History Main / KatanasAreJustBetter

12th Apr '18 1:19:31 PM infernape612
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** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn]]'', there's a sword called the Wo Dao that looks remarkably like a katana. Both Tellius games also have [[InfinityPlusOneSword the Vague Katti]]. In ''Path of Radiance'' it essentially took the place of the Wo Dao. In ''Radiant Dawn'' it's the strongest sword in terms of raw power gives a lower stat bonus and lacks extra bonuses like Ragnell and Alondite's ranged attacks or Amiti's extra attacks.
** The Wo Dao's been in a few other ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' games as well. Ironically its stats in ''Radiant Dawn'' are pretty much its worst showing. Usually it's slightly weaker or equal in Might to a Killing Edge, with slightly higher crit rate.
** Also Lyndis' swords in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'' are katanas.
** The series also goes back and forth with the Killing Edge, it is a katana in some games, but not in others. In addition, the Killer Lance in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' is a Naginata.

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** In ''[[VideoGame/FireEmblemTellius Fire Emblem: Radiant Dawn]]'', ''VideoGame/FireEmblemRadiantDawn'', there's a sword called the Wo Dao that looks remarkably like a katana. Both Tellius games also have [[InfinityPlusOneSword the Vague Katti]]. In ''Path of Radiance'' it essentially took the place of the Wo Dao. In ''Radiant Dawn'' it's the strongest sword in terms of raw power gives a lower stat bonus and lacks extra bonuses like Ragnell and Alondite's ranged attacks or Amiti's extra attacks.
** The Wo Dao's been in a few other ''VideoGame/FireEmblem'' ''Franchise/FireEmblem'' games as well. Ironically its stats in ''Radiant Dawn'' are pretty much its worst showing. Usually it's slightly weaker or equal in Might to a Killing Edge, with slightly higher crit rate.
** Also Lyndis' personal swords in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemElibe'' ''VideoGame/FireEmblemTheBlazingBlade'' are katanas.
** The series also goes back and forth with the Killing Edge, it is a katana in some games, but not in others. In addition, the Killer Lance in ''VideoGame/FireEmblemAwakening'' is a Naginata.naginata.



* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'': Crono, the main character, wields a katana as his weapon, and his ultimate weapon, the Rainbow Sword, is the most powerful PC weapon in the game. However, the random damage multipliers of Lucca's Wondershot can sometimes best it.) Note that Chrono lives in a European-esque ye olde medieval kingdom.

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* ''VideoGame/ChronoTrigger'': Crono, the main character, wields a katana as his weapon, and his ultimate weapon, the Rainbow Sword, is the most powerful PC weapon in the game. However, (However, the random damage multipliers of Lucca's Wondershot can sometimes best it.) Note that Chrono lives in a European-esque ye olde medieval kingdom.
27th Mar '18 9:08:53 PM foxley
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* In ''Film/BigTitsZombie'', Ginko grabs a katana from the yakuza bathhouse and uses it as her primary weapon for fighting zombies. It can parry almost anything, and can cut zombies in half lengthways.
14th Mar '18 5:01:43 PM CaptainCrawdad
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* The trope is put to the test on [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_3W1zg683A an episode]] of the German TV show ''Welt der Wunder'', featuring a smith named [[http://www.seelenschmie.de/ Stefan Roth]] who makes both European and Japanese styled blades and practices both styles of swordsmanship:
** While he likes Japanese swords, Stefan personally thinks the German longsword is superior, and wants to deflate the idea that katana can do the things they do in movies. In a series of tests to measure agility, precision, and cutting ability, he first gets impressive results with the katana, but then performs the same feats just as well using the German longsword. Near the end of the episode he gives one of his katana and one of his longswords the ultimate test by trying to cut another sword in half; the second sword--a European arming sword replica--is clamped down horizontally on top of a stand, and Stefan strikes against it vertically with all his might, wearing heavy protective gear in case he should be struck by flying blade fragments. The katana takes a deep notch through the edge, but more importantly it gets highly bent out of shape above the notch. The clamped sword has a notch in the edge but stays in one piece. In contrast, he succeeds in breaking the clamped sword in half using the German longsword[[note]]emphasis on "breaking"; actually ''cutting'' through one steel sword using another is physically impossible[[/note]], and while the edge of the longsword takes a small notch, he feels it's intact enough that he could keep fighting effectively with it, which he would not say of the bent katana. The results of the test were exactly what he expected, and indeed anyone who uses traditionally made katana knows that they are vulnerable to bending like this because of their differential hardening. Actually, a well-made katana is ''supposed'' to bend like this, since a poorly made one would simply snap.
** A couple of things to consider: while Stefan makes his katana the traditional way, starting with ''tamahagane'', and is considered a master swordsmith even in Japan, one would also have to know how he made the German longsword used in the test and what kind of steel the clamped swords were made of in order to draw more specific conclusions. Medieval European steel was not as good or consistent as modern high-carbon steel either (though the blast furnace and access to good ores at least gave them an advantage over the Japanese), and tests show that the quality of blade heat treatment was all over the place (many swords were very soft). Even allowing for modern knowledge that could ensure these old-fashioned methods were used more efficiently, one would have to do everything the old-fashined way down to the smelting of the steel in order to not give the European sword an unfair advantage. Also, it goes without saying that breaking another sword in half is not something any sword--European or Japanese--is designed for. Since one will be fighting a moving opponent whose sword isn't clamped in place, and who--like you--is probably trying not to severely damage his sword, the exact conditions of that destructive test are not likely to be encountered in real combat. After all, the ostensible purpose of Stefan's test was just to disprove the myth that a katana can cut another sword in half.
** However considering that Japanese sword smiths tended to use low quality steel derived from sand(necessitating the infamous folding technique), unlike European sword smiths who mastered blast furnaces relatively early, it is safe to say in historical conditions European sword would have an edge as far as materials are concerned

