History Main / ItsPopularNowItSucks

24th Mar '17 7:04:14 PM CyberTiger88
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In some cases, it's not an unreasonable complaint if the quality of the work begins to suffer as a result of the artist's popularity. If the artist begins to squander their talent or water down what made it interesting to make it acceptable to the LowestCommonDenominator, or PanderingToTheBase rather than expanding themselves as artists in the process, then it's not unreasonable that the fans might start crying foul. Likewise, if the artist becomes a [[SmallNameBigEgo raging egomaniacal]] [[PrimaDonnaDirector tool]] who believes that they can [[ArtistDisillusionment treat their fans like dirt]] and [[ProtectionFromEditors don't need to listen to their critics or higher ups]], things might go downhill fast. Perhaps their fame will rise [[ArtistDisillusionment beyond a level they can cope with]]. Perhaps MisaimedFandom will become an issue if the new crop of fans fundamentally misses the point of the work and latches on for all the wrong reasons. On another, more subjective note, the popularity and acclaim of an actually solid artist or work may rise to hyperbolic, unwarranted heights, which can have a negative effect if [[HypeBacklash the hype cannot possibly match the reality]]. Where live performances are involved, larger, less intimate venues will generally be required - perhaps a situation in which the performers donít come across so well - and audience demographics may change, the newcomers behaving differently to the older fans, causing an overall change in atmosphere. Production values may also change - acts who rely on a more stripped-down, raw aesthetic may wind up switching to a cleaner, more polished production style, which can be a jarring shift that very well may be incongruous with the work's style. And finally, some things ''are'' better in small doses, in which case the last thing you want is to be [[WolverinePublicity over-exposed to it]].

to:

In some cases, it's not an unreasonable complaint if the quality of the work begins to suffer as a result of the artist's popularity. If the artist begins to squander their talent or water down what made it interesting to make it acceptable to the LowestCommonDenominator, or PanderingToTheBase rather than expanding themselves as artists in the process, then it's not unreasonable that the fans might start crying foul. Likewise, if the artist becomes a [[SmallNameBigEgo raging egomaniacal]] [[PrimaDonnaDirector tool]] who believes that they can [[ArtistDisillusionment [[DearNegativeReader treat their fans like dirt]] and [[ProtectionFromEditors don't need to listen to their critics or higher ups]], things might go downhill fast. Perhaps their fame will rise rises [[ArtistDisillusionment beyond a level they can cope with]]. Perhaps A MisaimedFandom will could possibly become an issue if the new crop of fans fundamentally misses the point of the work and latches on for all the wrong reasons. On another, more subjective note, the popularity and acclaim of an actually solid artist or work may rise to hyperbolic, unwarranted heights, which can have a negative effect if [[HypeBacklash the hype cannot possibly match the reality]]. Where live performances are involved, larger, less intimate venues will generally be required - perhaps a situation in which the performers donít come across so well - and audience demographics may change, the newcomers behaving differently to the older fans, causing an overall change in atmosphere. Production values may also change - acts who rely on a more stripped-down, raw aesthetic may wind up switching to a cleaner, more polished production style, which can be a jarring shift that very well may be incongruous with the work's style. And finally, some things ''are'' better in small doses, in which case the last thing you want is to be [[WolverinePublicity over-exposed to it]].



To the extent that this trope ''is'' true, it will usually be as a result of the non-lethal form of TheFireflyEffect, where the studio are trying to boost ratings. There is one other way in which this trope can legitimately manifest, as well.

a} An initial film (''Film/TheMatrix'' being a good example, as was ''Cube'') is released, which the releasing studio does not expect to be a mainstream success. Because the initial film is only expected to appeal to a niche audience, the storyline will often be more intelligent than usual, and the producers very often won't resort to the usual cheap gimmicks (excessive [[FanService nudity]] or Michael Bay-like explosions unless those are genuinely in context with the storyline, etc) which are intended to draw in large audiences.

b} Because of said film's unusual degree of artistic integrity, it will become far more popular than the studio anticipated.

c} This causes a full-throated case of Sequelitis in the studio, due to the hope of making more money. Said sequels, unlike the original, ''will'' use the usual crowd-pleasing tropes mentioned above, as well as re-tooling the original film's premise to appeal to fifteen year old morons.
18th Mar '17 5:16:37 PM Mineboot45
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* Such notions went out the window shortly thereafter, as Act 5 of ''Homestuck'' led to a gigantic influx of fans that had no idea the comic was about suggestion boxes, or indeed, about anything that is not troll romance.

