History Main / JustTheFirstCitizen

29th Mar '17 10:19:49 AM TheBigBopper
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Either way, his title is short, simple, laconic and unpretentious, quite possibly little more than a job descriptor. His authority doesn't come from his title; it comes from ''[[AsskickingEqualsAuthority himself]]''.

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Either way, his title is short, simple, laconic and unpretentious, quite possibly little more than a job descriptor. His authority doesn't come from his title; it comes from ''[[AsskickingEqualsAuthority himself]]''.
12th Mar '17 3:14:46 PM Jhonny
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** The German title "Kanzler" (often translated as chancellor) did not originally mean "head of the government" either. The term originated in the medieval period derived from Latin canellarius and initially described a glorified clerk. And as a matter of fact, the German federal chancellor (Bundeskanzler or in case of a woman holding that office Bundeskanzlerin) is ''not'' the first citizen. In the official order of protocol the Bundespräsident is the undisputed number one, with the number two being either the President of the parliament or the President pro tempore of the Bundesrat (the upper chamber made up of appointed representatives of TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland; the position of president pro tempore rotates among the heads of the sixteen states) and the Bundeskanzler being somewhere down the line. As a further emphasis how "unimportant" the office of Bundeskanzler is, their official residence, the Bundeskanzleramt in Berlin is both lower and within viewing distance of the parliament (Bundestag). Given however, that the Bundeskanzler almost always has the support of the majority of the Bundestag, and is often the leader of one of the major parties, the real power is usually reversed.

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** The German title "Kanzler" (often translated as chancellor) did not originally mean "head of the government" either. The term originated in the medieval period derived from Latin canellarius cancellarius and initially described a glorified clerk. And as a matter of fact, the German federal chancellor (Bundeskanzler or in case of a woman holding that office Bundeskanzlerin) is ''not'' the first citizen. In the official order of protocol the Bundespräsident is the undisputed number one, with the number two being either the President of the parliament or the President pro tempore of the Bundesrat (the upper chamber made up of appointed representatives of TheSixteenLandsOfDeutschland; the position of president pro tempore rotates among the heads of the sixteen states) and the Bundeskanzler being somewhere down the line. As a further emphasis how "unimportant" the office of Bundeskanzler is, their official residence, the Bundeskanzleramt in Berlin is both lower and within viewing distance of the parliament (Bundestag). Given however, that the Bundeskanzler almost always has the support of the majority of the Bundestag, and is often the leader of one of the major parties, the real power is usually reversed.
12th Mar '17 2:42:32 PM karstovich2
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* The United States "President" (i.e. "the one who presides") was originally conceived as one of those, and the title had previously been mostly used for chairmen of committees. The style of the King was "By the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, Prince-Elector of Hannover, Duke of Brunswick". The longest title the President gets is "the President of the United States" and is generally addressed merely as "Mister President".

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* The United States "President" (i.e. "the one who presides") was originally conceived as one of those, and the title had previously been mostly used for chairmen of committees. The style of the King was "By the Grace of God, of Great Britain, France and Ireland, King, Defender of the Faith, Prince-Elector of Hannover, Duke of Brunswick".Brunswick" and is addressed as "Your Majesty". The longest title the President gets is "the President of the United States" and is generally addressed merely as "Mister President".
10th Mar '17 9:55:45 AM Khathi
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Julius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times]], a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.

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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), derived, originally from the historical honorary title ''Princeps Senatus'', that is, the person allowed to speak first, which by the late Republic evolved into a post not unilke the modern Speaker position), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Julius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times]], a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.


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** Note that while it's common to call the Soviet leader "Premier" in the English-speaking world, this is a journalistic invention and has very little in common with the real power structure of the UsefulNotes/SovietUnion: for example, an actual Prime Minister almost never held much of a political power there, it mostly being a technocratic managerial position. Soviet two-headed political structure pretty much ensured that the guy with a real power always was the Party boss, but he never was an ''official'' head of state this honor for the most of the Soviet history belonged to the President of Supreme Soviet (or its Presidium[[note]]The general Supreme Soviet being very large and staffed with part-time deputies, it only convened once a year at most, leaving a small standing body the Presidium fulfilling the necessary responsibilities in between of conventions.[[/note]] in some periods), a head of the Soviet Parliament.
4th Mar '17 10:48:24 AM nombretomado
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* MarkTwain's ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt'' styles himself [[AC:The Boss]].

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* MarkTwain's Creator/MarkTwain's ''Literature/AConnecticutYankeeInKingArthursCourt'' styles himself [[AC:The Boss]].
3rd Mar '17 10:25:12 PM Xtifr
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* In the first two books of ''Literature/TheStarchildTrilogy'', the Planner is officially just the man in charge of making sure that the dictates of the great [[MasterComputer Planning Machine]],, which is in charge of protecting and preserving mankind, are carried out properly. In practice, of course, he has great latitude in interpreting the machine's instructions, and is a dictator in all but name.

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* In the first two books of ''Literature/TheStarchildTrilogy'', the Planner is officially just the man in charge of making sure that the dictates of the great [[MasterComputer Planning Machine]],, Machine]], which is in charge of protecting and preserving mankind, are carried out properly. In practice, of course, he has great latitude in interpreting the machine's instructions, and is a dictator in all but name.
3rd Mar '17 10:24:07 PM Xtifr
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Added DiffLines:

* In the first two books of ''Literature/TheStarchildTrilogy'', the Planner is officially just the man in charge of making sure that the dictates of the great [[MasterComputer Planning Machine]],, which is in charge of protecting and preserving mankind, are carried out properly. In practice, of course, he has great latitude in interpreting the machine's instructions, and is a dictator in all but name.
3rd Mar '17 10:14:08 PM Xtifr
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times]], a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.

to:

* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar UsefulNotes/JuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius Julius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times]], a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.
8th Feb '17 1:58:35 PM gb00393
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Added DiffLines:

* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': The obvious leader of the ruling council of Qarth refers to himself as "simply a trader of spices." Everyone else just calls him "the Spice King".
21st Jan '17 9:57:29 AM Specialist290
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** UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi, disqualified by his humble birth from becoming ''shogun'', had to settle for ruling Japan under the title ''kampaku'' (imperial regent), and later as ''taikō'' (retired regent). These positions would have made him subordinate to the ''shogun'', had one existed at the time.

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** UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi, disqualified by his humble birth from becoming ''shogun'', had to settle for ruling Japan under the title ''kampaku'' (imperial regent), and later as ''taikō'' (retired regent). These positions would have made him subordinate to the ''shogun'', had one existed at the time.time; he made damn sure that one didn't for his lifetime.
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