History Main / JustTheFirstCitizen

10th Feb '16 6:28:49 PM karstovich2
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* Thomas Prendergast, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem political boss]] of Kansas City who maneuvered UsefulNotes/HarrySTruman into the White House, never held elected office himself. "Boss" Tweed, of Tammany Hall in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, served [[http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=T000440 one unremarkable term]] in Congress in the 1850s, before his rise to power.
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* Thomas Prendergast, Pendergast, [[UsefulNotes/AmericanPoliticalSystem boss]] of the Kansas City-area Democratic political boss]] of Kansas City machine in the early-mid 20th century, the who maneuvered UsefulNotes/HarrySTruman into the Senate seat that put him on the road to the White House, never held elected office himself. "Boss" Tweed, of Tammany Hall in UsefulNotes/NewYorkCity, served [[http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=T000440 one unremarkable term]] in Congress in the 1850s, before his rise to power.
10th Feb '16 6:22:11 PM karstovich2
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could remove him.
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could legitimately remove him.
31st Jan '16 3:46:57 PM Massimo
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** [[OlderThanTheyThink Before him]] we have UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini, who started out calling himself "Duce deň Partito Fascista", meaning "Leader of the Fascist Party". "Duce" itself was just a fancy way to say "leader" before his use of it ruined the title in the eyes of most Italians. As for the titles he used to rule, he was merely the "President of the Council of Ministers of the Kingdom of Italy", or Prime Minister for short (officially the king was still in charge, and had the power to dismiss him... As he actually did in 1943), and, during the German occupation, he was the "Duce e Capo del Governo", "Leader and Chief of the Government". After the conquest of Ethiopia, however, he gave himself a couple of bombastic titles, changing his title as chief of the Fascist Party into "Leader and Founder of the Empire" and appointing himself as "First Marshall of the Empire" together with the king (a move to put the prime minister, that is himself, on the same rank of the king in the military chain of command).
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** [[OlderThanTheyThink Before him]] we have UsefulNotes/BenitoMussolini, who started out calling himself "Duce deň del Partito Fascista", meaning "Leader of the Fascist Party". "Duce" itself was just a fancy way to say "leader" (coming from the Latin "[[PretentiousLatinMotto dux]]", from which also the Italian "duca" and its English equivalent "duke" are derived), before his use of it ruined the title in the eyes of most Italians. As for the titles he used to rule, he was merely the "President of the Council of Ministers of the Kingdom of Italy", or Prime Minister for short (officially the king was still in charge, and had the power to dismiss him... As he actually did in 1943), and, during the German occupation, he was the "Duce e Capo del Governo", "Leader and Chief of the Government". After the conquest of Ethiopia, however, he gave himself a couple of bombastic titles, changing his title as chief of the Fascist Party into "Leader and Founder of the Empire" and appointing himself as "First Marshall of the Empire" together with the king (a move to put the prime minister, that is himself, on the same rank of the king in the military chain of command).
24th Jan '16 9:42:57 AM karstovich2
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* After Deng Xiaoping retired from his last formal position as the chairman of the military commission, he only kept the title of Honorary Chairman of China Bridge Association. Until his death, however, everyone knew who was the real leader of Peoples' Republic of China.
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* After Deng Xiaoping retired from his last formal position as the chairman of the military commission, he only kept the title of Honorary Chairman of the China Bridge TabletopGame/{{Bridge}} Association. Until his death, however, everyone knew who was the real leader of Peoples' Republic of China.
24th Jan '16 9:34:23 AM karstovich2
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord").
to:
* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). Even when the Dominate came, it was a little while before the Emperors began to take on the trappings of monarchy or refer to themselves (loosely) as "kings"; even in UsefulNotes/TheByzantineEmpire, whose Emperors were called ''Basileus'' (Greek for "King"), the Imperial position still had many of the structures of the Roman Republican offices, including acclamation by the people, Senate, and Army, and an expectation that--unlike most other monarchies--if the sitting Emperor was incompetent or unpopular, one of those three groups could remove him.
