History Main / KangarooCourt

29th Jul '16 9:44:29 PM eowynjedi
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* ''Literature/WolfHall'' has Thomas Cromwell presiding over two: that of Sir Thomas More, and later Anne Boleyn and her five "lovers". There's no question of actual justice being involved; the trials are held because Henry wants them out of his hair and killing them is the quickest way to do that. Cromwell uses Anne's trial to get his own private revenge on the five men who he blames for Cardinal Wolsey's death, but he's also driven by the knowledge that he'll lose his own head if he doesn't do this, and so works up a "case" based on rumors and false confessions. (And when it happened anyway four years later, he didn't even get the courtesy of a sham trial.)
27th Jul '16 12:22:24 PM Willbyr
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* ''The Pot'' by Tool is about kangaroo courts for marijuana abusers.

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* ''The Pot'' by Tool Music/{{Tool}} is about kangaroo courts for marijuana abusers.



* ''{{Vocaloid}}'':

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* ''{{Vocaloid}}'':''Music/{{Vocaloid}}'':
26th Jul '16 4:54:49 PM Fireblood
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** Zigzagged in the ''Comicbook/NewKrypton'' arc. When Supergirl brings [[ArchEnemy Reactron]] to Kryptonian justice, her mother Alura coldly informs him that he'll be judged, found guilty and executed. However she intends to put him on trial rather than lynching him, unlike most of Kryptonians. However during a preliminary hearing a judge questions the trial's legality since Reactron hasn't been extradited lawfully, and Alura dismisses his concerns. However, when a lynch mob breaks into the building, she protects Reactron.
** In ''Comicbook/RedDaughterOfKrypton'', secondary character Sheko became a [[TheBerserker Red Lantern]] because she was a judge in a planet where kangaroo courts were the rule, the concept of justice had been turned into a joke, rich and powerful people got away with anything, and when she tried to make her job fairly, she got shot.

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** Zigzagged in the ''Comicbook/NewKrypton'' arc. When Supergirl brings [[ArchEnemy Reactron]] to Kryptonian justice, her mother Alura coldly informs him that he'll be judged, found guilty and executed. However she intends to put him on trial rather than lynching him, unlike most of the Kryptonians. However during a preliminary hearing a judge questions the trial's legality since Reactron hasn't been extradited lawfully, and Alura dismisses his concerns. However, when When a lynch mob breaks into the building, building though, she protects Reactron.
** In ''Comicbook/RedDaughterOfKrypton'', secondary character Sheko became a [[TheBerserker Red Lantern]] because she was a judge in on a planet where kangaroo courts were the rule, the concept of justice had been turned into a joke, rich and powerful people got away with anything, and when she tried to make her job fairly, she got shot.


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* In ''[[{{Literature/Divergent}} Allegiant]]'', the defendants' guilt isn't the issue (the {{truth serum}} reveals that) but the judges are blatantly biased against them and show no mercy. All of them are shot immediately. This is why Tris decides to break Caleb out and flee the city.
25th Jul '16 11:41:48 PM Tron80
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* Franchise/{{Superman}} and ''Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}'' stories have several examples:
** Zigzagged in the ''Comicbook/NewKrypton'' arc. When Supergirl brings [[ArchEnemy Reactron]] to Kryptonian justice, her mother Alura coldly informs him that he'll be judged, found guilty and executed. However she intends to put him on trial rather than lynching him, unlike most of Kryptonians. However during a preliminary hearing a judge questions the trial's legality since Reactron hasn't been extradited lawfully, and Alura dismisses his concerns. However, when a lynch mob breaks into the building, she protects Reactron.
** In ''Comicbook/RedDaughterOfKrypton'', secondary character Sheko became a [[TheBerserker Red Lantern]] because she was a judge in a planet where kangaroo courts were the rule, the concept of justice had been turned into a joke, rich and powerful people got away with anything, and when she tried to make her job fairly, she got shot.



* ''Characters/{{Batman}}'': ComicBook/TwoFace has a penchant for setting these up, first doing it to Batman around the time of ''ComicBook/{{Knightfall}}'' and explicitly denying him any sort of defense, where the "trial" was an excuse to demand answers from him and to berate Batman. He also subjects Commissioner Gordon and Renee Montoya to this in ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand''. The latter manage to get off by naming [[BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind Harvey Dent]] their defense attorney.

