History Main / KangarooCourt

6th May '17 8:42:13 AM Jeduthun
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See also TheScapegoat and MiscarriageOfJustice.

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See also TheScapegoat and MiscarriageOfJustice.
MiscarriageOfJustice. Not to be confused with DecadentCourt, which is about a corrupt ''royal'' court, although naturally they have been known to overlap.
1st May '17 7:01:04 AM Fireblood
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* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates have the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Trials of Roman citizens often go this way, as the magistrate is free to admit or ignore any evidence they please. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, is given a trial, but the outcome isn't in doubt. The only real privilege they have is that citizens can't be crucified (and the trial needs to be in Rome). Paul is put under house arrest and later beheaded, while while they crucify non-citizen Peter (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).

to:

* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates have the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Trials of Roman citizens often go this way, as the magistrate is free to admit or ignore any evidence they please. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, is given a trial, but the outcome isn't in doubt. The only real privilege they have is that citizens can't be crucified (and the trial needs to be in Rome). Paul is put under house arrest and later beheaded, while while they crucify non-citizen Peter (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).
30th Apr '17 2:00:44 PM Az_Tech341
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* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified (and the trial had to be in Rome). Paul was put under house arrest and later beheaded, while non-citizen Peter was crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).

to:

* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had have the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials Trials of Roman citizens often went go this way, as the magistrate was is free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. please. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was is given a trial, but the outcome was never isn't in doubt. The only real privilege they had was have is that citizens could not can't be crucified (and the trial had needs to be in Rome). Paul was is put under house arrest and later beheaded, while while they crucify non-citizen Peter was crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).
30th Apr '17 10:40:50 AM AnonFangeekGirl
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* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).

to:

* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus crucified (and the trial had to be in ''Acts'' Rome). Paul is was put under house arrest and later beheaded, while non-citizen Peter gets was crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).
8th Apr '17 7:00:42 PM Fireblood
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Added DiffLines:

[[folder:Religion]]
* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).
[[/folder]]
8th Apr '17 3:20:52 PM Jhonny
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[[folder:Religion]]
* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).
[[/folder]]
7th Apr '17 8:37:00 PM TheBigBopper
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A Kangaroo Court is a sham legal proceeding or court, one that denies due process and fairness in the name of expediency. The outcome of such a trial is essentially decided in advance for the purpose of providing a conviction; going through the motions of procedure is only done to make it "official". The defendant will likely be allowed no defense nor be allowed to call witnesses, present evidence or make objections. If they are allowed, they will be summarily overruled by the HangingJudge that usually presides over the trial in question. Especially nasty versions may even slap the accused with "contempt of court" penalties for even ''trying'' to mount a defense. If the trial results in a death sentence, some people will use the term "judicial murder" to describe it.

to:

A Kangaroo Court is a sham legal proceeding or court, trial, one that denies due process and fairness in the name of expediency. The outcome of such a trial is essentially decided in advance for the purpose of providing a conviction; going through the motions of procedure is only done to make it "official". The defendant will likely be allowed no defense nor be allowed to call witnesses, present evidence or make objections. If they are allowed, they will be summarily overruled by the HangingJudge that usually presides over the trial in question. Especially nasty versions may even slap the accused with "contempt of court" penalties for even ''trying'' to mount a defense. If the trial results in a death sentence, some people will use the term "judicial murder" to describe it.
2nd Apr '17 5:04:38 PM Az_Tech341
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* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death). Of course how much of this is historically accurate as described is better not discussed here as historians and theologians have spilled gallons of ink on the issue and those debates have sometimes resulted in gallons of blood being spilled.

to:

* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death). Of course how much of this is historically accurate as described is better not discussed here as historians and theologians have spilled gallons of ink on the issue and those debates have sometimes resulted in gallons of blood being spilled.
2nd Apr '17 3:23:55 PM Jhonny
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* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).

to:

* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death). Of course how much of this is historically accurate as described is better not discussed here as historians and theologians have spilled gallons of ink on the issue and those debates have sometimes resulted in gallons of blood being spilled.
2nd Apr '17 12:40:29 PM DustSnitch
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[[folder: Religion]]
* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries {{Jesus}} in ''Literature/TheBible''. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).

to:

[[folder: Religion]]
[[folder:Religion]]
* The Sanhedrin (high court of ancient Judea) that tries {{Jesus}} UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}} in ''Literature/TheBible''.Literature/TheFourGospels. Not only do the judges violate every ''single'' Jewish law governing trials, but they put on clearly perjured witnesses to convict him. The conduct of Pontius Pilate, the Roman governor who approves his death sentence (the Romans required it) also counts, as even he acknowledges that no Roman (or Jewish) laws were broken by Jesus. Roman magistrates had the power to have non-Romans crucified at will, however, making the whole Roman "justice" system essentially this for them. Even trials of Roman citizens often went this way, as the magistrate was free to admit or ignore any evidence they pleased. Later on Paul, a Roman citizen, was given a trial, but the outcome was never in doubt. The only real privilege they had was that citizens could not be crucified. Thus in ''Acts'' Paul is beheaded, while Peter gets crucified (upside down, as he doesn't want it to resemble Jesus' death).
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