History Main / ItWasADarkAndStormyNight

14th Aug '17 1:17:31 PM fruitcalculus
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[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Bulwer-Lytton,_1st_Baron_Lytton Edward Bulwer-Lytton]] was [[RuleOfThree three]] remarkable things: an author, the inventor of such catchy cliches as "the pen is mightier than the sword", "the great unwashed" and "the pursuit of the almighty dollar", and [[BreadEggsMilkSquick possibly a]] [[GodwinsLaw proto-Nazi]]. However he is not [[PopularHistory remembered]] for any of these: It is "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night..." that keeps him alive as a multimedia sensation beyond anything he could possibly have imagined -- the ''ur''-touchstone for convoluted PurpleProse and campfire [[GhostStory Ghost Stories]].

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[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Bulwer-Lytton,_1st_Baron_Lytton Edward Bulwer-Lytton]] was [[RuleOfThree three]] remarkable things: an author, the inventor of such catchy cliches as "the pen is mightier than the sword", "the great unwashed" and "the pursuit of the almighty dollar", and [[BreadEggsMilkSquick possibly a]] [[GodwinsLaw proto-Nazi]].dollar". However he is not [[PopularHistory remembered]] for any of these: It is "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night..." that keeps him alive as a multimedia sensation beyond anything he could possibly have imagined -- the ''ur''-touchstone for convoluted PurpleProse and campfire [[GhostStory Ghost Stories]].
25th Jul '17 3:24:34 AM Batman1016
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* Literature historians have theorized that Creator/MarkTwain was specifically mocking Bulwer-Lytton's infamous line with the hilarious prologue to his novel ''The American Claimant'' in which he insists that there will, in fact, be NO weather in his entire book (although he will include a convenient appendix at the end, detailing a variety of weather that the reader may apply to the book as desired). Being Mark Twain, he cheekily fulfills both promises, to the letter.

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* Literature historians have theorized that Creator/MarkTwain was specifically mocking Bulwer-Lytton's infamous line with the hilarious prologue to his novel ''The American Claimant'' in which he insists that there will, in fact, be NO weather in his entire book (although he will include a convenient appendix at the end, detailing a variety of weather that the reader may apply to the book as desired). Being Mark Twain, he cheekily fulfills both promises, to the letter.



''Many a reader who wanted to read a tale through was not able to do it because of delays on account of the weather. Nothing breaks up an authorís progress like having to stop every few pages to fuss-up the weather. Thus it is plain that persistent intrusions of weather are bad for both reader and author.''

''Of course weather is necessary to a narrative of human experience. That is conceded. But it ought to be put where it will not be in the way; where it will not interrupt the flow of the narrative. And it ought to be the ablest weather that can be had, not ignorant poor-quality, amateur weather. Weather is a literary specialty, and no untrained hand can turn out a good article of it. The present author can do only a few trifling ordinary kinds of weather, and he cannot do those very good. So it has seemed wisest to borrow such weather as is necessary for the book from qualified and recognized expertsógiving credit, of course. This weather will be found over in the back part of the book, out of the way. See Appendix. The reader is requested to turn over and help himself from time to time as he goes along.''

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''Many -->''Many a reader who wanted to read a tale through was not able to do it because of delays on account of the weather. Nothing breaks up an authorís progress like having to stop every few pages to fuss-up the weather. Thus it is plain that persistent intrusions of weather are bad for both reader and author.''

''Of -->''Of course weather is necessary to a narrative of human experience. That is conceded. But it ought to be put where it will not be in the way; where it will not interrupt the flow of the narrative. And it ought to be the ablest weather that can be had, not ignorant poor-quality, amateur weather. Weather is a literary specialty, and no untrained hand can turn out a good article of it. The present author can do only a few trifling ordinary kinds of weather, and he cannot do those very good. So it has seemed wisest to borrow such weather as is necessary for the book from qualified and recognized expertsógiving credit, of course. This weather will be found over in the back part of the book, out of the way. See Appendix. The reader is requested to turn over and help himself from time to time as he goes along.''
25th Jul '17 3:23:23 AM Batman1016
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Added DiffLines:

* Literature historians have theorized that Creator/MarkTwain was specifically mocking Bulwer-Lytton's infamous line with the hilarious prologue to his novel ''The American Claimant'' in which he insists that there will, in fact, be NO weather in his entire book (although he will include a convenient appendix at the end, detailing a variety of weather that the reader may apply to the book as desired). Being Mark Twain, he cheekily fulfills both promises, to the letter.
-->''No weather will be found in this book. This is an attempt to pull a book through without weather. It being the first attempt of the kind in fictitious literature it may prove a failure, but it seemed worth the while of some dare-devil person to try it, and the author was in just the mood.''

''Many a reader who wanted to read a tale through was not able to do it because of delays on account of the weather. Nothing breaks up an authorís progress like having to stop every few pages to fuss-up the weather. Thus it is plain that persistent intrusions of weather are bad for both reader and author.''