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* The trope is put to the test on On [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w_3W1zg683A an episode]] of the German TV show ''Welt der Wunder'', featuring a smith named [[http://www.seelenschmie.de/ Stefan Roth]] who makes both the host compares European and Japanese styled blades and practices both styles of swordsmanship:
** While he likes Japanese swords, Stefan personally thinks the German longsword is superior, and wants to deflate the idea that katana can do the things they do
in movies. In a series variety of tests to measure agility, precision, and cutting ability, he first gets impressive results with the katana, but then performs the same feats just as well using the German longsword. Near the end of the episode he gives one of his katana and one of his longswords the ultimate test by trying to cut another sword in half; the second sword--a European arming sword replica--is clamped down horizontally on top of a stand, and Stefan strikes against it vertically with all his might, wearing heavy protective gear in case he should be struck by flying blade fragments. The katana takes a deep notch through the edge, but more importantly it gets highly bent out of shape above the notch. The clamped sword has a notch in the edge but stays in one piece. In contrast, he succeeds in breaking the clamped sword in half using the German longsword[[note]]emphasis on "breaking"; actually ''cutting'' through one steel sword using another is physically impossible[[/note]], and while the edge of the longsword takes a small notch, he feels it's intact enough ultimately concludes that he could keep fighting effectively with it, which he would not say of the bent katana. The results of the test were exactly what he expected, and indeed anyone who uses traditionally made katana knows that they are vulnerable to bending like this because of their differential hardening. Actually, a well-made katana is ''supposed'' to bend like this, since a poorly made one would simply snap.
** A couple of things to consider: while Stefan makes his katana the traditional way, starting with ''tamahagane'', and is considered a master swordsmith even in Japan, one would also have to know how he made the German longsword used in the test and what kind of steel the clamped swords were made of in order to draw more specific conclusions. Medieval European steel was not as good or consistent as modern high-carbon steel either (though the blast furnace and access to good ores at least gave them an advantage over the Japanese), and tests show that the quality of blade heat treatment was all over the place (many swords were very soft). Even allowing for modern knowledge that could ensure these old-fashioned methods were used more efficiently, one would have to do everything the old-fashined way down to the smelting of the steel in order to not give
the European sword an unfair advantage. Also, it goes without saying that breaking another sword in half is not something any sword--European or Japanese--is designed for. Since one will be fighting a moving opponent whose sword isn't clamped in place, and who--like you--is probably trying not to severely damage his sword, the exact conditions of that destructive test style swords are not likely to be encountered in real combat. After all, the ostensible purpose of Stefan's test was just to disprove the myth that a katana can cut another sword in half.
** However considering that Japanese sword smiths tended to use low quality steel derived from sand(necessitating the infamous folding technique), unlike European sword smiths who mastered blast furnaces relatively early, it is safe to say in historical conditions European sword would have an edge as far as materials are concerned
slightly superior.
14th Mar '18 4:41:48 PM rixion
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* In the original Gameboy ''VideoGame/SaGa'' games (''Final Fantasy Legend'') katanas (and knives) are Agility-based weapons and European swords are Strength-based. While the Agility-based weapons sort of win out because they increase Agility and thus your chances of hitting faster late-game opponents, the European sword Excalibur ("[=XCalibur=]") is the only weapon in the game that will never break. In the third game, which follows a more traditional inventory system, the Excalibur is simply the strongest "Mystic Weapon", with the katana Masamune in second place.