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* ''Characters/{{Batman}}'': Franchise/{{Batman}}: ComicBook/TwoFace has a penchant for setting these up, first doing it to Batman around the time of ''ComicBook/{{Knightfall}}'' and explicitly denying him any sort of defense, where the "trial" was an excuse to demand answers from him and to berate Batman. He also subjects Commissioner Gordon and Renee Montoya to this in ''ComicBook/BatmanNoMansLand''. The latter manage to get off by naming [[BattleInTheCenterOfTheMind Harvey Dent]] their defense attorney.
19th Jul '16 5:44:24 AM Fireblood
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** In "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS02E25Tribunal Tribunal]]," the Cardassian system of justice operates on a similar system. All trials are conducted with the outcome predetermined. And those accused are always guilty. Not guilt until proven innocent, just guilty. The function of the trial is simply to show to the public the futility of rebellion against the state and to help the accused come to terms with their guilt. At the beginning, the judge announces, "The verdict is guilty. The sentence is death. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Let the trial begin]]." In the same episode, O'Brien tries to refuse answering an obviously provocative question. The judge replies that, under Cardassian law, he must answer the question. Sorry, no "taking the Fifth" in a Cardassian court. The entire episode, in fact, came about from a single line in a prior episode: "On Cardassia, the verdict is always known before the trial begins, and it's always the same." [[spoiler: His defense attorney is very upset when he manages to be acquitted despite this: "They'll ''kill'' me!"]]

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** In "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS02E25Tribunal Tribunal]]," the Cardassian system of justice operates on a similar system. All trials are conducted with the outcome predetermined. And those accused are always guilty. Not guilt guilty until proven innocent, just guilty. The function of the trial is simply to show to the public the futility of rebellion against the state and to help the accused come to terms with their guilt. At the beginning, the judge announces, "The verdict is guilty. The sentence is death. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Let the trial begin]]." In the same episode, O'Brien tries to refuse answering an obviously provocative question. The judge replies that, under Cardassian law, he must answer the question. Sorry, no "taking the Fifth" in a Cardassian court. The entire episode, in fact, came about from a single line in a prior episode: "On Cardassia, the verdict is always known before the trial begins, and it's always the same." [[spoiler: His defense attorney is very upset when he manages to be acquitted despite this: "They'll ''kill'' me!"]]
19th Jul '16 3:12:41 AM EnchantedSwan
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* In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'', Mario stands trial in one of the worst trials in video game history. The prosecutor states the sun has stopped shining due to the graffiti and Mario ''looks like the criminal''. Peach tries to object, but the judge ''overrules it without even hearing her out.'' With Peach being royal and all, this is a fail. And when you saw the tape on the plane about Isle Delfino, you could see the ''real'' person doing it. Even more facepalm-warranting, Shadow Mario/[[spoiler:Bowser Jr.]] is blue, transparent, and has a magic paintbrush. The real Mario is opaque, wears red clothes with blue overalls, and ''just got there.'' He's also wearing a robotic fire extinguisher. {{LetsPlay/Chuggaaconroy}} sums it up quite well.

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* In ''VideoGame/SuperMarioSunshine'', Mario stands trial in one of the worst trials in video game history. The prosecutor states the sun has stopped shining due to the graffiti and Mario ''looks like the criminal''. Peach tries and Toadsworth try to object, but the judge ''overrules it without even hearing her out.'' With Peach being royal and all, this is a fail. And when you saw the tape on the plane about Isle Delfino, you could see the ''real'' person doing it. Even more facepalm-warranting, Shadow Mario/[[spoiler:Bowser Jr.]] is blue, transparent, and has a magic paintbrush. The real Mario is opaque, wears red clothes with blue overalls, and ''just got there.'' He's also wearing a robotic fire extinguisher. {{LetsPlay/Chuggaaconroy}} sums it up quite well.
19th Jul '16 3:06:04 AM EnchantedSwan
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** In "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS02E25Tribunal Tribunal]]," the Cardassian system of justice operates on a similar system. All trials are conducted with the outcome predetermined. The function of the trial is simply to show to the public the futility of rebellion against the state and to help the accused come to terms with their guilt. At the beginning, the judge announces, "The verdict is guilty. The sentence is death. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Let the trial begin]]." In the same episode, O'Brien tries to refuse answering an obviously provocative question. The judge replies that, under Cardassian law, he must answer the question. Sorry, no "taking the Fifth" in a Cardassian court. The entire episode, in fact, came about from a single line in a prior episode: "On Cardassia, the verdict is always known before the trial begins, and it's always the same." [[spoiler: His defense attorney is very upset when he manages to be acquitted despite this: "They'll ''kill'' me!"]]

to:

