History Main / JustTheFirstCitizen

8th Feb '17 1:58:35 PM gb00393
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* ''Series/GameOfThrones'': The obvious leader of the ruling council of Qarth refers to himself as "simply a trader of spices." Everyone else just calls him "the Spice King".
21st Jan '17 9:57:29 AM Specialist290
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** UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi, disqualified by his humble birth from becoming ''shogun'', had to settle for ruling Japan under the title ''kampaku'' (imperial regent), and later as ''taikō'' (retired regent). These positions would have made him subordinate to the ''shogun'', had one existed at the time.

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** UsefulNotes/ToyotomiHideyoshi, disqualified by his humble birth from becoming ''shogun'', had to settle for ruling Japan under the title ''kampaku'' (imperial regent), and later as ''taikō'' (retired regent). These positions would have made him subordinate to the ''shogun'', had one existed at the time.time; he made damn sure that one didn't for his lifetime.
19th Jan '17 8:51:05 PM LordInsane
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* While the ''default'' leader titles in ''VideoGame/{{Stellaris}}'' don't fit this, at least contextually (High Technician sounds a lot more impressive in a society centred around powerful computers calculating the most efficient ways of governance), they are subject to player customisation -- so it is entirely possible to design a People's Republic governed by a First Citizen and have the government type be [[TheEmpire Despotic Empire]]
18th Jan '17 4:03:58 PM eroock
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-->--''Series/{{Rome}}''

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-->--''Series/{{Rome}}''
-->-- ''Series/{{Rome}}''
17th Jan '17 8:08:18 AM Jhonny
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* Literature/SixteenThirtyTwo: Mike Stearns goes through a handful of official titles, but they are mostly (at least to the ears of his 17th century contemporaries) relatively negligible. Prime Minister of the United States of Europe (before he - intentionally - loses reelection), a mere general among many in the army of Gustav Adolph of Sweden - the people however only refer to him as "the Prince of Germany" - a funny title for an erstwhile Union organizer from Appalachia. "Prince" also directly derives from the Latin Word "princeps", the title the TropeNamer Augusts wanted to be referred to and the German word for it - Fürst - Does not sound like "first" merely by coincidence.
17th Jan '17 5:48:00 AM sketchdoodle
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* Paulo Abacar the Elder of Literature/MaleRising, [[ReasonableAuthorityFigure though he'd spit in your eye if you told him that]]. As the founder of the Sokoto Republic, Paulo was the man who held the nation through despite his aversion of absolute power.
17th Jan '17 3:08:19 AM RobTan
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** UsefulNotes/FrederickTheGreat also called himself "the first servant of the state".
26th Dec '16 8:00:47 PM PaulA
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* ''Series/FlashGordon'': In the re-imagined series, Ming is no longer "Emperor Ming the Merciless" who dressed like rulers of Ancient China. Instead, he prefers a military uniform and the self-appointed title of "Benevolent Father". His subjects, though, still occasionally call him "Ming the Merciless" behind his back. And his daughter is still called Princess Aura.

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* ''Series/FlashGordon'': ''Series/{{Flash Gordon|2007}}'': In the re-imagined series, Ming is no longer "Emperor Ming the Merciless" who dressed like rulers of Ancient China. Instead, he prefers a military uniform and the self-appointed title of "Benevolent Father". His subjects, though, still occasionally call him "Ming the Merciless" behind his back. And his daughter is still called Princess Aura.
23rd Dec '16 8:21:30 PM SutairuMasuta
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* UsefulNotes/JosefStalin [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zags]] this trope. For all his power, all the control, all the spy networks and the state he built, he was simply the General Secretary of the Communist Party; his rivals during his rise to power jokingly called him "Comrade Card-Index", as the official role of the General Secretary in the early party was keeping the membership rolls. [[note]]Because of Stalin's use of this trope, the de facto leader during the history of the U.S.S.R. was always the person filling this post, regardless of whether or not that person was also the Premier.[[/note]] Someone stated that a title that would reflect his ''real'' power would have to be something like "Pope of the Communist church; Czar of Russia; CEO of Soviet Inc." In addition, he also allowed himself to be called simply "Vozhd" (leader/boss) after his fiftieth birthday celebration in 1929, and was given the title "Generalissimus" (the highest possible military rank), although he never wore the insignia. On the other hand, years before becoming General Secretary he changed his birth name from Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili to the Russian equivalent of [[AwesomeMcCoolname Joe Steel]]. During his personality cult he also accepted an immense number of grandiose titles, including "Coryphaeus of Science", "Father of Nations", "Brilliant Genius of Humanity", "Great Architect of Communism", "Gardener of Human Happiness", and many more.

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* UsefulNotes/JosefStalin [[ZigZaggedTrope zig-zags]] this trope. For all his power, all the control, all the spy networks and the state he built, he was simply the General Secretary of the Communist Party; his rivals during his rise to power jokingly called him "Comrade Card-Index", as the official role of the General Secretary in the early party was keeping the membership rolls. [[note]]Because of Stalin's use of this trope, the de facto leader during the history of the U.S.S.R. was always the person filling this post, regardless of whether or not that person was also the Premier.[[/note]] Someone stated that a title that would reflect his ''real'' power would have to be something like "Pope of the Communist church; Czar of Russia; CEO of Soviet Inc." In addition, he also allowed himself to be called simply "Vozhd" (leader/boss) (leader/boss/chief) after his fiftieth birthday celebration in 1929, and was given the title "Generalissimus" (the highest possible military rank), although he never wore the insignia. On the other hand, years before becoming General Secretary he changed his birth name from Ioseb Besarionis dze Jughashvili to the Russian equivalent of [[AwesomeMcCoolname Joe Steel]]. During his personality cult he also accepted an immense number of grandiose titles, including "Coryphaeus of Science", "Father of Nations", "Brilliant Genius of Humanity", "Great Architect of Communism", "Gardener of Human Happiness", and many more.
17th Dec '16 2:33:57 PM __Vano
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.

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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, [[Film/RevengeOfTheSith contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, times]], a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.
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