23rd Jan '16 10:11:34 PM karstovich2
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* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. ** Augustus himself adopted the title as Rome's last king, Tarquinius the Arrogant, had de-legitimized the concept of a monarchy to the Romans by being a huge tosser (for a modern day example, Americans would never accept a king due to their memory of King George III). Augustus [[TropeNamer merely invented a new, euphemistic term]] and ruled like a king anyway.
to:
* TropeNamer: The first Roman Emperors called themselves simply "The First" (''Princeps'', from which the word "Prince" is derived), after the example of [[UsefulNotes/{{Augustus}} Augustus]]. The title "Caesar" was of course taken from Creator/GaiusJuliusCaesar but only applied later to the ruler (mainly because the head of the Caesar family was the guy in charge for a century, starting with Gaius and ending with Nero, so people got in the habit of believing that 'Caesar' meant the person in charge). Augustus was more of a puppetmaster than an explicit dictator (unlike Caesar) given (in the end) a dozen individual powers by the senate. I.e. he was ''de facto'' Emperor (''Imperator'', which itself means "General," not king), but ''de jure'' just "the first citizen" and the first speaker of the senate.Senate. To paraphrase Augustus' own words 'he had no more power than any other magistrate but exceeded all in authority'. The very concept of the Roman Empire being something separate from the preceding Roman Republic was, contrary to how it's often thought of in in modern times, a very gradual process, and it took a while before the Emperors were seen as ''officially'' royal rather than simply the de facto rulers. rulers. Indeed, the standard periodization of the Roman Empire terms the period from 27 BCE (when Augustus came to power) until 235 CE (after the end of the Severan Dynasty precipitated the Crisis of the Third Century) the "Principate", characterized by the conscious efforts of the Emperors to retain the illusion of continued republican rule, and thus emphasis on the Emperor merely being ''princeps''. After the Crisis of the Third Century (at the accession of Diocletian in 284), the Empire became the openly monarchical "Dominate" (from the Latin ''dominus'', "lord"). ** Augustus himself adopted the title as Rome's last king, Tarquinius the Arrogant, Lucius Tarquinus Superbus ("Superbus" being historically interpreted as meaning "the Arrogant"), had de-legitimized the concept of a monarchy to the Romans by being a huge tosser (for a modern day example, Americans would never accept a king due to their memory of King George III). Augustus [[TropeNamer merely invented a new, euphemistic term]] and ruled like a king anyway.
23rd Jan '16 9:58:51 PM karstovich2
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*** Elves barely have any concept of "rank"; while they attach prestige to lineage, an individual's actual power mostly derives solely from other elves being willing to follow him (though if a given leader doesn't make many mistakes, other elves will tend to prefer status quo to revolution). Their political model is basically, in anthropological terms, a pre-chiefdom tribal one, like that of the Sioux or Apache.
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*** Elves barely have any concept of "rank"; while they attach prestige to lineage, an individual's actual power mostly derives solely from other elves being willing to follow him (though if a given leader doesn't make many mistakes, other elves Elves will tend to prefer status quo to revolution). Their political model is basically, in anthropological terms, a pre-chiefdom tribal one, like that of the Sioux or Apache. Mind you, the Elves ''do'' have more traditional sophisticated monarchies, and in ages past there were many Elf kingdoms,[[note]]The First Age had more than you can realistically count, while Gil-galad ran a decent-sized kingdom in the Second Age.[[/note]] but in the Third Age the only proper kingdom of Elves remaining in Middle-Earth is that of Thranduil at the northern end of Mirkwood (Legolas' people); the other remaining Elven kingdoms are in Valinor.
17th Jan '16 1:04:57 PM luiz4200
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Added DiffLines:
* ''WesternAnimation/YogisGang'': Smokestag Smog. He lives in a castle made of smog and convinced the people of Smog City to think the smog from his factory is a good thing but, as he claims whenever someone asks if he's the Mayor, he's really just the number one citizen. Another character is later revealed to be the Mayor and Smog is never shown to have anything to do with how the city is ruled.
13th Dec '15 3:15:48 PM Vios
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Added DiffLines:
* In the second book of ''Literature/ErebusSequence'', the de facto new queen disdains the title which would normally come with her role. This reflects a dislike of the traditional power structures of the kingdom rather than either humility or public relations. * In ''Literature/StarksWar'', the protagonist would rather still be referred to as plain "Sergeant" than get a new title after leading his rebellion, though his fellow sergeants do manage to persuade him to differentiate himself with "Commander" ("General" being right out, even though that's the job he's now doing).
8th Dec '15 4:05:44 AM Mullane
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** Not to mention that [[ValeusDissonance he was actually pretty reasonable compared to his wife Titania. However, the centuries caused her to mellow and develop while he remained the same.]]
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** Not to mention that [[ValeusDissonance [[ValuesDissonance he was actually pretty reasonable compared to his wife Titania. However, the centuries caused her to mellow and develop while he remained the same.]]
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