** In "[[Recap/StarTrekDeepSpaceNineS02E25Tribunal Tribunal]]," the Cardassian system of justice operates on a similar system. All trials are conducted with the outcome predetermined. And those accused are always guilty. Not guilt until proven innocent, just guilty. The function of the trial is simply to show to the public the futility of rebellion against the state and to help the accused come to terms with their guilt. At the beginning, the judge announces, "The verdict is guilty. The sentence is death. [[ComicallyMissingThePoint Let the trial begin]]." In the same episode, O'Brien tries to refuse answering an obviously provocative question. The judge replies that, under Cardassian law, he must answer the question. Sorry, no "taking the Fifth" in a Cardassian court. The entire episode, in fact, came about from a single line in a prior episode: "On Cardassia, the verdict is always known before the trial begins, and it's always the same." [[spoiler: His defense attorney is very upset when he manages to be acquitted despite this: "They'll ''kill'' me!"]]
14th Jul '16 3:43:30 PM Az_Tech341
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* Happens too many times to count in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' franchise; you can seemingly debunk every piece of evidence pointing towards your client (which is considered sufficient in real life, as the defense has nothing to prove), but they're ''still'' not off the hook until you can actually ''prove'' their innocence, seemingly always by catching the real killer. This is perhaps justified by RuleOfFun. Still, the incompetence of the games' current court system becomes more apparent as the series goes on and reaches a head in the third case of the fourth game, and Phoenix actually is so frustrated with this -- [[spoiler: especially since it ''cost him his career'']] -- that he begins a quiet crusade to reinstate the jury system and succeeds in getting a test run in the same game's fourth case. It's [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]] when the judge explains that jury systems work by virtue of ''normal citizens having common sense''. When [[spoiler: Ron Delite confesses he was the thief when Phoenix already proved him innocent]], the judge outright says, "What kind of a kangaroo court do you think this is?"[[note]]It should be noted that the ''Ace Attorney'' series is based on the Japanese court system, which is notorious for its ridiculously high conviction rate, which can lead to a heavy dose ValuesDissonance for Western players and led the localization team to put in some lines handwaving the dramatic differences between the game's court system and the American court system of today. The jury system was introduced as a TakeThat to Japan's trial-by-judge system and to promote trial by jury which is a largely foreign concept over there.[[/note]]

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* Happens too many times to count exclusively in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' franchise; you can seemingly debunk every piece of evidence pointing towards your client (which is considered sufficient in real life, as the defense has nothing to prove), but they're ''still'' not off the hook until you can actually ''prove'' their innocence, seemingly always innocence by catching the real killer. This is perhaps justified by RuleOfFun. Still, the incompetence of the games' current court system becomes more apparent as the series goes on and reaches a head in the third case of the fourth game, and Phoenix actually is so frustrated with this -- [[spoiler: especially since it ''cost him his career'']] -- that he begins a quiet crusade to reinstate the jury system and succeeds in getting a test run in the same game's fourth case. It's [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]] when the judge explains that jury systems work by virtue of ''normal citizens having common sense''. When [[spoiler: Ron Delite confesses he was the thief when Phoenix already proved him innocent]], the judge outright says, "What kind of a kangaroo court do you think this is?"[[note]]It should be noted that the ''Ace Attorney'' series is based on the Japanese court system, which is notorious for its ridiculously high conviction rate, which can lead to a heavy dose ValuesDissonance for Western players and led the localization team to put in some lines handwaving the dramatic differences between the game's court system and the American court system of today. The jury system was introduced as a TakeThat to Japan's trial-by-judge system and to promote trial by jury which is a largely foreign concept over there.[[/note]]
14th Jul '16 12:38:28 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Happens too many times to count in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' franchise; you can seemingly debunk every piece of evidence pointing towards your client (which is considered sufficient in real life, as the defense has nothing to prove), but they're ''still'' not off the hook until you can actually ''prove'' their innocence, seemingly always by catching the real killer. This is perhaps justified by RuleOfFun. Still, the incompetence of the games' current court system becomes more apparent as the series goes on and reaches a head in the third case of the fourth game, and Phoenix actually is so frustrated with this -- [[spoiler: especially since it ''cost him his career'']] -- that he begins a quiet crusade to reinstate the jury system and succeeds in getting a test run in the same game's fourth case. It's [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]] when the judge explains that jury systems work by virtue of ''normal citizens having common sense''. When [[spoiler: Ron Delite confesses he was the thief when Phoenix already proved him innocent]], the judge outright says, "What kind of a kangaroo court do you think this is?"[[note]]It should be noteed that the ''Ace Attorney'' series is based on the Japanese court system, which is notorious for its ridiculously high conviction rate, which can lead to a heavy dose ValuesDissonance for Western players and led the localization team to put in some lines handwaving the dramatic differences between the game's court system and the American court system of today. The jury system was introduced as a TakeThat to Japan's trial-by-judge system and to promote trial by jury which is a largely foreign concept over there.[[/note]]

to:

