in room zoom towards you-)
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*** At least one fan theory Witches and wizards can do a little magic through sheer force of will, without words or wands (though it's very imprecise), and the intent or mood of the caster is a factor in some wand-cast spells. Because of this, some fans have theorized that the words in spells are just a method to help the caster focus their will, and that a caster could theoretically cast his spells in ''any'' language. But the books strongly suggest that the ''specific'' word will ''always'' cast (or attempt to cast) its assigned spell, regardless of the caster's will. In the sixth book, for instance, Harry successfully casts one spell without knowing what it does beforehand, based solely on its word. And the first book notes that accidental mispronunciations of spells can be said in any language, but produce entirely unintended effects. ---> Prof. Flitwick: And saying the magic words properly is very important things are too never forget Wizard Baruffio, who said 's' instead of 'f' and found himself on the wand and the mind to focus the magic. Using foreign words makes it easier to focus floor with a buffalo on a specific spell, so that saying stuff in your own language doesn't accidentally create disaster (ie. "Could you give me that pot?" -All pots in room zoom towards you-)his chest.
26th Sep '15 1:42:38 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* Magic in the ''SecondApocalypse'' series by R. Scott Bakker uses an original variation on this; the trick to magic is not just speaking in another language, but in saying one string of words while ''simultaneously thinking a second and different string'' (not as easy as it sounds; try it). To make it worse, you have to simultaneously understand the meanings of both phrases; the reason being that the meaning of each phrase somehow clarifies and precisely limits the meaning of the other, creating sufficient mental precision to bring about the desired magical effect. (What happens to sorcerers who screw this up -- whether nothing happens or something exceedingly bad and unintended happens -- isn't specified.) ** It can probably be inferred that nothing happens. If something very bad happened from flubbing a spell, it's unlikely any sorcerers would survive their apprenticeships.
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* Magic in the ''SecondApocalypse'' ''Literature/SecondApocalypse'' series by R. Scott Bakker uses an original variation on this; the trick to magic is not just speaking in another language, but in saying one string of words while ''simultaneously thinking a second and different string'' (not as easy as it sounds; try it). To make it worse, you have to simultaneously understand the meanings of both phrases; the reason being that the meaning of each phrase somehow clarifies and precisely limits the meaning of the other, creating sufficient mental precision to bring about the desired magical effect. (What happens to sorcerers who screw this up -- whether nothing happens or something exceedingly bad and unintended happens -- isn't specified.) ** It can probably be inferred that nothing happens. If something very bad happened from flubbing a spell, it's unlikely any sorcerers would survive their apprenticeships.
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