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* ** Such notions went out the window shortly thereafter, as Act 5 of ''Homestuck'' led to a gigantic influx of fans that had no idea the comic was about suggestion boxes, or indeed, about anything that is not troll romance.
11th Mar '17 10:01:59 AM nombretomado
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* One of Fametracker's main features was "The Fame Audit", a rather justified/averted form of this trope, where, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the title suggests]], the evaluated the relative merits and demerits of various pop-culture figures, both famous and somewhat under-the-radar, and would determine whether they were getting the appropriate amount of fame, and whether or not for the right reasons. Notable nods included a then-under-the-radar Jon Stewart from when he was only a year into hosting ''Series/TheDailyShow'', where they determined that he deserved even more fame. Cut to the Re-Audit four years later when he was already quite famous, and they not only still loved him, but wanted his fame to continue to grow. ([[=FT=]] may be gone, but the former editors are still clearly pleased with his current fame.) In spite of the clear cases where they feel are low-talent (Sharon Stone and JohnTravolta) or on the wane (Music/MichaelJackson circa the 2002 audit) among other things, they are rather objective in their assessments, sometimes choosing to either leave well enough alone or suggest a bump up in fame for people they might otherwise be ambivalent about who are nonetheless unpretentious and enjoyable enough to deserve some sort of extended presence. Beyond that, they have recommended that stars they have liked stay at their exact same spot of fame lest they become too overexposed or pushed into overly high-profile projects (see: Creator/WillFerrell and Steven Soderbergh via their audits), or consequently a bump down for said cases either already beyond that point (Creator/StephenColbert's audit) or simply in need of going away in order to refocus (Lisa Kudrow and Creator/EdwardNorton).

to:

* One of Fametracker's main features was "The Fame Audit", a rather justified/averted form of this trope, where, [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin as the title suggests]], the evaluated the relative merits and demerits of various pop-culture figures, both famous and somewhat under-the-radar, and would determine whether they were getting the appropriate amount of fame, and whether or not for the right reasons. Notable nods included a then-under-the-radar Jon Stewart from when he was only a year into hosting ''Series/TheDailyShow'', where they determined that he deserved even more fame. Cut to the Re-Audit four years later when he was already quite famous, and they not only still loved him, but wanted his fame to continue to grow. ([[=FT=]] may be gone, but the former editors are still clearly pleased with his current fame.) In spite of the clear cases where they feel are low-talent (Sharon Stone and JohnTravolta) Creator/JohnTravolta) or on the wane (Music/MichaelJackson circa the 2002 audit) among other things, they are rather objective in their assessments, sometimes choosing to either leave well enough alone or suggest a bump up in fame for people they might otherwise be ambivalent about who are nonetheless unpretentious and enjoyable enough to deserve some sort of extended presence. Beyond that, they have recommended that stars they have liked stay at their exact same spot of fame lest they become too overexposed or pushed into overly high-profile projects (see: Creator/WillFerrell and Steven Soderbergh via their audits), or consequently a bump down for said cases either already beyond that point (Creator/StephenColbert's audit) or simply in need of going away in order to refocus (Lisa Kudrow and Creator/EdwardNorton).
10th Mar '17 6:47:03 AM ElSquibbonator
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Added DiffLines:

* The same thing happened to the Chicago Cubs in 2016. Given that they had last won a World Series in 1908, and had essentially sculpted their entire brand since then around being the "lovable losers", this had surprisingly mixed reactions among Cubs fans.
2nd Mar '17 12:48:55 AM ninjamitsuki2
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* Using the Phillips CD-I games as a source for WebAnimation/YouTubePoop has been frowned upon by the members of the YouChew community for years now, although some people are still able to make some funny videos using them.