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* In the original Gameboy ''VideoGame/SaGa'' ''[[Franchise/SaGaRPG SaGa]]'' games (''Final Fantasy Legend'') katanas (and knives) are Agility-based weapons and European swords are Strength-based. While the Agility-based weapons sort of win out because they increase Agility and thus your chances of hitting faster late-game opponents, the European sword Excalibur ("[=XCalibur=]") is the only weapon in the game that will never break. In the third game, which follows a more traditional inventory system, the Excalibur is simply the strongest "Mystic Weapon", with the katana Masamune in second place.
14th Mar '18 2:59:13 AM Samoja
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** However considering that Japanese sword smiths tended to use low quality steel derived from sand(necessitating the infamous folding technique), unlike European sword smiths who mastered blast furnaces relatively early, it is safe to say in historical conditions European sword would have an edge as far as materials are concerned
13th Mar '18 6:03:23 PM LlamaAdventure
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* The katana is the single most powerful melee weapon in ''VideoGame/MotherRussiaBleeds'', capable of killing multiple enemies in a single swing. The only downsides are that it's found in only one location in the game [[spoiler: kept at the government HQ in a glass case]] and the game ups the ante immediately after you get it by throwing dozens upon dozens of mooks at you at once.
12th Mar '18 7:30:42 PM MiriOhki
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* This was mocked in SwordArtOnlineAbridged episode two.
---> '''Kirito''': While both of them are slashing weapons, a talwar was favored by cavalrymen, while a [[BigFreakingSword nodachi]] was mostly used for [[CompensatingForSomething dick measuring.]]
10th Mar '18 2:35:27 PM KibaDoku
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* ''Webcomic/AxisPowersHetalia'' fanfic ''[[https://www.fanfiction.net/s/11886910/1/Gankona-Unnachgiebig-Unità Gankona, Unnachgiebig, Unità]]'': Why else would Japan use a katana when Germany has a ''gun''—a Browning Hi Power—on him? Not that Japan would use the word "cool" to describe the reason, but still.
17th Feb '18 11:49:02 PM Sammettik
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** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'', [[BigBad Ganonodorf]] menaces Link with a katana, and later pulls out [[DualWielding two of them]] in the final battle. Appropriately, he is a LightningBruiser who can take on both Link and the bow-wielding [[spoiler: Zelda]] at once.

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** In ''VideoGame/TheLegendOfZeldaTheWindWaker'', [[BigBad Ganonodorf]] Ganondorf]] menaces Link with a katana, and later pulls out [[DualWielding two of them]] in the final battle. Appropriately, he is a LightningBruiser who can take on both Link and the bow-wielding [[spoiler: Zelda]] at once.
14th Feb '18 3:01:08 PM Ajiryn
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*Played straight in ''VideoGame/RoboPit". The slashing class of weapons includes axes, scythes, and swords, but the 'Blade' is the best of them all. While it has a lower Power rating than the rest, it has insanely high speed, and allows for four heavy slashes before an enemy is knocked away (whereas the other slashing weapons only allow two heavy attacks before knocking your opponent back). This makes for -much- faster K.O.'s, not only out of the slashing weapons, but probably ALL of the melee weapons in the game. In case there was any doubt the 'Blade' was modeled off of a katana, the only enemy bot you can obtain it from is the Special Robot named Samurai.
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