''Of course weather is necessary to a narrative of human experience. That is conceded. But it ought to be put where it will not be in the way; where it will not interrupt the flow of the narrative. And it ought to be the ablest weather that can be had, not ignorant poor-quality, amateur weather. Weather is a literary specialty, and no untrained hand can turn out a good article of it. The present author can do only a few trifling ordinary kinds of weather, and he cannot do those very good. So it has seemed wisest to borrow such weather as is necessary for the book from qualified and recognized expertsógiving credit, of course. This weather will be found over in the back part of the book, out of the way. See Appendix. The reader is requested to turn over and help himself from time to time as he goes along.''
12th Jul '17 6:27:48 AM Mdumas43073
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* The phrase actually predates Bulwer-Lytton, appearing in Washington Irving's satirical 1809 book ''A History of New-York'':
-->It was a dark and stormy night when the good Anthony arrived at the famous creek (sagely denominated Haerlem ''river'') which separates the island of Manna-hatta from the main land.
12th Jul '17 6:17:22 AM Mdumas43073
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-->-- '''''Paul Clifford''''', opening line, by '''Creator/EdwardBulwerLytton'''

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-->-- '''''Paul Clifford''''', opening line, by '''Creator/EdwardBulwerLytton'''
'''Creator/EdwardBulwerLytton''', ''Paul Clifford'' (opening line)
12th Jul '17 6:15:17 AM Mdumas43073
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The phrase, which opens Bulwer-Lytton's 1830 novel ''Paul Clifford'', has been so thoroughly mocked and re-used it should be a DeadHorseTrope if it were not an UndeadHorseTrope: it's just too much fun. In fact, two yearly [[http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/ writing]] [[Literature/LyttleLyttonContest contests]] are held (and named) in Lytton's honour.

to:

The phrase, which opens Bulwer-Lytton's 1830 novel ''Paul Clifford'', has been so thoroughly mocked and re-used it should be a DeadHorseTrope if it were not an UndeadHorseTrope: it's just too much fun. In fact, two yearly [[http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/ writing]] [[Literature/LyttleLyttonContest contests]] are held (and named) in Lytton's honour.
Bulwer-Lytton's honor.
12th Jul '17 6:14:31 AM Mdumas43073
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The phrase has been so thoroughly mocked and re-used it should be a DeadHorseTrope if it were not an UndeadHorseTrope: it's just too much fun. In fact, two yearly [[http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/ writing]] [[Literature/LyttleLyttonContest contests]] are held (and named) in Lytton's honour.

to:

The phrase phrase, which opens Bulwer-Lytton's 1830 novel ''Paul Clifford'', has been so thoroughly mocked and re-used it should be a DeadHorseTrope if it were not an UndeadHorseTrope: it's just too much fun. In fact, two yearly [[http://www.bulwer-lytton.com/ writing]] [[Literature/LyttleLyttonContest contests]] are held (and named) in Lytton's honour.
18th May '17 12:16:33 PM HighCrate
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* ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': the night where Weathermay-Foxgrove sisters first made contact with [[TheFairFolk the Shadow Fey]], which was also their DangerousSixteenthBirthday‎. Gennifer even [[GenreSavvy mentions]] how such night would have been more fitting to have a fight with TheUndead or evil mages.

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* ''TabletopGame/{{Ravenloft}}'': the night where Weathermay-Foxgrove sisters first made contact with [[TheFairFolk the Shadow Fey]], which was also their DangerousSixteenthBirthday‎. Gennifer even [[GenreSavvy mentions]] mentions how such night would have been more fitting to have a fight with TheUndead or evil mages.
22nd Apr '17 3:17:11 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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--> What everypony else has written concerning the Riot has taken the form of a story. I have spoken to the ponies who were there. I know what truly happened and so you, as a student of the Riot, will gain that knowledge.
--> It was a dark and storm-free night.
--> It had taken just about all of his remaining pull with the Weather Bureau to get that storm postponed. But if ponies were going to be waiting, then they were going to be waiting in the dry.

to:

--> What -->What everypony else has written concerning the Riot has taken the form of a story. I have spoken to the ponies who were there. I know what truly happened and so you, as a student of the Riot, will gain that knowledge.
-->
knowledge.\\
It was a dark and storm-free night.
-->
night.\\
It had taken just about all of his remaining pull with the Weather Bureau to get that storm postponed. But if ponies were going to be waiting, then they were going to be waiting in the dry.



---> '''Troi''': Maybe it'll get better.

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---> --> '''Troi''': Maybe it'll get better.



--> "It was a dark and stormy night. I had just taken a creative writing course..."

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--> ---> "It was a dark and stormy night. I had just taken a creative writing course..."
10th Apr '17 11:35:07 PM Laevatein
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* In SFDebris' review of ''TheXFiles'' episode "Our Town" he notes:
--> "Our Town" begins with a couple in a parked car, in the woods, at night, which is the "It was a dark and stormy night" for modern horror.
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