* Happens too many times to count in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' franchise; you can seemingly debunk every piece of evidence pointing towards your client (which is considered sufficient in real life, as the defense has nothing to prove), but they're ''still'' not off the hook until you can actually ''prove'' their innocence, seemingly always by catching the real killer. This is perhaps justified by RuleOfFun. Still, the incompetence of the games' current court system becomes more apparent as the series goes on and reaches a head in the third case of the fourth game, and Phoenix actually is so frustrated with this -- [[spoiler: especially since it ''cost him his career'']] -- that he begins a quiet crusade to reinstate the jury system and succeeds in getting a test run in the same game's fourth case. It's [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]] when the judge explains that jury systems work by virtue of ''normal citizens having common sense''. When [[spoiler: Ron Delite confesses he was the thief when Phoenix already proved him innocent]], the judge outright says, "What kind of a kangaroo court do you think this is?"[[note]]It should be noteed noted that the ''Ace Attorney'' series is based on the Japanese court system, which is notorious for its ridiculously high conviction rate, which can lead to a heavy dose ValuesDissonance for Western players and led the localization team to put in some lines handwaving the dramatic differences between the game's court system and the American court system of today. The jury system was introduced as a TakeThat to Japan's trial-by-judge system and to promote trial by jury which is a largely foreign concept over there.[[/note]]
14th Jul '16 12:36:33 AM LucaEarlgrey
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* Happens too many times to count in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' franchise; you can seemingly debunk every piece of evidence pointing towards your client (which is considered sufficient in real life, as the defense has nothing to prove), but they're ''still'' not off the hook until you can actually ''prove'' their innocence, seemingly always by catching the real killer. This is perhaps justified by RuleOfFun. Still, the incompetence of the games' current court system becomes more apparent as the series goes on and reaches a head in the third case of the fourth game, and Phoenix actually is so frustrated with this -- [[spoiler: especially since it ''cost him his career'']] -- that he begins a quiet crusade to reinstate the jury system and succeeds in getting a test run in the same game's fourth case. It's [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]] when the judge explains that jury systems work by virtue of ''normal citizens having common sense''. When [[spoiler: Ron Delite confesses he was the thief when Phoenix already proved him innocent]], the judge outright says, "What kind of a kangaroo court do you think this is?"[[note]]It should be noteed that the ''Ace Attorney'' series is based on the Japanese court system, which is notorious for its ridiculously high conviction rate of criminals, which can lead to a heavy dose ValuesDissonance for Western players and led the localization team to put in some lines handwaving the dramatic differences between the game's court system and the American court system of today. The jury system was introduced as a TakeThat to Japan's trial-by-judge system and to promote trial by jury which is a largely foreign concept over there.[[/note]]

to:

* Happens too many times to count in the ''Franchise/AceAttorney'' franchise; you can seemingly debunk every piece of evidence pointing towards your client (which is considered sufficient in real life, as the defense has nothing to prove), but they're ''still'' not off the hook until you can actually ''prove'' their innocence, seemingly always by catching the real killer. This is perhaps justified by RuleOfFun. Still, the incompetence of the games' current court system becomes more apparent as the series goes on and reaches a head in the third case of the fourth game, and Phoenix actually is so frustrated with this -- [[spoiler: especially since it ''cost him his career'']] -- that he begins a quiet crusade to reinstate the jury system and succeeds in getting a test run in the same game's fourth case. It's [[{{Narm}} unintentionally hilarious]] when the judge explains that jury systems work by virtue of ''normal citizens having common sense''. When [[spoiler: Ron Delite confesses he was the thief when Phoenix already proved him innocent]], the judge outright says, "What kind of a kangaroo court do you think this is?"[[note]]It should be noteed that the ''Ace Attorney'' series is based on the Japanese court system, which is notorious for its ridiculously high conviction rate of criminals, rate, which can lead to a heavy dose ValuesDissonance for Western players and led the localization team to put in some lines handwaving the dramatic differences between the game's court system and the American court system of today. The jury system was introduced as a TakeThat to Japan's trial-by-judge system and to promote trial by jury which is a largely foreign concept over there.[[/note]]
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