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* Using For a while, using the Phillips CD-I games as a source for WebAnimation/YouTubePoop has been was frowned upon by the members of the YouChew community for years now, although some people are still able to make some funny videos using them.them, and in more recent years members of the forum frequently make jokes involving CD-I memes, though in a more post-ironic manner.
22nd Feb '17 6:48:22 AM MissConduct
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** Sometimes runs into some UnfortunateImplications, especially with names popular among African-Americans. Expect comments with lots of double standards, saying that a name more popular with rich white people with the same characteristic is better, such as this:
-->'''Comment on the name Shaniqua:''' Even by ghetto name standards, this is a really butt-ugly name. Come on, it's got that hideous ''kwa'' ending to it and everything. Names with the ''kwa'' or ''kwi'' sound are extremely ugly, unless we're talking about highly un-ghetto-esque names like Quinn. This name sounds hopelessly trashy, and it makes people picture an annoying, somewhat dimwitted girl or woman from the ghetto who either is or will likely end up pregnant by age 16 and who acts like a person from hell towards everyone higher on the social ladder. This name isn't exactly a mature, dignified, sophisticated name, and it will lead to merciless discrimination and jokes.
7th Feb '17 12:35:20 PM Anddrix
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c} This causes a full-throated case of Sequelitis in the studio, due to the hope of making more money. Said sequels, unlike the original, ''will'' use the usual crowd-pleasing tropes mentioned above, as well as re-tooling the original film's premise to appeal to [[ViewersAreMorons fifteen year old morons]].

to:

c} This causes a full-throated case of Sequelitis in the studio, due to the hope of making more money. Said sequels, unlike the original, ''will'' use the usual crowd-pleasing tropes mentioned above, as well as re-tooling the original film's premise to appeal to [[ViewersAreMorons fifteen year old morons]].
morons.
7th Feb '17 12:29:19 PM ZombieAladdin
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Added DiffLines:

* Pretty prevalent among beer enthusiasts--it's as if the quality of the beer is inversely proportional to how much beer the company makes. Also, for the more hardcore cases, if the beer maker does so much as create an advertisement or license its name, the beer automatically becomes garbage--good beers spread through word-of-mouth alone.
28th Jan '17 12:57:16 AM petrus4
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a} An initial film (''Film/TheMatrix'' being a good example, as was ''Cube'') is released, which the releasing studio does not expect to be a mainstream success. Because the initial film is only expected to appeal to a niche audience, the storyline will often be more intelligent than usual, and the producers very often won't resort to the usual cheap gimmicks (excessive [[Fanservice nudity]] or Michael Bay-like explosions unless those are genuinely in context with the storyline, etc) which are intended to draw in large audiences.

to:

a} An initial film (''Film/TheMatrix'' being a good example, as was ''Cube'') is released, which the releasing studio does not expect to be a mainstream success. Because the initial film is only expected to appeal to a niche audience, the storyline will often be more intelligent than usual, and the producers very often won't resort to the usual cheap gimmicks (excessive [[Fanservice [[FanService nudity]] or Michael Bay-like explosions unless those are genuinely in context with the storyline, etc) which are intended to draw in large audiences.
28th Jan '17 12:56:00 AM petrus4
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To the extent that this trope ''is'' true, it will usually be as a result of the non-lethal form of TheFireflyEffect, where the studio are trying to boost ratings.

to:

To the extent that this trope ''is'' true, it will usually be as a result of the non-lethal form of TheFireflyEffect, where the studio are trying to boost ratings.
ratings. There is one other way in which this trope can legitimately manifest, as well.

a} An initial film (''Film/TheMatrix'' being a good example, as was ''Cube'') is released, which the releasing studio does not expect to be a mainstream success. Because the initial film is only expected to appeal to a niche audience, the storyline will often be more intelligent than usual, and the producers very often won't resort to the usual cheap gimmicks (excessive [[Fanservice nudity]] or Michael Bay-like explosions unless those are genuinely in context with the storyline, etc) which are intended to draw in large audiences.

b} Because of said film's unusual degree of artistic integrity, it will become far more popular than the studio anticipated.

c} This causes a full-throated case of Sequelitis in the studio, due to the hope of making more money. Said sequels, unlike the original, ''will'' use the usual crowd-pleasing tropes mentioned above, as well as re-tooling the original film's premise to appeal to [[ViewersAreMorons fifteen year old morons]].
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